Sample records for worldwide refinery throughput

  1. Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial electrolysis cells (MECs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treatability studies on different refinery wastewater samples using high-throughput microbial, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Refinery wastewaters were tested as fuels in MECs effective for treatment or pre-treatment of some refinery wastewaters. The best way to start up MECs

  2. Refinery Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Leveraging existing refining infrastructure potentially reduces costs for biofuel production but we first need to understand the impacts Petroleum Refinery Picture courtesy...

  3. Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Multiperiod Refinery Planning Optimization with Nonlinear CDU Models Abdulrahman Alattas, Advisor #12;Refinery Planning Model Development 2 Extension to Multiperiod Planning #12;3 Multiperiod Refinery: refinery configuration Determine · What crude oil to process and in which time period? · The quantities

  4. Refinery Energy Profiling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, R. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a four-step procedure developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy for preparing energy profiles for a refinery, for a single unit, or for an individual piece of equipment. The four steps are preparation, data...

  5. Refinery Energy Profiling Procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, R. W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses a four-step procedure developed with support from the U.S. Department of Energy for preparing energy profiles for a refinery, for a single unit, or for an individual piece of equipment. The four steps are preparation, data...

  6. Tenneco revamps chalmette refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heck, W.E.; Ragsdale, R.

    1985-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A major expansion and modernization project has been completed at Tenneco Oil Co.'s Chalmette, La. refinery, which is on the outskirts of New Orleans. The $559 million project, called the Chalmette heavy oil processing program, included revamps and construction of new units. These new and modified facilities have increased the crude oil capacity of the refinery by 30,000 b/d to 127,000 b/d. Gasoline and/or middle distillate output potential has also been lifted by 30,000 b/d. Numerous studies were made and economic cases worked to determine the process configuration and selection for the project. These conclusions varied depending on the raw material chosen as the feedstock (crude source). The configuration finally chosen was driven by the decision to be able to process high metals crudes from around the world.

  7. Analysis Patterns for Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Zhen; Guangzhen Shao

    We present analysis patterns to describe the structure of oil refineries. The Refinery Produc tion Unit Pattern describes the structure of units and unit groups. The Oil Storage Pattern describes the structure of tanks and tank groups. The Oil Delivery Pattern describes the structure of stations for import and export of oil. The Production Process Pattern describes the productionprocess. The audience for this paper includes analysts, designers, and programmers who are involved in developing Refinery Information Systems.

  8. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06 2.013 1.673Refinery

  9. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001) - HouseholdshortEIA-782A andS FRecord U.S. oilRefinery1

  10. Hulett's South African Refineries Ltd.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Jennings

    The improvement in the quality of raw sugars sent to Hulett's Refinery during the three seasons, 1963164 to 1965166, was the subject of a paper presented to this association last year. (1) These

  11. Encon Motivation in European Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gambera, S.; Lockett, W., Jr.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One essential element in a successful energy conservation or Encon program is effective motivation of employees and organizations to conserve energy. Encon motivation in our European refineries is a continuing effort that requires utilization...

  12. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in RefineryCDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Carnegie Mellon University EWO Meeting ­ March 2011 1 #12;I t d tiIntroduction Refinery production planning models Optimizing refinery operation C d l ti Crude selection Maximizing profit; minimizing cost

  13. Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Benjamin R.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    the economic performance of fossil-based facilities can be enhanced by retrofitting and incorporation of bio-mass feedstocks. These systems can be regarded as bio-refineries or integrated fossilbio- refineries. This work presents a retrofitting analysis...

  14. A Texas Refinery Success Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kacsur, D.

    A Texas Refinery Success Story Dennis Kacsur Spirax Sarco Common knowledge rules that maintenance is the key to long-lasting machinery performance. Yet steam traps are often left to their own devices, to fail or succeed alone. And without... steam trap programs, plants are certain to experience a high failure rate. An oil refinery in Texas was continuously experiencing a high failure rate on its 4,790-steam trap system. Finally, the steam losses were judged to be too high, and plant...

  15. Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Nonlinear CDU Models in Refinery Planning Optimization Abdulrahman Alattas, Advisor #12;Refinery Planning Model Development Fixed-yieldModels SwingcutsModels LPPlanningModels Aggregate for the CDU #12;Planning Model Example Typical Refinery Configuration (Adapted from Aronofsky, 1978) Cat Ref

  16. Energy efficiency improvement and cost saving opportunities forpetroleum refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The petroleum refining industry in the United States is the largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually any economic sector,including the transport sector and the chemical industry. The industry operates 146 refineries (as of January 2004) around the country,employing over 65,000 employees. The refining industry produces a mix of products with a total value exceeding $151 billion. Refineries spend typically 50 percent of cash operating costs (i.e., excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy a major cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction. Energy use is also a major source of emissions in the refinery industry making energy efficiency improvement an attractive opportunity to reduce emissions and operating costs. Voluntary government programs aim to assist industry to improve competitiveness through increased energy efficiency and reduced environmental impact. ENERGY STAR (R), a voluntary program managed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, stresses the need for strong and strategic corporate energy management programs. ENERGY STAR provides energy management tools and strategies for successful corporate energy management programs. This Energy Guide describes research conducted to support ENERGY STAR and its work with the petroleum refining industry.This research provides information on potential energy efficiency opportunities for petroleum refineries. This Energy Guide introduces energy efficiency opportunities available for petroleum refineries. It begins with descriptions of the trends, structure, and production of the refining industry and the energy used in the refining and conversion processes. Specific energy savings for each energy efficiency measure based on case studies of plants and references to technical literature are provided. If available, typical payback periods are also listed. The Energy Guide draws upon the experiences with energy efficiency measures of petroleum refineries worldwide. The findings suggest that given available resources and technology, there are opportunities to reduce energy consumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry while maintaining the quality of the products manufactured. Further research on the economics of the measures, as well as the applicability of these to individual refineries, is needed to assess the feasibility of implementation of selected technologies at individual plants.

  17. Refinery Fuel Balancing with Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passman, K. W.; Taylor, R. I.; Williams, D. E.; Emanuel, D.

    in order to tie-in during a scheduled refinery wide turnaround and to be on line during the summer 1990 operating period. The two gas turbines exhaust to two existing boilers where the oxygen in the turbine exhaust is utilized for combustion. Supplementary...

  18. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Prot Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROPRIETARY INFORMATION? 2011 KBC Advanced Technologies plc. All Rights Reserved. Implementing an Energy Management System at TOTAL Port Arthur Refinery: The process to improving and sustaining energy efficiency performance at a facility May... Improvements ? Cost-savings initiatives ? Increasing environmental awareness ? Increasing throughput by debottlenecking processes ? Increasing government mandates 2May 2013 Energy Costs for a 200kBPD Complex refinery Typically, energy efficiency programs...

  19. Fluidized bed controls refinery emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulally, I.F.; Kersey, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In early 1983, two fluidized bed, waste heat boilers entered into service at the Ashland Petroleum Company refinery site in Ashland, Kentucky. These fluidized bed units are coupled to the regeneration end of a newly developed reduced crude conversion (RCC) process and served the purpose of reducing CO, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ emissions while recuperating waste heat from the regenerator process off gases.

  20. REFEREED PAPER PRE-TREATMENT OF REFINERY FINAL RUN-OFF FOR CHROMATOGRAPHIC SEPARATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh I; Stolz Hnp; Ndhlala T

    In the case of a back-end refinery, the final run-off or return syrup of 92-95 % purity and 75 brix is generally returned to the raw mill to be combined with raw syrup and boiled in the A-pans. Approximately 8 % of the input raw sugar brix into a refinery is returned, consequently locking up A-pan capacity and, in the case of a factory with marginal pan capacity, cane throughput is restricted. In addition, energy consumption is increased and sugar losses in final molasses are elevated. A number of processes have been considered to eliminate recycling refinery run-off, most of which require pre-treatment and/or high capital investment with a high degree of commercial risk. Test work was undertaken at the Tsb Malalane cane sugar refinery to determine the optimal pre-treatment option for decolorising and softening refinery return syrup. The pre-treatment results indicate that chemical softening, followed by the addition of a cationic colour precipitant and pH adjustment with sulphur dioxide, yields appreciable calcium reduction and modest decolourisation. The overall benefit indicates that the treated final run-off is of suitable quality to apply another crystallisation step and/or alternatively consider for further purification by chromatographic separation and/or resin decolourisation.

  1. Refinery Production Planning: Multiperiod MINLP with Nonlinear CDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 Refinery Production Planning: Multiperiod MINLP with Nonlinear CDU Model-Rivera (2011) developed a single-period, nonlinear programing refinery planning model production, distribution, sales and inventory management1,2. The refinery

  2. Chevron Richmond Refinery Pipe Rupture and Fire Animation - Work...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chevron Richmond Refinery Pipe Rupture and Fire Animation - Work Planning and Control is Not Chevron Richmond Refinery Pipe Rupture and Fire Animation - Work Planning and Control...

  3. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters - Fact Sheet 2014 Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters -...

  4. Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc formerly Worldwide...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USA Inc formerly Worldwide Manufacturing USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc (formerly Worldwide Manufacturing USA) Place: San Bruno,...

  5. Refinery burner simulation design architecture summary.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollock, Guylaine M.; McDonald, Michael James; Halbgewachs, Ronald D.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the architectural design for a high fidelity simulation of a refinery and refinery burner, including demonstrations of impacts to the refinery if errors occur during the refinery process. The refinery burner model and simulation are a part of the capabilities within the Sandia National Laboratories Virtual Control System Environment (VCSE). Three components comprise the simulation: HMIs developed with commercial SCADA software, a PLC controller, and visualization software. All of these components run on different machines. This design, documented after the simulation development, incorporates aspects not traditionally seen in an architectural design, but that were utilized in this particular demonstration development. Key to the success of this model development and presented in this report are the concepts of the multiple aspects of model design and development that must be considered to capture the necessary model representation fidelity of the physical systems.

  6. Recent trends in refinery hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitani, A.M.; Siddiqui, M.A.B. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Refiners are experiencing a rise in hydrogen requirements to improve product quality and process heavy sour crudes. Fuel reformulation has disrupted refinery hydrogen balance in two ways: more hydrogen is needed for hydroprocessing and less hydrogen is coproduced from catalytic naphtha reforming. The purpose of this paper is to review trends in maximizing refinery hydrogen production by modifications and alternatives to the conventional steam methane reforming, recovery from refinery off gases and {open_quote}across-the-fence{close_quote} hydrogen supply. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

  7. Getting it right at Catlettsburg: How Ashland Petroleum`s flagship refinery transformed itself

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitt, R.E.; Kennison, R.H.M.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Life has its surprises. In the midst of the pain and excitement of a massive organizational overhaul, Ashland Petroleum`s Catlettsburg refinery--a 220,000-b/d facility in Ashland, Ky.,--experienced an unplanned cracker shutdown, a few production mishaps, a two-week employee walk-out, and belt-tightening necessitated by competitive pressures. Yet, despite these adverse circumstances, the Catlettsburg Refinery Initiative (CRI), a 20-month effort that shifted from planning to implementation in October 1995, yielded remarkable results. By 1996, the refinery began achieving record levels of through-put with lower maintenance costs, increasing company profitability by about 15% in the first half of 1996, over the same period in 1995. In a post-initiative survey, refinery employees expressed enthusiam for the changes and their new work-roles. A number of factors converged to give the initiative drive and direction: a pervasive discomfort with the status quo, a determination by top management to make fundamental changes, a commitment to rapid implementation and effective use of an outside consultant. But above all, success at Catlettsburg was a result of a grassroots approach to the process of change.

  8. 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

  9. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2DBuilding Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

  10. Upgrade Your Refinery for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnnie, D. H., Jr.; Klooster, H. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upgrading existing refineries for efficient energy utilization imposes strict restraints upon design engineers. Present and future production requirements must be defined. Reliable operating data must be obtained from historical records and test...

  11. Making Refinery Wastewater Clean | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refinery Wastewater Clean Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Share on Facebook (Opens in new window) Click to share (Opens in new window) Click to share on...

  12. Retrofitting analysis of integrated bio-refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cormier, Benjamin R.

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    to integrated bio-refineries. Focus is given to the problem of process modification to an existing plant by considering capacity expansion and material substitution with biomass feedstocks. Process integration studies were conducted to determine cost...

  13. Application of Pinch Technology in Refinery Retrofits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, W. R.; Siegell, J. H.; Sideropoulos, T.; Robertson, J. L.; Papoulias, S. A.

    APPLICATION OF PINCH TECHNOLOGY IN REFINERY RETROFITS W. R. L. Thomas, J. H. Siegell, T. Sideropoulos, J. L. Robertson, S. A. Papoulias Exxon Research and Engineering Company Florham Park, New Jersey ABSTRACT This paper reviews... the application of pinch technology in the identification of the most attractive retrofit prospects in typical refineries. In the first part of the paper, methodology is described to identify attractive inter-unit heat integration opportunities as well...

  14. Monitoring and Management of Refinery Energy Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelham, R. O.; Moriarty, R. D.; Hudgens, P. D.

    MONITORING AND MANAGEMENT OF REFINERY ENERGY CONSUMPTION Roger O. Pelham Richard D. Moriarty Patrie D. Hudgens Profimatics, Inc. Thousand Oaks, California ABSTRACT Since 1972, the u.s. refining industry has made much progress in reduci... ng energy consumption. Lately, falling energy prices have de-emphasized the need to appropriate new capital for additional energy conservation projects. One area neglected in most refineries is the need to monitor and man age the daily use...

  15. Refinery siting workbook: appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this effort is to develop and provide basic refinery-related information for use by state and local government officials as a basis for establishing responsible refinery siting requirements and policies consistent with the federal clean air and water standards and socio-economic concerns. The report will be organized into two volumes. The main text comprises the basic topics of physical concerns, regulatory requirements, and permitting activities, while the second volume includes the detailed appendix materials such as the applicable laws, and the necessary permits, as available and a glossary of pertinent terms. As a means to this objective, three refinery sizes, 200,000, 100,000 and 30,000 barrels per day crude charge will be discussed in technical terms. Process unit configuration will be presented which will maximize either gasoline or heating oil production with either sweet or sour crude oil feedstocks. The major issues affecting the socio-economic impact of siting the refinery in a given locale will be presented. These data will review the factors affecting the human environment and the issues that must be addressed to assess the impact that a refinery will have on a community. The key federal registrations which impact upon a refinery siting decision shall be reviewed. Summaries of these regulations and a simplified decision diagram for the air and water acts shall be presented to assist both government and refinery officials in understanding the scope of regulatory impact. All pertinent procedures required for refinery permitting shall be reviewed under the generalized headings of air, water, health and safety, land use, and miscellaneous permits. This categorization at the federal, state and local levels of government shall be used as a basis for establishing degrees of emphasis.

  16. Kyrgyzstan starts up its first refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLeod, G. [Petrofac LLC, Tyler, TX (United States)

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan started up its first oil refinery in October 1996. The 10,000 b/d plant is designed to produce gasoline, diesel, and mazut (heavy fuel oil) from local Kyrgyz crude. Before construction of the Jalalabad refinery, all finished petroleum products were imported from neighboring countries. Kyrgyzstan`s demand for finished products is about 40,000 b/d. The new refinery was designed and constructed by Petrofac of Tyler, Texas, on behalf of Kyrgoil Corp., Calgary. Kyrgoil is a partner with the Kyrgyz state oil company, Kyrgyzsneft, in a venture called Kyrzgyz Petroleum Co. (KPC). KPC has undertaken restoration and continued development of the oil fields in Kyrgyzstan`s Fergana basin, in addition to the refinery project. The company also has marketing rights for finished products within Kyrgyzstan. The refinery comprises: a hydroskimming (atmospheric distillation) section, diesel steam stripping, gasoline blending, and utilities and off-sites, including steam generation, power generation, tank farm, truck and rail tank-car loading and unloading facilities, crude inlet pipeline, high-voltage power line, substation, air compression, laboratory, and maintenance facilities.

  17. Steam System Management Program Yields Fuel Savings for Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaines, L. D.; Hagan, K. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Phillips refinery at Borger, Texas, determined the need to develop a utility monitoring system. Shortly after this commitment was made, the refinery was introduced to a flowsheet modeling program that could be used to model and optimize steam...

  18. Software communications integrated into refinery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodpaster, R.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1989-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashland Oil Co. is integrating software communications, using real-time data, into the computerized information system at its Catlettsburg, Ky., refinery. The Ashland real-time information system (Artis) was designed to improve timeliness and accuracy of yield accounting to the refinery, and to standardize software communications between applications. With the system, real-time data are collected in a central data server and used to feed normal data reconciliation software for validation. This part of the system has been successfully implemented. Standardization of software communications is still under design, but most of the communication paths have been defined because a highly evolved information system already exists at the refinery. And efforts are under way to integrate information from the process to optimization.

  19. Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Global Optimization for Scheduling Refinery Crude Oil Operations Ramkumar Karuppiaha , Kevin C at the front-end of a petroleum refinery. The model relies on a continuous time representation making use-412-268-7139. Email address: grossmann@cmu.edu (I.E. Grossmann) #12;2 Keywords: Refinery scheduling; Nonconvex MINLP

  20. Wireless Critical Process Control in oil and gas refinery plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Wireless Critical Process Control in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1, Sergio Guardiano control in in- dustrial plants and oil/gas refineries. In contrast to wireline communication, wireless of an oil refinery is illustrated in Fig. 1: typical locations of wireless devices used for re- mote control

  1. Determinants of HR Effectiveness and Refinery Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blaine Mccormick; Gary C. Mcmahan; W. Scott Sherman; Patrick M. Wright; Patrick M. Wright; Gary C. Mcmahan; Blaine Mccormick; W. Scott Sherman

    This paper has not undergone formal review or approval of the faculty of the ILR School. It is intended to make results of Center research available to others interested in preliminary form to encourage discussion and suggestions. Page 1SHRM and Refinery Performance WP 97-16 Strategy, Core Competence and HR Involvement as

  2. Refinery siting workbook: appendices C to O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicable laws and permits available for the selection and building of petroleum refineries are enclosed. A glossary of pertinent terms is also included. References related to the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Toxic Substance Control Act, and Wetlands and Coastal Zone are included. Permit information is also presented. (DC)

  3. Flare Gas Recovery in Shell Canada Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, G. D.; Wey, R. E.; Chan, H. H.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the flow properties for compressor selection? What controls should be incorporated? How much operator and maintenance effort will be required for safe, efficient operation? What kind of process and hardware problems should be watched for? When...? This paper will touch on all these issues. SYSTEM CONFIGURATION A schematic of a typical refinery flare gas recovery facility is shown in Figure I. The facilities include the following pieces of equipment: - compressor suction drum - compressor set...

  4. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  5. Projection and Reaction for Decision Support in Refineries: Combining Multiple Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krebsbach, Kurt D.

    Projection and Reaction for Decision Support in Refineries: Combining Multiple Theories Kurt D system to provide decision support for refinery operations personnel (Krebsbach & Musliner 1997; Musliner to provide sufficiently flexible decision support in complex environments. Background: Refinery Control

  6. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 0.11 0.0949,797.6(MillionRefinery3,028,561- - -

  7. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  8. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  9. Reformulated gasoline: Costs and refinery impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of reformulated gasoline (RFG) costs and refinery impacts have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model (ORNL-RYM), a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy emissions constraints defined by preliminary complex emissions models. Policy makers may use the reformulation cost knee (the point at which costs start to rise sharply for incremental emissions control) to set emissions reduction targets, giving due consideration to the differences between model representations and actual refining operations. ORNL-RYM estimates that the reformulation cost knee for the US East Coast (PADD I) is about 15.2 cents per gallon with a 30 percent reduction of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The estimated cost knee for the US Gulf Coast (PADD III) is about 5.5 cents per gallon with a VOC reduction of 35 percent. Reid vapor pressure (RVP) reduction is the dominant VOC reduction mechanism. Even with anti-dumping constraints, conventional gasoline appears to be an important sink which permits RFG to be blended with lower aromatics and sulfur contents in PADD III. In addition to the potentially large sensitivity of RFG production to different emissions models, RFG production is sensitive to the non-exhaust VOC share assumption for a particular VOC model. ORNL-RYM has also been used to estimate the sensitivity of RFG production to the cost of capital; to the RVP requirements for conventional gasoline; and to the percentage of RFG produced in a refining region.

  10. Nigerian refineries strive for product balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obuasi, P.A.

    1985-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the growth patterns of the Nigerian refining industry. Production and consumption are expected to follow the pattern of consumption of fuel products by the domestic market, Presently, however, production and consumption are not evenly balanced for most fuel products, and non-fuel products are domestically consumed but not produced. Some progress has been made in the effort to match production and consumption of fuel products. But the progress that would have been made to balance non-fuel products has been nullified by 50% of the Daduna refinery being idle. This is due to problems associated with importation of heavy crude oil into Nigeria and also a weak market for asphalt in Nigeria.

  11. RCC complex now cornerstone of Ashland refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busch, L.E.; Hettinger, W.P.; Krock, R.P.

    1984-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of the first grassroots RCC process unit during its initial 1 1/2 years of operation at Ashland's principal refinery at Catlettsburg, Ky., has confirmed the commercial viability and process advantages of this new technology for heavy oil conversion. The unit has successfully processed untreated atmospheric residuum having Ramsbottom carbon content as high as 7.1 wt%, and metals contamination up to 70 ppm nickel plus vanadium into high yields of transportation and distillate fuels and other light products. The startup of this 40,000 b/d facility in March 1983 brought to fruition nearly 8 years of diligent process development and a 3-year accelerated engineering and construction program. The commercial unit was expressly designed and built to exploit process, hardware, and catalyst innovations flowing from the development effort and demonstrated to be especially applicable to converting long resids. The unit has generally met and exceeded technical expectations.

  12. Saber's heavy oil cracking refinery project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benefield, C.S.; Glasscock, W.L.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perhaps more than any other industry, petroleum refining has been subjected to the radical swings in business and political climates of the past several decades. Because of the huge investments and long lead times to construct refining facilities, stable government policies, predictable petroleum prices, secure feedstock supplies and markets, and reliable cost estimates are necessary ingredients to effectively plan new refinery projects. However, over the past ten years the political and economic climates have provided anything but these conditions. Yet, refiners have demonstrated a willingness to undertake risks by continuing to expand and modernize their refineries. The refining business -- just as most businesses -- responds to economic incentives. These incentives, when present, result in new technology and capacity additions. In the 1940's, significant technology advances were commercialized to refine higher-octane motor gasolines. Such processes as continuous catalytic cracking (Houdry Process Corporation), fluid catalytic cracking (Standard Oil Development Company), HF alkylation (UOP and Phillips Petroleum Company), and catalytic reforming (UOP) began to supply a growing gasoline market, generated from the war effort and the ever increasing numbers of automobiles on the road. The post-war economy of the 1950's and 1960's further escalated demand for refined products, products which had to meet higher performance specifications and be produced from a wider range of raw materials. The refining industry met the challenge by introducing hydro-processing technology, such as hydrocracking developed in 1960. But, the era must be characterized by the large crude processing capacity additions, required to meet demand from the rapidly expanding U.S. economy. In 1950, refining capacity was 6.2 million BPD. By 1970, capacity had grown to 11.9 million BPD, an increase of 91%.

  13. Integrating NABC bio-oil intermediates into the petroleum refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2D: Working Together: Conventional Refineries and Bio-Oil R&D Technologies Thomas Foust, Director, National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

  14. Implementing an Energy Management Strategy for a Houston Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, S. C.; Agrawal, R. K.; Canon, D.

    and maintained energy management program translates to PROFIT added directly to the BOTTOM LINE. Woodward-Clyde Consultants (WCC) recently implemented and energy management program at the Lyondell-Citgo Refinery in Houston, Texas. The basis of the program...

  15. Refinery Energy Conservation Experience with Enhanced Surface Reboilers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragi, E. G.; O'Neill, P. S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examples of refinery services where existing reboilers were retubed or replaced with enhanced High Flux tubing to better utilize or conserve energy are reported. (1) Retubing an existing toluene column reboiler permitted the use of low cost 115...

  16. Gas Separation Membrane Use in the Refinery and Petrochemical Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vari, J.

    Membranes have gained commercial acceptance as proven methods to recover valuable gases from waste gas streams. This paper explores ways in which gas separation membranes are used in the refinery and petrochemical industries to recover and purify...

  17. Petroleum Refinery Catalytic Reforming -- Cutting High Energy Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viar, W. L.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is essential that the operation and maintenance of these furnaces be optimized to minimize production costs. This paper describes the performance testing and evaluation of a set of ten refinery furnaces used to thermally drive several reforming reactors...

  18. Optimization of Steam Network in Tehran Oil Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodaie, H.; Nasr, M. R. J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dominated energy crisis in the world dictates to reduce energy consumption and identify energy saving opportunities in large and complex industries especially in oil refining industry. In this paper, Tehran oil refinery is considered as a proper...

  19. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  20. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  1. Steps taken at Malelane refinery to improve refined sugar quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Moodley; Pm Schorn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The refinery at Malelane has in the past produced refined sugar for the consumer market. A decision was taken by the management of Transvaal Sugar (TSB) to produce a quality of refined sugar that would also be acceptable to the industrial and the export markets. The processes that were evaluated and implemented at the Malelane refinery during the past three seasons to achieve this objective, are described.

  2. Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action...

  3. All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.4All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.4 All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.0All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.4All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.4 All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.0All EMBA Programs Worldwide 8.0 How do we compare? Executive MBA Program Boise State University EMBA Comparable Programs* 8.5Comparable Programs* 8.5 Overall Quality 9.1 Boise State University EMBA Comparable

  4. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650[degrees]F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  5. Assessment of coal liquids as refinery feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, P.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The R&D of direct coal liquefaction has reached such a stage that current two-stage processes can produce coal liquids with high yields and improved quality at a reasonable cost. To fully realize the potential value, these coal liquids should be refined into high-value liquid transportation fuels. The purpose of this study is to assess coal liquids as feedstocks to be processed by modern petroleum refining technologies. After the introduction, Section 2.0 summarizes ASTM specifications for major transportation fuels: gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel fuel, which serve as a target for coal-liquid refining. A concise description of modern refining processes follows with an emphasis on the requirements for the raw materials. These provide criteria to judge the quality of coal liquids as a refinery feedstock for the production of marketable liquid fuels. Section 3.0 surveys the properties of coal liquids produced by various liquefaction processes. Compared with typical petroleum oils, the current two-stage coal liquids are: Light in boiling range and free of resids and metals; very low in sulfur but relatively high in oxygen; relatively low in hydrogen and high in cyclics content; and essentially toxicologically inactive when end point is lower than 650{degrees}F, particularly after hydroprocessing. Despite these characteristics, the coal liquids are basically similar to petroleum. The modern refining technology is capable of processing coal liquids into transportation fuels meeting all specifications, and hydroprocessinq is obviously the major tool. The important point is the determination of a reasonable product slate and an appropriate refining scheme.

  6. VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING Phuong NGUYEN*, Pier-Paolo SAVIOTTI, refinery processes, variety, niche theory, Weitzman measure. JEL classification : L15 -L93 -O3 1

  7. STAMP-Based Analysis of a Refinery Overflow Accident Nancy Leveson, Margaret Stringfellow, and John Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    1 STAMP-Based Analysis of a Refinery Overflow Accident Nancy Leveson, Margaret Stringfellow, and John Thomas As an example of STAMP, we have taken an accident report produced for a real refinery

  8. Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery Opportunities for Biomass-Based Fuels and Products in a Refinery Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session...

  9. Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    Gross Error Detection in Chemical Plants and Refineries for On-Line Optimization Xueyu Chen, Derya) British Petroleum Applications mainly crude units in refineries and ethylene plants #12;Companies

  10. Mixed reality training application for an oil refinery: user requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marjaana Trskbck

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introducing mixed reality (MR) into safety-critical environment like oil refinery is difficult, since the environment and organization lays demanding restrictions for the application. In order to develop usable and safe MR application, we need to study the context of use and derive user requirements from it. This paper describes the user requirements for an MR based oil refinery training tool. The application is aimed to train employees of a specific process unit in the refinery. Training is currently done mainly in a classroom and on-site only when the process is closed down. On-site training is necessary, but expensive and rarely possible. The use of mixed reality offers a way to train employees on-site while the process is running. Users can virtually see inside the columns and can modify virtually the process..

  11. Potentials for Fuel Cells in Refineries and Chlor-Alkali Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altseimer, J. H.; Roach, F.

    POTENTIALS FOR FUEL CELLS IN REFINERIES AND CHLOR-ALKALI PLANTS John H. Altseimer and Fred Roach Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico ABSTRACT The market potentials for fuel cell cogenera tion systems in petroleum refineries... in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries...

  12. Ashland outlines $261 million in refinery unit construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Ashland Petroleum Co. has spelled out $261 million in projects completed, under way, or planned to produce cleaner fuel and further reduce emissions at two U.S. refineries. The company: Started up at $13 million pollution control system at its 213,400 b/cd Catlettsburg, Ky., plant. Started construction on six projects at its 67,100 b/cd St. Paul Park, Minn., refinery that will cost about $114 million and enable the plant to produce cleaner burning diesel fuel and further reduce emissions.

