National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for worldwide electricity consumption

  1. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  2. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  3. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  5. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  6. Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

  7. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2006-03-07

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  8. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K.; Chassin, David P.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael; Winiarski, David W.; Pratt, Robert G.; Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie

    2008-09-02

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  9. Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and state. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

  10. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  12. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  13. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency Below is...

  14. Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.

    2012-09-04

    Electrical energy consumption control apparatuses and electrical energy consumption control methods are described. According to one aspect, an electrical energy consumption control apparatus includes processing circuitry configured to receive a signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by a plurality of loads at a site, to compare the signal which is indicative of current of electrical energy which is consumed by the plurality of loads at the site with a desired substantially sinusoidal waveform of current of electrical energy which is received at the site from an electrical power system, and to use the comparison to control an amount of the electrical energy which is consumed by at least one of the loads of the site.

  15. Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  9. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  11. Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total...

  12. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growing | Department of Energy 40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Electricity generated from sources that are renewable - hydroelectric power, bio-fuels, geothermal, solar, wind, wood, waste - have grown 150% from 1980 to 2011 (latest year available). Of the selected countries/regions shown, Europe has consistently had the highest consumption of renewable electricity.

  13. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Grades: All Topics: Biomass, Wind Energy, Hydropower, Solar, Geothermal Owner: The NEED Project Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and...

  14. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Canadian Energy Demand Electricity Usage in India's Housing ... Canadian Energy Demand Release date: June 2, 2015 The ... This is the U.S. Energy Information Administration's second ...

  15. Lifestyle Factors in U.S. Residential Electricity Consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanquist, Thomas F.; Orr, Heather M.; Shui, Bin; Bittner, Alvah C.

    2012-03-30

    A multivariate statistical approach to lifestyle analysis of residential electricity consumption is described and illustrated. Factor analysis of selected variables from the 2005 U.S. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) identified five lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices associated with air conditioning, laundry usage, personal computer usage, climate zone of residence, and TV use. These factors were also estimated for 2001 RECS data. Multiple regression analysis using the lifestyle factors yields solutions accounting for approximately 40% of the variance in electricity consumption for both years. By adding the associated household and market characteristics of income, local electricity price and access to natural gas, variance accounted for is increased to approximately 54%. Income contributed only {approx}1% unique variance to the 2005 and 2001 models, indicating that lifestyle factors reflecting social and behavioral choices better account for consumption differences than income. This was not surprising given the 4-fold range of energy use at differing income levels. Geographic segmentation of factor scores is illustrated, and shows distinct clusters of consumption and lifestyle factors, particularly in suburban locations. The implications for tailored policy and planning interventions are discussed in relation to lifestyle issues.

  16. Environmental effects of interstate power trading on electricity consumption mixes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Marriott; H. Scott Matthews

    2005-11-15

    Although many studies of electricity generation use national or state average generation mix assumptions, in reality a great deal of electricity is transferred between states with very different mixes of fossil and renewable fuels, and using the average numbers could result in incorrect conclusions in these studies. The authors create electricity consumption profiles for each state and for key industry sectors in the U.S. based on existing state generation profiles, net state power imports, industry presence by state, and an optimization model to estimate interstate electricity trading. Using these 'consumption mixes' can provide a more accurate assessment of electricity use in life-cycle analyses. It is concluded that the published generation mixes for states that import power are misleading, since the power consumed in-state has a different makeup than the power that was generated. And, while most industry sectors have consumption mixes similar to the U.S. average, some of the most critical sectors of the economy - such as resource extraction and material processing sectors - are very different. This result does validate the average mix assumption made in many environmental assessments, but it is important to accurately quantify the generation methods for electricity used when doing life-cycle analyses. 16 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Consumption of the electric power inside silent discharge reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yehia, Ashraf

    2015-01-15

    An experimental study was made in this paper to investigate the relation between the places of the dielectric barriers, which cover the surfaces of the electrodes in the coaxial cylindrical reactors, and the rate of change of the electric power that is consumed in forming silent discharges. Therefore, silent discharges have been formed inside three coaxial cylindrical reactors. The dielectric barriers in these reactors were pasted on both the internal surface of the outer electrode in the first reactor and the external surface of the inner electrode in the second reactor as well as the surfaces of the two electrodes in the third reactor. The reactor under study has been fed by atmospheric air that flowed inside it with a constant rate at normal temperature and pressure, in parallel with the application of a sinusoidal ac voltage between the electrodes of the reactor. The electric power consumed in forming the silent discharges inside the three reactors was measured as a function of the ac peak voltage. The validity of the experimental results was investigated by applying Manley's equation on the same discharge conditions. The results have shown that the rate of consumption of the electric power relative to the ac peak voltage per unit width of the discharge gap improves by a ratio of either 26.8% or 80% or 128% depending on the places of the dielectric barriers that cover the surfaces of the electrodes inside the three reactors.

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  2. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models January 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts

  3. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in Indias Housing Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector November 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity Usage in India's Housing Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of

  4. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    none of which were elec- trically heated; each had an electric stove, dryer, dishwasher, and water heater. The researchers installed 24-h chart recorders in each residence...

  5. Fuel consumption of freight trains hauled by diesel electric locomotives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radford, R.W.

    1983-05-01

    The cost of railway diesel fuel has become an increasingly high proportion of railway operating expenses. The paper analyzes the generation and utilization of rail horsepower in freight train operations. The effects on fuel consumption of variations in several parameters including train consist, car weight, gradient, average speed, meet strategy, throttle control, locomotive axle arrangement, and train marshalling are examined. Estimates are made of the value, in terms of fuel cost, of weight reduction of freight cars and of selective train marshalling.

  6. Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, M.; Peng, J.

    2011-02-24

    Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

  7. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption and Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE / EERE / NEED Project

    2011-06-07

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  8. Power to the Plug: An Introduction to Energy, Electricity, Consumption, and Efficiency

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    The NEED Project and the U.S. Department of Energy have collaborated to bring you this educational four-page guide to energy, electricity, consumption and efficiency. It includes, on the last page, a home energy survey to help you analyze your home energy use.

  9. A Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Newmark, Robin; Heath, Garvin; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    This report provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. The presented water factors may be useful in modeling and policy analyses where reliable power plant level data are not available.

  10. Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study: Reducing Water Consumption of Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Concentrating Solar Power Commercial Application Study: Reducing Water Consumption of Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation Report to Congress U.S. Department of Energy This report is being disseminated by the Department of Energy. As such, the document was prepared in compliance with Section 515 of the Treasury and General Government Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (Public Law 106-554) and information quality guidelines issued by the Department of Energy. Though this report

  11. Determinants of residential electricity consumption: Using smart meter data to examine the effect of climate, building characteristics, appliance stock, and occupants' behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavousian, A; Rajagopal, R; Fischer, M

    2013-06-15

    We propose a method to examine structural and behavioral determinants of residential electricity consumption, by developing separate models for daily maximum (peak) and minimum (idle) consumption. We apply our method on a data set of 1628 households' electricity consumption. The results show that weather, location and floor area are among the most important determinants of residential electricity consumption. In addition to these variables, number of refrigerators and entertainment devices (e.g., VCRs) are among the most important determinants of daily minimum consumption, while number of occupants and high-consumption appliances such as electric water heaters are the most significant determinants of daily maximum consumption. Installing double-pane windows and energy-efficient lights helped to reduce consumption, as did the energy-conscious use of electric heater. Acknowledging climate change as a motivation to save energy showed correlation with lower electricity consumption. Households with individuals over 55 or between 19 and 35 years old recorded lower electricity consumption, while pet owners showed higher consumption. Contrary to some previous studies, we observed no significant correlation between electricity consumption and income level, home ownership, or building age. Some otherwise energy-efficient features such as energy-efficient appliances, programmable thermostats, and insulation were correlated with slight increase in electricity consumption. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption and Expenditures Electricity Consumption Natural Gas Consumption Wood and Solar Energy Consumption Fuel Oil and District Heat Consumption Energy Consumption in...

  13. ETA-HTP03 - Implementation of SAE J1634 May93 - Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Revision 0 Effective May 1, 2004 Implementation of SAE J1634 May93 - "Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure" Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date: ________ Roberta Brayer Approved by: _________________________________________________ Date: ____________ Donald Karner ETA-HTP03 Revision 0 2004 Electric Transportation Application All rights Reserved i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Objectives 1 2. Purpose 1 3.

  14. ETA-UTP003 - Implementation of SAE J1634 May93 - Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Revision 0 Effective March 23, 2001 Implementation of SAE J1634 May93 - "Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure" Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date: ________ Steven R. Ryan Approved by: _________________________________________________ Date: ____________ Jude M. Clark ETA-UTP003 Revision 0 ©2001 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives 3 2.0

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Electricity Consumption/Sales (Percent) Buildings Delivered Total | Total Industry Transportation Total (10^15 Btu) 1980 | 60.9% 38.9% 0.2% 100% | 7.15 1981 | 61.4% 38.5% 0.1% 100% | 7.33 1982 | 64.1% 35.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.12 1983 | 63.8% 36.1% 0.2% 100% | 7.34 1984 | 63.2% 36.7% 0.2% 100% | 7.80 1985 | 63.8% 36.0% 0.2% 100% | 7.93 1986 | 64.8% 35.1% 0.2% 100% | 8.08 1987 | 64.9% 34.9% 0.2% 100% | 8.38 1988 | 65.0% 34.8% 0.2% 100% | 8.80 1989 | 64.8% 35.0% 0.2% 100% |

  16. Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu Electricity-Only Plants 11<//td> 1989 767,378,330 25,574,094 241,960,194 3,460 517,385 270,124,673

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Consumption (Quadrillion Btu) Renewables Growth Rate Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 2010-Year 1980 2.87 0.06 2.92 2.74 (1) 24.32 1981 2.72 0.06 2.79 3.01 (1) 24.49 1982 3.23 0.05 3.29 3.13 (1) 23.95 1983 3.49 0.07 3.56 3.20 (1) 24.60 1984 3.35 0.09 3.44 3.55 (1) 25.59 1985 2.94 0.11 3.05 4.08 (1) 26.09 1986 3.04 0.12 3.16 4.38 (1) 26.22 1987 2.60 0.13 2.73 4.75 (1) 26.94 1988 2.30 0.12 2.43 5.59 (1) 28.27 1989 2.81 0.41 3.22 5.60 (1) 29.88

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings...