  13. GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning (Performance Analysis. Grossmann #12;2 Motivation · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies HF REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL

  14. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils Aerial deposition of Ni from a refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada has resulted in the enrichment in vegetable crops grown in the vicinity of the refinery. Conversely, dolomitic lime- stone additions resulted

  15. Optimal Industrial Load Control in Smart Grid: A Case Study for Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    Optimal Industrial Load Control in Smart Grid: A Case Study for Oil Refineries Armen Gholian, Hamed units finish their operations. Considering an oil refinery industry as an example, we not only identify Terms­Demand response, load management, manufactur- ing industries, oil refineries, optimal scheduling

  16. Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Wireless channel characterization and modeling in oil and gas refinery plants Stefano Savazzi1 modeling approach is validated by experimental measurements in two oil refinery sites using industry and gas refinery sites are characterized by harsh environments where radio signals are prone to blockage

  17. Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integration of Refinery Planning and Crude-Oil Scheduling using Lagrangian Decomposition Sylvain: refinery planning and crude-oil operations scheduling. The proposed approach consists of using Lagrangian-study and a larger refinery problem show that the Lagrangian decomposition algorithm is more robust than the other

  18. Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced 2013 Available online 5 November 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cells Refinery wastewater Biodegradability Separator electrode assembly a b s t r a c t The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW

  19. JANUARY 2007 THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    OF JANUARY 2007 THE REPORT THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL #12;From left;PANEL STATEMENT The B.P. U.S. Refineries Independent Safety Review Panel i Process safety accidents can be prevented. On March 23, 2005, the BP Texas City refinery experienced a catastrophic process accident

  20. Perception of an emergency Situation by operators in an oil refinery L.Pioche&J.RPineau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Perception of an emergency Situation by operators in an oil refinery L.Pioche&J.RPineau Institut de the operators' behaviour during an emergency Situation m an oil refinery. The aim ofthis stage the general objective is to analyse the operators' behaviour during an emergency Situation in an oil refinery

  1. STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    CHEVRONTEXACO WORLDWIDE POWER & GASIFICATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER SUBCONTRACT QZ001 UNDER DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NO....

  2. The MTBE solution: Octanes, technology, and refinery profitability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lander, E.P.; Hubbard, J.N.; Smith, L.A.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has been developed to provide refiners with business decision insight regarding the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) from refinery - (FCC) produced isobutylene. The driving forces making MTBE an attractive investment are examined with regard to the increasing demand for higher octane unleaded gasolines. The decision to proceed with MTBE production depends on the profitability of such an investment and the refiner's ability to meet market demands using available processing equipment, refinery produced streams and external feedstocks. The factors affecting this decision are analyzed in this paper and include: industry ability to meet rising octane demand; profit potential realized by diverting isobutylene to MTBE; availability of technology for producing MTBE; and investment and operating costs required to produce MTBE. Chemical Research and Licensing and NEOCHEM have developed a simple, low cost process to produce MTBE, reducing the excessive equipment and high operating costs that were associated with conventional MTBE designs. The economics and process benefits of installing a CRandL/NEOCHEM MTBE process are examined within the framework of a generalized medium-sized refinery configuration.

  3. Controlling Silver Dust and Fumes at Mine Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Haney; M. P. Valoski

    ABSTRACT: As part of the refining of gold and silver molten metal, silver dust and fumes are released into the atmosphere. The Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) enforces an 8-hour, equivalent Time Weighted Average concentration limit for silver dust and fumes of 10 g/m 3. MSHA initiated a program to assess the controls that were being used to control silver dust and fume exposure. Refineries were visited at six mines. The layout of each refinery and the controls used varied at each refinery. At each operation, personal and area silver fume and dust samples were collected to assess worker exposures and to determine sources of fume. Primary source of silver dust and fume exposure was the pouring of molten metal from the furnace. Secondary sources of exposure included: precipitate mixing, bar cooling, and housekeeping. Guidelines were developed addressing housekeeping, exhaust ventilation, general ventilation, administrative controls, and system monitoring. In most cases, housekeeping and general ventilation were adequate; however, the exhaust ventilation systems needed to be improved. 1 INRODUCTION Silver dust and fumes become airborne during the refining step of producing gold and silver. The dust

  4. Refinery gas waste heat energy conversion optimization in gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, A.D.; Francuz, D.J.; West, E.W. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilization of refinery fuel gas in gas turbines poses special challenges due to the combustion characteristics of the fuel gas which contains significant concentrations of hydrogen. Proper modifications to the combustion system of the existing gas turbines are required in order to combust such fuel gas streams in gas turbines while minimizing the NO{sub x} emissions. A novel approach to the utilization of this hydrogen bearing fuel gas in gas turbines consists of humidifying the fuel gas with water vapor by direct contact with hot water in a counter-current column, the feed water to the humidifier being first circulated through the refinery to recover waste heat. The refinery waste heat produces additional motive fluid with a result that the waste heat is converted to power in the gas turbine. Furthermore, the water vapor introduced into the fuel gas reduces the NO{sub x} formation and increases the gas turbine output, while the hydrogen present in the fuel gas provides the flame stability required when combusting a fuel gas containing a large concentration of water vapor.

  5. University of Maine Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) Technology Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendse, Hemant P.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project supported research on science and technology that forms a basis for integrated forest product refinery for co-production of chemicals, fuels and materials using existing forest products industry infrastructure. Clear systems view of an Integrated Forest Product Refinery (IFPR) allowed development of a compelling business case for a small scale technology demonstration in Old Town ME for co-production of biofuels using cellulosic sugars along with pulp for the new owners of the facility resulting in an active project on Integrated Bio-Refinery (IBR) at the Old Town Fuel & Fiber. Work on production of advanced materials from woody biomass has led to active projects in bioplastics and carbon nanofibers. A lease for 40,000 sq. ft. high-bay space has been obtained to establish a Technology Research Center for IFPR technology validation on industrially relevant scale. UMaine forest bioproducts research initiative that began in April 2006 has led to establishment of a formal research institute beginning in March 2010.

  6. GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1 GDP Formulation of a segmented CDU Swing Cut Model for Refinery Planning Department of Chemical · Refinery planning is an active area in process systems that strongly relies on the accuracy of the CDU REFINERY FUEL RG LPG LN HN KN GO1 GO2 VGO VR1 VR2 C1 LPG LIGHT NAPHTHA PMS 98 MOGAS 95 JET FUEL AGO HGO HFO

  7. Technical and operational overview of the C[sub 4] Oleflex process at Valero refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hohnholt, J.F.; Payne, D. (Valero Refining Co., Corpus Christi, TX (United States)); Gregor, J.; Smith, E. (UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States))

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in gasoline composition stemming from the 1990 Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments prompted Valero Energy Corporation to evaluate options for producing reformulated gasoline. The evaluation culminated in a project to upgrade butanes into methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). Technology selection focused on the dehydrogenation of isobutane, and the UOP Oleflex process was selected. The MTBE project was implemented in 34 months and was $3 million under budget. The guaranteed MTBE production of 12,500 BPSD was achieved within one month of mechanical completion and has since reached 15,000 BPSD. Even at the low MTBE prices prevailing in late 1993, the butane upgrading project contributed significantly to Valero Refinery's overall profitability. Worldwide demand is expected to increase MTBE prices in 1996, thereby further increasing profits. The paper describes the project evaluation activities which led to the selection of the Oleflex process, engineering and construction, the MTBE complex start-up and operation, the Valero MTBE complex performance, and future plans. The paper also discusses feedstock utilization efficiency and MTBE market analysis.

  8. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems)

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  9. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2004 producer refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery

  10. Career Information on the Worldwide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CarlCowen

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Career Information on the Worldwide Web. (URLs of the links are represented as indented from the parent page above it, Names of the pages or links are on the...

  11. Strategies for Low Carbon Growth In India: Industry and Non Residential Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, Jayant

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    71 Figure 25. Refinery Throughput, Exports and77 Figure 27. Indian Refinery78 Figure 28. Conservation Supply Curve for Refinery

  12. High throughput optical scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  13. Feasibility study report for the Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery: a 14. 9-million-gallon-per-year ethanol synfuel refinery utilizing geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction and operation of a 14,980,000 gallon per year fuel ethanol from grain refinery in the Imperial Valley of California is proposed. The Imperial Valley Ethanol Refinery (refinery) will use hot geothermal fluid from geothermal resources at the East Mesa area as the source of process energy. In order to evaluate the economic viability of the proposed Project, exhaustive engineering, cost analysis, and financial studies have been undertaken. This report presents the results of feasibility studies undertaken in geothermal resource, engineering, marketing financing, management, environment, and permits and approvals. The conclusion of these studies is that the Project is economically viable. US Alcohol Fuels is proceeding with its plans to construct and operate the Refinery.

  14. The Energy Minimization Method: A Multiobjective Fitness Evaluation Technique and Its Application to the Production Scheduling in a Petroleum Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coello, Carlos A. Coello

    to the Production Scheduling in a Petroleum Refinery Mayron Rodrigues de Almeida Slvio Hamacher Industrial applied to production scheduling of a petroleum refinery. The experimental results are presented of the method when applied to the production scheduling in a petroleum refinery. Section 5 discusses

  15. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  16. Equipment and services for worldwide applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents a digest of geothermal energy technology. The worldwide distribution of geothermal resources is described, and the degree to which various countries are exploiting their resources estimated. Detailed information about US technologies is presented, from exploration through applications to cost factors. (ACR)

  17. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1995 producer price, was approximately industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. World Refinery Production, Reserves, and Reserve Base: Refinery production Reserves6 Reserve base6 1994

  18. Hydrotreating Pyrolytic Lignin to Produce a Refinery Feedstock (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, R. J.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass followed by water separation to produce pyrolytic lignin and hydrotreating of the lignin could be used to produce a stable volatile low-oxygen intermediate liquid. Such a liquid could be converted into a finished motor-fuel in a refinery, taking advantage of the existing infrastructure and economies of scale of refineries. Hydrotreating just the lignin would consume less hydrogen while preserving about half of the energy of the original oil. The aqueous by-products could be reformed to produce the needed hydrogen and would contain much of the unwanted acids and unstable oxygenates. To assess such intermediate liquids, several pyrolytic lignins were prepared by mixing pyrolysis oil with water at 1:1 and 3:1 ratios. The carboxylic acidity in the pyrolytic lignin was reduced to 24 and 10 mg-KOH/g-lignin compared to 81 in the whole oil. These lignins were hydrotreated using Ni-Mo(S)/alumina, Pt/char, or Pd/C(activated) in a semi-batch 1 L stirred autoclave. The oil was stabilized under hydrogen at 150-280 degrees C, then water and light organics were removed by partial depressurization. Hydrodeoxygenation was then performed at 340-400 degrees C. Total pressure was controlled at 70 or 170 bar with hydrogen gas. Organic liquid yields of 39-56% were obtained. For many experiments the organic oxygen content was <7%, acidity was < 7 mg-KOH/g-oil, the volatility was greater than or equal to 94% and, on a carbon basis, the total yield of organic products miscible in hydrocarbons at a 1:10 ratio was over 50%. These properties are probably acceptable to a refinery.The residual liquids left in the reactor at the end of the experiment comprised 60-85% of the organic-phase product while the rest was condensate. 13C-NMR of the residual liquids showed that they were 50-80% aliphatic. 13C-NMR coupled with GC-MS identified phenolic compounds as the main oxygenates in most residual liquids.

  19. Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression This presentation by Matther Weaver of Pdc...

  20. CO2 Reduction through Optimization of Steam Network in Petroleum Refineries: Evaluation of New Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K; Khodaie, H.; Amidpour, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam network of petroleum refinery is energy intensive, and consequently contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions. A simple model for the estimation of CO2 emissions associated with operation of steam network as encountered...

  1. SELECTED TOPICS in APPLIED COMPUTER SCIENCE Data Mining and Data Gathering in a Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahmoud Reza Saybani A; Teh Ying Wah B

    This article handles one of critical steps of data mining, which is data collection. It will show how the researcher could get access to the valuable data of a refinery. And it explains the procedures of refining criteria for data collection. It also briefly explains the oil refining procedures to make the concept of data gathering at the refinery easier to understand. Each manufacturing company has its own specifications and rules that are needed to be considered when collecting data. As such the result of data gathering is almost always different for different manufacturing companies. Key-Words: Data gathering, data collection, data mining, oil refinery Data mining algorithms play an important and successful role in many manufacturing companies including oil refineries. Profit management, quality and process control in

  2. Refinery Furnaces Retrofit with Gas Turbines Achieve Both Energy Savings and Emission Reductions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacobbe, F.; Iaquaniello, G.; Minet, R. G.; Pietrogrande, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating gas turbines with refinery furnaces can be a cost effective means of reducing NOx emissions while also generating electricity at an attractive heat rate. Design considerations and system costs are presented....

  3. CO2 Reduction through Optimization of Steam Network in Petroleum Refineries: Evaluation of New Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manesh, M. H. K; Khodaie, H.; Amidpour, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam network of petroleum refinery is energy intensive, and consequently contribute significantly to the greenhouse gases emissions. A simple model for the estimation of CO2 emissions associated with operation of steam network as encountered...

  4. Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Worldwide Oil Production Example. The modern history of petroleum began in the 19Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production

  5. Assuring Mechanical Integrity of Refinery Equipment Through Global ON-Stream Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John W. Berthold

    2006-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of global on-stream inspection technology will have a dramatic effect on how refinery operations are managed in the U.S. in the future. Global on-stream inspection will provide assurance of the mechanical integrity of critical plant equipment and will allow refineries to operate more efficiently with less impact on our environment and with an increased margin of safety.

  6. Exergy Analysis of the Steam Network in Tehran Oil Refinery and Evaluation with New Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khodaei, H.; Taheri, R.; Arghandeh, R.

    oil refinery, Exergy Analysis, Steam Network, Retrofit, Optimization 1. INTRODUCTION Refinery steam network is considered as a unit that consumes energy greatly. The main objective of the network is to produce the steam, which is required...) Using heat recovery steam generating systems and gas turbines instead of old boilers and so on. Figure 1 shows the opportunities of optimization in steam networks. in this paper, we complete the lost works such as optimization and estimation...

  7. Energy Efficient Refinery Process Developed with U.S. D.O.E. Support

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mings, W. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ENERGY EFFICIENT REFINERY PROCESS DEVELOPED WITH U.S. D.O.E. SUPPORT Walter J. Mings, P.E. EG&G Idaho, Inc. Idaho Falls, Idaho Abstract The United States Department of Energy histori cally has encouraged private efforts to develop en ergy... with potential for extensive industrial energy savings. INTRODUCTION An innovative energy saving refinery process (also called the catalytic distillation process) for pro ducing MTBE (Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether) was devel oped by two Houston companies...

  8. Affordability analysis of lead emission controls for a smelter-refinery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherer, T.M.

    1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document evaluates the affordability and economic impact of additional control measures deemed necessary for a smelter-refinery to meet the lead emission standard. The emphasis in the analysis is on the impact of control costs on the smelter-refinery's profitability. The analysis was performed using control-cost data from two different lead-smelter studies in conjunction with other existing industry data.

  9. Technologies for the separation and recovery of hydrogen from refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcher, F.P.; Miller, G.Q.; Mitariten, M.J. [UOP, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective use and recovery of hydrogen from the major hydrogen-containing streams in the refinery is an important strategy to meet the refining demands of the 1990`s. Hydrogen upgrading in refinery applications can be achieved by pressure swing adsorption (PSA), selective permeation using polymer membranes, and cryogenic separation. Each of these processes has different characteristics which are of advantage in different situations. Process selection and specific application examples are discussed.

  10. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  11. Worldwide 'Power exchanges' | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifang Swisselectronic CoWindwardWorldwide 'Power

  12. International Journal of Chemistry; 2013[02] ISSN 2306-6415 Preservation Ways and Energy Consumption in Oil Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Samimi

    Abstract: Preservation increase and energy return is one of the effective tools in saving. Studies show that energy consumption for each productive crude oil barred is dependence on the refinery complicated in reconfiguration of forge. Energy recovery increase in refinery over time that is due to economic factors like consumption fuel increase, it means that return increase is consistent with fuel price. It developed use of crude oil capability, distillation products in modern refinery. Modern refinery recovery dead to 10 to 15 % saving in energy consumption, Modern refinery.can developed energy return in several ways such as: Thermal exchange increase between processes streams, effective hydro exchange in process units, use of heaters with high thermal return and use of gas turbines with preheated air and produce steam of waste thermal. This paper investigates management ways and energy consumption recovery in different parts of oil refinery.

  13. Production of coal-based fuels and value-added products: coal to liquids using petroleum refinery streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, C.E.B.; Schobert, H.H. [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are studying several processes that utilize coal, coal-derived materials, or biomass in existing refining facilities. A major emphasis is the production of a coal-based replacement for JP-8 jet fuel. This fuel is very similar to Jet A and jet A-1 in commercial variation, so this work has significant carry-over into the private sector. We have been focusing on three processes that would be retrofitted into a refinery: (1) coal tar/refinery stream blending and hydro-treatment; (2) coal extraction using refinery streams followed by hydro-treatment; and (3) co-coking of coal blended with refinery streams. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. High throughput protein production screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beernink, Peter T. (Walnut Creek, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Segelke, Brent W. (San Ramon, CA)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  15. World Biofuels Assessment; Worldwide Biomass Potential: Technology Characterizations (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bain, R. L.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Milestone report prepared by NREL to estimate the worldwide potential to produce and transport ethanol and other biofuels.

  16. FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Jones

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

  17. TSNo s02-roberts104537-O Microscopic and Spectroscopic Speciation of Ni in Soils in the Vicinity of a Ni Refinery.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    in the Vicinity of a Ni Refinery. abstract Accurately predicting the fate and bioavailability of metals in smelter REFINERY ASA-CSSA-SSSA Annual Meetings - October 21 - 25, 2001 - Charlotte, NC #12;

  18. Potentials for fuel cells in refineries and chlor-alkali plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. the most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

  19. Methods applied to investigate the major VCE that occured in the TOTAL refinery's Fluid Catalytic Cracking Unit at La Mede,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    95-35 Methods applied to investigate the major ?VCE that occured in the TOTAL refinery's Fluid.V.C.E, occured in the Gas Plant of the TOTAL refinery's Fluid Catalytic Cracking ünit at La Mede, France

  20. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marica Baldoncini; Ivan Callegari; Giovanni Fiorentini; Fabio Mantovani; Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of 10 years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  1. On Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    to the problem of optimizing end-to- end throughput in undirected data networks. We first illustrate the powerOn Achieving Optimal Throughput with Network Coding Zongpeng Li, Baochun Li, Dan Jiang, Lap Chi Lau Abstract-- With the constraints of network topologies and link capacities, achieving the optimal end

  2. EVALUATION OF THE SACCHAROFLEX 2000 REFLECTANCE MEASURING INSTRUMENT FOR REFINED SUGAR COLOUR ESTIMATION AT HULETTS REFINERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M Moodley; N K Padayachee; V Govender

    Due to the successful use of the Saccharoflex 2000 reflectance measurement instrument on the estimation of refined sugar colour elsewhere in the world, it was decided by Tongaat-Hulett Sugar to evaluate the instrument at the refinery in Durban. Tests were carried out on first, second, third and fourth refined sugars, the results of which showed a good correlation between the ICUMSA colour measurement and the reflectance reading obtained from the Saccharoflex 2000. The instrument offers a number of advantages, the main one being that a refined sugar colour value can be obtained in less than a minute. The refinery has therefore purchased one for process control.

  3. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2000 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and Issues: World refinery production of germanium remained steady in 2000. The recycling of scrap continued

  4. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2003 producer. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics, infrared

  5. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2002 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. The refinery in Oklahoma doubled its production

  6. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon the 2001 producer price-bearing materials generated from the processing of zinc ores. The germanium refineries in New York and Oklahoma and set up in New York. The refinery in Oklahoma expanded, and a new secondary facility was built in North

  7. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2008 producer of 2008. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production of fiber optics

  8. Problem 65 in Section 4.1 (Page 274) Constructing a pipeline Supertankers off-load oil at a docking facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schilling, Anne

    facility 4 mi offshore. The nearest refinery is 9 mi east of the shore point nearest the docking facility. A pipeline must be constructed connecting the docking facility with the refinery. The pipeline costs $300.42 miles away from the refinery, or equivalently 3.58 miles away from Point A (as the back of the book has

  9. 2:00-2:30 Beverages, 2:30-4 PM Seminar Chevron operates two refineries on the west coast of California. Large parcels of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4/18/2014 2:00-2:30 Beverages, 2:30-4 PM Seminar Abstract Chevron operates two refineries fuel must be moved between the refineries by ship to balance production. The El Segundo Marine Terminal these vapors are returned to the refinery for processing via a vapor return pipeline. El Segundo's terminal

  10. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1999 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania@usgs.gov, fax: (703) 648-7757] #12;73 GERMANIUM Events, Trends, and Issues: World refinery production

  11. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1996 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, and chemotherapy), 5%. Salient Statistics--United States: 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996e Production, refinery 13,000 10

  12. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated 2007 producer in the fourth quarter of 2007. A germanium refinery in Utica, NY, produced germanium tetrachloride for optical fiber production. Another refinery in Oklahoma produced refined germanium compounds for the production

  13. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation) High-ThroughputCombinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage Materials R&D (presentation)...

  14. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials: UOP Approaches High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials: UOP Approaches Presentation by Adriaan Sachtler from the High Throughput...

  15. High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) High-Throughput and Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation)...

  16. Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Potential of High-Throughput Experimentation with Ammonia Borane Solid...

  17. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman Spectroscopy. High Throughput Operando Studies using Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Raman...

  18. Energy Guideline Factors Provide a Better Measure of Refinery Energy Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libbers, D. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exxon Company, U.S.A. refineries reduced energy consumption by 25% between 1972 and 1978 compared with an 18% reduction for the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry over the same period. The Exxon approach to conserving energy in petroleum refining...

  19. THE NEW GASIFICATION PROJECT AT ENI SANNAZZARO REFINERY AND ITS INTEGRATION WITH A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mwe Power Plant; Guido Collodi; Dario Camozzi; Snamprogetti Italy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the new regulation introduced in Europe in the last years, defining more stringent limits for the emissions to the atmosphere, the necessity to find an alternative use for the fuel oil has created a new challenge for the refineries. At the same time the need to improve the Italian power production has pushed Eni, the Italian energy company, to enter the electricity market.

  20. Application and Operation of a 2-MW Organic Rankine Cycle System on a Refinery FCC Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, R. L.

    The nation's largest organic Rankine cycle (ORC) waste heat recovery system was started up in July 1984 at a West Coast oil refinery. The system includes two hermetically sealed turbine-generator units, each rated at 1070 kW. Each turbine...

  1. Restoration of Refinery Heaters Using the Technique of Prefabricated Ceramic Fiber Lined Panels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sento, H. D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refinery heater fuel requirements often represent 50% of a units operating cost. A one percent change in the efficiency of a heater firing 100 MBtu/hr amounts to more than $25,000 per year. Heater efficiency is influenced by casing hot spots, air...

  2. Networking and the Web World-Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Networking and the Web #12;World-Wide Web · Wide use of computers Web · Key components of the web ­ Computer Communica8on Networks

  3. Test plan, the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.; Tien, A.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Technology Center; Worsztynowicz, A.; Ulfig, K. [Inst. for Ecology of Industrial Areas, Katowice (Poland)

    1997-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the bioremediation project is to provide a cost effective bioremediation demonstration of petroleum contaminated soil at the Czechowice Oil Refinery. Additional objectives include training of personnel, and transfer of this technology by example to Poland, and the Risk Abatement Center for Central and Eastern Europe (RACE). The goal of the remediation is to reduce the risk of PAH compounds in soil and provide a green zone (grassy area) adjacent to the site boundary. Initial project discussions with the Czechowice Oil Refinery resulted in helping the refinery find an immediate cost effective solution for the dense organic sludge in the lagoons. They found that when mixed with other waste materials, the sludge could be sold as a fuel source to local cement kilns. Thus the waste was incinerated and provided a revenue stream for the refinery to cleanup the lagoon. This allowed the bioremediation project to focus on remediation of contaminated soil that unusable as fuel, less recalcitrant and easier to handle and remediate. The assessment identified 19 compounds at the refinery that represented significant risk and would require remediation. These compounds consisted of metals, PAH`s, and BTEX. The contaminated soil to be remediated in the bioremediation demonstration contains only PAH (BTEX and metals are not significantly above background concentrations). The final biopile design consists of (1) dewatering and clearing lagoon A to clean clay, (2) adding a 20 cm layer of dolomite with pipes for drainage, leachate collection, air injection, and pH adjustment, (3) adding a 1.1 m layer of contaminated soil mixed with wood chips to improve permeability, and (4) completing the surface with 20 cm of top soil planted with grass.

  4. High throughput 3-D tissue cytometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Hyuk-Sang, 1971-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the ongoing technological development of high throughput 3-D tissue cytometry.and its applications in biomedicine. 3-D tissue cytometry has been developed in our laboratory based on two-photon microscopy ...

  5. High-throughput quantification of glycoprotein sialylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markely, Lam Raga Anggara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sialic acid can improve qualities of therapeutic glycoproteins, such as circulatory half-life, biological activity, and solubility. In production of therapeutic glycoproteins, a high-throughput method (HTM) is required for ...

  6. High Throughput Materials Characterization John M. Gregoire

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paper for Establishing a User Facility for Synchrotron-based High Throughput Materials Characterization John M. Gregoire 1 , Matthew J. Kramer 2 , Apurva Mehta 3 1 Joint Center for...

  7. Scenarios for a Worldwide Deployment of Nuclear Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    and the transition to sustainable 4th generation nuclear reactors. We show that at least one comprehensive of sustainable, intensive nuclear power generation. Introduction The worldwide demand for primary energy, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex, FRANCE Intensive worldwide deployment of nuclear power could prove necessary

  8. Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moffit, Alfred Edward

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated...

  9. Refinery Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) Recovers LPG's and Gasoline, Saves Energy, and Reduces Air Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brant, B.; Brueske, S.; Erickson, D.; Papar, R.

    A first-of-its-kind Waste Heat Ammonia Absorption Refrigeration Plant (WHAARP) was installed by Planetec Utility Services Co., Inc. in partnership with Energy Concepts Co. at Ultramar Diamond Shamrock's 30,000 barrel per day refinery in Denver...

  10. Refinery fuel oxygenates in view of the complex model for reformulated gasline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C.D.; Haelsig, C.P. [Fluor Daniel, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final version of the Complex Model for reformulated gasoline (RFG) has now been issued with some surprising features that will significantly affect refinery fuel oxygenates planning. These include the following: (1) The only oxygenates included in the model are MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and Ethanol. (2) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME are significantly more effective for reduction of air toxics emissions than Ethanol and ETBE. (3) The Complex Model calculates that MTBE and TAME typically produce about equal reduction in air toxics emissions at the same RFG oxygen content. Although gasoline certification by the Complex Model is optional prior to 1998, after 1998 it will be mandatory for both reformulated and conventional gasolines. This paper considers refinery oxygenates production in view of these features of the Complex Model for RFG, basing the discussion on 2.0 weight percent oxygen content for RFG.

  11. Review of petroleum transport network models and their applicability to a national refinery model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J. N.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines four petroleum transport network models to determine whether parts of them can be incorporated into the transportation component of a national refinery model. Two questions in particular are addressed. (a) How do the models under examination represent the oil transport network, estimate link capacities, and calculate transport costs. (b) Are any of these network representations, capacity estimates, or cost functions suitable for inclusion in a linear programming model of oil refinery and primary distribution in the US. Only pipeline and waterway transport is discussed. The models examined are the Department of Energy's OILNET model, the Department of Transportation's Freight Energy Model, the Federal Energy Administration Petroleum Transportation Network Model, and an Oak Ridge National Laboratory oil pipeline energy model. Link capacity and cost functions are recommended for each transport mode. The coefficients of the recommended pipeline cost functions remain to be estimated.

  12. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first twelve months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  13. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  14. REFINERY INTEGRATION OF BY-PRODUCTS FROM COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; John Andresen

    2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  15. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie R. Rudnick; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the second year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil are reported. Coal samples have procured and are being assessed for cleaning prior to use in coking studies.

  16. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

  17. ,"U.S. Total Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant StocksPetroleum

  18. anp worldwide experience: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a model that leads to a scale-free network, capturing in a minimal fashion the self-organization processes governing the world-wide web. Albert-Laszlo Barabasi; Reka Albert;...

  19. 1 Worldwide Computing Middleware 1 1.1 Middleware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    Contents 1 Worldwide Computing Middleware 1 1.1 Middleware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.1.1 Asynchronous Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.1.2 Higher-level Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.3 Virtual Machines

  20. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 2, technology development, annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil refineries discharge large volumes of H{sub 2}, CO, and CO{sub 2} from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This program seeks to develop a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol, which can be blended with gasoline to reduce emissions. Production of ethanol from all 194 US refineries would save 450 billion BTU annually, would reduce crude oil imports by 110 million barrels/year and emissions by 19 million tons/year. Phase II efforts has yielded at least 3 cultures (Clostridium ljungdahlii, Isolate O-52, Isolate C-01) which are able to produce commercially viable concentrations of ethanol from CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2} in petroleum waste gas. Single continuous stirred tank reactor studies have shown that 15-20 g/L of ethanol can be produced, with less than 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Culture and reactor optimization in Phase III should yield even higher ethanol concentrations and minimal acetic acid. Product recovery studies showed that ethanol is best recovered in a multi-step process involving solvent extraction/distillation to azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation, or direct distillation to the azeotrope/azeotropic distillation or pervaporation. Projections show that the ethanol facility for a typical refinery would require an investment of about $30 million, which would be returned in less than 2 years.

  1. Stable Throughput in a Cognitive Wireless Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fanous, Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study, from a network layer perspective, the effect of an Ad-Hoc secondary network with N nodes randomly accessing the spectrum licensed to a primary node during the idle slots of the primary user. If the sensing is perfect, then the secondary nodes do not interfere with the primary node and hence do not affect its stable throughput. In case of imperfect sensing, it is shown that if the primary user's arrival rate is less than some calculated finite value, cognitive nodes can employ any transmission power or probabilities without affecting the primary user's stability; otherwise, the secondary nodes should control their transmission parameters to reduce the interference on the primary. It is also shown that in contrast with the primary's maximum stable throughput which strictly decreases with increased sensing errors, the throughput of the secondary nodes might increase with sensing errors as more transmission opportunities become available to them. Finally, we explore the use of the secondary nodes as rel...

  2. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1998 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania Production, refinery 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000 22,000e Total imports 14,700 16,200 27,500 23,700 20

  3. (Data in kilograms of germanium content, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based on the 1997 producer price. The domestic industry consisted of three germanium refineries, one each in New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania, refinery 10,000 10,000 10,000 18,000 20,000e Total imports 15,000 15,000 16,000 27,000 17,0001 Exports NA

  4. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain ...

  5. High-throughput Microfluidic Screening Platforms for Microalgae Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel studies are needed, however, current microalgae culture systems are lack of high-throughput screening capabilities, and thus not suitable for the parallel studies. Here, three different high-throughput microfluidic microalgae screening platforms...

  6. Chemistry & Biology Genome-Wide High-Throughput Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yin, Jun

    Chemistry & Biology Article Genome-Wide High-Throughput Mining of Natural-Product Biosynthetic Gene.01.006 SUMMARY We have developed a phage-display method for high-throughput mining of bacterial gene clus- ters

  7. Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Maximum Throughput Power Control in CDMA Wireless Networks Anastasios Giannoulis Department introduce crosslayer, distributed power control algorithms that guarantee maximum possible data throughput performing dynamic routing and scheduling together with power control. The crosslayer interaction consists

  8. An overlay architecture for throughput optimal multipath routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Nathaniel M.

    Legacy networks are often designed to operate with simple single-path routing, like shortest-path, which is known to be throughput suboptimal. On the other hand, previously proposed throughput optimal policies (i.e., ...

  9. High-throughput Microfluidic Screening Platforms for Microalgae Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun Soo

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel studies are needed, however, current microalgae culture systems are lack of high-throughput screening capabilities, and thus not suitable for the parallel studies. Here, three different high-throughput microfluidic microalgae screening platforms...

  10. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain quality of service...

  11. Measuring Meaning on the World-Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerts, Diederik

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the notion of the 'meaning bound' of a word with respect to another word by making use of the World-Wide Web as a conceptual environment for meaning. The meaning of a word with respect to another word is established by multiplying the product of the number of webpages containing both words by the total number of webpages of the World-Wide Web, and dividing the result by the product of the number of webpages for each of the single words. We calculate the meaning bounds for several words and analyze different aspects of these by looking at specific examples.

  12. Test plan: the Czechowice Oil Refinery bioremediation demonstration of a process waste lagoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altman, D.J.; Lombard, K.H.; Hazen, T.C.

    1997-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation strategies that will be applied at the Czechowice Oil Refinery waste lagoon in Czechowice, Poland are designed, managed, and implemented under the direction of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) for the United States Department of Energy (DOE). WSRC will be assisted in the demonstration by The Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas (IETU). This collaboration between IETU and DOE will provide the basis for international technology transfer of new and innovative remediation technologies that can be applied in Poland and the Eastern European Region as well.

  13. Morbidity And Sulfur Dioxide: Evidence From French Strikes At Oil Refineries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Neidell; Emmanuelle Lavaine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the impact of sulfur dioxide (SO2) in France on health outcomes at a census track level. To do so, we use recent strikes affecting oil refineries in France, in October 2010, as a natural experiment. Our work offers several contributions. We first show that a temporal shut down in the refining process leads to a reduction in sulfur dioxide concentration. We then use this narrow time frame exogenous shock to assess the impact of a change in air pollution concentration on respiratory outcomes. Our estimates suggest that daily variation in SO2 air pollution has economically significant health effects at levels below the current standard. 0

  14. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using rotating cage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cage (RC) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  15. ,"U.S. Working Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural GasU.S. Underground NaturalWorking

  16. 1946-2010: Worldwide Hurricane Activity Les Hatton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatton, Les

    1946-2010: Worldwide Hurricane Activity Les Hatton March 5, 2011 Abstract This paper complements Storms, Hurricanes and major Hurricanes, (3 or larger on the Saffir- Sampson scale). 2010 has been one to be very active. Keywords: Severe weather event frequency, Hurricanes, global warming 1 Document revision

  17. A Summary Report Fluctuating energy costs and economic uncertainties worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Club of Minneapolis and St. Paul Energy Uncertainties: Supply Chain Impacts in the Upper MidwestA Summary Report Fluctuating energy costs and economic uncertainties worldwide are disrupting Upper Midwest supply chains. While facing these challenges, participants throughout a supply chain need to con

  18. Diabetes is an epidemic worldwide, growing in parallel to obesity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toledo, University of

    Diabetes is an epidemic worldwide, growing in parallel to obesity 1 out of 10 American adults have diabetes. By 2034, the incidence is expected to triple. More then one million Ohioans have diabe reported a more than 10.1% incidence of diabetes among adults in Lucas County. Ohio is among the leading

  19. New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

  20. Achieving very low mercury levels in refinery wastewater by membrane filtration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgun Demirtas, M.; Benda, P.; Gillenwater, P. S.; Negri, M. C.; Xiong, H.; Snyder, S. W. (Center for Nanoscale Materials); ( ES)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfiltration (MF), ultrafiltration (UF), nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes were evaluated for their ability to achieve the world's most stringent Hg discharge criterion (<1.3 ng/L) in an oil refinery's wastewater. The membrane processes were operated at three different pressures to demonstrate the potential for each membrane technology to achieve the targeted effluent mercury concentrations. The presence of mercury in the particulate form in the refinery wastewater makes the use of MF and UF membrane technologies more attractive in achieving very low mercury levels in the treated wastewater. Both NF and RO were also able to meet the target mercury concentration at lower operating pressures (20.7 bar). However, higher operating pressures ({ge}34.5 bar) had a significant effect on NF and RO flux and fouling rates, as well as on permeate quality. SEM images of the membranes showed that pore blockage and narrowing were the dominant fouling mechanisms for the MF membrane while surface coverage was the dominant fouling mechanism for the other membranes. The correlation between mercury concentration and particle size distribution was also investigated to understand mercury removal mechanisms by membrane filtration. The mean particle diameter decreased with filtration from 1.1 {+-} 0.0 {micro}m to 0.74 {+-} 0.2 {micro}m after UF.

  1. Refinery Integration

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18,new2004_v1.3_5.0.zipFlorida4 U.S. Manufacturing Energy UseMary

  2. Wilolud Online Journals, 2008. THE NIGERIAN FUEL ENERGY SUPPLY CRISIS AND THE PROPOSED PRIVATE REFINERIES PROSPECTS AND PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agwom Sani Z

    Dynamism of the world economy has compelled Nigerians to accept the liberalization of its economy to encourage private sector participation and induce managerial efficiency. This has become very imperative most especially, in the downstream sub-sector of the Nigerian oil and gas industry by the establishment and management of private refineries in view of the persistent fuel energy crisis. An attempt is made here at analyzing the prospects and problems of such refineries that are expected to end the fuel energy crisis which started in the 1970s due to increased demand for petroleum products for rehabilitation and reconstruction after the civil war but later metamorphosed into a hydraheaded monster in the 1980s to date. Efforts towards arresting this crisis by the government through the establishment of more refineries, storage depots and network of distribution pipelines etc achieved a short-term solution due to the abysmal low performance of the refineries and facilities in contrast to increasing demand for petroleum products. It is deduced that the low performance resulted from bad and corrupt management by indigenous technocrats and political leaders as well as vandalization of facilities. Prospects for such investments were identified, as well as some of the problems to content with. This is in order to understand the pros and cons of such investments in view of their capital intensiveness and the need to achieve economic goals that must incorporate environmental and social objectives.

  3. High throughput chemical munitions treatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haroldsen, Brent L. (Manteca, CA); Stofleth, Jerome H. (Albuquerque, NM); Didlake, Jr., John E. (Livermore, CA); Wu, Benjamin C-P (San Ramon, CA)

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new High-Throughput Explosive Destruction System is disclosed. The new system is comprised of two side-by-side detonation containment vessels each comprising first and second halves that feed into a single agent treatment vessel. Both detonation containment vessels further comprise a surrounding ventilation facility. Moreover, the detonation containment vessels are designed to separate into two half-shells, wherein one shell can be moved axially away from the fixed, second half for ease of access and loading. The vessels are closed by means of a surrounding, clam-shell type locking seal mechanisms.

  4. High-Throughput/Combinatorial Techniques in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with a High Binding Energy (New Joint UC-BerkeleySymyx DoDDLA Project), Jeffrey Long, University of California, Berkeley High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen...

  5. High Throughput/Combinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials (presentation) High ThroughputCombinatorial Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Storage Meeting...

  6. High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami UNREL DoDDLA Project) (presentation) High...

  7. Heterogeneous High Throughput Scientific Computing with APM X-Gene and Intel Xeon Phi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Abdurachmanov; Brian Bockelman; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Robert Knight; Shahzad Muzaffar

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power requirements will be a constraint on the future growth of Distributed High Throughput Computing (DHTC) as used by High Energy Physics. Performance-per-watt is a critical metric for the evaluation of computer architectures for cost- efficient computing. Additionally, future performance growth will come from heterogeneous, many-core, and high computing density platforms with specialized processors. In this paper, we examine the Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Cores (MIC) co-processor and Applied Micro X-Gene ARMv8 64-bit low-power server system-on-a-chip (SoC) solutions for scientific computing applications. We report our experience on software porting, performance and energy efficiency and evaluate the potential for use of such technologies in the context of distributed computing systems such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG).

  8. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

  9. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

  10. Standard guide for evaluating and qualifying oilfield and refinery corrosion inhibitors in the laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide covers some generally accepted laboratory methodologies that are used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oilfield and refinery applications in well defined flow conditions. 1.2 This guide does not cover detailed calculations and methods, but rather covers a range of approaches which have found application in inhibitor evaluation. 1.3 Only those methodologies that have found wide acceptance in inhibitor evaluation are considered in this guide. 1.4 This guide is intended to assist in the selection of methodologies that can be used for evaluating corrosion inhibitors. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory requirements prior to use.

  11. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules (Released in the STEO January 1998)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On August 27, 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an individual refinery baseline is not available to domestic refiners.) If a foreign refiner did not establish and use an individual baseline, the gasoline they export to the United States would be regulated through the importer, and subject to the importer's baseline (most likely the statutory baseline). Specific regulatory provisions are implemented to ensure that the option to use an individual baseline would not lead to adverse environmental impacts. This involves monitoring the average quality of imported gasoline, and if a specified benchmark is exceeded, remedial action would be taken by adjusting the requirements applicable to imported gasoline.

  12. Worldwide reliability surveys of high voltage circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heising, C.R.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on the results of two CIGRE 13.06 Working Group worldwide surveys of the reliability of high voltage circuit breakers, 63 kV and above. The first inquiry included 78,000 breaker-years of ``in service data`` from 102 utilities in 22 countries during the years 1974--1977 and included all interrupting technologies. The second inquiry included 70,708 breaker-years from 132 utilities in 22 countries for the years 1988--1991 and only included single-pressure SF6 breakers, because this is what most utilities are now buying. Thirty-one US utilities submitted data.

  13. Worldwide status of energy standards for buildings: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janda, K.B.; Busch, J.F.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This informal survey was designed to gain information about the worldwide status of energy efficiency standards for buildings, particularly non-residential buildings such as offices, schools, and hotels. The project has three goals: 1. To understand and learn from the experience of countries with existing building energy standards; 2. To locate areas where these lessons might be applied and energy standards might be effectively proposed and developed; and 3. To share the information gathered with all participating countries. These appendices include the survey cover letter, the survey, and the details of selected energy standards in 35 countries, thus providing supporting material for the authors` article of the same title.

  14. Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

  15. Worldwide Overview of Lessons Learned from Decommissioning Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laraia, Michele [IAEA, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With an increasing number of radioactive facilities and reactors now reaching the end of their useful life and being taken out of service, there is a growing emphasis worldwide on the safe and efficient decommissioning of such plants. There is a wealth of experience already gained in decommissioning projects for all kinds of nuclear facilities. It is now possible to compare and discuss progress and accomplishments worldwide. In particular, rather than on the factual descriptions of projects, technologies and case histories, it is important to focus on lessons learned: in this way, the return of experience is felt to effectively contribute to progress. Key issues - inevitably based on a subjective ranking - are presented in this paper. Through the exchange of lessons learned, it is possible to achieve full awareness of the need for resources for and constraints of safe and cost-effective decommissioning. What remains now is the identification of specific, remaining issues that may hinder or delay the smooth progress of decommissioning. To this end, lessons learned provide the necessary background information; this paper tries to make extensive use of practical experience gained by the international community.

  16. Measurements of Worldwide Radioxenon Backgrounds - The "EU" Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, Ted W.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Forrester, Joel B.; Haas, Derek A.; Hansen, Randy R.; Keller, Paul E.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lidey, Lance S.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Payne, Rosara F.; Saey, Paul R.; Thompson, Robert C.; Woods, Vincent T.; Williams, Richard M.

    2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), radioactive xenon (radioxenon) measurements are one of the principle techniques used to detect nuclear underground nuclear explosions, and specifically, the presence of one or more radioxenon isotopes allows one to determine whether a suspected event was a nuclear explosion or originated from an innocent source. During the design of the International Monitoring System (IMS), which was designed as the verification mechanism for the Treaty, it was determined that radioxenon measurements should be performed at 40 or more stations worldwide. At the time of the design of the IMS, however, very few details about the background of the xenon isotopes was known and it is now recognized that the backgrounds were probably evolving anyhow. This paper lays out the beginning of a study of the worldwide concentrations of xenon isotopes that can be used to detect nuclear explosions and several sources that also release radioxenons, and will have to be accounted for during analysis of atmospheric levels. Although the global concentrations of the xenon isotopes are the scope of a much larger activity that could span over several years, this study measures radioxenon concentrations in locations where there was either very little information or there was a unique opportunity to learn more about emissions from known sources. The locations where radioxenon levels were measured and reported are included.

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Propylene Epoxidation: High-Throughput Screening of Supported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Propylene Epoxidation: High-Throughput Screening of Supported Metal Catalysts of propylene using molecular oxygen was studied on a variety of supported metal catalysts. The most promising Propylene Epoxidation Solgel High-throughput 1 Introduction Propylene oxide (PO) is an important raw

  18. Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Microfluidic Technologies for High-Throughput Screening Applications Thesis by Todd Thorsen, patiently giving me advice on a large variety of subjects, ranging from microfluidics to optics of microfluidic devices for high-throughput screening applications, such as mutant enzyme libraries expressed

  19. Soot and SO[subscript 2] contribution to the supersites in the MILAGRO campaign from elevated flares in the Tula Refinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, Luisa Tan

    This work presents a simulation of the plume trajectory emitted by flaring activities of the Miguel Hidalgo Refinery in Mexico. The flame of a representative sour gas flare is modeled with a CFD combustion code in order ...

  20. Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of How the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction in the ENERGY STAR Commercial, Industrial and Residential Sectors. An Example of how the Refinery Industry is Capitalizing on ENERGY STAR Kelly Patrick U.S. Environmental Protection Agency kelly...

  1. A reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldoncini, Marica; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Mantovani, Fabio; Ricci, Barbara; Strati, Virginia; Xhixha, Gerti

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillate...

  2. Fuel Cells Market Exceeds $1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells Market Exceeds 1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales Fuel Cells Market Exceeds 1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales December 1, 2014 - 5:14pm Addthis The market for fuel cells is...

  3. Carbon Capture and Sequestration from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engels, Cheryl; Williams, Bryan, Valluri, Kiranmal; Watwe, Ramchandra; Kumar, Ravi; Mehlman, Stewart

    2010-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOE?s target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  4. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Phase 3. Engineering development. Annual report, April 1, 1995--May 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C; Gaddy, J.L.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refineries discharge large volumes of H2, CO, and CO 2 from cracking, coking, and hydrotreating operations. This R&D program seeks to develop, demonstrate, and commercialize a biological process for converting these waste gases into ethanol for blending with gasoline. A 200,000 BPD refinery could produce up to 38 million gallons ethanol per year. The program is being conducted in 3 phases: II, technology development; III, engineering development; and IV, demonstration. Phase I, exploratory development, has been completed. The research effort has yielded two strains (Isolates O-52 and C-01) which are to be used in the pilot studies to produce ethanol from CO, CO2, and H2 in petroleum waste gas. Results from single continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) laboratory tests have shown that 20-25 g/L ethanol can be produced with < 5 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Laboratory studies with two CSTRs in series have yielded ethanol concentrations of 30-35 g/L with 2-4 g/L acetic acid byproduct. Water recycle from distillation back to the fermenter shows that filtration of the water before distillation eliminates the recycle of toxic materials back to the fermenter. Product recovery in the process will use direct distillation to the azeotrope, followed by adsorption to produce neat ethanol. This is less energy intensive than e.g. solvent extraction, azeotropic distillation, or pervaporation. Economic projections are quite attractive; the economics are refinery stream dependent and thus vary depending on refinery location and operation.

  5. ,"U.S. Refinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum Products"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy SourcesRefinery, Bulk Terminal, and Natural Gas Plant Stocks of Selected Petroleum

  6. Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Charles; Wilson, Robert

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project culminated in the demonstration of a full-scale industrial burner which allows a broad range of opportunity gaseous fuels to be cost-effectively and efficiently utilized while generating minimal emissions of criteria air pollutants. The burner is capable of maintaining a stable flame when the fuel composition changes rapidly. This enhanced stability will contribute significantly to improving the safety and reliability of burner operation in manufacturing sites. Process heating in the refining and chemicals sectors is the primary application for this burner. The refining and chemical sectors account for more than 40% of total industrial natural gas use. Prior to the completion of this project, an enabling technology did not exist that would allow these energy-intensive industries to take full advantage of opportunity fuels and thereby reduce their natural gas consumption. Opportunity gaseous fuels include biogas (from animal and agricultural wastes, wastewater plants, and landfills) as well as syngas (from the gasification of biomass, municipal solid wastes, construction wastes, and refinery residuals). The primary challenge to using gaseous opportunity fuels is that their composition and combustion performance differ significantly from those of conventional fuels such as natural gas and refinery fuel gas. An effective fuel-flexible burner must accept fuels that range widely in quality and change in composition over time, often rapidly. In Phase 1 of this project, the team applied computational fluid dynamics analysis to optimize the prototype burners aerodynamic, combustion, heat transfer, and emissions performance. In Phase 2, full-scale testing and refinement of two prototype burners were conducted in test furnaces at Zeecos offices in Broken Arrow, OK. These tests demonstrated that the full range of conventional and opportunity fuels could be utilized by the projects burner while achieving robust flame stability and very low levels of air pollutant emissions. In Phase 3, the team retrofitted three fuel-flexible burners into a fired heater at a Shell plant and demonstrated the projects technology over a 6-month period. The project burners performed well during this period. They remain in commercial service at the Shell plant. Through this work, an improved understanding of flame stabilization mechanisms was gained. Also, methods for accommodating a wide range of fuel compositions were developed. This knowledge facilitated the commercialization of a new generation of burners that are suitable for the fuels of the future.

  7. Osnabrcker Studierende der Wirtschaftsinformatik erstellen ersten Online-Nachhaltigkeitsbericht fr Hellmann Worldwide Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jrgen

    -Nachhaltigkeitsbericht fr Hellmann Worldwide Logistics Auf Initiative von Prof. Dr. Lohmeier und Prof. Dr. Teuteberg wurde Osnabrcker Unternehmens Hellmann Worldwide Logistics (10.735 Mitarbeiter und 2,67 Milliarden Euro Umsatz PDF-Dokument verfgba- ren Nachhaltigkeitsbericht von Hellmann Worldwide Logistics in einen mit vielen

  8. Allocation of Energy Use LCA Case Studies LCA Case Studies Allocation of Energy Use in Petroleum Refineries to Petroleum Products Implications for Life-Cycle Energy Use and Emission Inventory of Petroleum Transportation Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Wang; Hanjie Lee; John Molburg

    Aim, Scope, and Background. Studies to evaluate the energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems have to address allocation of the energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products because refineries produce multiple products. The allocation is needed in evaluating energy and emission effects of individual transportation fuels. Allocation methods used so far for petroleum-based fuels (e.g., gasoline, diesel, and liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) are based primarily on mass, energy content, or market value shares of individual fuels from a given refinery. The aggregate approach at the refinery level is unable to account for the energy use and emission differences associated with producing individual fuels at the next sub-level: individual refining processes within a refinery. The approach ignores the fact that different refinery products

  9. Gasification of refinery sludge in an updraft reactor for syngas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, Reem; Eldmerdash, Usama [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Sinnathambi, Chandra M., E-mail: chandro@petronas.com.my [Fundamental and Applied Sciences Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The study probes into the investigation on gasification of dry refinery sludge. The details of the study includes; influence of operation time, oxidation temperature and equivalence ratios on carbon gas conversion rate, gasification efficiency, heating value and fuel gas yield are presented. The results show that, the oxidation temperature increased sharply up to 858C as the operating time increased up to 36 min then bridging occurred at 39 min which cause drop in reaction temperature up to 819 C. This bridging was found to affect also the syngas compositions, meanwhile as the temperature decreased the CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} compositions are also found to be decreases. Higher temperature catalyzed the reduction reaction (CO{sub 2}+C?=?450?2CO), and accelerated the carbon conversion and gasification efficiencies, resulted in more solid fuel is converted to a high heating value gas fuel. The equivalence ratio of 0.195 was found to be the optimum value for carbon conversion and cold gas efficiencies, high heating value of gas, and fuel gas yield to reach their maximum values of 96.1 % and 53.7 %, 5.42 MJ Nm{sup ?3} of, and 2.5 Nm{sup 3} kg{sup ?1} respectively.

  10. Summary of the proceedings of the workshop on the refinery of the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report on the Workshop on the Refinery of the Future has been prepared for participants to provide them with a succinct summary of the presentations, deliberations, and discussions. In preparing the summary, we have striven to capture the key findings (conclusions) and highlight the issues and concerns raised during the plenary and breakout sessions. The presentation of the summary of the proceedings follows the final workshop agenda, which is given in Section I; each section is tabbed to facilitate access to specific workshop topics. The material presented relies heavily on the outline summaries prepared and presented by the Plenary Session Chairman and the Facilitators for each breakout group. These summaries are included essentially as presented. In addition, individuals were assigned to take notes during each session; these notes were used to reconstruct critical issues that were discussed in more detail. The key comments made by the participants, which tended to represent the range of views expressed relative to the issues, are presented immediately following the facilitator`s summary outline in order to convey the flavor of the discussions. The comments are not attributed to individuals, since in many instances they represent a composite of several similar views expressed during the discussion. The facilitators were asked to review the writeups describing the outcomes of their sessions for accuracy and content; their suggested changes were incorporated. Every effort has thus been made to reconstruct the views expressed as accurately as possible; however, errors and/or misinterpretations undoubtedly have occurred.

  11. Cracking of simulated oil refinery off-gas over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan Zhang; Jin-hu Wu; Dong-ke Zhang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (China). Institute of Coal Chemistry

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cracking of oil refinery off-gas, simulated with a gas mixture containing methane (51%), ethylene (21.4%), ethane (21.1%), and propane (6.5%), over a coal char, petroleum coke, and quartz, respectively, has been studied in a fixed bed reactor. The experiments were performed at temperatures between 850 and 1000{sup o}C and at atmospheric pressure. The results show that the conversions of all species considered increased with increasing temperature. Ethane and propane completely decomposed over all three bed materials in the temperature range investigated. However, the higher initial conversion rates of methane and ethylene cracking at all temperatures were observed only over the coal char and not on the petroleum coke and quartz, indicating a significant catalytic effect of the coal char on methane and ethylene cracking. Methane and ethylene conversions decreased with reaction time due to deactivation of the coal char by carbon deposition on the char surface and, in the later stage of a cracking experiment, became negative, suggesting that methane and ethylene had been formed during the cracking of ethane and propane. 16 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Production of ethanol from refinery waste gases. Final report, April 1994--July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, D.; Basu, R.; Breshears, F.S.; Gaines, L.D.; Hays, K.S.; Phillips, J.R.; Wikstrom, C.V.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was to develop a commercial process for producing ethanol from refinery waste gases. this report presents results from the development phases. The major focus of this work was the preparation of the prototype design which will demonstrate this technology in a 2.5 lb/hr ethanol production facility. Additional areas of focus included efforts in obtaining an industrial partner to help finance the prototype, and advanced engineering experiments concentrating on process optimization in various areas needing future development and optimization. The advanced engineering experiments were performed in the laboratory in these areas: treatment and use of recycle water from distillation back to fermentation; alternative methods of removing cells from the fermentation broth; the fermentation of streams containing CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} alone, with little to no CO present; dealing with methanogen contaminants that are capable of fermenting CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} to methane; and acetate tolerance by the culture. Results from the design, industrial partner search and the laboratory R&D efforts are discussed in this report.

  13. Throughput-cost analysis of optical flow switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Vincent W. S.

    In this paper, we employ a cost model embodying major sources of capital expenditure (CapEx) to compare the throughput-cost tradeoff offered by optical flow switching to that of more traditional optical network architectures.

  14. Maximizing the throughput of large ad hoc wireless networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Y; Huang, Y; Garcia-Luna-Aceves, J J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi-input, single-output (MISO) protocol. During eachthe maximum throughput of the MISO protocol, in bits-meters/s/ Hz/node, is C MISO = (n ? 1) A log 2 1 + 2n P T ? h

  15. New Tools for High Throughput Chemistry and Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galveia, Luciano Paulo Rosa

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New strategies for the high-throughput determination of protease substrate specificity using a dual colour microarray based format with a small library of FRET-based peptides were developed. Integral to this process was ...

  16. Development and optimization of high-throughput zebrafish screening platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koo, Bryan Kyo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high-throughput zebrafish screening platform is a revolutionary tool that enables subcellular precision in vivo whole animal screening of Danio Rerio. It can perform laser surgery and/or imaging in less than twenty ...

  17. High-Throughput Mass-Spectrometry Monitoring for Multisubstrate Enzymes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Ben G.

    (EC 2.4.1.22), and the recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana GT UGT72B1 (EC 2.4.1.-). The GAR (green a fast, high-throughput method for finding potential donors and acceptors from substrate libraries

  18. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation - second worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A. [ed.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first world wide review of the geological problems in radioactive waste isolation was published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991. This review was a compilation of reports that had been submitted to a workshop held in conjunction with the 28th International Geological Congress that took place July 9-19, 1989 in Washington, D.C. Reports from 15 countries were presented at the workshop and four countries provided reports after the workshop, so that material from 19 different countries was included in the first review. It was apparent from the widespread interest in this first review that the problem of providing a permanent and reliable method of isolating radioactive waste from the biosphere is a topic of great concern among the more advanced, as well as the developing, nations of the world. This is especially the case in connection with high-level waste (HLW) after its removal from nuclear power plants. The general concensus is that an adequate isolation can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the underground system with its engineered barriers. This document contains the Second Worldwide Review of Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation, dated September 1996.