  19. Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric ...

  20. Table 2.3 Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy Consumption for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by End Use, 2006 End-Use Category Net Electricity 1 Residual Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil LPG 2 and NGL 3 Natural Gas Coal 4 Total 5 Million Kilowatthours Million Barrels Billion Cubic Feet Million Short Tons Indirect End Use (Boiler Fuel) 12,109 21 4 2 2,059 25 – – Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 2 1,245 6 – – CHP 6 and/or Cogeneration Process – – 10 1 (s) 814 19 – – Direct End Use All Process Uses 657,810

  1. Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc formerly Worldwide...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Manufacturing USA Inc formerly Worldwide Manufacturing USA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Worldwide Energy and Manufacturing USA Inc (formerly Worldwide Manufacturing USA)...

  2. Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Subset of Table 8.4a; Billion Btu) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other ...

  3. Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power 5 Renewable Energy Other 9 Electricity Net Imports 10 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric ...

  4. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  5. 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The 2010 Worldwide Gasification Database describes the current world gasification industry and identifies near-term planned capacity additions. The database lists gasification projects and includes information (e.g., plant location, number and type of gasifiers, syngas capacity, feedstock, and products). The database reveals that the worldwide gasification capacity has continued to grow for the past several decades and is now at 70,817 megawatts thermal (MWth) of syngas output at 144 operating plants with a total of 412 gasifiers.

  6. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 U.S. Electric Power Sector Cumulative Power Plant Additions Needed to Meet Future Electricity Demand (1) Typical New Number of New Power Plants to Meet Demand Electric Generator Plant Capacity (MW) 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Coal Steam 1,300 7 8 8 8 8 Combined Cycle 540 28 29 43 79 130 Combustion Turbine/Diesel 148 62 105 174 250 284 Nuclear Power 2,236 1 3 3 3 4 Pumped Storage 147 (2) 0 0 0 0 0 Fuel Cells 10 0 0 0 0 0 Conventional Hydropower 20 (2) 20 47 81 125 185 Geothermal 50 9 26 41 62 81

  8. Hydro and geothermal electricity as an alternative for industrial petroleum consumption in Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendis, M.; Park, W.; Sabadell, A.; Talib, A.

    1982-04-01

    This report assesses the potential for substitution of electricity for petroleum in the industrial/agro-industrial sector of Costa Rica. The study includes a preliminary estimate of the process energy needs in this sector, a survey of the principal petroleum consuming industries in Costa Rica, an assessment of the electrical technologies appropriate for substitution, and an analysis of the cost trade offs of alternative fuels and technologies. The report summarizes the total substitution potential both by technical feasibility and by cost effectiveness under varying fuel price scenarios and identifies major institutional constraints to the introduction of electric based technologies. Recommendations to the Government of Costa Rica are presented. The key to the success of a Costa Rican program for substitution of electricity for petroleum in industry rests in energy pricing policy. The report shows that if Costa Rica Bunker C prices are increased to compare equitably with Caribbean Bunker C prices, and increase at 3 percent per annum relative to a special industrial electricity rate structure, the entire substitution program, including both industrial and national electric investment, would be cost effective. The definition of these pricing structures and their potential impacts need to be assessed in depth.

  9. ETA-TP003 - Rev. 2 - Implementation of SAE J1634 May 93 - "Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure"

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Revision 2 Effective March 1, 1997 Implementation of SAE J1634 May93 - "Electric Vehicle Energy Consumption and Range Test Procedure" Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date: ________ Jude M. Clark Approved by: _________________________________________________ Date: ____________ Donald B. Karner Procedure ETA-TP003 Revision 2 ©1997 Electric Transportation Application All rights Reserveds 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives 3

  10. Gaia Worldwide | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Logo: Gaia Worldwide Name: Gaia Worldwide Address: PO Box 400848 Place: Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip: 02140 Region: Greater Boston Area Number of Employees: 1-10 Year...

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 U.S. Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Coal Steam Other Fossil Combine Cycle Combustion Turbine Nuclear Pumped Total 1980 0.0 1981 0.0 1982 0.0 1983 0.0 1984 0.0 1985 0.0 1986 0.0 1987 0.0 1988 0.0 1989 18.1 1990 19.5 1991 18.4 1992 21.2 1993 21.1 1994 21.2 1995 21.4 1996 21.1 1997 19.3 1998 19.5 1999 19.6 2000 19.5 2001 19.7 2002 20.4 2003 20.5 2004 20.8 2005 21.3 2006 21.5 2007 21.9 2008 21.9 2009 22.2 2010 22.2 2011 22.2 2012 22.2 2013 22.2 2014

  12. Profiling Real-Time Electricity Consumption Data for Process Monitoring and Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2013-01-01

    Today, smart meters serve as key assets to utilities and their customers because they are capable of recording and communicating real-time energy usage data; thus, enabling better understanding of energy usage patterns. Other potential benefits of smart meters data include the ability to improve customer experience, grid reliability, outage management, and operational efficiency. Despite these tangible benefits, many utilities are inundated by data and remain uncertain about how to extract additional value from these deployed assets outside of billing operations. One way to overcome this challenge is the development of new metrics for classifying utility customers. Traditionally, utilities classified their customers based on their business nature (residential, commercial, and industrial) and/or their total annual consumption. While this classification is useful for some operational functions, it is too limited for designing effective monitoring and control strategies. In this paper, a data mining methodology is proposed for clustering and profiling smart meters data in order to form unique classes of customers exhibiting similar usage patterns. The developed clusters could help utilities in identifying opportunities for achieving some of the benefits of smart meters data.

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 U.S. Renewable Electric Utility and Nonutility Net Summer Electricity Generation Capacity (GW) Conv. Hydropower Geothermal Municipal Solid Waste Biomass Solar Thermal Solar PV Wind 1980 81.7 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. N.A. 1981 82.4 0.9 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1982 83.0 1.0 0.0 0.1 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1983 83.9 1.2 0.0 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1984 85.3 1.2 0.0 0.3 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1985 88.9 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1986 89.3 1.6 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1987 89.7 1.5 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0 1988 90.3 1.7 0.2 0.2 0.0 N.A. 0.0

  14. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 U.S. Electricity Net Generation, by Plant Type (Billion kWh) Renewables Growth Rate Hydr(1) Oth(2) Total CHP (3) Tot.(4) 2010-year 1980 276 6 282 N.A. 1981 261 6 267 N.A. 1982 309 5 314 N.A. 1983 332 6 339 N.A. 1984 321 9 330 N.A. 1985 281 11 292 N.A. 1986 291 12 302 N.A. 1987 250 12 262 N.A. 1988 223 12 235 N.A. 1989 269 28 297 42 1990 290 35 324 61 1991 286 38 324 72 1992 250 40 290 91 1993 278 42 320 108 1994 254 42 296 123 1995 305 39 345 141 1996 341 41 382 147 1997 351 41 392 148 1998

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.1 Electric Utility Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 U.S. Electricity Generation Input Fuel Shares (Percent) Renewables Natural Gas Petroleum Coal Hydro. Oth(2) Total Nuclear Other (3) Total 1980 15.7% 10.8% 50.2% 11.8% 0.2% 12.1% 11.3% (1) 100% 1981 15.4% 9.0% 51.8% 11.2% 0.3% 11.4% 12.3% (1) 100% 1982 13.9% 6.6% 52.6% 13.6% 0.2% 13.8% 13.1% (1) 100% 1983 12.2% 6.3% 53.9% 14.3% 0.3% 14.6% 13.1% (1) 100% 1984 12.6% 5.1% 54.9% 13.2% 0.4% 13.5% 14.0% (1) 100% 1985 12.1% 4.2% 56.2% 11.3% 0.4% 11.8% 15.7% (1) 100% 1986 10.2% 5.6% 55.3% 11.7% 0.5%

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  19. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  1. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  2. Dynamic Worldwide Solar Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Worldwide Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dynamic Worldwide Solar Energy Sector: Solar Product: US-based solar developer and financer. References: Dynamic Worldwide...

  3. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,229,870 169,653,294 133,545,718 363,247 4,365,768 1,828,157,897 13,815,263 832 809,873 6,874

  4. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

  5. Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Worldwide Energy Efficiency Action through Capacity Building and Training (WEACT) Name Worldwide...

  6. Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide )

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide 1) Year Coal Natural Gas 3 Petroleum Geo- thermal Non- Biomass Waste 5 Total 2 Biomass 2 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood 6 Waste 7 Total 1949 187 30 2 NA 30 33 NA NA 250 1 NA 1 1950 206 35 2 NA 35 37 NA NA 278 1 NA 1 1951 235 42 2 NA 29 31 NA NA 308 1 NA 1 1952 240 50 2 NA 31 33 NA NA 323 1 NA 1 1953 260 57 3 NA 38 40 NA NA 358 (s) NA (s)

  7. Survey Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  8. Full Consumption Report.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    214(2013) July 2015 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2013 2013 Consumption Summary Tables S U M M A R I E S U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption 3 Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2013 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial

  9. Worldwide 'Power exchanges' | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Breakdown Structure Draft MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Worldwide 'Power exchanges' Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding more Group members (24) Managers:...

  10. Worldwide Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy LLC Place: Montana Zip: 59701 1530 Product: Start-up company focused on manufacturing low-cost, robust fuel cell stacks for fuel cell powerplants. References: Worldwide...

  11. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average...

  12. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Canadian...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Canadian Energy Demand June 2015 Independent Statistics & ... DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Issues ... change in household electricity consumption between 1990 ...

  13. US ESC TN Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33%

  14. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than

  15. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  16. Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Use Compare Activities by ... Electricity Use Total Electricity Consumption by Building Type Commercial buildings in the U.S. used a total of approximately 908 billion...

  17. Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566,415 218,383,703 145,398,976 363,247 5,590,014 1,943,302,355 14,468,564 1,059 984,406

  18. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  19. Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.6a) Year Coal 1 Petroleum Natural Gas 6 Other Gases 7 Biomass Other 10 Distillate Fuel Oil 2 Residual Fuel Oil 3 Other Liquids 4 Petroleum Coke 5 Total 5 Wood 8 Waste 9 Short Tons Barrels Short Tons Barrels Thousand Cubic Feet Billion Btu Billion Btu Billion Btu 1989 638,798 119,640 1,471,031 762 – 1,591,433 81,669,945 2,804 24,182 5,687

  20. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power outlets. The purpose is to measure the ...