  19. WorldWide Telescope in Research and Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Alyssa; Muench, August; Pepe, Alberto; Udomprasert, Patricia; Wong, Curtis

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The WorldWide Telescope computer program, released to researchers and the public as a free resource in 2008 by Microsoft Research, has changed the way the ever-growing Universe of online astronomical data is viewed and understood. The WWT program can be thought of as a scriptable, interactive, richly visual browser of the multi-wavelength Sky as we see it from Earth, and of the Universe as we would travel within it. In its web API format, WWT is being used as a service to display professional research data. In its desktop format, WWT works in concert (thanks to SAMP and other IVOA standards) with more traditional research applications such as ds9, Aladin and TOPCAT. The WWT Ambassadors Program (founded in 2009) recruits and trains astrophysically-literate volunteers (including retirees) who use WWT as a teaching tool in online, classroom, and informal educational settings. Early quantitative studies of WWTA indicate that student experiences with WWT enhance science learning dramatically. Thanks to the wealth ...

  20. Changes in worldwide demand for metals (final). Open File report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faucett, J.G.; Chmelynski, H.J.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide demand for metals was analyzed to identify the important factors that explain differences in the level of demand among world countries. The per capita demand for steel, aluminum, copper, and total nonferrous metals was investigated for 40 to 50 countries over a 22-year period. These countries have been further grouped into four world regions for purposes of making generalizations about the importance of these factors for countries in different stages of development and with dissimilar levels of per capita gross domestic product (GDP). Intercountry and intertemporal differences are explained largely by differences in per capita GDP and changes over time in per capita GDP, oil real prices, and to a lesser extent, metal real prices. The trend in world consumption is dramatically different in the last decade than the previous one. In 1962-73, per capita consumption increased in all areas and consumption intensity (consumption divided by (GDP) increased in most areas). In 1973-84, per capita consumption fell in most areas and intensity fell dramatically, except in developing nations.

  1. A 39 year follow-up of the UK oil refinery and distribution centre studies: results for kidney cancer and leukaemia. Environ Health Perspect Suppl 101(Suppl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesley Rushton

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents briefly some of the principal results of a mortality analysis of a cohort of workers employed for at least 1 year between 1950 and 1975 at eight oil refineries and approximately 750 distribution centers in the U.K, together with detailed results for kidney cancer and leukemia. Over 99 % of the workers were successfully traced. Their mortality was compared with that of all males in the national population. The mortality from all causes of death is lower than that of the comparison population in both studies, and reduced mortality is also found for many of the major nonmalignant causes of death. In the refinery study, some increased mortality patterns are found for diseases of the arteries, and no healthy worker effect is found in the distribution center study for ischemic heart disease. Mortality from all neoplasms is lower than expected overall in both studies, largely due to a deficit of deaths from malignant neoplasm of the lung. Mortality from malignant neoplasm of the kidney is increased overall in the distribution center study, and in drivers in particular. The mortality from this disease increases with increased time since first exposure. The observed deaths from leukemia are slightly less than expected in the refinery study and slightly more than expected in the distribution center study. One refinery shows increased mortality due to in myeloid leukemia, and mortality is increased among refinery operators. Mortality is also raised in distribution center drivers, particularly for myeloid leukemias, including acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. WASTE INCINERATION wr090203 Activity 090203 SNAP CODE: 090203 SOURCE ACTIVITY TITLE: WASTE INCINERATION Flaring in Oil Refinery NOSE CODE: 109.03.11 NFR CODE:

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    So Nox; Nmvoc Ch; Co Co; No Nh

    Flares are commonly used during petroleum refining for the safe disposal of waste gases during process upsets (e.g., start-up, shut-down, system blow-down) and emergencies to combust the organic content of waste emission streams without recovering/using the associated energy. 2 CONTRIBUTION TO TOTAL EMISSIONS Although flaring emission estimates are approximate, total hydrocarbon emissions from flaring at Canadian petroleum refineries during 1988 represented about 0.1 % of the refinery sector process and fugitive emissions that also included petroleum marketing emissions (CPPE, 1990). Thus the flaring operation at refineries is estimated to contribute a very small fraction of the total HC emissions in Canada. Emissions from flaring activities may also include: particulate, SOx, NOx, CO and other NMVOC. The CO2 contribution of both miscellaneous vent and flare emission sources represented approximately 9 % of the total petroleum refinery SO2 emission in Canada during 1988. Emissions estimates from flaring in petroleum refineries as reported in the CORINAIR90 inventory are summarised in Table 1. Table 1: Contribution to total emissions of the CORINAIR90 inventory (28 countries) Source-activity SNAP-code Contribution to total emissions [%

  3. Conversion of high carbon refinery by-products. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katta, S.; Henningsen, G.; Lin, Y.Y.; O`Donnell, J.

    1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project is to demonstrate that a partial oxidation system, which utilizes a transport reactor, is a viable means of converting refinery wastes, byproducts, and other low value materials into valuable products. The primary product would be a high quality fuel gas, which could also be used as a source of hydrogen. The concept involves subjecting the hydrocarbon feed to pyrolysis and steam gasification in a circulating bed of solids. Carbon residue formed during pyrolysis, as well as metals in the feed, are captured by the circulating solids which are returned to the bottom of the transport reactor. Air or oxygen is introduced in this lower zone and sufficient carbon is burned, sub-stoichiometrically, to provide the necessary heat for the endothermic pyrolysis and gasification reactions. The hot solids and gases leaving this zone pass upward to contact the feed material and continue the gasification process. The Transport Reactor Test Unit (TRTU) was commissioned to conduct studies on pyrolysis of Rose Bottoms using spent FCC (Fluid Catalytic Cracker) catalyst as the circulating medium and gasification of this carbon over a temperature range of 1,600 to 1,700 F. The Rose Bottoms (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) was produced in the Rose unit. Studies were done in the Bench Scale Reactor Unit (BRU) to develop suitable catalyst formulations and to study the steam reforming of methane and propane in support of the experiments to be conducted in the TRTU. Studies were also conducted on gasification of coke breeze, petroleum cokes and carbon deposited on FCC catalyst. The catalytic effect of potassium on gasification of these solids was studied. Studies were conducted in the CFS (cold flow simulator) to investigate flow problems experienced in the TRTU. Results from these studies are presented in this report.

  4. Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon Editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson Editor, G.S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The broad range of activities on radioactive waste isolation that are summarized in Table 1.1 provides a comprehensive picture of the operations that must be carried out in working with this problem. A comparison of these activities with those published in the two previous reviews shows the important progress that is being made in developing and applying the various technologies that have evolved over the past 20 years. There are two basic challenges in perfecting a system of radioactive waste isolation: choosing an appropriate geologic barrier and designing an effective engineered barrier. One of the most important developments that is evident in a large number of the reports in this review is the recognition that a URL provides an excellent facility for investigating and characterizing a rock mass. Moreover, a URL, once developed, provides a convenient facility for two or more countries to conduct joint investigations. This review describes a number of cooperative projects that have been organized in Europe to take advantage of this kind of a facility in conducting research underground. Another critical development is the design of the waste canister (and its accessory equipment) for the engineered barrier. This design problem has been given considerable attention in a number of countries for several years, and some impressive results are described and illustrated in this review. The role of the public as a stakeholder in radioactive waste isolation has not always been fully appreciated. Solutions to the technical problems in characterizing a specific site have generally been obtained without difficulty, but procedures in the past in some countries did not always keep the public and local officials informed of the results. It will be noted in the following chapters that this procedure has caused some problems, especially when approval for a major component in a project was needed. It has been learned that a better way to handle this problem is to keep all stakeholders fully informed of project plans and hold periodic meetings to brief the public, especially in the vicinity of the selected site. This procedure has now been widely adopted and represents one of the most important developments in the Third Worldwide Review.

  5. Economic impacts of oil spills: Spill unit costs for tankers, pipelines, refineries, and offshore facilities. [Task 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impacts of oil spills -- ranging from the large, widely publicized Exxon Valdez tanker incident to smaller pipeline and refinery spills -- have been costly to both the oil industry and the public. For example, the estimated costs to Exxon of the Valdez tanker spill are on the order of $4 billion, including $2.8 billion (in 1993 dollars) for direct cleanup costs and $1.125 billion (in 1992 dollars) for settlement of damages claims caused by the spill. Application of contingent valuation costs and civil lawsuits pending in the State of Alaska could raise these costs appreciably. Even the costs of the much smaller 1991 oil spill at Texaco`s refinery near Anacortes, Washington led to costs of $8 to 9 million. As a result, inexpensive waming, response and remediation technologies could lower oil spin costs, helping both the oil industry, the associated marine industries, and the environment. One means for reducing the impact and costs of oil spills is to undertake research and development on key aspects of the oil spill prevention, warming, and response and remediation systems. To target these funds to their best use, it is important to have sound data on the nature and size of spills, their likely occurrence and their unit costs. This information could then allow scarce R&D dollars to be spent on areas and activities having the largest impact. This report is intended to provide the ``unit cost`` portion of this crucial information. The report examines the three key components of the US oil supply system, namely, tankers and barges; pipelines and refineries; and offshore production facilities. The specific purpose of the study was to establish the unit costs of oil spills. By manipulating this key information into a larger matrix that includes the size and frequency of occurrence of oil spills, it will be possible` to estimate the likely future impacts, costs, and sources of oil spills.

  6. Standard practice for evaluating and qualifying oil field and refinery corrosion inhibitors using the rotating cylinder electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers a generally accepted procedure to use the rotating cylinder electrode (RCE) for evaluating corrosion inhibitors for oil field and refinery applications in defined flow conditions. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. K. S. Telang, R. W. Pike, F. C. Knopf, J. R. Hopper, J. Saleh, S. Waghchoure, S. C. Hedge and T. A. Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers and Chemical Engineering, Vol. 23, p. S727-730 (1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pike, Ralph W.

    . Hertwig,"An Advanced Process Analysis System for Improving Chemical and Refinery Processes," Computers Chemical and Refinery Processes K. S. Telang, X. Chen, R. W. Pike and F. C. Knopf Louisiana State and refineries for process improvements. The system integrates programs for on-line optimization, chemical

  8. A GPU-INSPIRED SOFT PROCESSOR FOR HIGH-THROUGHPUT ACCELERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffan, J. Gregory

    Methodology 35 6.1 System Simulation . . . . . . . A GPU-INSPIRED SOFT PROCESSOR FOR HIGH-THROUGHPUT ACCELERATION by Jeffrey Richard Code Kingyens Code Kingyens #12;Abstract A GPU-Inspired Soft Processor for High-Throughput Acceleration Jeffrey

  9. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting Diode Testing High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness Light-Emitting...

  10. Agenda from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput Screening...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop on June 26, 2007 Agenda from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput...

  11. FLUID: Improving Throughputs in Enterprise Wireless LANs through Flexible Channelization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    the usefulness of flexible channels in the context of 802.11-based networks. Current 802.11 hardware can provideFLUID: Improving Throughputs in Enterprise Wireless LANs through Flexible Channelization Shravan for designing 802.11 wireless LANs (WLANs) using flexible channelization -- the choice of an appropriate channel

  12. Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control JIANYONG ZHANG, ANAND storage systems. A consequence of this trend is the need to serve multiple users and/or workloads of the underlying storage system; (2) couple rate and latency allocation in a single scheduler, making them less

  13. On the Throughput Capacity of Heterogeneous Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Latchman, Haniph A.

    On the Throughput Capacity of Heterogeneous Wireless Networks Pan Li, Member, IEEE, and Yuguang of wireless networks. However, it is commonly assumed that all nodes in the network are identical. The issue of heterogeneous wireless networks with general network settings. Specifically, we consider an extended network

  14. Maximizing Throughput in Wireless Networks with Finite Internal Buffers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Cheng-Shang

    Maximizing Throughput in Wireless Networks with Finite Internal Buffers Ching-Min Lien, Cheng of a discrete-time wireless network, where only certain sets of links can transmit simultaneously. It is well of the configuration vectors determines the capacity region of the wireless network. In the literature, packet

  15. Dynamic Power Allocation For Maximizing Throughput in Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaze, Rahul

    1 Dynamic Power Allocation For Maximizing Throughput in Energy Harvesting Communication System general case of arbitrarily varying energy arrivals is considered, where neither the future energy arrival strategy that invests available energy uniformly over all remaining slots until the next energy arrival

  16. Applying Speculative Technique to Improve TCP Throughput over Lossy Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    @ou.edu Abstract-- The throughput degradation of Transport Control Protocol (TCP) over lossy links due performance due to control hazards in CPU design. First, two types of loss events in networks with lossy links links are involved in TCP connections. The objective of this paper is to propose a protocol

  17. Enhanced resolution and throughput of Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Enhanced resolution and throughput of Fresnel incoherent correlation holography (FINCH) using dual Montgomery County Campus, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA * barakk@ee.bgu.ac.il Abstract: Fresnel incoherent Fresnel holography," Opt. Lett. 32(8), 912914 (2007). 7. J. Rosen and G. Brooker, "Fluorescence

  18. Applying Speculative Technique to Improve TCP Throughput over Lossy Links

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , Mohammed Atiquzzaman Honeywell Labs 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 55418, USA E-mail: haowei.bai@honeywell #12;Applying Speculative Technique to Improve TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Haowei Bai Honeywell Labs 3660 Technology Drive Minneapolis, MN 55418 haowei.bai@honeywell.com David Lilja Electrical

  19. Improving Bluetooth EDR Data Throughput Using FEC and Interleaving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Improving Bluetooth EDR Data Throughput Using FEC and Interleaving Ling-Jyh Chen1 , Tony Sun2 Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) mode detailed in the new Bluetooth spec v2.0. We first studied the APT algorithm/IFEC coding schemes for the new EDR packet types, assessed their ability to alleviate the impact of burst

  20. Engineering of a High-Throughput Screening System to Identify Cellulosic Biomass,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    - grated high-throughput (HTP) screening pipeline. Herein, we report on the engineering of a novel HTP

  1. On Optimal Throughput-Energy Curve for Multi-hop Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    Laboratory Washington, DC, USA Abstract--Network throughput and energy consumption are two important throughput under some energy constraint or minimizing energy consumption while satisfying some throughput, through- put and energy consumption are two key performance metrics that bear in the minds of network

  2. Modification of Corn Starch Ethanol Refinery to Efficiently Accept Various High-Impact Cellulosic Feedstocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derr, Dan

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Corn-to-Cellulosic Migration (CCM) pilot facility was to demonstrate the implementation of advanced technologies and methods for conversion of non-food, cellulosic feedstocks into ethanol, assess the economics of the facility and evaluate potential environmental benefits for biomass to fuels conversion. The CCM project was comprised of design, build, and operate phases for the CCM pilot facility as well as research & development, and modeling components. The CCM pilot facility was designed to process 1 tonne per day of non-food biomass and biologically convert that biomass to ethanol at a rate of 70 gallons per tonne. The plant demonstrated throughputs in excess of 1 tonne per day for an extended run of 1400 hours. Although target yields were not fully achieved, the continuous operation validated the design and operability of the plant. These designs will permit the design of larger scale operations at existing corn milling operations or for greenfield plants. EdeniQ, a partner in the project and the owner of the pilot plant, continues to operate and evaluate other feedstocks.

  3. Public health assessment for US Smelter and Lead Refinery, Inc. (A/K/A USS Lead Refinery Inc. ) East Chicago, Lake County, Indiana, Region 5. Cerclis no. IND047030226. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Smelter and Lead Refinery, Inc. (USS Lead), in East Chicago, Indiana, has been operating as a primary and secondary smelting facility since 1906. Wastes which were produced during smelting operations are calcium sulfate sludge, blast furnace flue-dust, baghouse bags, rubber and plastic battery casings, and waste slag. Limited sampling information is available, and indicates that on-site soils and wastes are contaminated with lead and other metals. Additional sampling off-site surface soils indicate that the contamination has spread off-site as far as one-half mile from the site. Surface water and sediment on-site has also become contaminated with lead and other metals, as well as waste oil. Based on the completed exposure pathways to lead through soil ingestion and dust inhalation, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry concludes that contamination from the USS Lead site is a public health hazard.

  4. Effective monitoring of non-chromate chemical treatment programs for refinery cooling systems using sewage water as make-up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    AlMajnouni, A.D.; Jaffer, A.E. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treated sewage water as make-up to the cooling tower requires novel approaches to control potential cooling water problems common to refineries besides meeting environmental regulations. An intensive field study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of non-chromate treatment programs. On-line cleaning of the exchangers occurred prior to instituting the new chemical treatment program. Low carbon steel corrosion rates with minimal deposition was achieved. Microbiological fouling was controlled with chlorination and non-oxidizing biocide program. Field results are presented which compare the efficacy of these proprietary treatments to control corrosion and inhibit scale and fouling. Analytical results which provide a comprehensive performance evaluation of a new non-chromate chemical treatment program are presented.

  5. For a Worldwide Leading Industrial Automation Company, we are looking for : Embedded Software Development Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    For a Worldwide Leading Industrial Automation Company, we are looking for : Embedded Software that will developing complex solutions in the framework of the industrial automation and takes full responsibility

  6. The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab March 26, 2015 The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide By the end of the century, the...

  7. The WTERT Awards recognize outstanding contributions to advancing sustainable waste management worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The WTERT Awards recognize outstanding contributions to advancing sustainable waste management worldwide Past WTERT Awards to: 2004: Martin Gmb of the 2014 Awards Dinner by the Materials and Energy Recovery (MER) Division

  8. Optical Multiplexing for High-Throughput Spectroscopic Analysis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Saadiah

    2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    in optical biosensor testing as it provides greater throughput and scalability while being an economical and compact solution. v NOMENCLATURE MFPF Multi Frequency Phase Fluorometer MUX Multiplexer LED Light Emitting Diode DIO Digital Input... oxidase in hybrid silicate microsphere that is coated with nanofilm and reference dye (RITC) (Fig. 1) [2]. The phosphorescent dye is excited by a green light from a LED (light emitting diode) to emit luminescence, the intensity of which is dependent...

  9. Worldwide Bikesharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan; Guzman, Stacey

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stations use mobile phone technology and street furnitureFinally, advanced technology (e.g. , mobile phones, Slovenia

  10. Carbon Capture and Sequestration (via Enhanced Oil Recovery) from a Hydrogen Production Facility in an Oil Refinery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart Mehlman

    2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The project proposed a commercial demonstration of advanced technologies that would capture and sequester CO2 emissions from an existing hydrogen production facility in an oil refinery into underground formations in combination with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). The project is led by Praxair, Inc., with other project participants: BP Products North America Inc., Denbury Onshore, LLC (Denbury), and Gulf Coast Carbon Center (GCCC) at the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin. The project is located at the BP Refinery at Texas City, Texas. Praxair owns and operates a large hydrogen production facility within the refinery. As part of the project, Praxair would construct a CO2 capture and compression facility. The project aimed at demonstrating a novel vacuum pressure swing adsorption (VPSA) based technology to remove CO2 from the Steam Methane Reformers (SMR) process gas. The captured CO2 would be purified using refrigerated partial condensation separation (i.e., cold box). Denbury would purchase the CO2 from the project and inject the CO2 as part of its independent commercial EOR projects. The Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology, a unit of University of Texas at Austin, would manage the research monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) project for the sequestered CO2, in conjunction with Denbury. The sequestration and associated MVA activities would be carried out in the Hastings field at Brazoria County, TX. The project would exceed DOEs target of capturing one million tons of CO2 per year (MTPY) by 2015. Phase 1 of the project (Project Definition) is being completed. The key objective of Phase 1 is to define the project in sufficient detail to enable an economic decision with regard to proceeding with Phase 2. This topical report summarizes the administrative, programmatic and technical accomplishments completed in Phase 1 of the project. It describes the work relative to project technical and design activities (associated with CO2 capture technologies and geologic sequestration MVA), and Environmental Information Volume. Specific accomplishments of this Phase include: 1. Finalization of the Project Management Plan 2. Development of engineering designs in sufficient detail for defining project performance and costs 3. Preparation of Environmental Information Volume 4. Completion of Hazard Identification Studies 5. Completion of control cost estimates and preparation of business plan During the Phase 1 detailed cost estimate, project costs increased substantially from the previous estimate. Furthermore, the detailed risk assessment identified integration risks associated with potentially impacting the steam methane reformer operation. While the Phase 1 work identified ways to mitigate these integration risks satisfactorily from an operational perspective, the associated costs and potential schedule impacts contributed to the decision not to proceed to Phase 2. We have concluded that the project costs and integration risks at Texas City are not commensurate with the potential benefits of the project at this time.

  11. Reliability and Throughput in Future Automotive Communication Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajkumar, Ragunathan "Raj"

    Star. This action created a new industry called automotive telematics, helping to save lives and providing, the automotive telematics industry has experienced a healthy growth in North America. During the current economic downturn, the automotive telematics industry has grown worldwide surprisingly faster than prediction

  12. The Pet-Fish problem on the World-Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aerts, Diederik; D'Hooghe, Bart; Sozzo, Sandro

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We identify the presence of Pet-Fish problem situations and the corresponding Guppy effect of concept theory on the World-Wide Web. For this purpose, we introduce absolute weights for words expressing concepts and relative weights between words expressing concepts, and the notion of 'meaning bound' between two words expressing concepts, making explicit use of the conceptual structure of the World-Wide Web. The Pet-Fish problem occurs whenever there are exemplars - in the case of Pet and Fish these can be Guppy or Goldfish - for which the meaning bound with respect to the conjunction is stronger than the meaning bounds with respect to the individual concepts.

  13. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of

  14. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResources ResourcesRobust, High-Throughput Analysis

  15. Robust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 toAdvances WindRobust, High-Throughput

  16. automating high-throughput blast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to electron transfer dissoci- ation (ETD) mass spectrometry Shorter, James 15 Using High Throughput Screening to Acquire Promising Drug Candidates Against Mycobacterium...

  17. automated high-throughput cultivations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to electron transfer dissoci- ation (ETD) mass spectrometry Shorter, James 15 Using High Throughput Screening to Acquire Promising Drug Candidates Against Mycobacterium...

  18. High Throughput Pretreatment and Enzyme Hydrolysis of Biomass: Screening Recalcitrance in Large Sample Populations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Decker, S. R.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on the execution of the first high-throughput thermochemical pretreatment/enzyme digestion pipeline for screening biomass for recalcitrance.

  19. Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zhigang

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation1 Introduction Microfluidics has gained significant advancesof mammalian cells using microfluidics 3,4 , there have been

  20. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment III. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm and methanol refinery: the background environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide array of general background information is presented on the Central Florida area in which the eucalyptus energy plantation and methanol refinery will be located. Five counties in Central Florida may be affected by the project, DeSoto, Hardee, Hillsborough, Manatee, and Polk. The human resources of the area are reviewed. Included are overviews of population demographic and economic trends. Land use patterns and the transportation are system described, and the region's archeological and recreational resources are evaluated. The region's air quality is emphasized. The overall climate is described along with noise and air shed properties. An analysis of the region's water resources is included. Ground water is discussed first followed by an analysis of surface water. Then the overall quality and water supply/demand balance for the area is evaluated. An overview of the region's biota is presented. Included here are discussions of the general ecosystems in Central Florida, and an analysis of areas with important biological significance. Finally, land resources are examined.

  1. refinery BP Oil's Alliance refinery in Louisiana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    is the focus of an environmental control program, which is also being implemented in other BP plants

  2. Refinery Yield of Liquefied Refinery Gases

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION

  3. please recycle. Recent decades have seen fundamental shifts in the business of forestry worldwide. Private

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    please recycle. Recent decades have seen fundamental shifts in the business of forestry worldwide analysis and management. Today's master's programs in forestry and environmental management address forest; one of the oldest and best forestry education programs in the world; and a strong network

  4. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12877 Worldwide acceleration of mountain erosion under a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature12877 Worldwide acceleration of mountain erosion under a cooling climate glaciers throughout the Pliocene and Pleistocene epochs10,11 . As a consequence of these oscillations fission track, zircon (UTh)/He and zircon fission track, which have approximate closuretemperaturesof70u

  5. Predicting worldwide invasiveness for four major problematic decapods: an evaluation of using different calibration sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Brian

    different calibration sets Ce´sar Capinha, Brian Leung and Pedro Anasta´cio C. Capinha (capinha of occurrence data to use for model calibration. Additionally, pseudo-absences are also known to cause different calibration sets for building worldwide invasiveness models for four major problematic decapods

  6. Sismos l'Ecole: A Worldwide Network of Real-Time Seismometers in Schools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolet, Guust

    Sismos à l'Ecole: A Worldwide Network of Real-Time Seismometers in Schools by F. Courboulex, J. L countries in the world. Thanks to Sismos à l'Ecole (SaE) network stations, acces- sible in real time

  7. Growing consumption of petroleum products worldwide has resulted in the proliferation of vessels carrying oil, chemicals, and gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Growing consumption of petroleum products worldwide has resulted in the proliferation of vessels carrying oil, chemicals, and gases into our harbors. Meeting our society's surging demand for commodities

  8. SMOV3B WFPC2 UV Contamination Monitoring and Throughput Check

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirianni, Marco

    1 SMOV3B WFPC2 UV Contamination Monitoring and Throughput Check A. M. Koekemoer, S. Gonzaga, L is potentially susceptible to significant decreases as a result of contaminants deposited on the cold CCD windows intensive monitoring of this contamination using the F170W filter, to ensure that the throughput never

  9. High-throughput generation of hydrogel microbeads with varying elasticity for cell encapsulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    High-throughput generation of hydrogel microbeads with varying elasticity for cell encapsulation a microfluidic approach for high-throughput generation of 3D microenvironments with different elasticity for studies of cell fate. The generation of agarose microgels with different elastic moduli was achieved by (i

  10. Adaptive Congestion Control in Broadband-ISDN: High Throughput with Sustained Quality of Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsillides, Andreas

    ). The controller regulates QoS by manipulating the flow of controllable traffic into the network. Controllability. In this paper we use an adaptive feedback and feedforward control system to maximise throughput such that the QoAdaptive Congestion Control in Broadband-ISDN: High Throughput with Sustained Quality of Service

  11. Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Catherine P.

    1 Throughput-Lifetime Tradeoffs in Multihop Wireless Networks under an SINR-based Interference crucial design objectives for a number of multihop wireless network applica- tions. As these two this tradeoff between the network throughput and lifetime, for the case of fixed wireless networks where link

  12. Improving TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using Protocol-Level Speculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Improving TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using Protocol-Level Speculations Haowei Bai Honeywell@ou.edu Abstract-- The degradation of Transport Control Protocol (TCP) throughput in networks with lossy links. This is very similar to processor performance degradation due to control hazards in CPU design. First, two

  13. Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab-Initio Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtarolo, Stefano

    Assessing the Thermoelectric Properties of Sintered Compounds via High-Throughput Ab Database have been considered as nanograined, sintered-powder thermoelectrics with the high-throughput ab the electronic band gap and the carrier effective mass, and that the probability of having large thermoelectric

  14. High throughput energy efficient multi-FFT architecture on FPGAs (Draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    computing, High throughput FFT, Energy efficient design I. INTRODUCTION As FPGAs are programmed specifically in spread spec- trum receiver [4]. In the design of high throughput FFT architectures, energy-efficient design techniques can be used to maximize performance under power dissipation constraints. The power

  15. Parallel Interleaver Architecture with New Scheduling Scheme for High Throughput Configurable Turbo Decoder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    Parallel Interleaver Architecture with New Scheduling Scheme for High Throughput Configurable Turbo}@rice.edu, yuanbinguo@huawei.com Abstract--Parallel architecture is required for high throughput turbo decoder to meet also shows great flexibility and scalability compared to prior work. Index Terms--VLSI, turbo decoder

  16. On-chip sub-cellular resolution whole-animal manipulation for high-throughput in vivo screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Christopher Benjamin

    We present a suite of technologies that can be combined to perform complex high-throughput whole-animal genetic and drug screens. When used in various combinations, these devices facilitate a variety of high-throughput ...

  17. Interactive Visual Analysis of High Throughput Text Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL; Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL; Maness, Christopher S [ORNL; Senter, James K [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale, velocity, and dynamic nature of large scale social media systems like Twitter demand a new set of visual analytics techniques that support near real-time situational awareness. Social media systems are credited with escalating social protest during recent large scale riots. Virtual communities form rapidly in these online systems, and they occasionally foster violence and unrest which is conveyed in the users language. Techniques for analyzing broad trends over these networks or reconstructing conversations within small groups have been demonstrated in recent years, but state-of- the-art tools are inadequate at supporting near real-time analysis of these high throughput streams of unstructured information. In this paper, we present an adaptive system to discover and interactively explore these virtual networks, as well as detect sentiment, highlight change, and discover spatio- temporal patterns.

  18. A microfluidic platform for high-throughput multiplexed protein quantitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volpetti, Francesca; Maerkl, Sebastian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high-throughput microfluidic platform capable of quantitating up to 384 biomarkers in 4 distinct samples by immunoassay. The microfluidic device contains 384 unit cells, which can be individually programmed with pairs of capture and detection antibody. Samples are quantitated in each unit cell by four independent MITOMI detection areas, allowing four samples to be analyzed in parallel for a total of 1,536 assays per device. We show that the device can be pre-assembled and stored for weeks at elevated temperature and we performed proof-of-concept experiments simultaneously quantitating IL-6, IL-1\\b{eta}, TNF-{\\alpha}, PSA, and GFP. Finally, we show that the platform can be used to identify functional antibody combinations by screening 64 antibody combinations requiring up to 384 unique assays per device.

  19. A high throughput (>90%), large compensation range, single-prism femtosecond pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kong, Lingjie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a high throughput, large compensation range, single-prism femtosecond pulse compressor, using a single prism and two roof mirrors. The compressor has zero angular dispersion, zero spatial dispersion, zero pulse-front tilt, and unity magnification. The high efficiency is achieved by adopting two roof mirrors as the retroreflectors. We experimentally achieved ~ -14500 fs2 group delay dispersion (GDD) with 30 cm of prism tip-roof mirror prism separation, and ~90.7% system throughput with the current implementation. With better components, the throughput can be even higher.

  20. Standard practice for evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in high-pressure, high-temperature refinery hydrogen service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the evaluation of disbonding of bimetallic stainless alloy/steel plate for use in refinery high-pressure/high-temperature (HP/HT) gaseous hydrogen service. It includes procedures to (1) produce suitable laboratory test specimens, (2) obtain hydrogen charging conditions in the laboratory that are similar to those found in refinery HP/HT hydrogen gas service for evaluation of bimetallic specimens exposed to these environments, and (3) perform analysis of the test data. The purpose of this practice is to allow for comparison of data among test laboratories on the resistance of bimetallic stainless alloy/steels to hydrogen-induced disbonding (HID). 1.2 This practice applies primarily to bimetallic products fabricated by weld overlay of stainless alloy onto a steel substrate. Most of the information developed using this practice has been obtained for such materials. The procedures described herein, may also be appropriate for evaluation of hot roll bonded, explosive bonded...

  1. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esser, G. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Giessen (Germany). Inst. for Plant Ecology; Lieth, H.F.H. [Univ. of Osnabrueck (Germany). Systems Research Group; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  2. The year open (energy) data went worldwide | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe year open (energy) data went worldwide

  3. Advances in High Throughput Screening of Biomass Recalcitrance (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, G. B.; Decker, S. R.; Tucker, M. P.; Law, C.; Doeppke, C.; Sykes, R. W.; Davis, M. F.; Ziebell, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This was a poster displayed at the Symposium. Advances on previous high throughput screening of biomass recalcitrance methods have resulted in improved conversion and replicate precision. Changes in plate reactor metallurgy, improved preparation of control biomass, species-specific pretreatment conditions, and enzymatic hydrolysis parameters have reduced overall coefficients of variation to an average of 6% for sample replicates. These method changes have improved plate-to-plate variation of control biomass recalcitrance and improved confidence in sugar release differences between samples. With smaller errors plant researchers can have a higher degree of assurance more low recalcitrance candidates can be identified. Significant changes in plate reactor, control biomass preparation, pretreatment conditions and enzyme have significantly reduced sample and control replicate variability. Reactor plate metallurgy significantly impacts sugar release aluminum leaching into reaction during pretreatment degrades sugars and inhibits enzyme activity. Removal of starch and extractives significantly decreases control biomass variability. New enzyme formulations give more consistent and higher conversion levels, however required re-optimization for switchgrass. Pretreatment time and temperature (severity) should be adjusted to specific biomass types i.e. woody vs. herbaceous. Desalting of enzyme preps to remove low molecular weight stabilizers and improved conversion levels likely due to water activity impacts on enzyme structure and substrate interactions not attempted here due to need to continually desalt and validate precise enzyme concentration and activity.

  4. CellVisualizer : exploring hierarchical, multi-dimensional data with applications to high-throughput microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, InHan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we present a system for visualizing hierarchical, multi-dimensional, memory-intensive datasets. Specifically, we designed an interactive system to visualize data collected by high-throughput microscopy and ...

  5. Development of High-Throughput Microfluidic Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Analyzing Microdroplets in Droplet Microfluidic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobahi, Nebras MohammedKamal A.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of a high-throughput microfluidic impedance spectroscopy platform for electrically detecting analyzing impedance measurements of non-contact and label free microdroplets. This microfluidic impedance spectroscopy...

  6. Infrastructure to support ultra high throughput biodosimetry screening after a radiological event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    GUY GARTY1 , ANDREW KARAM2 , & DAVID J. BRENNER3 1 Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Radiological Research Accelerator Facility, Nevis Laboratories, Columbia UniverInfrastructure to support ultra high throughput biodosimetry screening after a radiological event

  7. Cell bioprinting as a potential high-throughput method for fabricating cell-based biosensors (CBBs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, F.

    Cell-based biosensors (CBBs) are becoming an important tool for biosecurity applications and rapid diagnostics. For current CBBs technology, cell immobilization and high throughput fabrication are the main challenges. To ...

  8. Methods and technologies for high-throughput and high-content small animal screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Christopher, 1979-

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-throughput and high-content screening (HTS and HCS) of whole animals requires their immobilization for high-resolution imaging and manipulation. Here we present methods to enable HTS and HCS of the nematode Caenorhabditis ...

  9. Engineering a single cell microarray platform for high throughput DNA damage and repair analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weingeist, David McGregor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DNA damage contributes to cancer, aging, and heritable diseases. Ironically, DNA damaging agents are also commonly used in current cancer treatment. We therefore need robust, high throughput, and inexpensive tools for ...

  10. The Materials genome : rapid materials screening for renewable energy using high-throughput density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Anubhav, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis relates to the emerging field of high-throughput density functional theory (DFT) computation for materials design and optimization. Although highthroughput DFT is a promising new method for materials discovery, ...

  11. Attendees list from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Attendees list from the U.S. Department of Energy's High Throughput Screening of Hydrogen Storage Materials Workshop on June 26, 2007 Attendees list from the U.S. Department of...

  12. VLPW: The Very Long Packet Window Architecture for High Throughput Network-On-Chip Router Designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Haiyin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    -chip routers and the ideal interconnect fabric. To improve throughput, VLPW optimizes Switch Allocation (SA) efficiency. Existing SA normally applies Round-Robin scheduling to arbitrate among the packets targeting the same output port. However, this simple...

  13. Molecular display of synthetic oligonucleotide libraries and their analysis with high throughput DNA sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larman, Harry Benjamin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High throughput methods in molecular biology have changed the landscape of biomedical research. In particular, advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing and synthesis technologies are defining our genomes and the ...

  14. An instrument for high-throughput measurements of fiber mechanical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristofek, Grant William, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an instrument is designed and constructed for the purpose of measuring the mechanical properties of single fibers. The instrument is intended to provide high throughput measurement of single fiber geometric ...

  15. A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    A microfluidic device for high throughput bacterial biofilm studies Jeongyun Kim,a Manjunath Hegde of biofilm community formation. Here, we describe the development of a PDMS-based two-layer microfluidic flow

  16. Development of High-Throughput Microfluidic Impedance Spectroscopy Platform for Analyzing Microdroplets in Droplet Microfluidic System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sobahi, Nebras MohammedKamal A.

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of a high-throughput microfluidic impedance spectroscopy platform for electrically detecting analyzing impedance measurements of non-contact and label free microdroplets. This microfluidic impedance spectroscopy...

  17. Throughput Optimal Scheduling in the Presence of Heavy-Tailed Traffic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannathan, Krishna Prasanna

    We investigate the tail behavior of the steady-state queue occupancies under throughput optimal scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, served by a single ...

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    by State as of January 1, 2006 PDF 5 Refiners' Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2006 PDF 6 Operable Crude Oil and Downstream Charge...

  19. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Single Cycle Shown for ATB SteamCarbon 3 * ATB reforming * Steamcarbon 3 * Syngas generated during reforming * 70% H 2 * 20% CO * Syngas composition agrees with...

  20. Refinery Capacity Report

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubic Feet) Yeara 436INCIDENCE OF AN2009

  1. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21

  2. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity Report

  3. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity Report5

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity

  5. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity Operable

  6. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacity

  7. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacityof Last

  8. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21Capacityof

  9. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"21CapacityofVacuum

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION / Refiner /

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION / Refiner

  13. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION / RefinerAlkylates

  14. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION / RefinerAlkylates

  15. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION /

  16. Refinery Outages: Fall 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION /Product:

  17. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Capacity Report June 2014 With Data as of January 1, 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by...

  18. Refinery Capacity Report

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail

  19. Refinery Capacity Report Historical

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source:Additions to Capacity onThousand(Dollars2009Rail

  20. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral Testimony ofMonitoring, Protectionof

  1. U.S. Refinery

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude Oil and Petroleum

  2. U.S. Refinery

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,932 130,902672009Dec-14

  3. An Image and Video Search Engine for the World-Wide Web John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    An Image and Video Search Engine for the World-Wide Web John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Image Technology for New Media Columbia University, New York, N

  4. Towards Chip Scale Liquid Chromatography and High Throughput Immunosensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, J.

    2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes several research projects aimed towards developing new instruments and novel methods for high throughput chemical and biological analysis. Approaches are taken in two directions. The first direction takes advantage of well-established semiconductor fabrication techniques and applies them to miniaturize instruments that are workhorses in analytical laboratories. Specifically, the first part of this work focused on the development of micropumps and microvalves for controlled fluid delivery. The mechanism of these micropumps and microvalves relies on the electrochemically-induced surface tension change at a mercury/electrolyte interface. A miniaturized flow injection analysis device was integrated and flow injection analyses were demonstrated. In the second part of this work, microfluidic chips were also designed, fabricated, and tested. Separations of two fluorescent dyes were demonstrated in microfabricated channels, based on an open-tubular liquid chromatography (OT LC) or an electrochemically-modulated liquid chromatography (EMLC) format. A reduction in instrument size can potentially increase analysis speed, and allow exceedingly small amounts of sample to be analyzed under diverse separation conditions. The second direction explores the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a signal transduction method for immunoassay analysis. It takes advantage of the improved detection sensitivity as a result of surface enhancement on colloidal gold, the narrow width of Raman band, and the stability of Raman scattering signals to distinguish several different species simultaneously without exploiting spatially-separated addresses on a biochip. By labeling gold nanoparticles with different Raman reporters in conjunction with different detection antibodies, a simultaneous detection of a dual-analyte immunoassay was demonstrated. Using this scheme for quantitative analysis was also studied and preliminary dose-response curves from an immunoassay of a mo del antigen were obtained. Simultaneous detection of several analytes at the same address can potentially increase the analysis speed, and can further expand the analysis capability of a microarray chip.

  5. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  6. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

  7. High-throughput scanning confocal microscope for single molecule Chandran R. Sabanayagam, John S. Eid, and Amit Mellera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meller, Amit

    High-throughput scanning confocal microscope for single molecule analysis Chandran R. Sabanayagam and probing of single molecules, and an automatic focusing feature that enables the unattended scanning

  8. Now available at the DNA Sequencing and Genotyping Core Facility OpenArray High-throughput nanofluidic PCR technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruvinsky, Ilya

    -throughput nanofluidic PCR technology from Life Technologies/Applied Biosystems Application/ Service Area Types Experimental flexibility open-format layout Nanofluidic design reduces reagent usage Questions? Contact

  9. PROCESS CHANGES TO DWPF TO INCREASE THROUGHPUT AND INCORPORATE SALT STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C; David Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Michael Stone, M; Michael02 Smith, M

    2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has been vitrifying High Level Waste sludge since 1996. Sludge batch 1a, 1b, 2, and 3 have been successfully stabilized. In the last several years, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has worked with DWPF to implement process and compositional changes to improve throughput. These changes allowed significant increases in waste throughput for processing of sludge batch 3 and will be necessary to maintain reasonable throughput for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). SB4 processing was initiated in June 2007 and will be the first significantly HM-type sludge batch processed. This sludge is high in aluminum and other components troublesome to DWPF processing. In addition, coupled processing is scheduled to start in the next fiscal year, which will also impact throughput. Coupled processing will begin with the incorporation of waste streams from the Actinide Removal Process and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit and will eventually transition to the feed from the larger scale Salt Waste Processing Facility. A discussion of the programs to improve throughput and implement salt processing will be provided.

  10. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  11. Solion ion source for high-efficiency, high-throughput solar cell manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koo, John, E-mail: john-koo@amat.com; Binns, Brant; Miller, Timothy; Krause, Stephen; Skinner, Wesley; Mullin, James [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)] [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Equipment Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, Massachusetts 01930 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce the Solion ion source for high-throughput solar cell doping. As the source power is increased to enable higher throughput, negative effects degrade the lifetime of the plasma chamber and the extraction electrodes. In order to improve efficiency, we have explored a wide range of electron energies and determined the conditions which best suit production. To extend the lifetime of the source we have developed an in situ cleaning method using only existing hardware. With these combinations, source life-times of >200 h for phosphorous and >100 h for boron ion beams have been achieved while maintaining 1100 cell-per-hour production.

  12. 2005 International Conference on Wireless Networks, Communications and Mobile Computing Improving TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    TCP Throughput over Lossy Links Using Protocol-Level Speculations Haowei Bai Honeywell Labs 3660- The degradation of Transport Control Protocol (TCP) throughput in networks with lossy links is mainly due to processor performance degradation due to control hazards in CPU design. First, two types of loss events

  13. The worldwide NORM production and a fully automated gamma-ray spectrometer for their characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Xhixha; GP. Bezzon; C. Broggini; GP. Buso; A. Caciolli; I. Callegari; S. De Bianchi; G. Fiorentini; E. Guastaldi; M. Kaeli Xhixha; F. Mantovani; G. Massa; R. Menegazzo; L. Mou; A. Pasquini; C. Rossi Alvarez; M. Shyti

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials containing radionuclides of natural origin, which is modified by human made processes and being subject to regulation because of their radioactivity are known as NORM. We present a brief review of the main categories of non-nuclear industries together with the levels of activity concentration in feed raw materials, products and waste, including mechanisms of radioisotope enrichments. The global management of NORM shows a high level of complexity, mainly due to different degrees of radioactivity enhancement and the huge amount of worldwide waste production. The future tendency of guidelines concerning environmental protection will require both a systematic monitoring based on the ever-increasing sampling and high performance of gamma ray spectroscopy. On the ground of these requirements a new low background fully automated high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer MCA_Rad has been developed. The design of Pb and Cu shielding allowed to reach a background reduction of two order of magnitude with respect to laboratory radioactivity. A severe lowering of manpower cost is obtained through a fully automation system, which enables up to 24 samples to be measured without any human attendance. Two coupled HPGe detectors increase the detection efficiency, performing accurate measurements on sample volume (180 cc) with a reduction of sample transport cost of material. Details of the instrument calibration method are presented. MCA_Rad system can measure in less than one hour a typical NORM sample enriched in U and Th with some hundreds of Bq/kg, with an overall uncertainty less than 5%. Quality control of this method has been tested. Measurements of certified reference materials RGK-1, RGU-2 and RGTh-1 containing concentrations of K, U and Th comparable to NORM have been performed, resulting an overall relative discrepancy of 5% among central values within the reported uncertainty.

  14. Turbine fuels from tar-sands bitumen and heavy oil. Volume 2. Phase 3. Process design specifications for a turbine-fuel refinery charging San Ardo heavy crude oil. Final report, 1 June 1985-31 March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, A.F.; Swesey, J.R.; Magill, L.G.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering design was developed for a 50,000-BPSD grass-roots refinery to produce aviation turbine fuel grades JP-4 and JP-8 from San Ardo heavy crude oil. The design was based on the pilot-plant studies described in Phase III - Volume I of this report. The detailed plant design described in this report was used to determine estimated production costs.

  15. Searching for Images and Videos on the World-Wide Web John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Fu

    Searching for Images and Videos on the World-Wide Web John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang Department of Electrical Engineering and Center for Image Technology for New Media, Columbia University, New York, N-Wide Web. #12;John R. Smith and Shih-Fu Chang 1 1 Introduction A large number of catalogs and search

  16. Declarative Integration of Interactive 3D Graphics into the World-Wide Web: Principles, Current Approaches, and Research Agenda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Declarative Integration of Interactive 3D Graphics into the World-Wide Web: Principles, Current With the advent of WebGL, plugin-free hardware-accelerated inter- active 3D graphics has finally arrived in all of incor- porating 3D graphics directly into HTML to enable its use on any Web page. We present declarative

  17. Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from 1961 to 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observed reductions of surface solar radiation at Sites in the United States and worldwide from-20146 Hamburg, Germany). ABSTRACT Surface solar radiation revealed an estimated 7W/m2 or 4% decline in solar radiation in the United States can be explained. It is shown that solar radiation declined below

  18. Abstract-Electricity transmission planning does not have a common solution worldwide, with most countries trusting on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    Abstract- Electricity transmission planning does not have a common solution worldwide, with most have reactivated but some improvements to the process must be done. Index Terms--transmission planning issue in the restructuring of the electricity market all over the world. Transmission systems costs

  19. For a Worldwide Leading Industrial Automation Company, we are looking for: Electronics and Power Electronics Development Engineer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    For a Worldwide Leading Industrial Automation Company, we are looking for: Electronics and Power Electronics Development Engineer in Barcelona In this position the candidate will join the Global Development with Software and System Test Engineers, with colleagues from Marketing, Sales and Production

  20. Obesity has become a major worldwide health prob-lem, not least because it is strongly associated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    Obesity has become a major worldwide health prob- lem, not least because it is strongly associated evidence indicates that obesity is causally linked to a chronic low-grade inflammatory state1,2 , which con- tributes to the development of obesity-linked disor- ders, in particular to metabolic dysfunction

  1. Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal cell to a malignant one

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Transformation of a normal regulators of growth. Biomarkers associated with cancer were examined in human breast epithelial cells transformed by high-LET radiation in the presence of 17?-estradiol. An established cancer model was used

  2. A Joint Programme of: "Water will remain a strategic resource for countries worldwide, and the quest for water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    the distinction between water as a resource and water as a service and thus lack the necessary institutionalA Joint Programme of: "Water will remain a strategic resource for countries worldwide, and the quest for water sustainability will become increasingly intricate and delicate. A keen understanding

  3. TANSEI 04The University of Tokyo Magazine March, 2004 TANSEI aims at sharing worldwide the latest developments at UT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imai, Hiroshi

    TANSEI 04The University of Tokyo Magazine March, 2004 Vol. TANSEI aims at sharing worldwide of Tokyo in the World 18 Renewal of Agreement between the University of Tokyo and the European Organization establishment to society, as well as develop education and research internationally and interact with other

  4. High-Throughput Screening of Gene Function in Stem Cells Using Clonal Microarrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, David V.

    High-Throughput Screening of Gene Function in Stem Cells Using Clonal Microarrays RANDOLPH S. ASHTON,a JOSEPH PELTIER,b CHRISTOPHER A. FASANO,c ANALEAH O'NEILL,b JOSHUA LEONARD,b SALLY TEMPLE,c DAVID. Sox2 transcription factor Akt1 Neural progenitor cells Soft lithography ABSTRACT We describe

  5. Route Throughput Analysis with Spectral Reuse for Multi-Rate Mobile Ad Hoc Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yu-Chee

    networks (MANETs) have received a lot of attention for its flexible network architecture. While many network (MANET) is a flexible and dynamic architecture that is attractive due to its ease in network1 Route Throughput Analysis with Spectral Reuse for Multi-Rate Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Lien-Wu Chen

  6. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hantke, Max, F.

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  7. High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hantke, Max, F.

    Preprocessed detector images that were used for the paper "High-throughput imaging of heterogeneous cell organelles with an X-ray laser". The CXI file contains the entire recorded data - including both hits and blanks. It also includes down-sampled images and LCLS machine parameters. Additionally, the Cheetah configuration file is attached that was used to create the pre-processed data.

  8. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bell, Ronald E.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy morewavelength calibration.less

  9. Joint Power Control and Link Scheduling in Wireless Networks for Throughput Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Joint Power Control and Link Scheduling in Wireless Networks for Throughput Optimization Liqun Fu--This paper concerns the problem of finding the minimum-length TDMA frame of a power-controlled wire- less formulate the general joint link scheduling and power control problem as an in- teger linear programming

  10. Trapped Capacity: Scheduling under a Power Cap to Maximize Machine-Room Throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pakin, Scott

    in the machine room and thereby increase system throughput. Our goal is not to reduce energy or power consumption power and energy in machine rooms. In practice the power for machine rooms is well over-provisioned, specified by high energy LINPACK runs or nameplate power estimates. This results in a considerable amount

  11. Throughput Optimization in Multi-hop Wireless Networks with Multi-packet Reception and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaweera, Sudharman K.

    Mexico College, Espanola, NM - USA Electrical & Computer Engineering Dept., University of New Mexico layer have enabled the simultaneous reception of multiple packets by a node in wireless net- works. We model for the throughput optimization in MPR-capable wireless net- works, where nodes have one or more

  12. High-throughput two-hybrid analysis The promise and the peril

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Maitreya

    , reduction in reagent costs and further refinements of the approach. As throughput escalates, so does use. The first stage is the initial description of a method: the prototype version. Typically. For a large fraction of new technologies, few other examples beyond this proto- type are ever described

  13. Accounting for Memory Use, Cost, Throughput, and Latency in the Design of a Media Server

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Edward Y.

    : the perstream costs and the worstcase initial latency before a new media request can be satisfied. WeAccounting for Memory Use, Cost, Throughput, and Latency in the Design of a Media Server Edward scheduling and data place ment ones. We show that, some disk latency reduction techniques can

  14. SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    SCHEDULING ABOVE MAC TO MAXIMIZE BATTERY LIFETIME AND THROUGHPUT IN WLANS Edoardo Regini, Daeseob Diego La Jolla, CA 92093 {eregini, dalim, tajana}@ucsd.edu ABSTRACT Maximizing battery lifetime. This is because in heavy traffic conditions, the chance of nodes to successfully transmit a packet decreases

  15. Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid-producing algae{,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Amar S.

    Optical microplates for high-throughput screening of photosynthesis in lipid- producing algae-producing algae of interest in 2nd generation biofuels. By conducting 96 experiments in parallel, photoirradiance the study of photosynthesis in algae. Societal challenges in energy sustainability have renewed interest

  16. Applied Catalysis A: General 254 (2003) 97106 Photoionization detection (PID) as a high throughput

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senkan, Selim M.

    Applied Catalysis A: General 254 (2003) 97­106 Photoionization detection (PID) as a high throughput 2002 Abstract A versatile photoionization detection (PID) system has been developed to rapidly screen libraries of catalytic materials. The PID approach involves the use of an appropriately selected dc

  17. Throughput Validation of an Advanced Channel Assignment Algorithm in IEEE 802.11 Mohamad Haidar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akl, Robert

    assignment for hot-spot service areas in a WLAN by formulating an Integer Linear Programming (ILP) modelThroughput Validation of an Advanced Channel Assignment Algorithm in IEEE 802.11 WLAN Mohamad channel-assignment algorithm at the Access Points (APs) of a Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN

  18. Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perrimon, Norbert

    Droplet microfluidic technology for single-cell high-throughput screening Eric Brouzesa,b,1 (received for review March 31, 2009) We present a droplet-based microfluidic technology that enables high our droplet microfluidic platform is modular, robust, uses no moving parts, and has a wide range

  19. Throughput analysis for MIMO systems in the high SNR regime Narayan Prasad and Mahesh K. Varanasi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varanasi, Mahesh K.

    . The throughputs of MISO and SIMO fading channels are extensively analyzed and it is shown that asymptoti- cally [1, 2] and is defined as the maximum rate that can be transmitted reliably over all channel realiza rate which can be reliably transmitted This work was supported in part by NSF Grant CCF-0431170

  20. Effect of Height (Fresnel Clearance) on Signal Strength and Throughput for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Effect of Height (Fresnel Clearance) on Signal Strength and Throughput for Medium and Long Distance obstruction height Ignoring Fresnel Clearance For 20Km long Wireless Link, Fresnel Clearance requires around, height 4 m at Q ensures 100% Fresnel Clearance On Physical Inspection: No LOS even at 8 meters Distance

  1. A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A High-Throughput Method to Examine Protein- Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets can easily be applied to examine multiple protein-protein, protein-nucleotide and nucleotide-nucleotide Protein-Nucleotide Interactions Identifies Targets of the Bacterial Transcriptional Regulatory Protein Fur

  2. High-Throughput Contention-Free Concurrent Interleaver Architecture for Multi-Standard Turbo Decoder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellor-Crummey, John

    High-Throughput Contention-Free Concurrent Interleaver Architecture for Multi-Standard Turbo paral- lel turbo decoder architectures have been developed. However, the interleaver has become a major that can efficiently solve the memory conflict problem for parallel turbo decoders with very high

  3. Grid Portal Interface for Interactive Use and Monitoring of High-Throughput Proteome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourne, Philip E.

    Grid Portal Interface for Interactive Use and Monitoring of High-Throughput Proteome Annotation software on a high performance computing platform such as the grid. The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) project application to drive grid software development. It is a flagship application for the TeraGrid project [3

  4. Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection of biochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangdong

    Oblique-incidence reflectivity difference microscope for label-free high-throughput detection (OI-RD) microscope, a form of polarization-modulated imaging ellipsometer, for label on the polarizer compensatorsampleanalyzer scheme and under the off-null condition, a polarization-modulated OI

  5. HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELL AND PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION USING ISO-DIELECTRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voldman, Joel

    HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELL AND PARTICLE CHARACTERIZATION USING ISO-DIELECTRIC SEPARATION Michael D. Vahey conductivity. Using a re- cently developed separation method - iso-dielectric separation (IDS) - we character for developing new screens. THEORY We recently developed a separa- tion method, called iso-dielectric sepa

  6. Cherish every Joule: Maximizing throughput with an eye on network-wide energy consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hou, Y. Thomas

    Cherish every Joule: Maximizing throughput with an eye on network-wide energy consumption Canming: {jcm, yshi, thou, wjlou}@vt.edu Abstract Conserving network-wide energy consumption is becoming of wireless networks, the concern of energy consumption is becoming in- creasingly important for network

  7. High-throughput approaches to sourcing of human hepatocytes for cell-based therapies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jing (Jing Meghan)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chronic liver disease affects more than 500 million people worldwide. The only therapy shown to directly prevent mortality is organ transplantation. However, there is growing discrepancy between supply and demand of ...

  8. Uranium Transport in a High-Throughput Electrorefiner for EBR-II Blanket Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Hua, Thanh Q.; Vaden, DeeEarl [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)

    2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique high-throughput Mk-V electrorefiner is being used in the electrometallurgical treatment of the metallic sodium-bonded blanket fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. Over many cycles, it transports uranium back and forth between the anodic fuel dissolution baskets and the cathode tubes until, because of imperfect adherence of the dendrites, it all ends up in the product collector at the bottom. The transport behavior of uranium in the high-throughput electrorefiner can be understood in terms of the sticking coefficients for uranium adherence to the cathode tubes in the forward direction and to the dissolution baskets in the reverse direction. The sticking coefficients are inferred from the experimental voltage and current traces and are correlated in terms of a single parameter representing the ratio of the cell current to the limiting current at the surface acting as the cathode. The correlations are incorporated into an engineering model that calculates the transport of uranium in the different modes of operation. The model also uses the experimentally derived electrorefiner operating maps that describe the relationship between the cell voltage and the cell current for the three principal transport modes. It is shown that the model correctly simulates the cycle-to-cycle variation of the voltage and current profiles. The model is used to conduct a parametric study of electrorefiner throughput rate as a function of the principal operating parameters. The throughput rate is found to improve with lowering of the basket rotation speed, reduction of UCl{sub 3} concentration in salt, and increasing the maximum cell current or cut-off voltage. Operating conditions are identified that can improve the throughput rate by 60 to 70% over that achieved at present.

  9. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,800 10,100 7,100 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 681 1,760 7,190 4,510 4,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  10. (Data in kilograms of germanium content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The value of domestic refinery production of germanium, based upon an estimated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,200 13,800 26,500 Shipments from Government stockpile excesses 5,730 681 1,760 7,190 5,000 Consumption.S. germanium consumption. The major end uses for germanium, worldwide, were estimated to be polymerization catalysts, 31%; fiber-optic systems, 24%; infrared optics, 23%; electronics/solar electric applications, 12

  11. With BlueCard Worldwide you can explore the world with peace of mind. Like your passport, always carry your Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    With BlueCard Worldwide you can explore the world with peace of mind. Like your passport, always carry your Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Oklahoma (BCBSOK) identification (ID) card with you when you travel or live abroad. Through the BlueCard Worldwide program, you have access to medical assistance

  12. Method and apparatus for maximizing throughput of indirectly heated rotary kilns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Ralph L; Smoot, L. Douglas; Hatfield, Kent E

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for achieving improved throughput capacity of indirectly heated rotary kilns used to produce pyrolysis products such as shale oils or coal oils that are susceptible to decomposition by high kiln wall temperatures is disclosed. High throughput is achieved by firing the kiln such that optimum wall temperatures are maintained beginning at the point where the materials enter the heating section of the kiln and extending to the point where the materials leave the heated section. Multiple high velocity burners are arranged such that combustion products directly impact on the area of the kiln wall covered internally by the solid material being heated. Firing rates for the burners are controlled to maintain optimum wall temperatures.