  1. Hawaii Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    312015 Next Release Date: 01292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Hawaii Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of...

  2. Turbine Electric Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Power Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Turbine Electric Power Inc Sector: Vehicles Product: US-based, holder of the 'exclusive worldwide rights' to install, sell,...

  3. US NE MA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  4. US ENC IL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  5. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels

  6. US NE MA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption

  7. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to

  8. Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression This presentation by Matther Weaver of Pdc...

  9. A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Report on Worldwide Hydrogen Bus Demonstrations, 2002-2007 Agency...

  10. Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc Quantum Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Quantum Fuel Systems Technologies Worldwide Inc (Quantum Technologies) Place: Irvine,...

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which...

  12. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of...

  13. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: August 2015 Retail ratesprices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based...

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    sales volumes are presented as a proxy for end-use electricity consumption. Average Revenue per kWh by state Percent Change Per KWh map showing U.S. electric industry percent...

  15. Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-05

    This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

  16. Landfill aeration worldwide: Concepts, indications and findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritzkowski, M.; Stegmann, R.

    2012-07-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different landfill aeration concepts and accordant application areas are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Examples of full scale projects are provided for Europe, North-America and Asia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Major project findings are summarised, including prospects and limitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inconsistencies between laboratory and full scale results have been elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An explanatory approach in connection with the inconsistencies is provided. - Abstract: The creation of sustainable landfills is a fundamental goal in waste management worldwide. In this connection landfill aeration contributes towards an accelerated, controlled and sustainable conversion of conventional anaerobic landfills into a biological stabilized state associated with a minimised emission potential. The technology has been successfully applied to landfills in Europe, North America and Asia, following different strategies depending on the geographical region, the specific legislation and the available financial resources. Furthermore, methodologies for the incorporation of landfill aeration into the carbon trade mechanisms have been developed in recent years. This manuscript gives an overview on existing concepts for landfill aeration; their application ranges and specifications. For all of the described concepts examples from different countries worldwide are provided, including details regarding their potentials and limitations. Some of the most important findings from these aeration projects are summarised and future research needs have been identified. It becomes apparent that there is a great demand for a systematisation of the available results and implications in order to further develop and optimise this very promising technology. The IWWG (International Waste Working Group) Task Group 'Landfill Aeration' contributes towards the achievement of this goal.

  17. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    household (2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to...

  18. CMS centres worldwide: A new collaborative infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Lucas; Gottschalk, Erik; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC is establishing a global network of inter-connected 'CMS Centres' for controls, operations and monitoring. These support: (1) CMS data quality monitoring, detector calibrations, and analysis; and (2) computing operations for the processing, storage and distribution of CMS data. We describe the infrastructure, computing, software, and communications systems required to create an effective and affordable CMS Centre. We present our highly successful operations experiences with the major CMS Centres at CERN, Fermilab, and DESY during the LHC first beam data-taking and cosmic ray commissioning work. The status of the various centres already operating or under construction in Asia, Europe, Russia, South America, and the USA is also described. We emphasise the collaborative communications aspects. For example, virtual co-location of experts in CMS Centres Worldwide is achieved using high-quality permanently-running 'telepresence' video links. Generic Web-based tools have been developed and deployed for monitoring, control, display management and outreach.

  19. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less

  20. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are

  1. US SoAtl VA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are

  2. CSV File Documentation: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption Estimates The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion

  3. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  4. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  5. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  6. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Energy Consumption Survey.'" X-Input-Content-Type: applicationvnd.ms-excel X-Translator-Status: translating "Table N13.1. Electricity: Components of Net Demand,...

  8. Hilton Worldwide is First Hospitality Company Certified under Superior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Performance® Designation | Department of Energy Hilton Worldwide is First Hospitality Company Certified under Superior Energy Performance® Designation Hilton Worldwide is First Hospitality Company Certified under Superior Energy Performance® Designation January 15, 2016 - 2:25pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) congratulates Hilton Worldwide for being an energy management pioneer for the hospitality industry-and the commercial sector. In December 2015, three of Hilton

  9. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,053,747 1,034,595 901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 2001-2015 Alabama 39,373 37,742 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 2001-2015 Alaska 2,365 2,116 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2001-2015 Arizona 33,842 38,244 31,091 24,561 17,672 17,515 2001-2015 Arkansas 12,805 12,523 8,552 4,130 5,434 6,754 2001-2015 California 86,319 91,733 89,295 84,917 59,484 63,111 2001-2015 Colorado 9,620 10,114 9,582 8,172 9,658 8,346 2001-2015 Connecticut 11,619 12,188 10,504 10,291 9,814 11,119 2001-2015 Delaware 5,710 5,119 4,903

  10. Issues in International Energy Consumption Analysis: Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Using surveys and literature research to develop these models, they were able to build a ... in India, Document of Data and Methodology, 2008; data reproduced with permission ...

  11. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6,872,533 7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 1997-2014 Alabama 227,015 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 1997-2014 Alaska 38,078 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944...

  12. Hilton Worldwide is First Hospitality Company Certified under...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    based on the International Hilton Image.jpg Standards Organization (ISO) 50001 standard. ... For Hilton Worldwide, SEP certification follows the company's system-wide ISO 50001 Energy ...

  13. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  14. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  15. Power consumption monitoring using additional monitoring device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tru?c?, M. R. C. Albert, ?. Tudoran, C. Soran, M. L. F?rca?, F.; Abrudean, M.

    2013-11-13

    Today, emphasis is placed on reducing power consumption. Computers are large consumers; therefore it is important to know the total consumption of computing systems. Since their optimal functioning requires quite strict environmental conditions, without much variation in temperature and humidity, reducing energy consumption cannot be made without monitoring environmental parameters. Thus, the present work uses a multifunctional electric meter UPT 210 for power consumption monitoring. Two applications were developed: software which carries meter readings provided by electronic and programming facilitates remote device and a device for temperature monitoring and control. Following temperature variations that occur both in the cooling system, as well as the ambient, can reduce energy consumption. For this purpose, some air conditioning units or some computers are stopped in different time slots. These intervals were set so that the economy is high, but the work's Datacenter is not disturbed.

  16. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $700 $1,400 $2,100 $2,800 $3,500 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Average energy consumption (127 million Btu per year) in New Jersey homes and average household energy expenditures ($3,065 per year) are among the

  17. US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all

  18. US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl NJ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $700 $1,400 $2,100 $2,800 $3,500 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US MidAtl NJ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Average energy consumption (127 million Btu per year) in New Jersey homes and average household energy expenditures ($3,065 per year) are among the

  19. US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all

  20. US SoAtl GA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per

  1. Activity: Conserving Electric Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Students participate in two experiments in which they (1) gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity and (2) learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy...

  2. Residential Energy Consumption Survey:

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... ...*...,,.<,<,...,,.,,.,,. 97 Table 6. Residential Fuel Oil and Kerosene Consumption and Expenditures April 1979 Through March 1980 Northeast...

  3. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  4. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    End Use: December 2015 Retail rates/prices and consumption In this section, we look at what electricity costs and how much is purchased. Charges for retail electric service are based primarily on rates approved by state regulators. However, a number of states have allowed retail marketers to compete to serve customers and these competitive retail suppliers offer electricity at a market-based price. EIA does not directly collect retail electricity rates or prices. However, using data collected on

  5. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the U.S. economy based on data from the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. The sample used in this report represented about 250,000 of the largest manufacturing establishments which account for approximately 98 percent of U.S. economic output from manufacturing, and an expected similar proportion of manufacturing energy use. The amount of energy use was collected for all operations of each establishment surveyed. Highlights of the report include profiles for the four major energy-consuming industries (petroleum refining, chemical, paper, and primary metal industries), and an analysis of the effects of changes in the natural gas and electricity markets on the manufacturing sector. Seven appendices are included to provide detailed background information. 10 figs., 51 tabs.

  6. All Consumption Tables.vp

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004...

  7. Electric power monthly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  8. Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression Pdc - The Worldwide Leader in Hydrogen Refueling Station Compression This presentation by Matther Weaver of Pdc Machines Inc. was given at the was given at the DOE Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Workshop in March 2013. PDF icon csd_workshop_3_weaver.pdf More Documents & Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report CX-100223

  9. Jefferson Lab Groups Encourage Digital Literacy Through Worldwide 'Hour

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Code' Campaign | Jefferson Lab Groups Encourage Digital Literacy Through Worldwide 'Hour of Code' Campaign Jefferson Lab Groups Encourage Digital Literacy Through Worldwide 'Hour of Code' Campaign Dana Cochran, Jefferson Lab staff member, helps students as they participate in a coding activity. To raise awareness of the need for digital literacy and a basic understanding of computer science, Jefferson Lab's Information Technology Division and Science Education staff are encouraging

  10. Worldwide Carbon Capture and Storage Projects on the Increase | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy D.C. -- Worldwide efforts to fund and establish carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects have accelerated, according to a new Department of Energy (DOE) online database, indicating ongoing positive momentum toward achieving the G-8 goal for launching 20 CCS demonstrations by 2010. The database, a project of the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), reveals 192 proposed and active CCS projects worldwide. The projects are located in 20

  11. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in

  12. ,"Total Natural Gas Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Total ","Space Heating","Water Heating","Cook- ing","Other","Total ","Space...

  13. Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Hydropower Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel Wind Geothermal Solar Energy in Brief How much U.S. electricity is generated from renewable energy?...

  14. Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention Hanford's 200 West Pump and Treat System Garners Worldwide Attention August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The award recognized CH2M HILL for its excellence in the international water industry. CH2M HILL’s Water Business Group's International Client Sector Director Peter Nicol accepted the award from Global Water Awards Speaker and former Mexican President Vicente Fox. The award recognized CH2M HILL

  15. Electric Metering | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Metering Electric Metering Saving Money by Saving Energy The Department of Energy has installed meters in the James Forrestal Building that will enable DOE to measure electricity use and costs in its headquarters facility. You may explore this data further by visiting our Forrestal Metering Dashboard at the following website: http://forrestal.nrel.gov The Forrestal electric meters provide daily read-outs and comparison of data on electricity consumption for overhead lighting and power

  16. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential; Unit: Physical Units. Actual Minimum Maximum Energy Sources Consumption Consumption(a) Consumption(b) Total United States Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthour 745,247 727,194 770,790 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 5,064 4,331 5,298 Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 22 20 82 Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 13 9 46 Coal (thousand short

  17. " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2010; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;" " Unit: Physical Units." ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum" "Energy Sources","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)" ,"Total United States" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",745247,727194,770790

  18. Electric power monthly, April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-07

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  19. Electric power monthly, May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-25

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  20. Waukesha Electric Systems Smart Grid Demonstration Project |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transformer, lower power consumption through reduction of losses, and increase the reliability of the electrical grid. References ARRA Smart Grid Demonstration Projects...

  1. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and

  2. Electric Power Annual 2014 - U.S. Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for...

  3. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  4. ORISE: REAC/TS Strengthens Preparedness for Radiation Emergencies Worldwide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REAC/TS Strengthens Preparedness for Radiation Emergencies Worldwide International partnerships help prepare medical professionals around the world for radiation medical emergencies ORISE's Global Partnerships Strengthen International Preparedness for Radiological Emergencies The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) continues to establish international partnerships through education, exercises and conferences,

  5. US MidAtl PA Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also

  6. DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents composing a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and...

  7. Benchmarking the energy efficiency of Dutch industry: An assessment of the expected effect on energy consumption and CO2 emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phylipsen, Dian; Blok, Kornelis; Worrell, Ernst; De Beer, Jeroen

    2002-06-01

    As part of its energy and climate policy the Dutch government has reached an agreement with the Dutch energy-intensive industry that is explicitly based on industry's relative energy efficiency performance. The energy efficiency of the Dutch industry is benchmarked against that of comparable industries in countries world-wide. In the agreement, industry is required to belong to the top-of-the-world in terms of energy efficiency. In return, the government refrains from implementing additional climate policies.This article assesses the potential effects of this agreement on energy consumption and CO2 emissions by comparing the current level of energy efficiency of the Dutch industry - including electricity production - to that of the most efficient countries and regions. At the current structure achieving the regional best practice level for the selected energy-intensive industries would result in a 5plus or minus 2 percent lower current primary energy consumption than the actual level. Most of the savings are expected in the petrochemical industry and in electricity generation. Avoided CO2 emissions would amount to 4 Mt CO2. A first estimate of the effect of the benchmarking agreement in 2012 suggests primary energy savings of 50-130 PJ or 5-10 Mt CO2 avoided compared to the estimated Business as Usual development (5-15 percent). This saving is smaller than what a continuation of the existing policies of Long Term Agreements would probably deliver.

  8. Household Energy Consumption Segmentation Using Hourly Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwac, J; Flora, J; Rajagopal, R

    2014-01-01

    The increasing US deployment of residential advanced metering infrastructure (AMI) has made hourly energy consumption data widely available. Using CA smart meter data, we investigate a household electricity segmentation methodology that uses an encoding system with a pre-processed load shape dictionary. Structured approaches using features derived from the encoded data drive five sample program and policy relevant energy lifestyle segmentation strategies. We also ensure that the methodologies developed scale to large data sets.

  9. Worldwide status of energy standards for buildings: Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janda, K.B.; Busch, J.F.

    1993-02-01

    This informal survey was designed to gain information about the worldwide status of energy efficiency standards for buildings, particularly non-residential buildings such as offices, schools, and hotels. The project has three goals: 1. To understand and learn from the experience of countries with existing building energy standards; 2. To locate areas where these lessons might be applied and energy standards might be effectively proposed and developed; and 3. To share the information gathered with all participating countries. These appendices include the survey cover letter, the survey, and the details of selected energy standards in 35 countries, thus providing supporting material for the authors` article of the same title.

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Use: December 2015 Supply and fuel consumption In this section, we look at the resources used to produce electricity. Generating units are chosen to run primarily on their operating costs, of which fuel costs account for the lion's share. Therefore, we present below, electricity generation output by fuel type and generator type. Since the generator/fuel mix of utilities varies significantly by region, we also present generation output by region. Generation output by region By fuel type

  11. Electric power monthly, August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-13

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  12. Electric power monthly, September 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-17

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  13. Measurements of Worldwide Radioxenon Backgrounds - The "EU" Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, Ted W.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Hayes, James C.; Forrester, Joel B.; Haas, Derek A.; Hansen, Randy R.; Keller, Paul E.; Kirkham, Randy R.; Lidey, Lance S.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Payne, Rosara F.; Saey, Paul R.; Thompson, Robert C.; Woods, Vincent T.; Williams, Richard M.

    2009-09-24

    Under the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), radioactive xenon (radioxenon) measurements are one of the principle techniques used to detect nuclear underground nuclear explosions, and specifically, the presence of one or more radioxenon isotopes allows one to determine whether a suspected event was a nuclear explosion or originated from an innocent source. During the design of the International Monitoring System (IMS), which was designed as the verification mechanism for the Treaty, it was determined that radioxenon measurements should be performed at 40 or more stations worldwide. At the time of the design of the IMS, however, very few details about the background of the xenon isotopes was known and it is now recognized that the backgrounds were probably evolving anyhow. This paper lays out the beginning of a study of the worldwide concentrations of xenon isotopes that can be used to detect nuclear explosions and several sources that also release radioxenons, and will have to be accounted for during analysis of atmospheric levels. Although the global concentrations of the xenon isotopes are the scope of a much larger activity that could span over several years, this study measures radioxenon concentrations in locations where there was either very little information or there was a unique opportunity to learn more about emissions from known sources. The locations where radioxenon levels were measured and reported are included.

  14. Electric sales and revenue 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  15. "Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a

  16. "Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of

  17. "Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent

  18. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 2012 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for the 2012 CBECS provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, computing (including servers), office equipment, and other uses. Although details vary by energy source, there are

  19. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  20. Health Care Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption Tables Sum of Major Fuel Consumption by Size and Type of Health Care Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per...

  1. Electric power monthly, May 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Statistics by company and plant are published on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  2. Electric power monthly, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the U.S., Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. This April 1994 issue contains 1993 year-end data and data through January 1994.

  3. Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27

  4. Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19

  5. Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION

  6. Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733

  7. Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18

  8. Table 5.8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP

  9. Minimize oil field power consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.; Ennis, P.

    1999-08-01

    Though electric power is a major operating cost of oil production, few producers have systematically evaluated their power consumption for ways to be more efficient. There is significant money to be saved by doing so, and now is a good time to make an evaluation because new power options are at hand. They range from small turbo generators that can run on casing head gas and power one or two lift pumps, to rebuilt major turbines and ram-jet powered generators that can be set in a multi-well field and deliver power at bargain prices. Power industry deregulation is also underway. Opportunities for more advantageous power contracts from competitive sources are not far off. This two-part series covers power efficiency and power options. This article reviews steps you can take to evaluate the efficiency of your power use and go about improving it. Part 2 will discuss opportunities for use of distributed power and changes you can expect from decentralized power.

  10. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy`s (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  11. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-02

    DOE2.1E-121SUNOS is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS).« less

  12. Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conserving Electric Energy Conserving Electric Energy A classroom activity whereby students participate in two experiments in which they gain an appreciation for their dependency on electricity, and learn how regulating the rate of energy consumption makes the energy source last longer. PDF icon Conserving Electric Energy - Elementary School More Documents & Publications Activity: Conserving Electric Energy Energy Basics Activity: How Much Does it Cost to Light Your School?

  13. Geological problems in radioactive waste isolation - second worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The first world wide review of the geological problems in radioactive waste isolation was published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in 1991. This review was a compilation of reports that had been submitted to a workshop held in conjunction with the 28th International Geological Congress that took place July 9-19, 1989 in Washington, D.C. Reports from 15 countries were presented at the workshop and four countries provided reports after the workshop, so that material from 19 different countries was included in the first review. It was apparent from the widespread interest in this first review that the problem of providing a permanent and reliable method of isolating radioactive waste from the biosphere is a topic of great concern among the more advanced, as well as the developing, nations of the world. This is especially the case in connection with high-level waste (HLW) after its removal from nuclear power plants. The general concensus is that an adequate isolation can be accomplished by selecting an appropriate geologic setting and carefully designing the underground system with its engineered barriers. This document contains the Second Worldwide Review of Geological Problems in Radioactive Waste Isolation, dated September 1996.

  14. Community Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-21

    The TDIST3 program performs an analysis of large integrated community total energy systems (TES) supplying thermal and electrical energy from one or more power stations. The program models the time-dependent energy demands of a group of representative building types, distributes the thermal demands within a thermal utility system (TUS), simulates the dynamic response of a group of power stations in meeting the TUS demands, and designs an optimal base-loaded (electrically) power plant and thermal energymore » storage reservoir combination. The capital cost of the TES is evaluated. The program was developed primarily to analyze thermal utility systems supplied with high temperature water (HTW) from more than one power plant. The TUS consists of a transmission loop and secondary loops with a heat exchanger linking each secondary loop to the transmission loop. The power stations electrical output supplies all community buildings and the HTW supplies the thermal demand of the buildings connected through the TUS, a piping network. Basic components of the TES model are one or more power stations connected to the transmission loop. These may be dual-purpose, producing electricity and HTW, or just heating plants producing HTW. A thermal storage reservoir is located at one power station. The secondary loops may have heating plants connected to them. The transmission loop delivers HTW to local districts; the secondary loops deliver the energy to the individual buildings in a district.« less

  15. Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99

  16. Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36

  17. Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249

  18. Electric power monthly, October 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-11

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  19. Electric Power Monthly, September 1991. [CONTAINS GLOSSARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-12

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, statistics at the company and plant level are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 63 tabs.

  20. Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Energy Sources; Column: Consumption Potential; Unit: Physical Units. Actual Minimum Maximum Energy Sources Consumption Consumption(a) Consumption(b) Total United States Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthour 854,102 826,077 889,281 Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 5,357 4,442 5,649 Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 22,139 19,251 101,340 Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels) 39,925

  1. DOETEIAO32l/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; Consumption

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    purchase diaries from a subset of respondents comprising a Household Transportation Panel and is reported separately. * Wood used for heating. Although wood consumption data...