  13. Increasing throughput of multiplexed electrical bus in pipe-lined architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asaad, Sameh; Brezzo, Bernard V; Kapur, Mohit

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques are disclosed for increasing the throughput of a multiplexed electrical bus by exploiting available pipeline stages of a computer or other system. For example, a method for increasing a throughput of an electrical bus that connects at least two devices in a system comprises introducing at least one signal hold stage in a signal-receiving one of the two devices, such that a maximum frequency at which the two devices are operated is not limited by a number of cycles of an operating frequency of the electrical bus needed for a signal to propagate from a signal-transmitting one of the two devices to the signal-receiving one of the two devices. Preferably, the signal hold stage introduced in the signal-receiving one of the two devices is a pipeline stage re-allocated from the signal-transmitting one of the two devices.

  14. Robust, high-throughput solution structural analyses by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hura, Greg L.; Menon, Angeli L.; Hammel, Michal; Rambo, Robert P.; Poole II, Farris L.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Jenney Jr, Francis E.; Classen, Scott; Frankel, Kenneth A.; Hopkins, Robert C.; Yang, Sungjae; Scott, Joseph W.; Dillard, Bret D.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Tainer, John A.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an efficient pipeline enabling high-throughput analysis of protein structure in solution with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our SAXS pipeline combines automated sample handling of microliter volumes, temperature and anaerobic control, rapid data collection and data analysis, and couples structural analysis with automated archiving. We subjected 50 representative proteins, mostly from Pyrococcus furiosus, to this pipeline and found that 30 were multimeric structures in solution. SAXS analysis allowed us to distinguish aggregated and unfolded proteins, define global structural parameters and oligomeric states for most samples, identify shapes and similar structures for 25 unknown structures, and determine envelopes for 41 proteins. We believe that high-throughput SAXS is an enabling technology that may change the way that structural genomics research is done.

  15. A simple packet retransmission strategy for throughput and delay enhancement on power line communication channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onunga, J.O. (Kenya Posts and Telecommunications Corp., Nairobi (Kenya)); Donaldson, R.W. (Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new, simple, and effective communication protocol is developed and evaluated for use on power line distribution networks. The protocol involves retransmission of unacknowledged packets, which are sent in either single or multiple (N) copies in accordance with estimates of communication link quality. Multiple packet copies can be code combined at the receiver, using majority voting on each bit position, to reduce packet error rates. Adaptive link quality estimates are based on the receipt or absence of positive acknowledgements. Information throughput efficiency is calculated and N optimized in terms of system variables. Performance benefits of code combining are clearly demonstrated. The algorithm was implemented and tested using a five-station intrabuilding power line communications network operating at 1.2, 2.4, 4.8 and 9.6 kbit/s data rate. Substantial throughput and delay improvement occurred on poor quality links, without degrading performance on good links.

  16. Using Channel Output Feedback to Increase Throughput in Hybrid-ARQ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Mayur; Love, David J; Balakrishnan, Venkataramanan

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since its inclusion in the High Speed Downlink Packet Access (HSPDA) standard, the hybrid-ARQ protocol has become very popular in packet transmission schemes. Hybrid-ARQ combines the normal automatic repeat request (ARQ) method with error correction codes to increase reliability and throughput. The use of rate-compatible punctured turbo codes has been shown to work well for block fading channels. In this paper, we look at improving upon this performance using feedback information from the receiver; in particular, using a turbo code in conjunction with a proposed linear feedback code for the Rayleigh fading channels. The new hybrid-ARQ scheme is extended to various different multiple-antenna scenarios (MIMO/MISO/SISO) with varying amounts of feedback information. Simulations are given to illustrate gains in throughput.

  17. Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation ( 7th Annual SFAF Meeting, 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jordan, Scott [Physik Instrumente

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Scott Jordan on "Advances in high-throughput speed, low-latency communication for embedded instrumentation" at the 2012 Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future Meeting held June 5-7, 2012 in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

  18. High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Athavale, Ajay [Monsanto

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Ajay Athavale (Monsanto) presents "High Throughput Plasmid Sequencing with Illumina and CLC Bio" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  19. High Throughput Synthesis of Uniform Biocompatible Polymer Beads with High Quantum Dot Loading Using Microfluidic Jet-Mode Breakup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung-Kon

    Uniform polymer microbeads with highly loaded quantum dots (QDs) are produced using high-throughput coherent jet breakup of a biocompatible poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) prepolymer resin, followed by in-line ...

  20. Evaluation of Tavorite-Structured Cathode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries Using High-Throughput Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Tim

    Cathode materials with structure similar to the mineral tavorite have shown promise for use in lithium-ion batteries, but this class of materials is relatively unexplored. We use high-throughput density-functional-theory ...

  1. High-throughput data mined prediction of inorganic compounds and computational discovery of new lithium-ion battery cathode materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hautier, Geoffroy (Geoffroy T. F.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to computationally predict the properties of new materials, even prior to their synthesis, has been made possible due to the current accuracy of modern ab initio techniques. In some cases, high-throughput ...

  2. High Throughput Computing Impact on Meta Genomics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, Brooklin [Morgridge Institute for Research] [Morgridge Institute for Research

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes a brief background on High Throughput Computing, correlating gene transcription factors, optical mapping, genotype to phenotype mapping via QTL analysis, and current work on next gen sequencing.

  3. 2008NaturePublishingGrouphttp://www.nature.com/naturemethods BAC TransgeneOmics: a high-throughput method for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    to assess protein function at high throughput. Here we describe a fast and reliable pipeline to study ubiquitous or tissue-specific promoters. As a result they do not reproduce the endogenous regulation

  4. High Throughput Computing Impact on Meta Genomics (Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gore, Brooklin [Morgridge Institute for Research

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation includes a brief background on High Throughput Computing, correlating gene transcription factors, optical mapping, genotype to phenotype mapping via QTL analysis, and current work on next gen sequencing.

  5. Coev2Net: a computational framework for boosting confidence in high-throughput protein-protein interaction datasets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hosur, Raghavendra

    Improving the quality and coverage of the protein interactome is of tantamount importance for biomedical research, particularly given the various sources of uncertainty in high-throughput techniques. We introduce a ...

  6. THE NOCHAR{reg_sign} TECHNOLOGY DEPLOYMENT PROGRAM, PROVIDING A PROVEN METHOD WORLDWIDE FOR WASTE SOLIDIFICATION AND STABILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunkow, W. G.; Govers, R.; Pietsch, C.; Kelley, D.; Krause, D.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent fall of the Soviet government and the decommissioning of defense plants in the U.S. DOE Complex, and the increasing worldwide emphasis on environmental restoration and controls, a critical need has developed for a proven ''off the shelf'' technology to deal with these enormous hazardous waste issues. While many new technologies are on the horizon and under development to handle complex waste streams, few of these offer immediate solutions. High technology polymers are an answer to present day needs that will allow immediate burial site disposal, above ground depository use for ''safe store'' applications, and stabilization and immobilization plans for safe transport or incineration at a later date.

  7. Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey of Remediation at Building 14, Former Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawanda, New York (LI001V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, S.P.

    2000-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program, a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological verification survey of Building 14 at the former Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawanda, New York. The purpose of the survey was to verify that remedial action completed by the project management contractor had reduced contamination levels to within authorized limits. Prior to remediation, fixed and removable beta-gamma emitting material was Prevalent throughout Building 14 and in some of the process piping. Decontamination consisted of removal of surface contamination from floors, floor-wall interfaces, walls, wall-ceiling interfaces, and overhead areas; decontamination or removal of process piping; excavation and removal of subsurface soil; and vacuuming of dust. This independent radiological assessment was performed to verify that the remedial action had reduced contamination levels to within authorized limits. Building 14 at the former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York, was thoroughly investigated inside for radionuclide residues. Surface residual activity levels were generally well below applicable guidelines for protection against radiation. Similarly, removable alpha and beta-gamma activity levels were below guidelines. Gamma exposure rates within the building were at typical background levels, and no elevated indoor radon concentrations were measured. However, numerous areas exceeding U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) applicable guidelines still remain inside and underneath the building. These areas were either (1) inaccessible or (2) removal was not cost-effective or (3) removal would affect the structural integrity of the building. These above-guideline areas have been listed, described, and characterized by the remediation subcontractor (Appendix A), and dose to an exposed worker during typical exposure scenarios has been calculated. Based on the remediation subcontractor's characterization data and dose assessment calculations, these areas pose insignificant risk to building inhabitants under current use scenarios. However, future renovations, repairs, or demolition of the building must require prior evaluation and consideration of the areas. Analysis of the project management contractor's post-remedial action data and results of this independent radiological verification survey by ORNL confirm that residual contamination inside the building is either below the limits prescribed by DOE applicable guidelines for protection against radiation or areas exceeding applicable guidelines have been characterized and a risk assessment completed. Building 14 can be released for unrestricted use under current use scenarios; however, arrangements must be made to inform current and future building owners of the locations of areas exceeding DOE guidelines and any associated restrictions concerning renovations, repairs, or demolition of the building.

  8. Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey of Remediation at Building 31, Former Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawanda, New York (LI001V)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenzie, S.P.; Uziel, M.S.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Progmq a team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducted a radiological veriihtion survey of Building 31 at the former Linde Uranium Refinery, Tonawau& New York. The purpose of the survey was to ver@ that remedial action completed by the project management contractor had reduced contamination levels to within authorized limits. Prior to remediatioq tied radioactive material was prevalent throughout the building and in some of the ductwork Decontaminadon consisted of removing surfhce contamination from floors, baseboards, and overhead areas; removing some air ducts; and vacuuming dust. Building 31 at the former Linde site in TonawandA New Yorlq was thoroughly investigated inside and outside for radionuclide residues. The verification team discovered previously undetected contaminadon beneath the concrete pad on the first floor and underneath floor tiles on the second floor. All suspect floor tiles were removed and any contamination beneath them cleaned to below guideline levels. The verification team also discovered elevated radiation levels associated with overhead air lines that led to the eventual removal of the entire air lige and a complete investigation of the history of all process piping in the building. Final verification surveys showed that residual surface beta-gamma activity levels were slightly elevated in some places but below U.S. Department of Energy applicable guidelines for protection against radiation (Table 1). Similarly, removable radioactive contamination was also below applicable guidelines. Exposure rates within the building were at typical background levels, and no consistently elevated indoor radon concentrations were measured. However, radionuclide analysis of subsurface soil from beneath the concrete floor on the ground level showed concentrations of `*U and'% that exceeded applicable guidelines. At the time of this survey, there was no measured exposure pathway for this subslab contamination under current use scenarios, and there was low risk associated with this contaminadon if the conaete slab is not cracked or penetrated. However, any penetration of the concrete slab caused by renovations, repairs, demolitio% or a naturally-occurring craclq would require further investigation and evaluation. Analysis of the project management contractor's post-remedial action data and results of this independent radiological vaification survey by ORNL confirm that all radiological measurements inside the building, on the exterior walls, and on the roof are below the limits prescribed by applicable guidelines for protection against radiation.

  9. ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES: SRNL GLASS SELECTION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has authorized a team of glass formulation and processing experts at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) at Catholic University of America to develop a systematic approach to increase high level waste melter throughput (by increasing waste loading with minimal or positive impacts on melt rate). This task is aimed at proof-of-principle testing and the development of tools to improve waste loading and melt rate, which will lead to higher waste throughput. Four specific tasks have been proposed to meet these objectives (for details, see WSRC-STI-2007-00483): (1) Integration and Oversight, (2) Crystal Accumulation Modeling (led by PNNL)/Higher Waste Loading Glasses (led by SRNL), (3) Melt Rate Evaluation and Modeling, and (4) Melter Scale Demonstrations. Task 2, Crystal Accumulation Modeling/Higher Waste Loading Glasses is the focus of this report. The objective of this study is to provide supplemental data to support the possible use of alternative melter technologies and/or implementation of alternative process control models or strategies to target higher waste loadings (WLs) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)--ultimately leading to higher waste throughputs and a reduced mission life. The glass selection strategy discussed in this report was developed to gain insight into specific technical issues that could limit or compromise the ability of glass formulation efforts to target higher WLs for future sludge batches at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These technical issues include Al-dissolution, higher TiO{sub 2} limits and homogeneity issues for coupled-operations, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} solubility, and nepheline formation. To address these technical issues, a test matrix of 28 glass compositions has been developed based on 5 different sludge projections for future processing. The glasses will be fabricated and characterized based on the protocols outlined in the SRNL Task and Quality Assurance (QA) plan.

  10. Getter sputtering system for high-throughput fabrication of composition spreads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoire, John M.; Dover, R. B. van; Jin Jing; Di Salvo, Francis J.; Abruna, Hector D. [Department of Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States) and Cornell Fuel Cell Institute, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a sputtering system that can deposit composition spreads in an effectively UHV environment but which does not require the high-throughput paradigm to be compromised by a long pump down each time a target is changed. The system deploys four magnetron sputter guns in a cryoshroud (getter sputtering) which allows elements such as Ti and Zr to be deposited with minimal contamination by oxygen or other reactive background gases. The system also relies on custom substrate heaters to give rapid heating and cool down. The effectiveness of the gettering technique is evaluated, and example results obtained for catalytic activity of a pseudoternary composition spread are presented.

  11. High-throughput method for optimum solubility screening for homogeneity and crystallization of proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung-Hou (Moraga, CA); Kim, Rosalind (Moraga, CA); Jancarik, Jamila (Walnut Creek, CA)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimum solubility screen in which a panel of buffers and many additives are provided in order to obtain the most homogeneous and monodisperse protein condition for protein crystallization. The present methods are useful for proteins that aggregate and cannot be concentrated prior to setting up crystallization screens. A high-throughput method using the hanging-drop method and vapor diffusion equilibrium and a panel of twenty-four buffers is further provided. Using the present methods, 14 poorly behaving proteins have been screened, resulting in 11 of the proteins having highly improved dynamic light scattering results allowing concentration of the proteins, and 9 were crystallized.

  12. Evaluation of the effects of various culture condition on Cr (VI) reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in a novel high-throughput mini-bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Laidlaw, David; Gani, Kishen; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high-throughput mini-bioreactor Yinjie Tang ,1 , Davidexamined using a mini-bioreactor system that independentlyreduction. The mini-bioreactor system enabled the rapid

  13. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multimodal transportation network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, and focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  14. Modeling most likely pathways for smuggling radioactive and special nuclear materials on a worldwide multi-modal transportation network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saeger, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cuellar, Leticia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear weapons proliferation is an existing and growing worldwide problem. To help with devising strategies and supporting decisions to interdict the transport of nuclear material, we developed the Pathway Analysis, Threat Response and Interdiction Options Tool (PATRIOT) that provides an analytical approach for evaluating the probability that an adversary smuggling radioactive or special nuclear material will be detected during transit. We incorporate a global, multi-modal transportation network, explicit representation of designed and serendipitous detection opportunities, and multiple threat devices, material types, and shielding levels. This paper presents the general structure of PATRIOT, all focuses on the theoretical framework used to model the reliabilities of all network components that are used to predict the most likely pathways to the target.

  15. Development of Control Applications for High-Throughput Protein Crystallography Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaponov, Yurii A.; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Honda, Nobuo; Sasajima, Kumiko; Igarashi, Noriyuki; Hiraki, Masahiko; Yamada, Yusuke; Wakatsuki, Soichi [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated client-server control system (PCCS) with a unified relational database (PCDB) has been developed for high-throughput protein crystallography experiments on synchrotron beamlines. The major steps in protein crystallographic experiments (purification, crystallization, crystal harvesting, data collection, and data processing) are integrated into the software. All information necessary for performing protein crystallography experiments is stored in the PCDB database (except raw X-ray diffraction data, which is stored in the Network File Server). To allow all members of a protein crystallography group to participate in experiments, the system was developed as a multi-user system with secure network access based on TCP/IP secure UNIX sockets. Secure remote access to the system is possible from any operating system with X-terminal and SSH/X11 (Secure Shell with graphical user interface) support. Currently, the system covers the high-throughput X-ray data collection stages and is being commissioned at BL5A and NW12A (PF, PF-AR, KEK, Tsukuba, Japan)

  16. A Warm Near-Infrared High-Resolution Spectrograph with Very High Throughput (WINERED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondo, Sohei; Kobayashi, Naoto; Yasui, Chikako; Mito, Hiroyuki; Fukue, Kei; Nakanishi, Kenshi; Kawanishi, Takafumi; Nakaoka, Tetsuya; Otsubo, Shogo; Kinoshita, Masaomi; Kitano, Ayaka; Hamano, Satoshi; Mizumoto, Misaki; Yamamoto, Ryo; Izumi, Natsuko; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WINERED is a newly built high-efficiency (throughput$ > 25-30\\%$) and high-resolution spectrograph customized for short NIR bands at 0.9-1.35 ${\\rm \\mu}$m. WINERED is equipped with ambient temperature optics and a cryogenic camera using a 1.7 ${\\rm \\mu}$m cut-off HgCdTe HAWAII-2RG array detector. WINERED has two grating modes: one with a conventional reflective echelle grating (R$\\sim$28,300), which covers 0.9-1.35 $\\mu$m simultaneously, the other with ZnSe or ZnS immersion grating (R$\\sim$100,000). We have completed the development of WINERED except for the immersion grating, and started engineering and science observations at the Nasmyth platform of the 1.3 m Araki Telescope at Koyama Astronomical Observatory of Kyoto-Sangyo University in Japan. We confirmed that the spectral resolution ($R\\sim$ 28,300) and the throughput ($>$ 40\\% w/o telescope/atmosphere/array QE) meet our specifications. We measured ambient thermal backgrounds (e.g., 0.06 ${\\rm [e^{-}/sec/pixel]}$ at 287 K), which are roughly consistent ...

  17. Development of a high-throughput microfluidic integrated microarray for the detection of chimeric bioweapons.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppod, Timothy; Satterfield, Brent; Hukari, Kyle W.; West, Jason A. A.; Hux, Gary A.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advancement of DNA cloning has significantly augmented the potential threat of a focused bioweapon assault, such as a terrorist attack. With current DNA cloning techniques, toxin genes from the most dangerous (but environmentally labile) bacterial or viral organism can now be selected and inserted into robust organism to produce an infinite number of deadly chimeric bioweapons. In order to neutralize such a threat, accurate detection of the expressed toxin genes, rather than classification on strain or genealogical decent of these organisms, is critical. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknowns chimeric bioweapons. The development of a high-throughput microarray approach will enable the detection of unknown bioweapons. We have developed a unique microfluidic approach to capture and concentrate these threat genes (mRNA's) upto a 30 fold concentration. These captured oligonucleotides can then be used to synthesize in situ oligonucleotide copies (cDNA probes) of the captured genes. An integrated microfluidic architecture will enable us to control flows of reagents, perform clean-up steps and finally elute nanoliter volumes of synthesized oligonucleotides probes. The integrated approach has enabled a process where chimeric or conventional bioweapons can rapidly be identified based on their toxic function, rather than being restricted to information that may not identify the critical nature of the threat.

  18. Generalized schemes for high throughput manipulation of the Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough genome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Butland, G.; Elias, D.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Fok, V.; Juba, T.; Gorur, A.; Allen, S.; Leung, C.-M.; Keller, K.; Reveco, S.; Zane, G.; Semkiw, E.; Prathapam, R.; Gold, B.; Singer, M.; Ouellet, M.; Sazakal, E.; Jorgens, D.; Price, M.; Witkowska, E.; Beller, H.; Hazen, T.C.; Biggin, M.; Auer, M.; Wall, J.; Keasling, J.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to conduct advanced functional genomic studies of the thousands of sequenced bacteria has been hampered by the lack of available tools for making high- throughput chromosomal manipulations in a systematic manner that can be applied across diverse species. In this work, we highlight the use of synthetic biological tools to assemble custom suicide vectors with reusable and interchangeable DNA parts to facilitate chromosomal modification at designated loci. These constructs enable an array of downstream applications including gene replacement and creation of gene fusions with affinity purification or localization tags. We employed this approach to engineer chromosomal modifications in a bacterium that has previously proven difficult to manipulate genetically, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, to generate a library of over 700 strains. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these modifications can be used for examining metabolic pathways, protein-protein interactions, and protein localization. The ubiquity of suicide constructs in gene replacement throughout biology suggests that this approach can be applied to engineer a broad range of species for a diverse array of systems biological applications and is amenable to high-throughput implementation.

  19. Recycle of oily refinery wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartilucci, M.P.; Karsner, G.G.; Tracy, W.J. III.

    1989-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for recycling of petroleum containing sludge. It comprises segregating waste oil-containing sludges into a relatively high oil content sludge and a relatively high water content sludge; introducing the high oil content sludge into a delayed coking drum under delayed conditions in the presence of a liquid coker hydrocarbon feedstock to form coke; introducing the high water content sludge into a delayed coking drum to quench the coke formed in the coking drum.

  20. Recycle of oily refinery wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartilucci, M.P.; Karsner, G.G.; Tracy, W.J.

    1991-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a process for disposing of petroleum containing sludge. It comprises segregating waste oil-containing sludges into a first sludge and a second sludge, the first sludge being of high oil content relative to the second sludge and the second sludge being of high water content relative to the first sludge; dewatering the first, high oil content sludge; introducing the dewatered sludge into a delayed coking drum under delayed coking conditions in the presence of a liquid coker hydrocarbon feedstock to form coke; introducing the second, high water content sludge into a delayed coking drum to quench the coke formed in the coking drum.

  1. A Louisiana Refinery Success Story

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kacsur, D.

    recommended replacing the inverted bucket steam traps with 1-1/2-in. strainers and 1-1/2-in. flanged float & thermostatic steam traps. They also suggested that the existing trap discharge piping should be removed and re-piped with globe-style bypass valves...

  2. Refinery Fuel Balancing with Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passman, K. W.; Taylor, R. I.; Williams, D. E.; Emanuel, D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of independent operation of boilers and turbines dictated that a dump stack be provided. CONTROL SYSTEM The turbines are controlled locally. Remote monitoring and shutdown are provided in the Refine& Control Center. The existing system of remote boiler... control was left in place. The turbines will normally operate in a base load mode. At normal steaming rates, sUPPlementa~ firing will maintain steam header pressure utilizing the oxygen in the turbine exhaust. During peak stea GENERAL ARRANGEMENT...

  3. Integrated Forest Products Refinery (IFPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Heiningen, Adriaan R. P.

    2010-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pre-extractionkraft studies of hardwoods showed that when extracting about 10% of the wood, the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could only be maintained at a level similar to that of regular kraft pulp when the final extract pH was close to neutral. This so-called near neutral pre-extraction condition at a level of 10% wood dissolution was achieved by contacting the wood chips with green liquor (GL) at a charge of about 3% (as Na2O on wood) at 160 C for almost 2 hours (or an H-factor of about 800 hrs.). During subsequent kraft cooking of the pre-extracted hardwood chips the effective alkali charge could be reduced by about 3% (as Na2O on wood) and the cooking time shortened relative to that during regular kraft cooking, while still producing the same bleachable grade kappa number as the kraft control pulp. For softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered in the present investigation whereby both the final kraft pulp yield and physical properties could be maintained at a level similar to that of regular softwood kraft pulp. Therefore for hardwoods the near- neutral green liquor pre-extraction conditions do meet the requirements of the IFPR concept, while for softwood, no extraction conditions were discovered which do meet these requirements. Application of simulated industrial GL at an extraction H-factor of about 800 hrs and 3% GL charge in a recirculating digester produced an hardwood extract containing about 4% (on wood) of total anhydro-sugars, 2% of acetic acid, and 1.3% of lignin. Xylan comprised of 80% of the sugars of which about 85% is oligomeric. Since only polymeric hemicelluloses and lignin may be adsorbed on pulp (produced at a yield of about 50% from the original wood), the maximum theoretical yield increase due to adsorption may be estimated as 10% on pulp (or 5% on wood). However, direct application of raw GL hardwood extract for hemicelluloses adsorption onto hardwood kraft pulp led to a yield increase of only about 1% (on pulp). By using the wet-end retention aid guar gum during the adsorption process at a charge of 0.5% on pulp the yield gain may be increased to about 5%. Unfortunately, most of this yield increase is lost during subsequent alkaline treatments in the pulp bleach plant. It was found that by performing the adsorption at alkaline conditions the adsorption loss during alkaline treatment in the bleach plant is mostly avoided. Thus a permanent adsorption yield of about 3 and 1.5% (on pulp) was obtained with addition of guar gum at a charge of 0.5 and 0.1% respectively during adsorption of GL hardwood extract on pre-extracted kraft pulp at optimal conditions of pH 11.5, 90 C for 60 minutes at 5% consistency. The beatability of the adsorbed kraft pulps was improved. Also, significant physical strength improvements were achieved. Further study is needed to determine whether the improvements in pulp yield and paper properties make this an economic IFPR concept. Application of the wood solids of a hot water extract of Acer rubrum wood strands as a substitute for polystyrene used for production of SMC maintained the water adsorption properties of the final product. Further work on the physical properties of the hemicellulose containing SMCs need to be completed to determine the potential of wood extracts for the production of partially renewable SMCs. The discovery of the near-neutral green liquor extraction process for hardwood was formed the basis for a commercial Integrated Biorefinery that will extract hemicelluloses from wood chips to make biofuels and other specialty chemicals. The pulp production process will be maintained as is proposed in the present researched IFBR concept. This Integrated Biorefinery will be constructed by Red Shield Acquisition LLC (RSA) at the Old Town kraft pulp mill in Maine. RSA in collaboration with the University of Maine will develop and commercialize the hemicellulose extraction process, the conversion of the hemicellulose sugars into butanol by fermentation, and the separation of specialty chemicals such as acetic acid fr

  4. Refinery Outages: First Half 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for TableCORPORATION /Product:First

  5. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May(MillionFeet)JulyEndData

  6. U.S. Refinery Stocks

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and InstitutionalArea: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1)

  7. Refinery Outages: First Half 2015

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14Table 4.April 25, 20137a.06 2.013

  8. U.S. Refinery Yield

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude OilNov-14

  9. Motiva Refinery | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of the NationalPennsylvania |February 2013

  10. U.S. Refinery Yield

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,9322009 2010 2011 2012 2013

  11. Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a evie _ =_ In7, 20116,650.0622Product:Refiners Switch

  12. Worldwide report, arms control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1987-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on Arms Control. Titles include: USSR Journal Review of French Book on SDI; Moscow Talk Show Considers Possibility of Dealing with U.S.; Thatcher, Gorbachev Talks Anticipated; U.S. Presents Draft Treaty to Eliminate INF from Europe; TASS: White House Rejects Treaty of Tatotonga; Soviet Paper on Congressional Divisions on Moratorium; Turkish Officials on Deployment of Nuclear Weapons; and others.

  13. A high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer for mapping the heliopause and 3-D Solar Wind using He+ 30.4nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer for mapping the heliopause and 3-D Solar Wind using Entrance slit farm with ~ 1000 slits Photon counting imager Concave grating used near normal incidence >> Need a higher throughput diffuse EUV spectrometer solar wind respond to coronal

  14. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Ronald E., E-mail: rbell@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm{sup ?1} grating is matched with fast f/1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ?0.075 arc sec. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount at the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  15. Development and Operation of High-throughput Accurate-wavelength Lens-based Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Ronald E

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  16. Learning quantitative sequence-function relationships from high-throughput biological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwal, Gurinder S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the transcriptional regulatory code, as well as other types of information encoded within biomolecular sequences, will require learning biophysical models of sequence-function relationships from high-throughput data. Controlling and characterizing the noise in such experiments, however, is notoriously difficult. The unpredictability of such noise creates problems for standard likelihood-based methods in statistical learning, which require that the quantitative form of experimental noise be known precisely. However, when this unpredictability is properly accounted for, important theoretical aspects of statistical learning which remain hidden in standard treatments are revealed. Specifically, one finds a close relationship between the standard inference method, based on likelihood, and an alternative inference method based on mutual information. Here we review and extend this relationship. We also describe its implications for learning sequence-function relationships from real biological data. Fin...

  17. High-throughput, dual probe biological assays based on single molecule detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollars, Christopher W. (Brentwood, CA); Huser, Thomas R. (Livermore, CA); Lane, Stephen M. (Oakland, CA); Balhorn, Rodney L. (Livermore, CA); Bakajin, Olgica (San Leandro, CA); Darrow, Christopher (Pleasanton, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe H. (Patterson, CA)

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus with the sensitivity to detect and identify single target molecules through the localization of dual, fluorescently labeled probe molecules. This can be accomplished through specific attachment of the taget to a surface or in a two-dimensional (2D) flowing fluid sheet having approximate dimensions of 0.5 .mu.m.times.100 .mu.m.times.100 .mu.m. A device using these methods would have 10.sup.3 10.sup.4 greater throughput than previous one-dimensional (1D) micro-stream devices having 1 .mu.m.sup.3 interrogation volumes and would for the first time allow immuno- and DNA assays at ultra-low (femtomolar) concentrations to be performed in short time periods (.about.10 minutes). The use of novel labels (such as metal or semiconductor nanoparticles) may be incorporated to further extend the sensitivity possibly into the attomolar range.