  2. Building Energy Consumption Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-01-24

    DOE2.1E-121 is a set of modules for energy analysis in buildings. Modules are included to calculate the heating and cooling loads for each space in a building for each hour of a year (LOADS), to simulate the operation and response of the equipment and systems that control temperature and humidity and distribute heating, cooling and ventilation to the building (SYSTEMS), to model energy conversion equipment that uses fuel or electricity to provide the required heating,more » cooling and electricity (PLANT), and to compute the cost of energy and building operation based on utility rate schedule and economic parameters (ECONOMICS). DOE2.1E-121 contains modifications to DOE2.1E which allows 1000 zones to be modeled.« less

  3. Electric power monthly, July 1995 - with data for April 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This publication provides statistical data on net generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on fossil fuel stocks and costs are also included.

  4. Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon Editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson Editor, G.S.

    2001-12-01

    The broad range of activities on radioactive waste isolation that are summarized in Table 1.1 provides a comprehensive picture of the operations that must be carried out in working with this problem. A comparison of these activities with those published in the two previous reviews shows the important progress that is being made in developing and applying the various technologies that have evolved over the past 20 years. There are two basic challenges in perfecting a system of radioactive waste isolation: choosing an appropriate geologic barrier and designing an effective engineered barrier. One of the most important developments that is evident in a large number of the reports in this review is the recognition that a URL provides an excellent facility for investigating and characterizing a rock mass. Moreover, a URL, once developed, provides a convenient facility for two or more countries to conduct joint investigations. This review describes a number of cooperative projects that have been organized in Europe to take advantage of this kind of a facility in conducting research underground. Another critical development is the design of the waste canister (and its accessory equipment) for the engineered barrier. This design problem has been given considerable attention in a number of countries for several years, and some impressive results are described and illustrated in this review. The role of the public as a stakeholder in radioactive waste isolation has not always been fully appreciated. Solutions to the technical problems in characterizing a specific site have generally been obtained without difficulty, but procedures in the past in some countries did not always keep the public and local officials informed of the results. It will be noted in the following chapters that this procedure has caused some problems, especially when approval for a major component in a project was needed. It has been learned that a better way to handle this problem is to keep all stakeholders fully informed of project plans and hold periodic meetings to brief the public, especially in the vicinity of the selected site. This procedure has now been widely adopted and represents one of the most important developments in the Third Worldwide Review.

  5. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

  6. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or commercial trucks (See Table 1). Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 5 The 1991 RTECS count includes vehicles that were owned or used...

  7. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the...

  8. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual...

  9. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    logo printer-friendly version logo for Portable Document Format file Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Release Next Update: August 1997. Based on the 1991...

  10. Electric power monthly, March 1998 with data for December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  11. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  12. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2015 Stocks In December, U.S. coal stockpiles increased to 197 million tons, up 4% from the previous month. This increase in November-to-December coal stockpiles can be attributed to the significant decrease in coal consumption that occurred in December due to the record warm temperatures and reduced reliance on coal as a fuel used for electricity generation. Overall U.S. coal stockpile are now nearing record levels due to the loss in market share to

  13. Reconfiguration of Paducah Site's Electrical Distribution Provides...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PADUCAH, Ky. - While EM's Paducah Site is preparing its gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) ... Currently, electricity consumption at the site is only about 0.5 percent of what was used ...

  14. Electric power monthly, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. The EPM is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels. Data on quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels lag data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the US, Census division, and State level tables. However, for purposes of comparison, plant-level data are presented for the earlier month.

  15. Electric power monthly, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-20

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  16. Electric power monthly, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-26

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  17. Electric Power Monthly, July 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-12

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost in fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 12 refs., 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  18. Electric power monthly, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-16

    The Electric Power Monthly (EMP) presents monthly electricity statistics. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data in this report are presented for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) as amended. This publication provides monthly statistics at the US, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on the capability of new generating units, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fossil fuels.

  19. Energy Overview and A Perspective on Fuel Cell Technologies: 2010 Worldwide

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Conference | Department of Energy Energy Overview and A Perspective on Fuel Cell Technologies: 2010 Worldwide Energy Conference Energy Overview and A Perspective on Fuel Cell Technologies: 2010 Worldwide Energy Conference Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the 2010 Worldwide Energy Conference on May 11, 2010. PDF icon Energy Overview and A Perspective on Fuel Cell Technologies More Documents & Publications DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview: 2011 Waste-to-Energy Using Fuel Cells

  20. Proceedings of the 23rd Seismic Research Symposium: Worldwide Monitoring of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear Explosions (Conference) | SciTech Connect 3rd Seismic Research Symposium: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proceedings of the 23rd Seismic Research Symposium: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions These proceedings contain papers prepared for the 23rd Seismic Research Review: Worldwide Monitoring of Nuclear Explosions, held 2-5 October, 2001 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming. These papers represent the combined research related to

  1. Kairos Consulting Worldwide Wins HUBZone Business of the Year Award at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Small Business Forum & Expo | Department of Energy Kairos Consulting Worldwide Wins HUBZone Business of the Year Award at Small Business Forum & Expo Kairos Consulting Worldwide Wins HUBZone Business of the Year Award at Small Business Forum & Expo October 10, 2014 - 10:12am Addthis Lynn Sutton, Managing Principal of Kairos Consulting Worldwide, Chicago, IL, accepted the HUBZone Business of the Year Award from Kevin Knobloch, DOE Chief of Staff (l), and John Hale III, Director of

  2. Resource demand growth and sustainability due to increased world consumption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Balatsky, Galina I.; Borysov, Stanislav S.

    2015-03-20

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially neededmore » immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.« less

  3. Resource demand growth and sustainability due to increased world consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balatsky, Alexander V.; Balatsky, Galina I.; Borysov, Stanislav S.

    2015-03-20

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet’s limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially needed immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.

  4. Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon Smart Meters Help Balance Energy Consumption at Solar Decathlon September 28, 2011 - 10:57am Addthis The Team Tidewater Virginia smart meter, as seen on opening day, indicates the team generated 5 kW hours of electricity in the first several hours of the competition. | Image courtesy of Lachlan Fletcher, Studio 18a The Team Tidewater Virginia smart meter, as seen on opening day, indicates the team generated

  5. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration (EIA) ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data 2009 2005 2001 1997 1993 Previous Analysis & Projections RECS Terminology A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ A Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are "Commercial," "Industrial,"

  6. Effects of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Barbara C. Farhar Colleen Fitzpatrick January 1989 Prepared under Task No. BE911041 Solar Energy Research Institute A Division of MidwestResearch Institute 1617 Cole...

  7. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    473.44 73.66 48.31 920.23 1,833.17 1983 341.75 486.57 85.54 49.87 954.37 1,918.09 1984 332.95 495.14 85.93 53.41 1,018.07 1,985.49 1985 295.04 490.97 91.48 50.51 1,078.20 ...

  8. Table 2.11 Commercial Buildings Electricity Consumption by End...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    End Use Space Heating Cooling Ventilation Water Heating Lighting Cooking Refrigeration Office Equipment Computers Other 1 Total All Buildings 167 481 436 88 1,340 24 381 69 156 418 ...

  9. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (San Francisco, CA: Aspen Environmental Group) Aspen Environmental Group 2011b Topaz Solar Farm Conditional Use Permit: Final Environmental Impact Report (DRC2008-00009) (San...

  10. Electric Power Monthly, June 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-13

    The EPM is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. Quantity, quality, and cost of fuel data lag the net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour data by 1 month. This difference in reporting appears in the national, Census division, and State level tables. However, at the plant level, all statistics presented are for the earlier month for the purpose of comparison. 40 tabs.

  11. Electric sales and revenue 1991. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenue, and average revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  12. Electric power monthly, February 1998 with data for November 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  13. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of...

  14. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for 1994, will continue the 3-year cycle. The RTECS, a subsample of the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), is an integral part of a series of surveys designed by...

  15. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    16.8 17.4 18.6 18.9 1.7 2.2 0.6 1.5 Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 15 Vehicle Miles Traveled per Vehicle (Thousand) . . . . . . . . ....

  16. Electric sales and revenue, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  17. Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

  18. "Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE"

  19. Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1982 and 2012 | Department of Energy 2: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012 Fact #792: August 12, 2013 Energy Consumption by Sector and Energy Source, 1982 and 2012 In the last 30 years, overall energy consumption has grown by about 22 quadrillion Btu. The share of energy consumption by the transportation sector has seen modest growth in that time - from about 26% to 28% of the energy consumed. The electric utility sector saw the greatest increase

  20. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  1. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot...

  2. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot (gallons)","per Worker...

  3. Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the...

  4. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per...

  5. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand)...

  6. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of...

  8. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  10. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of...

  11. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

  12. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet)...

  13. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace...

  14. Electric power monthly, January 1991. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-17

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and state levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation are also displayed at the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region level. Additionally, company and plant level information are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  15. The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption The Impact of Using Derived Fuel Consumption Maps to Predict Fuel Consumption Poster presented at the...

  16. Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States

  17. Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL

  18. Standby power consumption in U.S. residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huber, W.

    1997-12-01

    {open_quotes}Leaking electricity{close_quotes} is the electricity consumed by appliances while they are switched {open_quotes}off{close_quote} or not performing their principal function. Leaking electricity represents approximately 5 % of U.S. residential electricity. This is a relatively new phenomenon and is a result of proliferation of electronic equipment in homes. The standby losses in TVs, VCRs, compact audio systems, and cable boxes account for almost 40% of all leaking electricity. There is a wide range in standby losses in each appliance group. For example, standby losses in compact audio systems range from 2.1 to 28.6 W, even though their features are identical. In some cases, leaking electricity while switched off was only slightly less than energy consumption in the on mode. New features in these appliances may greatly increase leaking electricity, such as electronic program guides in TVs and cable boxes. In the standby mode, these new features require many extra components energized to permit the downloading of information. Several techniques are available to cut standby losses, most without using any new technologies. Simple redesign of circuits to avoid energizing unused components appears to save the most energy. A separate power supply, precisely designed for the actual power needed, is another solution. A switch mode power supply can substitute for the less efficient linear power supply. Switch mode power supplies cut no-load and standby losses by 60-80%. The combination of these techniques can cut leaking electricity by greater than 75%.

  19. Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon vss077_shidore_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Government Performance Result Act (GPRA) / Portfolio

  20. Hilton Worldwide and Whole Foods Market Partner with the U.S. DOE to Launch

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Better Buildings Challenge SWAP | Department of Energy Hilton Worldwide and Whole Foods Market Partner with the U.S. DOE to Launch Better Buildings Challenge SWAP Hilton Worldwide and Whole Foods Market Partner with the U.S. DOE to Launch Better Buildings Challenge SWAP February 17, 2016 - 9:07am Addthis News Media Contact 202-586-4940 DOENews@hq.doe.gov WASHINGTON - Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) unveiled the Better Buildings Challenge SWAP, which involved Hilton Worldwide and

  1. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified...

  2. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A24. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of Energy- Management Program, 1994:...

  3. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    59 Appendix B. Thermal Conversion Factors A P P E N D I X B Table B1. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Heat Rates for Electricity, Selected Years, 1960-2013 Year Petroleum Consumption Electricity Net Generation Distillate Fuel Oil, All Sectors (DFTCKUS) Liquefied Petroleum Gases, Industrial Sector (LGICKUS) Liquefied Petroleum Gases, All Sectors (LGTCKUS) Motor Gasoline, All Sectors (MGTCKUS) Total Petroleum Products, All Sectors a (PATCKUS) Fossil-Fueled Steam-Electric Plants b

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    59 Appendix B. Thermal Conversion Factors A P P E N D I X B Table B1. Approximate Heat Content of Petroleum and Heat Rates for Electricity, Selected Years, 1960-2014 Year Petroleum Consumption Electricity Net Generation Distillate Fuel Oil, All Sectors (DFTCKUS) Liquefied Petroleum Gases, Industrial Sector (LGICKUS) Liquefied Petroleum Gases, All Sectors (LGTCKUS) Motor Gasoline, All Sectors (MGTCKUS) Total Petroleum Products, All Sectors a (PATCKUS) Fossil-Fueled Steam-Electric Plants b

  5. Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Review, Section 7: Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks For 1989-2000, monthly and annual data were collected for electric utilities; however, during this time period, only annual data were collected for independent power producers, commercial plants, and industrial plants. To obtain 1989-2000 monthly estimates for the Electric Power, Commercial, and Industrial Sectors, electric utility patterns were used for each energy source (MonthX = MonthUtility *

  6. Electric power monthly, May 1995 with data for February 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-24

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisiommakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuel, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  7. Electric power monthly, December 1997 with data for September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 63 tabs.

  8. San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks to San Diego's ambitious solar energy program, the Otay Water Treatment Plant may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption.

  9. The year open (energy) data went worldwide | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    some examples to answer that question at a recent TED talk: TED 2010 Video: The year open data went worldwide And if you missed his talk from last year, it provides even more...

  10. Hilton Worldwide is First Hospitality Company Certified under Superior Energy Performance® Designation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) congratulates Hilton Worldwide for being an energy management pioneer for the hospitality industry—and the commercial sector. In December 2015, three of Hilton...

  11. The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rolling Stone" covers climate change research at Los Alamos Lab March 26, 2015 The Fate of Trees: How Climate Change May Alter Forests Worldwide By the end of the century, the...

  12. Fuel Cells Market Exceeds $1.3 Billion in Worldwide Sales

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The market for fuel cells is growing, exceeding $1.3 billion in worldwide sales during 2013, according to the recently released "Business Case for Fuel Cells" report from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office.

  13. Redesigned CCS Website Offers Wealth of Information on Worldwide Technology, Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A wealth of information about worldwide carbon capture and storage technologies and projects is available on the newly launched, updated and redesigned National Carbon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) website.

  14. electricity.pdf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Usage Form 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Timely submission of this report is mandatory under Public Law 93-275, as amended. 2. This completed questionnaire is due by 3. Data reported on this questionnaire are for the entire building identified in the label to the right. 4. Data may be submitted directly on this questionnaire or in any other format, such as a computer-generated listing, which provides the same i nformation and is conve nient for y our

  15. Electric power monthly January 1997 with data for October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    This publication presents monthly electricity statistical data. Information is included on U.S. electric utility net generation, consumption of fossil fuels, and fossil-fuel stocks; U.S. electric utility sales; receipts and cost of fossil fuels at utilities; and monthly plant aggregates. A glossary is included.

  16. Geothermal energy as a source of electricity. A worldwide survey of the design and operation of geothermal power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiPippo, R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview of geothermal power generation is presented. A survey of geothermal power plants is given for the following countries: China, El Salvador, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines, Turkey, USSR, and USA. A survey of countries planning geothermal power plants is included. (MHR)

  17. Electric Power Monthly with data for July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 57 tabs.

  18. "Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ,"

  19. "Table A2. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region, Industry Group, and Selected" " Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day) " ,,,,," Input for Heat,",,," Primary" " ",," Consumption for All Purposes",,,"Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," Consumption for Nonfuel Purposes ",,,"RSE" "SIC",,"

  20. Electric Power Monthly, September 1995: With data for June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions.

  1. Electric power monthly: April 1996, with data for January 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 64 tabs.

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"West South Central","Moun- tain","Pacific","West South Central","Moun-...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 2003","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West North...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone 4","Zone 5","Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone...

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 2003","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  9. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"West North Central","South Atlantic","East South Central","West North...

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  12. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  13. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"New England","Middle Atlantic","East North Central","New England","Middle...

  14. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet","10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet","Over 100,000...

  15. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone 4","Zone 5","Zone 1","Zone 2","Zone 3","Zone...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Natural Gas (million square feet)",,,"Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feetsquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 1999","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  17. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu square foot)" ,"West South Central","Moun- tain","Pacific","West South Central","Moun-...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"1959 or Before","1960 to 1989","1990 to 1999","1959 or Before","1960 to...

  19. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)",,,,"Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btusquare foot)" ,"North- east","Mid- west","South","West","North- east","Mid-...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    90,1024,3251,1511,"Q",106.6,97.3,100.6 "Office ...",305,325,329,175,3012,2989,3782,2425,101.2,108.8,87,72.1 "Public Assembly ...",93,103,109,64,1048,...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,60,56.7,43.1,31.4,22.1 "1990 to 1999 ...",69,87,51,93,34,1735,1988,1202,3012,1267,40,43.8,42.4,30.9,26.9 "2000 to 2003 ...",23,40,"Q",28,15,693,1086,7...

  2. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  3. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    able to participate--on a limited basis and, for the most part, as participants in pilot projects. There is no reason to believe that the restructuring of the electricity market...

  4. Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at...

  5. US WSC TX Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    over 80% using central air conditioners. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US WSC TX OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  6. US ENC WI Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    on central air conditioning for cooling. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US ENC WI OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  7. US ENC IL Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    on central air conditioning for cooling. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US ENC IL OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  8. US ENC MI Site Consumption

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on central air conditioning for cooling. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US ENC MI OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  9. US WNC MO Site Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    in the South than those in the Midwest. 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% US WNC MO OtherNone Propane Electricity Natural Gas MAIN HEATING FUEL USED COOLING EQUIPMENT USED DIVISION:...

  10. 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    E (2005) - Household Electricity Usage Form OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring May 31, 2008 Household Electricity Usage Form Service Address: If the customer account number is not shown above, please enter it here. STEP 1 Customer Account: __/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/__/ STEP 2 Now, please turn the page and provide the requested information for the household identified above. Completed forms are due by March 4, 2006. If you have any questions, please call (toll-free) 1-NNN-NNN-NNNN. Ask

  11. DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey:

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    18/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D! Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 1111? This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office |GPO). Make check or money order payable to the Superintendent of Documents. You may send your order to the U.S. Government Printing Office or the National Energy Information Center. GPO prices are

  12. Electric power monthly, December 1996 with data for September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    The report presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  13. Electric power monthly, July 1999, with data for April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The Electric Power Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM). This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  14. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  15. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) U.S. Petroleum Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Buildings Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Buildings Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 9% 28% 8% 56% | 14% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 8% 26% 7% 59% | 12% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 8% 26% 5% 61% | 11% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 8% 25% 5% 62% | 12% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 9% 26% 4% 61% | 11% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 8% 24% 5% 63% | 11% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 8% 25% 4% 63% | 11% 26%

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Natural Gas Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 13% 41% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 20.22 1981 13% 42% 19% 3% | 18% 49% 3% 19.74 1982 14% 39% 18% 3% | 20% 45% 3% 18.36 1983 14% 39% 17% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.20 1984 14% 40% 17% 3% | 19% 47% 3% 18.38 1985 14% 40% 18% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 17.70 1986 14% 40% 16% 3% | 19% 46% 3% 16.59 1987 14% 41% 17% 3% |

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Commercial Buildings Share of U.S. Petroleum Consumption (Percent) Site Consumption Primary Consumption Total Commercial Industry Electric Gen. Transportation Commercial Industry Transportation (quads) 1980 4% 28% 8% 56% | 6% 31% 56% 34.2 1981 4% 26% 7% 59% | 5% 29% 59% 31.9 1982 3% 26% 5% 61% | 5% 28% 61% 30.2 1983 4% 25% 5% 62% | 5% 27% 62% 30.1 1984 4% 26% 4% 61% | 5% 27% 61% 31.1 1985 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 30.9 1986 4% 24% 5% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.2 1987 3% 25% 4% 63% | 5% 26% 63% 32.9

  18. Determinants of measured energy consumption in public housing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greely, K.M.; Mills, E.; Goldman, C.A.; Ritschard, R.L. )

    1988-01-01

    In this study, the authors used a two-part methodology to analyze metered energy use patterns in 91 public housing projects. Their goal was to develop a technique that could be used by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and public housing authorities (PHAs) to derive reasonable energy use guidelines for different segments of the public housing stock. In the authors' approach, actual energy use was first normalized to consumption in a year with ''typical'' weather and then used in a multiple regression analysis of different cross-sectional variables. The regression model explained 80% of the variation in energy use, with the type of account and the management practices of PHAs emerging as important explanatory factors. As compared to previous engineering estimates of public housing consumption, the projects in this study used 8% (per square foot) to 16% (per apartment) less fuel and electricity, but consumption was still significantly higher (43%) than that of privately owned multifamily housing. They conclude that this methodology could be used to help HUD and PHAs increase their understanding of energy use patterns and appropriate consumption levels in public housing.