  18. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordmeyer, Robert A. (San Leandro, CA); Snell, Gyorgy P. (Richmond, CA); Cornell, Earl W. (Antioch, CA); Kolbe, William F. (Moraga, CA); Yegian, Derek T. (Oakland, CA); Earnest, Thomas N. (Berkeley, CA); Jaklevich, Joseph M. (Lafayette, CA); Cork, Carl W. (Walnut Creek, CA); Santarsiero, Bernard D. (Chicago, IL); Stevens, Raymond C. (La Jolla, CA)

    2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  19. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Snell, Gyorgy P.; Cornell, Earl W.; Kolbe, William; Yegian, Derek; Earnest, Thomas N.; Jaklevic, Joseph M.; Cork, Carl W.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  20. Advancing the High Throughput Identification of Liver Fibrosis Protein Signatures Using Multiplexed Ion Mobility Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Diamond, Deborah L.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purdy, David E.; Moore, Ronald J.; Danielson, William F.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Crowell, Kevin L.; Slysz, Gordon W.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Sandoval, John D.; Lamarche, Brian L.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Simons, Brenna C.; McMahon, Brian J.; Bhattacharya, Renuka; Perkins, James D.; Carithers, Robert L.; Strom, Susan; Self, Steven; Katze, Michael G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid diagnosis of disease states using less invasive, safer, and more clinically acceptable approaches than presently employed is an imperative goal for the field of medicine. While mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics approaches have attempted to meet these objectives, challenges such as the enormous dynamic range of protein concentrations in clinically relevant biofluid samples coupled with the need to address human biodiversity have slowed their employment. Herein, we report on the use of a new platform that addresses these challenges by coupling technical advances in rapid gas phase multiplexed ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) separations [1, 2] with liquid chromatography (LC) and MS to dramatically increase measurement sensitivity and throughput, further enabling future MS-based clinical applications. An initial application of the LC-IMS-MS platform for the analysis of blood serum samples from stratified post-liver transplant patients with recurrent fibrosis progression illustrates its potential utility for disease characterization and use in personalized medicine [3, 4].

  1. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometera)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bell, Ronald E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543, USA

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  2. High throughput ultrasoft x-ray polychromator for embedded impurity pellet injection studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Tritz, K.; Tamura, N.; Kalinina, D.; Matsubara, A.; Sato, K.; Sudo, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); and Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho 322-6, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); and Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype ultrasoft x-ray polychromator has been developed for local particle transport measurements in magnetic fusion devices using the H{sub {alpha}} charge exchange emission from low-Z impurity pellets. High throughput together with few cm radial resolution in the plasma are achieved using a toroidally aligned grid collimator, while a few A spectral bandpass together with strong background rejection are obtained using planar multilayer mirrors and foil filters. As high sensitivity detectors we use a new type of compact, efficient and high-gain multichannel plates. The prototype instrument has been evaluated in the laboratory and tested on the Large Helical Device in Japan. In addition to transport studies, this type of device is of interest for next step experiments, where high beam energy and strong attenuation will make visible charge exchange recombination spectroscopy difficult.

  3. An infrared imaging method for high-throughput combinatorial investigation of hydrogenation-dehydrogenation and new phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    An infrared imaging method for high-throughput combinatorial investigation of hydrogenation Received 9 April 2009; accepted 30 June 2009; published online 30 July 2009 We have developed an infrared imaging setup enabling in situ infrared images to be acquired, and expanded on capabilities of an infrared

  4. Novel mixed polyanions lithium-ion battery cathode materials predicted by high-throughput ab initio computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    Novel mixed polyanions lithium-ion battery cathode materials predicted by high-throughput ab initio (>700 Wh/kg) cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries. 1 Introduction The widespread use of lithium-ion monoclinic phase).5 However, the field of lithium-ion batteries is very active, and a large number

  5. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 32, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 1791 DevStaR: High-Throughput Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    of C. elegans embryonic viability in high-throughput (HTP) applications. A leading genetic model organism for the study of animal development and behavior, C. elegans is particularly amenable to HTP the algorithmic design of the DevStaR system and demonstrate its performance in scoring image data acquired in HTP

  6. A Cross-Referencing-Based Droplet Manipulation Method for High-Throughput and Pin-Constrained Digital Microfluidic Arrays*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    -Constrained Digital Microfluidic Arrays* Tao Xu and Krishnendu Chakrabarty Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA {tx, krish}@ee.duke.edu Abstract Digital microfluidic. As high-throughput bioassays are mapped to digital microfluidic platforms, the need for design automation

  7. Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control Jianyong Zhang Alma Riska Anand Sivasubramaniam Qian Wang Erik Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riska, Alma

    Storage Performance Virtualization via Throughput and Latency Control Jianyong Zhang Alma Riska and managing storage systems. A consequence of this trend is the need to serve multiple users that can be built on top of an existing storage utility. This frame- work uses a low-level feedback

  8. been the key to their success is the use of high-throughput experiments to assess various zeo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Whendee

    it and the resulting pore structure. It could be that the hexamethonium molecules pack in such a way as to providebeen the key to their success is the use of high- throughput experiments to assess various zeo and shape of the resulting pores cor- responds to the size and shape of the organic molecule. ITQ-33

  9. Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening: Classifying the activities of various compounds towards Cobalt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    Applications of Artificial Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models in High Throughput Screening to the existing HTS method, via Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) using Artificial Neural in solving non-linear pattern classification problems, we propose several different models of neural networks

  10. A cell based high-throughput screening approach for the discovery of new inhibitors of respiratory syncytial virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Dong-Hoon; Moore, Blake P.; Matharu, Daljit S.; Golden, Jennifer E.; Maddox, Clinton; Rasmussen, Lynn; Sosa, Melinda I.; Ananthan, Subramaniam; White, E. Lucile; Jia, Fuli; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Severson, William E.

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is a highly contagious pathogen and is the most common cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia for infants and children under one year of age. Worldwide, greater than 33 ...

  11. Acoustic transfer of protein crystals from agarose pedestals to micromeshes for high-throughput screening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuttitta, Christina M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); The City University of New York, 2800 Victory Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 10314 (United States); Ericson, Daniel L. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); University at Buffalo, SUNY, 12 Capen Hall, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Scalia, Alexander [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Binghamton University, 4400 Vestal Parkway East, Binghamton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Roessler, Christian G. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Teplitsky, Ella [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5215 (United States); Joshi, Karan [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Campos, Olven [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL 33414 (United States); Agarwal, Rakhi; Allaire, Marc [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Orville, Allen M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States); Sweet, Robert M.; Soares, Alexei S., E-mail: soares@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acoustic high-throughput screening method is described for harvesting protein crystals and combining the protein crystals with chemicals such as a fragment library. Acoustic droplet ejection (ADE) is an emerging technology with broad applications in serial crystallography such as growing, improving and manipulating protein crystals. One application of this technology is to gently transfer crystals onto MiTeGen micromeshes with minimal solvent. Once mounted on a micromesh, each crystal can be combined with different chemicals such as crystal-improving additives or a fragment library. Acoustic crystal mounting is fast (2.33 transfers s{sup ?1}) and all transfers occur in a sealed environment that is in vapor equilibrium with the mother liquor. Here, a system is presented to retain crystals near the ejection point and away from the inaccessible dead volume at the bottom of the well by placing the crystals on a concave agarose pedestal (CAP) with the same chemical composition as the crystal mother liquor. The bowl-shaped CAP is impenetrable to crystals. Consequently, gravity will gently move the crystals into the optimal location for acoustic ejection. It is demonstrated that an agarose pedestal of this type is compatible with most commercially available crystallization conditions and that protein crystals are readily transferred from the agarose pedestal onto micromeshes with no loss in diffraction quality. It is also shown that crystals can be grown directly on CAPs, which avoids the need to transfer the crystals from the hanging drop to a CAP. This technology has been used to combine thermolysin and lysozyme crystals with an assortment of anomalously scattering heavy atoms. The results point towards a fast nanolitre method for crystal mounting and high-throughput screening.

  12. The Case for the Application of Worldwide Marine Radioactivity Studies In the Search for Undeclared Facilities and Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Schanfein

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Undeclared nuclear facilities unequivocally remain the most difficult safeguards challenge facing the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Recent cases of undeclared facilities revealed in Iran and Syria, which are NPT signatory States, show both the difficulty and the seriousness of this threat to nonproliferation. In the case of undeclared nuclear facilities, the most effective deterrent against proliferation is the application of Wide-Area Environmental Sampling (WAES); however, WAES is currently cost-prohibitive. As with any threat, the most effective countering strategy is a multifaceted approach. Some of the approaches applied by the IAEA include: open source analysis, satellite imagery, on-site environmental sampling, complementary access under the Additional Protocol (where in force), traditional safeguards inspections, and information provided by member States. These approaches, naturally, are focused on specific States. Are there other opportunities not currently within the IAEA purview to assess States that may provide another opportunity to detect clandestine facilities? In this paper, the author will make the case that the IAEA Department of Safeguards should explore the area of worldwide marine radioactivity studies as one possible opportunity. One such study was released by the IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory in January 2005. This technical document focused on 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239/240Pu. It is clearly a challenging area because of the many sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the worlds oceans and seas including: nuclear weapons testing, reprocessing, accidents, waste dumping, and industrial and medical radioisotopes, whose distributions change based on oceanographic, geochemical, and biological processes, and their sources. It is additionally challenging where multiple States share oceans, seas, and rivers. But with the application of modern science, historical sampling to establish baselines, and a focus on the most relevant radionuclides, the potential is there to support this challenging IAEA safeguards mission.

  13. Students of the B.Sc Electronic Engineering have the ability to work in the positions listed below and related areas within the Electronics Industry worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphrys, Mark

    Students of the B.Sc Electronic Engineering have the ability to work in the positions listed below and related areas within the Electronics Industry worldwide: INTRA Programme B.Eng Electronic Engineering is to produce graduates who have: Programme Outline: The B.Eng Electronic Engineering is designed to provide

  14. Published in The ASIST 75th Anniversary History Perspective. The history of ASIS&T and Information Science and Technology worldwide October 27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Science and Technology worldwide October 27 Baltimore 2012, pp. 83-95. Whither Information Science in France? Fidelia Ibekwe-SanJuan Department of Information & Communication Sciences Jean Moulin University Information science (IS) in France forms part of an inter-discipline named 'Information & Communication

  15. The worldwide demand for green energy systems is evident. In this context, wind energy converters will play a paramount role. Extending the service life of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ABSTRACT The worldwide demand for green energy systems is evident. In this context, wind energy with respect to the future energy supply. As a consequence, a massive demand for green energy systems becomes converters will play a paramount role. Extending the service life of a wind energy converter translates

  16. Dewey Decimal Classification System We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed and sustained by members since 1967. Our public purpose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Carlos

    Dewey Decimal Classification System We are a worldwide library cooperative, owned, governed to reduce costs for libraries through collaboration. The world's most widely used classification system can used by libraries in 138 countries. The Dewey Decimal Classification system continues to evolve

  17. Home Page > Business > Industrial > Global Trade Of Wood Chips Down 26% In 2009 As Pulpmills Reduce Production Worldwide, Reports Wood Resources International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Europe searching for additional sources of woody biomass, it is likely that trade with wood chips On March 16-17, 2010, the 4th Global Wood Fiber Conference: Trade in Wood chips and Biomass worldwide, European demand for pellets and biomass chips, outlook for plantation wood chip supply, ocean

  18. High-throughput liquid-absorption air-sampling apparatus and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaromb, Solomon (95706 William Dr., Hinsdale, IL 60521)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable high-throughput liquid-absorption air sampler [PHTLAAS] has an asymmetric air inlet through which air is drawn upward by a small and light-weight centrifugal fan driven by a direct current motor that can be powered by a battery. The air inlet is so configured as to impart both rotational and downward components of motion to the sampled air near said inlet. The PHTLAAS comprises a glass tube of relatively small size through which air passes at a high rate in a swirling, highly turbulent motion, which facilitates rapid transfer of vapors and particulates to a liquid film covering the inner walls of the tube. The pressure drop through the glass tube is <10 cm of water, usually <5 cm of water. The sampler's collection efficiency is usually >20% for vapors or airborne particulates in the 2-3.mu. range and >50% for particles larger than 4.mu.. In conjunction with various analyzers, the PHTLAAS can serve to monitor a variety of hazardous or illicit airborne substances, such as lead-containing particulates, tritiated water vapor, biological aerosols, or traces of concealed drugs or explosives.

  19. Integrated Controlling System and Unified Database for High Throughput Protein Crystallography Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaponov, Yu.A.; Igarashi, N.; Hiraki, M.; Sasajima, K.; Matsugaki, N.; Suzuki, M.; Kosuge, T.; Wakatsuki, S. [Structural Biology Research Center, Photon Factory, Institute of Materials Structure Science, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated controlling system and a unified database for high throughput protein crystallography experiments have been developed. Main features of protein crystallography experiments (purification, crystallization, crystal harvesting, data collection, data processing) were integrated into the software under development. All information necessary to perform protein crystallography experiments is stored (except raw X-ray data that are stored in a central data server) in a MySQL relational database. The database contains four mutually linked hierarchical trees describing protein crystals, data collection of protein crystal and experimental data processing. A database editor was designed and developed. The editor supports basic database functions to view, create, modify and delete user records in the database. Two search engines were realized: direct search of necessary information in the database and object oriented search. The system is based on TCP/IP secure UNIX sockets with four predefined sending and receiving behaviors, which support communications between all connected servers and clients with remote control functions (creating and modifying data for experimental conditions, data acquisition, viewing experimental data, and performing data processing). Two secure login schemes were designed and developed: a direct method (using the developed Linux clients with secure connection) and an indirect method (using the secure SSL connection using secure X11 support from any operating system with X-terminal and SSH support). A part of the system has been implemented on a new MAD beam line, NW12, at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring for general user experiments.

  20. A search model for topological insulators with high-throughput robustness descriptors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kesong; Setyawan, Wahyu; Wang, Shidong; Nardelli, Marco B.; Curtarolo, Stephano

    2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Topological insulators (TI) are becoming one of the most studied classes of novel materials because of their great potential for applications ranging from spintronics to quantum computers. To fully integrate TI materials in electronic devices, high-quality epitaxial single-crystalline phases with sufficiently large bulk bandgaps are necessary. Current efforts have relied mostly on costly and time-consuming trial-and-error procedures. Here we show that by defining a reliable and accessible descriptor {cflx X}TI, which represents the topological robustness or feasibility of the candidate, and by searching the quantum materials repository aflowlib.org, we have automatically discovered 28 TIs (some of them already known) in five different symmetry families. These include peculiar ternary halides, Cs{l_brace}Sn,Pb,Ge{r_brace}{l_brace}Cl,Br,I{r_brace}{sub 3}, which could have been hardly anticipated without high-throughput means. Our search model, by relying on the significance of repositories in materials development, opens new avenues for the discovery of more TIs in different and unexplored classes of systems.

  1. Metal Organic Framework Research: High Throughput Discovery of Robust Metal Organic Framework for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: LBNL is developing a method for identifying the best metal organic frameworks for use in capturing CO2 from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. Metal organic frameworks are porous, crystalline compounds that, based on their chemical structure, vary considerably in terms of their capacity to grab hold of passing CO2 molecules and their ability to withstand the harsh conditions found in the gas exhaust of coal-fired power plants. Owing primarily to their high tunability, metal organic frameworks can have an incredibly wide range of different chemical and physical properties, so identifying the best to use for CO2 capture and storage can be a difficult task. LBNL uses high-throughput instrumentation to analyze nearly 100 materials at a time, screening them for the characteristics that optimize their ability to selectively adsorb CO2 from coal exhaust. Their work will identify the most promising frameworks and accelerate their large-scale commercial development to benefit further research into reducing the cost of CO2 capture and storage.

  2. Ultrahigh throughput plasma processing of free standing silicon nanocrystals with lognormal size distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dogan, Ilker; Kramer, Nicolaas J.; Westermann, Rene H. J.; Verheijen, Marcel A. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dohnalova, Katerina; Gregorkiewicz, Tom [Van der Waals-Zeeman Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); Smets, Arno H. M. [Photovoltaic Materials and Devices Laboratory, Delft University of Technology, P.O. Box 5031, 2600 GA Delft (Netherlands); Sanden, Mauritius C. M. van de [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a method for synthesizing free standing silicon nanocrystals in an argon/silane gas mixture by using a remote expanding thermal plasma. Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal that the distribution has a bimodal shape consisting of two distinct groups of small and large silicon nanocrystals with sizes in the range 2-10 nm and 50-120 nm, respectively. We also observe that both size distributions are lognormal which is linked with the growth time and transport of nanocrystals in the plasma. Average size control is achieved by tuning the silane flow injected into the vessel. Analyses on morphological features show that nanocrystals are monocrystalline and spherically shaped. These results imply that formation of silicon nanocrystals is based on nucleation, i.e., these large nanocrystals are not the result of coalescence of small nanocrystals. Photoluminescence measurements show that silicon nanocrystals exhibit a broad emission in the visible region peaked at 725 nm. Nanocrystals are produced with ultrahigh throughput of about 100 mg/min and have state of the art properties, such as controlled size distribution, easy handling, and room temperature visible photoluminescence.

  3. Bonus Organisms in High-Throughput Eukaryotic Whole-Genome Shorgun Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Platt, Darren

    2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Joint Genome Institute has sequenced over 50 eukaryotic genomes, ranging in size from 15 MB to 1.6 GB, over a wide range of organism types. In the course of doing so, it has become clear that a substantial fraction of these data sets contains bonus organisms, usually prokaryotes, in addition to the desired genome. While some of these additional organisms are extraneous contamination, they are sometimes symbionts, and so can be of biological interest. Therefore, it is desirable to assemble the bonus organisms along with the main genome. This transforms the problem into one of metagenomic assembly, which is considerably more challenging than traditional whole-genome shotgun (WGS) assembly. The different organisms will usually be present at different sequence depths, which is difficult to handle in most WGS assemblers. In addition, with multiple distinct genomes present, chimerism can produce cross-organism combinations. Finally, there is no guarantee that only a single bonus organism will be present. For example, one JGI project contained at least two different prokaryotic contaminants, plus a 145 KB plasmid of unknown origin. We have developed techniques to routinely identify and handle such bonus organisms in a high-throughput sequencing environment. Approaches include screening and partitioning the unassembled data, and iterative subassemblies. These methods are applicable not only to bonus organisms, but also to desired components such as organelles. These procedures have the additional benefit of identifying, and allowing for the removal of, cloning artifacts such as E.coli and spurious vector inclusions.

  4. FBI Fingerprint Image Capture System High-Speed-Front-End throughput modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathke, P.M.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has undertaken a major modernization effort called the Integrated Automated Fingerprint Identification System (IAFISS). This system will provide centralized identification services using automated fingerprint, subject descriptor, mugshot, and document processing. A high-speed Fingerprint Image Capture System (FICS) is under development as part of the IAFIS program. The FICS will capture digital and microfilm images of FBI fingerprint cards for input into a central database. One FICS design supports two front-end scanning subsystems, known as the High-Speed-Front-End (HSFE) and Low-Speed-Front-End, to supply image data to a common data processing subsystem. The production rate of the HSFE is critical to meeting the FBI`s fingerprint card processing schedule. A model of the HSFE has been developed to help identify the issues driving the production rate, assist in the development of component specifications, and guide the evolution of an operations plan. A description of the model development is given, the assumptions are presented, and some HSFE throughput analysis is performed.

  5. A microreactor array for spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity for high-throughput catalysis science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondratyuk, Petro; Gumuslu, Gamze; Shukla, Shantanu; Miller, James B.; Morreale, Bryan D.; Gellman, Andrew J.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a 100 channel microreactor array capable of spatially resolved measurement of catalytic activity across the surface of a flat substrate. When used in conjunction with a composition spread alloy film (CSAF, e.g. Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y}) across which component concentrations vary smoothly, such measurements permit high-throughput analysis of catalytic activity and selectivity as a function of catalyst composition. In the reported implementation, the system achieves spatial resolution of 1 mm{sup 2} over a 1010 mm{sup 2} area. During operation, the reactant gases are delivered at constant flow rate to 100 points of differing composition on the CSAF surface by means of a 100-channel microfluidic device. After coming into contact with the CSAF catalyst surface, the product gas mixture from each of the 100 points is withdrawn separately through a set of 100 isolated channels for analysis using a mass spectrometer. We demonstrate the operation of the device on a Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} CSAF catalyzing the H{sub 2}-D{sub 2} exchange reaction at 333 K. In essentially a single experiment, we measured the catalytic activity over a broad swathe of concentrations from the ternary composition space of the Pd{sub x}Cu{sub y}Au{sub 1-x-y} alloy.

  6. Modelling the Impact of User Mobility on the Throughput in Networks of Wireless 802.11 LANs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Mei, Rob

    Modelling the Impact of User Mobility on the Throughput in Networks of Wireless 802.11 LANs Sandjai The Netherlands Email: sbhulai@few.vu.nl Rob van der Mei a,b b CWI Advanced Communication Networks P.O. Box 94079@feweb.vu.nl Abstract-- The wireless LAN technology 802.11, also called Wi-Fi, offers high speed wireless Internet

  7. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 8, AUGUST 2001 1307 Attainable Throughput of an Interference-Limited Multiple-Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driessen, Peter F.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMMUNICATIONS, VOL. 49, NO. 8, AUGUST 2001 1307 Attainable Throughput, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V82 3P6 Canada. L. J. Greenstein is with AT&T Laboratories

  8. On-chip whole-animal manipulation for high-throughput subcellular-resolution in-vivo drug/genetic screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanik, Mehmet Fatih

    Techniques for rapid and automated small-animal manipulation and immobilization are necessary for high-throughput in vivo genetic/drug screens using cellular and sub-cellular features in multicellular organisms. We present ...

  9. New Challenges of the Computation of Multiple Sequence Alignments in the High-Throughput Era (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Notredame, Cedric [Centre for Genomic Regulation

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Cedric Notredame from the Centre for Genomic Regulation gives a presentation on "New Challenges of the Computation of Multiple Sequence Alignments in the High-Throughput Era" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 26, 2010.

  10. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High-Throughput Study of Diffusion and Phase Transformation Kinetics of Magnesium-Based Systems For Automotive Cast Magnesium Alloys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Ohio State University at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high-throughput study...

  11. Role of small lead-cooled fast reactors for international deployment in worldwide sustainable nuclear energy supply.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J. J.; Wade, D. C.; Moisseytsev, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most recently, the global nuclear energy partnership (GNEP) has identified, as one of its key objectives, the development and demonstration of concepts for small and medium-sized reactors (SMRs) that can be globally deployed while assuring a high level of proliferation resistance. Lead-cooled systems offer several key advantages in meeting these goals. The small lead-cooled fast reactor concept known as the small secure transportable autonomous reactor (SSTAR) has been under ongoing development as part of the US advanced nuclear energy systems programs. Meeting future worldwide projected energy demands during this century (e.g., 1000 to 2000 GWe by 2050) in a sustainable manner while maintaining CO2 emissions at or below today's level will require massive deployments of nuclear reactors in non-fuel cycle states as well as fuel cycle states. The projected energy demands of non-fuel cycle states will not be met solely through the deployment of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in those states without using up the world's resources of fissile material (e.g., known plus speculative virgin uranium resources = 15 million tonnes). The present U.S. policy is focused upon domestic deployment of large-scale LWRs and sodium-cooled fast spectrum Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) working in a symbiotic relationship that burns existing fissile material while destroying the actinides which are generated. Other major nuclear nations are carrying out the development and deployment of SFR breeders as witness the planning for SFR breeder deployments in France, Japan, China, India, and Russia. Small (less that 300 MWe) and medium (300 to 700 MWe) size reactors are better suited to the growing economies and infrastructures of many non-fuel cycle states and developing nations. For those deployments, fast reactor converters which are fissile self-sufficient by creating as much fissile material as they consume are preferred to breeders that create more fissile material than they consume. Thus, there is a need for small and medium size fast reactors in non-fuel cycle states operating in a converter mode as well as large sodium-cooled fast breeders in fuel cycle states. Desired attributes for exportable small fast reactors include: proliferation resistance features such as restricted access to fuel; long core life further restricting access by reducing or eliminating the need for refueling; restricted potential to be misused in a breeding mode; fuel form that is unattractive in the safeguards sense; and a conversion ratio of unity to self-generate as much fissile material as is consumed. Desired attributes for exportable small reactor deployments in developing nations and remote sites also include: a small power level to match the smaller demand of towns or sites that are off-grid or on immature local grids; low enough cost to be economically competitive with alternative energy sources available to developing nation customers (e.g. diesel generators in remote locations); readily transported and assembled from transportable modules; simple to operate and highly reliable reducing plant operating staff requirements; as well as high reliability and passive safety reducing the number of accident initiators and need for safety systems as well as reducing the size of the exclusion and emergency planning zones. The Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) has the desired attributes. An example of a small exportable LFR concept is the 20 MWe (45 MWt) Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) incorporating proliferation resistance, fissile selfsufficiency, autonomous load following, a high degree of passive safety, and supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy conversion for high plant efficiency and improved economic competitiveness.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of four new metal 5-phosphonoisophthalates discovered by high-throughput experimentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Sebastian [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Christian-Albrechts-University, Otto-Hahn-Platz 6/7, D 24098 Kiel (Germany); Stock, Norbert [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Christian-Albrechts-University, Otto-Hahn-Platz 6/7, D 24098 Kiel (Germany)], E-mail: stock@ac.uni-kiel.de

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new ligand, 5-diethylphosphonoisophthalic acid ((HOOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2}, H{sub 2}Et{sub 2}L), for the hydrothermal synthesis of inorganic-organic hybrid compounds was prepared and characterized by NMR-spectroscopy. Its in situ hydrolysis leads to the corresponding 5-phosphonoisophthalic acid ((HOOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}, H{sub 4}L). Applying high-throughput methods, different di- and trivalent metal salts for the synthesis of crystalline metal phosphonates based on H{sub 2}Et{sub 2}L have been screened. From the resulting discovery library, single-crystals of four new compounds, [Sm{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}(H(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cu{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O)(H(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}){sub 2}].2H{sub 2}O (2), Ca{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)[H(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}H]{sub 2} (3), and Ba{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}(OOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3} (4), have been isolated. The single-crystal structure determination of the title compounds shows H{sub 4}L to be a versatile ligand, exhibiting different types of coordination modes between the functional groups and the metal ions. A comparison of the structural features of the title compounds shows a varying degree of M-O-M connectivities. Thus, isolated metal-oxygen clusters (compounds 1 and 2), infinite M-O-M chains (compound 3), and infinite M-O-M layers (compound 4) are observed. The title compounds 1, 2, and 3 were further characterized by IR-spectroscopy, TG-, EDX-, and elemental chemical analysis. - Graphical abstract: Applying high-throughput methods, the new ligand 5-diethylphosphonoisophtalic acid, (HOOC){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-PO{sub 3}(C{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 2} (H{sub 2}Et{sub 2}L), was reacted with several di- and trivalent metal salts under hydrothermal conditions. Single-crystals of four new inorganic-organic hybrid compounds were isolated from the discovery library. The single-crystal structure analysis shows a varying M-O-M connectivity.