  19. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  20. Denton Municipal Electric- GreenSense Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Denton Municipal Electric pays residential and small commercial customers to reduce energy demand and consumption in order to reduce the utility bills of DME customers, reduce peak load, reduce...

  1. Electric Power Monthly, August 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly summaries of electric utility statistics at the national, Census division, and State level. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Data includes generation by energy source (coal, oil, gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear); generation by region; consumption of fossil fuels for power generation; sales of electric power, cost data; and unusual occurrences. A glossary is included.

  2. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  3. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  4. Energy consumption series: Lighting in commercial buildings. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-11

    Lighting represents a substantial fraction of commercial electricity consumption. A wide range of initiatives in the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Strategy have focused on commercial lighting as a potential source of energy conservation. This report provides a statistical profile of commercial lighting, to examine the potential for lighting energy conservation in commercial buildings. The principal conclusion from this analysis is that energy use for lighting could be reduced by as much as a factor of four using currently available technology. The analysis is based primarily on the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 1986 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The more recent 1989 survey had less detail on lighting, for budget reasons. While changes have occurred in the commercial building stock since 1986, the relationships identified by this analysis are expected to remain generally valid. In addition, the analytic approach developed here can be applied to the data that will be collected in the 1992 CBECS.

  5. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  6. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  7. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  8. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  9. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  10. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  11. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now used the multiferroic bismuth-iron-oxygen compound BiFeO3 (BFO) to explore electrical control of magnetism through

  12. Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Electric Field Control of Local Ferromagnetism with a Magnetoelectric Multiferroic Print Wednesday, 30 July 2008 00:00 Magnetoelectric multiferroics-materials that simultaneously show some form of magnetic and ferroelectric order-have excited condensed-matter researchers worldwide with the promise of coupling between magnetic and electric order parameters. A Berkeley-Stanford-Swiss group has now

  13. 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U S C E N S U S B U R E A U 2014 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Sponsored by the Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy Administered and Compiled by the Bureau of the Census U.S. Department of Commerce Form EIA-846 (mm-dd-yy) OMB Approval No. xxxx-xxxx Expires: mm/dd/yyyy Report Electronically: www.census.gov/ econhelp/mecs Username: Password: Reporting electronically allows you to save your work as you go through the form and could save you time If you need

  14. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  15. Database specification for the Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faby, E.Z.; Fluker, J.; Hancock, B.R.; Grubb, J.W.; Russell, D.L.; Loftis, J.P.; Shipe, P.C.; Truett, L.F.

    1994-03-01

    This Database Specification for the Worldwide Port System (WPS) Regional Integrated Cargo Database (ICDB) describes the database organization and storage allocation, provides the detailed data model of the logical and physical designs, and provides information for the construction of parts of the database such as tables, data elements, and associated dictionaries and diagrams.

  16. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi (Niskayuna, NY); Reddy, Patel Bhageerath (Madison, WI)

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  17. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  18. Electric power monthly, September 1996, with data for June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  19. Electric power monthly, June 1995 with data for March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-19

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 68 tabs.

  20. Electric power monthly with data for January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  1. Electric power monthly with data for December 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  2. Electric power monthly with data for October 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  3. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  4. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Administration (EIA) CBECS Terminology NOTE: This glossary is specific to the 1999, 2003 and 2012Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS). CBECS glossaries for prior years can be found in the appendices of past CBECS reports. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are

  5. Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4

  6. Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 258 12 22 579 5 182 2 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 57 * 1 121 * 126 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 26 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 4 1

  7. Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,038 314 6 53 445 14 25 Q 181 20-49 918 296 11 19 381 10 97 5 97 50-99 1,018 308 7 13 440 5 130 6 110

  8. Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-07-31

    The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

  9. Electric power monthly, August 1998, with data for May 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 9 refs., 57 tabs.

  10. Electric power monthly, March 1999 with data for December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be sued in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 63 tabs.

  11. Electric power monthly, May 1998, with data for February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The EIA collected the information in this report to fulfill its data collection and dissemination responsibilities as specified in the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974. The EPM provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. 30 refs., 58 tabs.

  12. Economic Rebalancing and Electricity Demand in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Gang; Lin, Jiang; Yuan, Alexandria

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the relationship between economic growth and electricity use is essential for power systems planning. This need is particularly acute now in China, as the Chinese economy is going through a transition to a more consumption and service oriented economy. This study uses 20 years of provincial data on gross domestic product (GDP) and electricity consumption to examine the relationship between these two factors. We observe a plateauing effect of electricity consumption in the richest provinces, as the electricity demand saturates and the economy develops and moves to a more service-based economy. There is a wide range of forecasts for electricity use in 2030, ranging from 5,308 to 8,292 kWh per capita, using different estimating functions, as well as in existing studies. It is therefore critical to examine more carefully the relationship between electricity use and economic development, as China transitions to a new growth phase that is likely to be less energy and resource intensive. The results of this study suggest that policymakers and power system planners in China should seriously re-evaluate power demand projections and the need for new generation capacity to avoid over-investment that could lead to stranded generation assets.

  13. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  14. Electric power monthly, February 1999 with data for November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The Electric Power Monthly presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. Statistics are provided for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt-hour of electricity sold.

  15. Energy consumption in thermomechanical pulping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marton, R.; Tsujimoto, N.; Eskelinen, E.

    1981-08-01

    Various components of refining energy were determined experimentally and compared with those calculated on the basis of the dimensions of morphological elements of wood. The experimentally determined fiberization energy of spruce was 6 to 60 times larger than the calculated value and that of birch 3 to 15 times larger. The energy consumed in reducing the Canadian standard freeness of isolated fibers from 500 to 150 ml was found to be approximately 1/3 of the total fiber development energy for both spruce and birch TMP. Chip size affected the refining energy consumption; the total energy dropped by approximately 30% when chip size was reduced from 16 mm to 3 mm in the case of spruce and approximately 40% for birch. 6 refs.

  16. Electric sales and revenue, 1990. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-21

    The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. Previous publications presented data on typical electric bills at specified consumption levels as well as sales, revenues, and average revenue. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1990. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the revenue billed for the amount of kilowatthours sold, revenue from income, unemployment and other State and local taxes, energy or demand charges, consumer services charges, environmental surcharges, franchise fees, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

  17. 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person Per capita energy consumption across all sectors of the economy. Click on a state for more information.

  18. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis Report for Richland Middle School

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Bing

    2003-12-18

    Richland Middle School is a single story, 90,000 square feet new school located in Richland, WA. The design team proposed four HVAC system options to serve the building. The proposed HVAC systems are listed as following: (1) 4-pipe fan coil units served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boilers, (2) Ground-source closed water loop heat pumps with water loop heat pumps with boiler and cooling tower, and (3) VAV system served by electrical chiller and gas-fired boiler. This analysis estimates the annual energy consumptions and costs of each system option, in order to provide the design team with a reasonable basis for determining which system is most life-cycle cost effective. eQuest (version 3.37), a computer-based energy simulation program that uses the DOE-2 simulation engine, was used to estimate the annual energy costs.

  19. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S. (Pleasanton, CA); Wilson, James R. (Livermore, CA); McDonald, Jr., Charles A. (Danville, CA)

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  20. Energy Intensity Indicators: Commercial Source Energy Consumption |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Commercial Source Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Commercial Source Energy Consumption Figure C1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) commercial building floor space, 2) energy use based on source energy consumption, 3) energy intensity, and 4) the year-to-year influence of weather. Activity: Since 1970, the quantity of commercial floor space has nearly doubled, with about half of that increase occurring after 1985. There

  1. Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Residential Source Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Residential Source Energy Consumption Figure R1 below reports as index numbers over the period 1970 through 2011: 1) the number of U.S. households, 2) the average size of those housing units, 3) residential source energy consumption, 4) energy intensity, and 5) an overall structural component that represents "other explanatory factors." Activity: Since 1970, the number of household (occupied

  2. Symposium Focuses on WomenÕs Role in Worldwide Sustainable Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Symposium Focuses on Women's Role in Worldwide Sustainable Development For more information contact: Kerry Masson (303) 275-4083 Golden, Colo., June 10, 1996 -- Women's role in world sustainable energy development will be discussed at a symposium Sun. June 16 as part of the fourth World Renewable Energy Congress. Featured speakers include Maneka Ghandi, India's former Minister of the Envrionment, and Dr. Elizabeth Cecelski of Germany's Energy, Environment and Development Agency. The symposium is

  3. ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Census Division, 1999" ,"Natural Gas Consumption",,,"Natural Gas Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand cubic feet)","per Square Foot (cubic feet)","per Worker (thousand cubic...

  4. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1995...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    fuel oil, and district heat consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings by building characteristics. Previous Page Arrow Separater Bar File Last Modified: January 29,...

  5. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Appendix I Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption For information about how to obtain these publi- cations, see the inside cover of this report. Please note that the...

  6. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on a...

  7. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Energy Information Adminstration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

  8. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    in this report were based on monthly billing records submitted by the buildings' energy suppliers. The section, "Annual Consumption and Expenditures" provide a detailed...

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures per Building (thousand cubic feet) per Square Foot (cubic feet) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (cubic feetsquare foot) 25th...

  10. CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    consumption by major fuel, 1992 Divider Line To View andor Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties,...

  11. ,"Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  12. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  13. ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GREENHOUSES...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fuel-fired peak heating for geothermal greenhouses Rafferty, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; GREENHOUSES; AUXILIARY HEATING; CAPITALIZED COST; OPERATING...

  14. Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    t 7 Energy Preview: Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, Preliminary Estimates, 1991 (See Page 1) This publication and other Energy Information Administration...

  15. Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    > Derived Annual Estimates - Executive Summary Derived Annual Estimates of Manufacturing Energy Consumption, 1974-1988 Figure showing Derived Estimates Executive Summary This...

  16. Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - Appendix C

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on...

  17. Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    national concerns about dependence on foreign oil and the deleterious effect on the environment of fossil fuel combustion, residential vehicle fleet fuel consumption was...

  18. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis & Projections...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    homes plus increased use of electronics, improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household. ...

  19. ,"Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  20. ,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  1. ,"Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  2. ,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","930...

  3. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    that extend from the foundation to the roof. Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) took place between April and November 2013,...