  13. RESULTS OF THE FY09 ENHANCED DOE HIGH LEVEL WASTE MELTER THROUGHPUT STUDIES AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    High-level waste (HLW) throughput (i.e., the amount of waste processed per unit time) is a function of two critical parameters: waste loading (WL) and melt rate. For the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at the Hanford Site and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), increasing HLW throughput would significantly reduce the overall mission life cycle costs for the Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this task is to develop data, assess property models, and refine or develop the necessary models to support increased WL of HLW at SRS. It is a continuation of the studies initiated in FY07, but is under the specific guidance of a Task Change Request (TCR)/Work Authorization received from DOE headquarters (Project Number RV071301). Using the data generated in FY07, FY08 and historical data, two test matrices (60 glasses total) were developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in order to generate data in broader compositional regions. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), viscosity, liquidus temperature (TL) measurement and durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The results of this study are summarized below: (1) In general, the current durability model predicts the durabilities of higher waste loading glasses quite well. A few of the glasses exhibited poorer durability than predicted. (2) Some of the glasses exhibited anomalous behavior with respect to durability (normalized leachate for boron (NL [B])). The quenched samples of FY09EM21-02, -07 and -21 contained no nepheline or other wasteform affecting crystals, but have unacceptable NL [B] values (> 10 g/L). The ccc sample of FY09EM21-07 has a NL [B] value that is more than one half the value of the quenched sample. These glasses also have lower concentrations of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}. (3) Five of the ccc samples (EM-13, -14, -15, -29 and -30) completely crystallized with both magnetite and nepheline, and still had extremely low NL [B] values. These particular glasses have more CaO present than any of the other glasses in the matrix. It appears that while all of the glasses contain nepheline, the NL [B] values decrease as the CaO concentration increases from 2.3 wt% to 4.3 wt%. A different form of nepheline may be created at higher concentrations of CaO that does not significantly reduce glass durability. (4) The T{sub L} model appears to be under-predicting the measured values of higher waste loading glasses. Trends in T{sub L} with composition are not evident in the data from these studies. (5) A small number of glasses in the FY09 matrix have measured viscosities that are much lower than the viscosity range over which the current model was developed. The decrease in viscosity is due to a higher concentration of non-bridging oxygens (NBO). A high iron concentration is the cause of the increase in NBO. Durability, viscosity and T{sub L} data collected during FY07 and FY09 that specifically targeted higher waste loading glasses was compiled and assessed. It appears that additional data may be required to expand the coverage of the T{sub L} and viscosity models for higher waste loading glasses. In general, the compositional regions of the higher waste loading glasses are very different than those used to develop these models. On the other hand, the current durability model seems to be applicable to the new data. At this time, there is no evidence to modify this model; however additional experimental studies should be conducted to determine the cause of the anomalous durability data.

  14. Soft inertial microfluidics for high throughput separation of bacteria from human blood cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Zhigang; Willing, Ben; Bjerketorp, Joakim; Jansson, Janet K.; Hjort, Klas

    2009-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a new approach to separate bacteria from human blood cells based on soft inertial force induced migration with flow defined curved and focused sample flow inside a microfluidic device. This approach relies on a combination of an asymmetrical sheath flow and proper channel geometry to generate a soft inertial force on the sample fluid in the curved and focused sample flow segment to deflect larger particles away while the smaller ones are kept on or near the original flow streamline. The curved and focused sample flow and inertial effect were visualized and verified using a fluorescent dye primed in the device. First the particle behavior was studied in detail using 9.9 and 1.0 {micro}m particles with a polymer-based prototype. The prototype device is compact with an active size of 3 mm{sup 2}. The soft inertial effect and deflection distance were proportional to the fluid Reynolds number (Re) and particle Reynolds number (Re{sub p}), respectively. We successfully demonstrated separation of bacteria (Escherichia coli) from human red blood cells at high cell concentrations (above 10{sup 8}/mL), using a sample flow rate of up to 18 {micro}L/min. This resulted in at least a 300-fold enrichment of bacteria at a wide range of flow rates with a controlled flow spreading. The separated cells were proven to be viable. Proteins from fractions before and after cell separation were analyzed by gel electrophoresis and staining to verify the removal of red blood cell proteins from the bacterial cell fraction. This novel microfluidic process is robust, reproducible, simple to perform, and has a high throughput compared to other cell sorting systems. Microfluidic systems based on these principles could easily be manufactured for clinical laboratory and biomedical applications.

  15. New Composite Membranes for High Throughput Solid-Liquid Separations at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhave, Ramesh R [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Composite Membranes for High Throughput Solid-Liquid Separations at the Savannah River Site R. Bhave (Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oak Ridge, TN) and M. R. Poirier* (Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC) Solid-liquid separation is the limiting step for many waste treatment processes at the Savannah River Site. SRNL researchers have identified the rotary microfilter as a technology to improve the rate of solid-liquid separation processes. SRNL is currently developing the rotary microfilter for radioactive service and plans to deploy the technology as part of the small column ion exchange process. The rotary microfilter can utilize any filter media that is available as a flat sheet. The current baseline membrane is a 0.5 micron (nominal) porous metal filter (Pall PMM050). Previous testing with tubular filters showed that filters composed of a ceramic membrane on top of a stainless steel support produce higher flux than filters composed only of porous metal. The authors are working to develop flat sheet filter media composed of a ceramic membrane and/or ceramic-metal composite on top of a porous stainless steel support that can be used with the rotary microfilter to substantially increase filter flux resulting in a more compact, energy efficient and cost-effective high level radioactive waste treatment system. Composite membranes with precisely controlled pore size distribution were fabricated on porous metal supports. High quality uniform porous metal (316SS) supports were fabricated to achieve high water permeability. Separative layers of several different materials such as ultrafine metal particles and ceramic oxides were used to fabricate composite membranes. The fabrication process involved several high temperature heat treatments followed by characterization of gas and liquid permeability measurements and membrane integrity analysis. The fabricated composite membrane samples were evaluated in a static test cell manufactured by SpinTek. The composite membranes were evaluated on several feed slurries: 1 wt. % strontium carbonate in deionized water, 1 wt. % monosodium titanate in simulated salt solution, and 1 wt. % simulated sludge in simulated salt solution and deionized water. Flux as a function of feed flow rate and transmembrane pressure was measured for each of the above described feed slurries. The authors will discuss the new membrane development efforts, waste slurry filtration performance evaluations and scale-up considerations.

  16. RECENT PROCESS AND EQUIPMENT IMPROVEMENTS TO INCREASE HIGH LEVEL WASTE THROUGHPUT AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Odriscoll, R; Allan Barnes, A; Jim Coleman, J; Timothy Glover, T; Robert Hopkins, R; Dan Iverson, D; Jeff Leita, J

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began stabilizing high level waste (HLW) in a glass matrix in 1996. Over the past few years, there have been several process and equipment improvements at the DWPF to increase the rate at which the high level waste can be stabilized. These improvements have either directly increased waste processing rates or have desensitized the process to upsets, thereby minimizing downtime and increasing production. Improvements due to optimization of waste throughput with increased HLW loading of the glass resulted in a 6% waste throughput increase based upon operational efficiencies. Improvements in canister production include the pour spout heated bellows liner (5%), glass surge (siphon) protection software (2%), melter feed pump software logic change to prevent spurious interlocks of the feed pump with subsequent dilution of feed stock (2%) and optimization of the steam atomized scrubber (SAS) operation to minimize downtime (3%) for a total increase in canister production of 12%. A number of process recovery efforts have allowed continued operation. These include the off gas system pluggage and restoration, slurry mix evaporator (SME) tank repair and replacement, remote cleaning of melter top head center nozzle, remote melter internal inspection, SAS pump J-Tube recovery, inadvertent pour scenario resolutions, dome heater transformer bus bar cooling water leak repair and new Infra-red camera for determination of glass height in the canister are discussed.

  17. High-throughput characterization of stresses in thin film materials libraries using Si cantilever array wafers and digital holographic microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Y. W.; Ludwig, A. [Institute for Materials, Chair for Materials for Microsystems, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Materials Research Department, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany); Hamann, S.; Ehmann, M. [Institute for Materials, Chair for Materials for Microsystems, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of an advanced high-throughput stress characterization method for thin film materials libraries sputter-deposited on micro-machined cantilever arrays consisting of around 1500 cantilevers on 4-inch silicon-on-insulator wafers. A low-cost custom-designed digital holographic microscope (DHM) is employed to simultaneously monitor the thin film thickness, the surface topography and the curvature of each of the cantilevers before and after deposition. The variation in stress state across the thin film materials library is then calculated by Stoney's equation based on the obtained radii of curvature of the cantilevers and film thicknesses. DHM with nanometer-scale out-of-plane resolution allows stress measurements in a wide range, at least from several MPa to several GPa. By using an automatic x-y translation stage, the local stresses within a 4-inch materials library are mapped with high accuracy within 10 min. The speed of measurement is greatly improved compared with the prior laser scanning approach that needs more than an hour of measuring time. A high-throughput stress measurement of an as-deposited Fe-Pd-W materials library was evaluated for demonstration. The fast characterization method is expected to accelerate the development of (functional) thin films, e.g., (magnetic) shape memory materials, whose functionality is greatly stress dependent.

  18. Poles as the only true resonant-state signals extracted from a worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes using only one, well controlled pole-extraction method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadzimehmedovic, M.; Osmanovic, H.; Stahov, J. [Univerzity of Tuzla, Faculty of Science, Univerzitetska 4, 75000 Tuzla (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Ceci, S.; Svarc, A. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka cesta 54, P.O. Box 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Each and every energy-dependent partial-wave analysis is parametrizing the pole positions in a procedure defined by the way the continuous energy dependence is implemented. These pole positions are, henceforth, inherently model dependent. To reduce this model dependence, we use only one, coupled-channel, unitary, fully analytic method based on the isobar approximation to extract the pole positions from each available member of the worldwide collection of partial-wave amplitudes, which are understood as nothing more but a good energy-dependent representation of genuine experimental numbers assembled in a form of partial-wave data. In that way, the model dependence related to the different assumptions on the analytic form of the partial-wave amplitudes is avoided, and the true confidence limit for the existence of a particular resonant state, at least in one model, is established. The way the method works and first results are demonstrated for the S{sub 11} partial wave.

  19. Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc formerly Worldwide Manufacturing

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy ResourcesWoodsCenters Jump to:Technologies

  20. A General Framework for Development and Data Analysis of Competitive High-Throughput Screens for Small-Molecule Inhibitors of Protein-Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Recent advances in chemical biology and high-throughput (HTP)1 screening (13-15) have introduced the use sensitive, robust, and widely used HTP methods for the study of protein interactions and drug discovery (19, can serve as a sensitive molecular sensor. HTP FP assays usually detect changes in polarization caused

  1. In: Proceedings of the 2005 IEEE International Symposium on Workload Characterization (IISWC), October 2005, c IEEE Comprehensive Throughput Evaluation of LANs in Clusters of PCs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics of net- works for clusters. A first microbenchmark tests the basic pro- cessing limitations. A second microbenchmark tests arbitrary communication pat- terns by pairwise connecting nodes for high-speed throughput tests. A third and slightly more realistic microbenchmark ex- ecutes an all-to-all personalised

  2. High-throughput identification of off-targets for the mechanistic study of severe adverse drug reactions induced by analgesics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Jian-Bo [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Nan; Pan, Wen; Hong, Ru [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Wang, Hao [Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Ji, Zhi-Liang, E-mail: appo@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Stress Cell Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361102 (China); Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, The Key Laboratory for Chemical Biology of Fujian Province, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drugs may induce adverse drug reactions (ADRs) when they unexpectedly bind to proteins other than their therapeutic targets. Identification of these undesired protein binding partners, called off-targets, can facilitate toxicity assessment in the early stages of drug development. In this study, a computational framework was introduced for the exploration of idiosyncratic mechanisms underlying analgesic-induced severe adverse drug reactions (SADRs). The putative analgesic-target interactions were predicted by performing reverse docking of analgesics or their active metabolites against human/mammal protein structures in a high-throughput manner. Subsequently, bioinformatics analyses were undertaken to identify ADR-associated proteins (ADRAPs) and pathways. Using the pathways and ADRAPs that this analysis identified, the mechanisms of SADRs such as cardiac disorders were explored. For instance, 53 putative ADRAPs and 24 pathways were linked with cardiac disorders, of which 10 ADRAPs were confirmed by previous experiments. Moreover, it was inferred that pathways such as base excision repair, glycolysis/glyconeogenesis, ErbB signaling, calcium signaling, and phosphatidyl inositol signaling likely play pivotal roles in drug-induced cardiac disorders. In conclusion, our framework offers an opportunity to globally understand SADRs at the molecular level, which has been difficult to realize through experiments. It also provides some valuable clues for drug repurposing. - Highlights: A novel computational framework was developed for mechanistic study of SADRs. Off-targets of drugs were identified in large scale and in a high-throughput manner. SADRs like cardiac disorders were systematically explored in molecular networks. A number of ADR-associated proteins were identified.

  3. Towards a worldwide storage infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quintard, Julien

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in order to easily manage the permissions granted to potentially hundreds or thousands of end-users. In addition, as for centralised file systems which rely on a special user, referred to as root on Unices, distributed file systems equally require some...

  4. Gaia Worldwide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFifeGEXA Corp. (New Jersey) JumpGREETGWEWorldwide Jump

  5. ,"U.S. Refinery Net Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    mbblpda.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetpnprefp2dcnusmbblpda.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help,...

  6. U.S. Fuel Consumed at Refineries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin Transition in2,EHSSCoal Production andOrigin219:131,097 152,084Fuel

  7. U.S. Refineries Competitive Positions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year Jan

  8. U.S. Refinery Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude Oil andNov-14Nov-14

  9. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude Oil

  10. U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalThe Outlook269,023Year JanCrude OilNov-14 Dec-14

  11. U.S. Refinery Net Input

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,932 130,902672009Dec-1420092009

  12. U.S. Refinery Net Production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,932 130,902672009Dec-14200920092009

  13. U.S. Refinery Utilization and Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,9322009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

  14. Virginia Biodiesel Refinery | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmweltVillage ofInformationVineyard EnergyVireol

  15. Myriant Succinic Acid BioRefinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico |

  16. Assessment of advanced coal-gasification processes. [AVCO high throughput gasification in process; Bell High Mass Flux process; CS-R process; and Exxon Gasification process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarthy, J.; Ferrall, J.; Charng, T.; Houseman, J.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents a technical assessment of the following advanced coal gasification processes: AVCO High Throughput Gasification (HTG) Process, Bell Single - Stage High Mass Flux (HMF) Process, Cities Service/Rockwell (CS/R) Hydrogasification Process, and the Exxon Catalytic Coal Gasification (CCG) Process. Each process is evaluated for its potential to produce SNG from a bituminous coal. In addition to identifying the new technology these processes represent, key similarities/differences, strengths/weaknesses, and potential improvements to each process are identified. The AVCO HTG and the Bell HMF gasifiers share similarities with respect to: short residence time (SRT), high throughput rate, slagging and syngas as the initial raw product gas. The CS/R Hydrogasifier is also SRT but is non-slagging and produces a raw gas high in methane content. The Exxon CCG gasifier is a long residence time, catalytic fluidbed reactor producing all of the raw product methane in the gasifier.

  17. On-the-fly machine-learning for high-throughput experiments: search for rare-earth-free permanent magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusne, Aaron Gilad [University of Maryland; Gao, Tieren [University of Maryland; Mehta, Apurva [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Ke, Liqin [Ames Laboratory; Nguyen, Manh Cuong [Ames Laboratory; Ho, Kai-Ming [Ames Laboratory; Antropov, Vladimir [Ames Laboratory; Wang, Cai-Zhuang [Ames Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J [Ames Laboratory; Long, Christian [University of Maryland; Takeuchi, Ichiro [University of Maryland

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced materials characterization techniques with ever-growing data acquisition speed and storage capabilities represent a challenge in modern materials science, and new procedures to quickly assess and analyze the data are needed. Machine learning approaches are effective in reducing the complexity of data and rapidly homing in on the underlying trend in multi-dimensional data. Here, we show that by employing an algorithm called the mean shift theory to a large amount of diffraction data in high-throughput experimentation, one can streamline the process of delineating the structural evolution across compositional variations mapped on combinatorial libraries with minimal computational cost. Data collected at a synchrotron beamline are analyzed on the fly, and by integrating experimental data with the inorganic crystal structure database (ICSD), we can substantially enhance the accuracy in classifying the structural phases across ternary phase spaces. We have used this approach to identify a novel magnetic phase with enhanced magnetic anisotropy which is a candidate for rare-earth free permanent magnet.

  18. The results of a world-wide study on yield improvement are presented. Die yields col-lected from 21 fabs are transformed via a logit formula and compared. The die yields and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    -aided manufacturing practices and statistical process control practices in addition to commonly cited practices improvement rates of the fabs are compared, and manufacturing yield improve- ment practices are evaluated such as particle control and advanced manufacturing technology. #12;Introduction The results of a world-wide study

  19. Indeed is the #1 job search engine worldwide. Since 2004, Indeed has given job seekers free access to millions of jobs from thousands of company websites and job boards. Our core mis-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    Indeed is the #1 job search engine worldwide. Since 2004, Indeed has given job seekers free access to millions of jobs from thousands of company websites and job boards. Our core mis- sion is to help people get jobs. To make this possible, we built an amazing platform that han- dles 5 billion job search

  20. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Tu, Qichao; Xu, Meiying; Hemme, Chris; Wu, Liyou; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Xingyuan; Gentry, Terry; Yin, Yifeng; Liebich, Jost

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Microarray-based genomic technology has been widely used for microbial community analysis, and it is expected that microarray-based genomic technologies will revolutionize the analysis of microbial community structure, function and dynamics. A new generation of functional gene arrays (GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with 27,812 probes covering 56,990 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance, and organic contaminant degradation. Those probes were derived from 2,744, 140, and 262 species for bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. GeoChip 3.0 has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating, and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Our computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes had a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Also, experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036percent-0.025percent false positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which demonstrated that the structure, composition, and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. All results indicate that GeoChip 3.0 is a high throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning. To our knowledge, GeoChip 3.0 is the most comprehensive microarrays currently available for studying microbial communities associated with geobiochemical cycling, global climate change, bioenergy, agricuture, land use, ecosystem management, environmental cleanup and restoration, bioreactor systems, and human health.

  1. High Throughput Sample Preparation and Analysis for DNA Sequencing, PCR and Combinatorial Screening of Catalysis Based on Capillary Array Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yonghua Zhang

    2002-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Sample preparation has been one of the major bottlenecks for many high throughput analyses. The purpose of this research was to develop new sample preparation and integration approach for DNA sequencing, PCR based DNA analysis and combinatorial screening of homogeneous catalysis based on multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence or imaging UV absorption detection. The author first introduced a method to integrate the front-end tasks to DNA capillary-array sequencers. protocols for directly sequencing the plasmids from a single bacterial colony in fused-silica capillaries were developed. After the colony was picked, lysis was accomplished in situ in the plastic sample tube using either a thermocycler or heating block. Upon heating, the plasmids were released while chromsomal DNA and membrane proteins were denatured and precipitated to the bottom of the tube. After adding enzyme and Sanger reagents, the resulting solution was aspirated into the reaction capillaries by a syringe pump, and cycle sequencing was initiated. No deleterious effect upon the reaction efficiency, the on-line purification system, or the capillary electrophoresis separation was observed, even though the crude lysate was used as the template. Multiplexed on-line DNA sequencing data from 8 parallel channels allowed base calling up to 620 bp with an accuracy of 98%. The entire system can be automatically regenerated for repeated operation. For PCR based DNA analysis, they demonstrated that capillary electrophoresis with UV detection can be used for DNA analysis starting from clinical sample without purification. After PCR reaction using cheek cell, blood or HIV-1 gag DNA, the reaction mixtures was injected into the capillary either on-line or off-line by base stacking. The protocol was also applied to capillary array electrophoresis. The use of cheaper detection, and the elimination of purification of DNA sample before or after PCR reaction, will make this approach an attractive alternative to current methods for genetic analysis and disease diagnosis.

  2. Robofurnace: A semi-automated laboratory chemical vapor deposition system for high-throughput nanomaterial synthesis and process discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, C. Ryan; Westrick, William; Koehler, Jeremy; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; Anagnostopoulos-Politis, Ilias; Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Hart, A. John, E-mail: ajhart@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory research and development on new materials, such as nanostructured thin films, often utilizes manual equipment such as tube furnaces due to its relatively low cost and ease of setup. However, these systems can be prone to inconsistent outcomes due to variations in standard operating procedures and limitations in performance such as heating and cooling rates restrict the parameter space that can be explored. Perhaps more importantly, maximization of research throughput and the successful and efficient translation of materials processing knowledge to production-scale systems, relies on the attainment of consistent outcomes. In response to this need, we present a semi-automated lab-scale chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace system, called Robofurnace. Robofurnace is an automated CVD system built around a standard tube furnace, which automates sample insertion and removal and uses motion of the furnace to achieve rapid heating and cooling. The system has a 10-sample magazine and motorized transfer arm, which isolates the samples from the lab atmosphere and enables highly repeatable placement of the sample within the tube. The system is designed to enable continuous operation of the CVD reactor, with asynchronous loading/unloading of samples. To demonstrate its performance, Robofurnace is used to develop a rapid CVD recipe for carbon nanotube (CNT) forest growth, achieving a 10-fold improvement in CNT forest mass density compared to a benchmark recipe using a manual tube furnace. In the long run, multiple systems like Robofurnace may be linked to share data among laboratories by methods such as Twitter. Our hope is Robofurnace and like automation will enable machine learning to optimize and discover relationships in complex material synthesis processes.

  3. Miniaturized Analytical Platforms From Nanoparticle Components: Studies in the Construction, Characterization, and High-Throughput Usage of These Novel Architectures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew David Pris

    2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific community has recently experienced an overall effort to reduce the physical size of many experimental components to the nanometer size range. This size is unique as the characteristics of this regime involve aspects of pure physics, biology, and chemistry. One extensively studied example of a nanometer sized experimental component, which acts as a junction between these three principle scientific theologies, is deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA). These biopolymers not only contain the biological genetic guide to code for the production of life-sustaining materials, but are also being probed by physicists as a means to create electrical circuits and furthermore as controllable architectural and sensor motifs in the chemical disciplines. Possibly the most common nano-sized component between these sciences are nanoparticles composed of a variety of materials. The cross discipline employment of nanoparticles is evident from the vast amount of literature that has been produced from each of the individual communities within the last decade. Along these cross-discipline lines, this dissertation examines the use of several different types of nanoparticles with a wide array of surface chemistries to understand their adsorption properties and to construct unique miniaturized analytical and immunoassay platforms. This introduction will act as a literature review to provide key information regarding the synthesis and surface chemistries of several types of nanoparticles. This material will set the stage for a discussion of assembling ordered arrays of nanoparticles into functional platforms, architectures, and sensors. The introduction will also include a short explanation of the atomic force microscope that is used throughout the thesis to characterize the nanoparticle-based structures. Following the Introduction, four research chapters are presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 examines the self-assembly of polymeric nanoparticles exhibiting a variety of surface chemistries and attempts to deconvolute general adsorption rules for their assembly on various substrates. Chapter 2 extends the usage of self-assembly of polymeric nanoparticles through a layer-by-layer deposition concept and photolithography methodologies to create analytical platforms with a vertical height controlled within the nanometer regime. This platform is then furthered in Chapter 3 by employing this integrated concept as a bio-recognition platform, with the extension of the method to a high-throughput screening system explored. Chapter 4 exploits two different types of nanoparticles, silica and gold, as multiplexed, self-assembled immunoassay sensors. This final research chapter is followed by a general summation and future prospectus section that concludes the dissertation.

  4. P h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n Shipboard Surveys of Regional and Worldwide Field Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5. Operations typically involve a CTD survey along 20W and the annual servicing of three PIRATAP h y s i c a l O c e a n o g r a p h y D i v i s i o n Shipboard Surveys of Regional and Worldwide Field Operations PhOD personnel spend on average a total of 420 days at sea every year. The following

  5. Outlook for Refinery Outages and Available Refinery Capacity in the First Half of 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved(Million Barrels)21Year Jan Feb

  6. Analytic expressions for atomic layer deposition: Coverage, throughput, and materials utilization in cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanguas-Gil, Angel; Elam, Jeffrey W., E-mail: jelam@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Energy Systems Division, 9700 S Cass Ave, Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, the authors present analytic models for atomic layer deposition (ALD) in three common experimental configurations: cross-flow, particle coating, and spatial ALD. These models, based on the plug-flow and well-mixed approximations, allow us to determine the minimum dose times and materials utilization for all three configurations. A comparison between the three models shows that throughput and precursor utilization can each be expressed by universal equations, in which the particularity of the experimental system is contained in a single parameter related to the residence time of the precursor in the reactor. For the case of cross-flow reactors, the authors show how simple analytic expressions for the reactor saturation profiles agree well with experimental results. Consequently, the analytic model can be used to extract information about the ALD surface chemistry (e.g., the reaction probability) by comparing the analytic and experimental saturation profiles, providing a useful tool for characterizing new and existing ALD processes.

  7. Nine Students Reflect on Their Worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraden, Seth

    for Relief from an AIDS Epidemic: Clients and Community at Gay Men's Health Crisis Aaron Breslow '10 From and faith in his heart, discovered the essence of leadership in two distinct parts of the world: Ethiopia in the Gay Men's Health Crisis Center. There he challenged himself to do more, to stay committed

  8. Lessons Learned from Microgrid Demonstrations Worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and test systems, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews,around the world-a review, Renewable and Sustainable Energy29 Hachinohe Project (an all-renewable

  9. Worldwide Carsharing Growth: An International Comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan A.; Cohen, Adam P

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as gasolineelectric hybrid cars, in their ?eets (12, 23,of overall car- sharing fleets: hybrid vehicles arehybrid vehicles are popular among operators in Singapore, but con- ventional gasoline cars

  10. Lessons Learned from Microgrid Demonstrations Worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CCHP .energy functions: CHP and CCHP Demands for electricity,and power, technologies (CCHP), deployed successfully by the

  11. An assessment of worldwide supercomputer usage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasserman, H.J.; Simmons, M.L.; Hayes, A.H.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a comparative study of advanced supercomputing usage in Japan and the United States as of Spring 1994. It is based on the findings of a group of US scientists whose careers have centered on programming, evaluating, and designing high-performance supercomputers for over ten years. The report is a follow-on to an assessment of supercomputing technology in Europe and Japan that was published in 1993. Whereas the previous study focused on supercomputer manufacturing capabilities, the primary focus of the current work was to compare where and how supercomputers are used. Research for this report was conducted through both literature studies and field research in Japan.

  12. Worldwide report: Arms control, [May 29, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1987-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information concerning arms control of the USSR. Topics include: (1) intermediate range nuclear forces, (2) chemical and biological weapons, and (3) related issues.

  13. Worldwide report: Arms control, [July 26, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains translations/transcriptions of articles and/or broadcasts on arms control. Titles include; Soviet Spokesman Explains Far East Arms Cut; Delegation attends Society Naval Exercise; Defense Minister Queried on Military Reductions; Further on Society Force Withdrawals from Poland; Criteria of Military-Strategic Parity, Sufficiency; Further on Allegations of CW Materiel Sale to Iran; Reports on Nuclear, Chemical Warheads Denied; and others.

  14. Worldwide report: Arms control, [November 7, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains articles about arms control throughout the world. Some topics discussed include SDI and space arms, US and USSR nuclear and space arms talks, intermediate range nuclear forces, nuclear testing and free zone proposals.

  15. Worldwide report: Arms control, [April 8, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1987-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information concerning arms control of the USSR. Topics include: (1) SDI and space arms, (2) US-USSR nuclear and space arms talks, (3) SALT/START issues, (4) intermediate range nuclear forces, (5) European conferences, and (6) nuclear testing and free zone proposals.

  16. Worldwide report: Arms control, [April 9, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1987-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains information concerning arms control and the USSR. Topics include: (1) SDI and space arms, (2) US-USSR nuclear and space arms talks, (3) intermediate range nuclear forces, (4) chemical and biological weapons, (5) nuclear testing and free zone proposals, (6) related issues.

  17. Lecture 7: Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CERN. Geneva

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will introduce in an informal, but technically correct way the challenges that are linked to the needs of massively distributed computing architectures in the context of the LHC offline computing. The topics include technological and organizational aspects touching many aspects of LHC computing, from data access, to maintenance of large databases and huge collections of files, to the organization of computing farms and monitoring. Fabrizio Furano holds a Ph.D in Computer Science and has worked in the field of Computing for High Energy Physics for many years. Some of his preferred topics include application architectures, system design and project management, with focus on performance and scalability of data access. Fabrizio has experience in a wide variety of environments, from private companies to academic research in particular in object oriented methodologies, mainly using C++. He has also teaching experience at university level in Software Engineering and C++ Programming.

  18. World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed target experiments. The second is to maintain circulating beams, either for synchrotron light sources or for colliding beam experiments. Given the differing requirements, these two uses led to rather different implementations and, in particular, different average operating gradients. A second difference in the implementation is the speed of the particle being accelerated. Electrons are sufficiently relativistic at low beam energies (> {approx} 5 MeV) that cavities designed for relativistic beams can also function acceptably at low energy. This is not the case for protons or ion accelerators so, until recently, copper cavities were used to cover the first {approx} 100 MeV. Superconducting cavities are now also being proposed to cover this energy range as well using a series of superconducting cavities, each of which is matched to the particle velocity.

  19. Worldwide deposition of strontium-90 through 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monetti, M.A.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium-90 results from the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML) Global Fallout Program (GFP) are presented for the years 1987 through 1990. Quarterly {sup 90}Sr deposition results for the 66 sampling locations of EML`s GFP were generally low, indicating that there was no significant release of fission products into the atmosphere during this period. The global {sup 90}Sr deposition during these 4 years was lower than it has been for any similar period since this program began in 1958. Since there was no major atmospheric source of {sup 90}Sr during this period, the global cumulative deposit of {sup 90}Sr continued to decrease by radioactive decay to a 27 year low of 311.4 Pbq.

  20. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Forestry and Resource Management; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.