  4. Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis & Projection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manufacturing Activity between 2002 and 2010 Released: March 19, 2013 Total energy consumption in the manufacturing sector decreased by 17% from 2002 to 2010, according to data...

  5. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  6. ,"New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","92015" ,"Release...

  7. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWhsquare foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North...

  8. Building and occupant characteristics as determinants of residential energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Nieves, A.L.

    1981-10-01

    The major goals of the research are to gain insight into the probable effects of building energy performance standards on energy consumption; to obtain observations of actual residential energy consumption that could affirm or disaffirm comsumption estimates of the DOE 2.0A simulation model; and to investigate home owner's conservation investments and home purchase decisions. The first chapter covers the investigation of determinants of household energy consumption. The presentation begins with the underlying economic theory and its implications, and continues with a description of the data collection procedures, the formulation of variables, and then of data analysis and findings. In the second chapter the assumptions and limitations of the energy use projections generated by the DOE 2.0A model are discussed. Actual electricity data for the houses are then compared with results of the simulation. The third chapter contains information regarding households' willingness to make energy conserving investments and their ranking of various conservation features. In the final chapter conclusions and recommendations are presented with an emphasis on the policy implications of this study. (MCW)

  9. 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Form EIA-457C (2001)--Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Form EIA-457C (2001)--Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire OMB No. 1905-0092, Expiring March 31, 200X i U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey Rental Agents, Landlords, and Apartment Managers Questionnaire INTRODUCTION TO INTERVIEW Hello, I am __________________________ from Roper Starch Worldwide Inc., a social science research firm. We are conducting a study for the U.S. Department of Energy about energy

  10. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  11. Electric power monthly with data for June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity, and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation by energy source and capability of new generating units by company and plant are also included. A section is included in the report which summarizes major industry developments. 1 fig., 64 tabs.

  12. Furnace Blower Electricity: National and Regional Savings Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florida Solar Energy Center; Franco, Victor; Franco, Victor; Lutz, Jim; Lekov, Alex; Gu, Lixing

    2008-05-16

    Currently, total electricity consumption of furnaces is unregulated, tested at laboratory conditions using the DOE test procedure, and is reported in the GAMA directory as varying from 76 kWh/year to 1,953 kWh/year. Furnace blowers account for about 80percent of the total furnace electricity consumption and are primarily used to distribute warm air throughout the home during furnace operation as well as distribute cold air during air conditioning operation. Yet the furnace test procedure does not provide a means to calculate the electricity consumption during cooling operation or standby, which account for a large fraction of the total electricity consumption. Furthermore, blower electricity consumption is strongly affected by static pressure. Field data shows that static pressure in the house distribution ducts varies widely and that the static pressure used in the test procedure as well as the calculated fan power is not representative of actual field installations. Therefore, accurate determination of the blower electricity consumption is important to address electricity consumption of furnaces and air conditioners. This paper compares the potential regional and national energy savings of two-stage brushless permanent magnet (BPM) blower motors (the blower design option with the most potential savings that is currently available in the market) to single-stage permanent split capacitor (PSC) blower motors (the most common blower design option). Computer models were used to generate the heating and cooling loads for typical homes in 16 different climates which represent houses throughout the United States. The results show that the potential savings of using BPM motors vary by region and house characteristics, and are very strongly tied to improving house distribution ducts. Savings decrease dramatically with increased duct pressure. Cold climate locations will see savings even in the high static pressure duct situations, while warm climate locations will see less savings overall and negative savings in the high static pressure duct situations. Moderate climate locations will see little or no savings.

  13. Solutia: Massachusetts Chemical Manufacturer Uses SECURE Methodology to Identify Potential Reductions in Utility and Process Energy Consumption. Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) Chemicals BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study (Brochure).

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies Program BENEFITS * Identified potential annual cost savings of nearly $3.3 million from reduced resource consumption and improved productivity * Found ways to reduce annual electricity consumption by almost 9.6 million kWh and annual fuel consumption by 338,000 MMBtu * Identified ways to decrease fresh water consumption and wastewater generation * Resulted in short-term plans for immediate benefit, such as steam trap and lighting surveys, and long-term plans for optimizing the

  14. Energy Intensity Indicators: Industrial Source Energy Consumption |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Industrial Source Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Industrial Source Energy Consumption The industrial sector comprises manufacturing and other nonmanufacturing industries not included in transportation or services. Manufacturing includes 18 industry sectors, generally defined at the three-digit level of the North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS). The nonmanufacturing sectors are agriculture, forestry and fisheries, mining, and

  15. Electric power monthly, June 1998, with data for March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and Us levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 5 refs., 57 tabs.

  16. Electrically powered hand tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myers, Kurt S.; Reed, Teddy R.

    2007-01-16

    An electrically powered hand tool is described and which includes a three phase electrical motor having a plurality of poles; an electrical motor drive electrically coupled with the three phase electrical motor; and a source of electrical power which is converted to greater than about 208 volts three-phase and which is electrically coupled with the electrical motor drive.

  17. Worldwide estimates and bibliography of net primary productivity derived from pre-1982 publications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esser, G.; Lieth, H.F.H.; Scurlock, J.M.O.; Olson, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    An extensive compilation of more than 700 field estimates of net primary productivity of natural and agricultural ecosystems worldwide was synthesized in Germany in the 1970s and early 1980s. Although the Osnabrueck data set has not been updated since the 1980s, it represents a wealth of information for use in model development and validation. This report documents the development of this data set, its contents, and its recent availability on the Internet from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center for Biogeochemical Dynamics. Caution is advised in using these data, which necessarily include assumptions and conversions that may not be universally applicable to all sites.

  18. 2013 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 3. Power Electronics and Electrical Machines Technologies Because they are essential to electric drive vehicles, improvements in electric traction drives have the potential to significantly reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector as well as help meet national economic and energy security goals. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) can reduce petroleum use compared to average conventional vehicles by as much as 50%, while plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) extend these savings even

  19. Electric power monthly, June 1999, with data for March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  20. Electric power monthly, November 1998, with data for August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  1. Electric power monthly, April 1999 with data for January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  2. Electric power monthly: October 1995, with data for July 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-19

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  3. Electric power monthly, September 1998, with data for June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant.

  4. Electric power monthly, October 1998, with data for July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. The Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy prepares the EPM. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 57 tabs.

  5. Electric Power detailed State data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Detailed State Data Final annual data for 2014 Release Date: October 21, 2015 Next Release Date: October 15, 2016 January 13, 2016 Revision/Corrections Annual data format 1990 - 2014 Net Generation by State by Type of Producer by Energy Source (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)1 XLS 1990 - 2014 Fossil Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation by Year, Industry Type and State (EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923)2 XLS 1990 - 2013 Existing Nameplate and Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source, Producer Type

  6. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  7. Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

  8. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  9. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Section 3. Natural Gas Physical units Eight natural gas data series are used to derive the natural gas consump- tion estimates in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Several of these data series are deliveries of natural gas to the end user by state and are used as consumption because actual consumption data at these levels are not available. The sources for the natural gas data are the Natural Gas Annual and Electric Power Annual published by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

  10. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2014: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Section 3. Natural Gas Physical units Eight natural gas data series are used to derive the natural gas consump- tion estimates in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). Several of these data series are deliveries of natural gas to the end user by state and are used as consumption because actual consumption data at these levels are not available. The sources for the natural gas data are the Natural Gas Annual and Electric Power Annual published by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

  11. US MidAtl NY Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. ...

  12. Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Transportation Energy Consumption Energy Intensity Indicators: Transportation Energy Consumption This section contains an overview of the aggregate transportation sector, combining both passenger and freight segments of this sector. The specific energy intensity indicators for passenger and freight can be obtained from the links, passenger transportation, or freight transportation. For further detail within the transportation sector, download the appropriate Trend Data worksheet

  13. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  14. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology and Documentation General The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics,...

  15. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Information and Staff The Electricity Monthly Update is prepared by the Electric Power Operations Team, Office of Electricity, Renewables and Uranium Statistics, U.S....

  16. Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

    1981-09-15

    Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

  17. Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

  18. Electrical receptacle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, R.

    1993-06-22

    The invention is a receptacle for a three prong electrical plug which has either a tubular or U-shaped grounding prong. The inventive receptacle has a grounding prong socket which is sufficiently spacious to prevent the socket from significantly stretching when a larger, U-shaped grounding prong is inserted into the socket, and having two ridges to allow a snug fit when a smaller tubular shape grounding prong is inserted into the socket. The two ridges are made to prevent the socket from expanding when either the U-shaped grounding prong or the tubular grounding prong is inserted.

  19. Electrical Safety

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is

  20. Electrical Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE HANDBOOK ELECTRICAL SAFETY DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 July 2013 Superseding DOE-HDBK-1092-2004 December 2004 U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C.20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ ii DOE-HDBK-1092-2013 FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Handbook is

  1. Analysis of federal incentives used to stimulate energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.J.; Cone, B.W.; Emery, J.C.; Huelshoff, M.; Lenerz, D.E.; Marcus, A.; Morris, F.A.; Sheppard, W.J.; Sommers, P.

    1981-08-01

    The purpose of the analysis is to identify and quantify Federal incentives that have increased the consumption of coal, oil, natural gas, and electricity. The introductory chapter is intended as a device for presenting the policy questions about the incentives that can be used to stimulate desired levels of energy development. In the theoretical chapter federal incentives were identified for the consumption of energy as Federal government actions whose major intent or result is to stimulate energy consumption. The stimulus comes through changing values of variables included in energy demand functions, thereby inducing energy consumers to move along the function in the direction of greater quantity of energy demanded, or through inducing a shift of the function to a position where more energy will be demanded at a given price. The demand variables fall into one of six categories: price of the energy form, price of complements, price of substitutes, preferences, income, and technology. The government can provide such incentives using six different policy instruments: taxation, disbursements, requirements, nontraditional services, traditional services, and market activity. The four major energy forms were examined. Six energy-consuming sectors were examined: residential, commercial, industrial, agricultural, transportation, and public. Two types of analyses of incentive actions are presented in this volume. The generic chapter focused on actions taken in 1978 across all energy forms. The subsequent chapters traced the patterns of incentive actions, energy form by energy form, from the beginning of the 20th century, to the present. The summary chapter includes the results of the previous chapters presented by energy form, incentive type, and user group. Finally, the implications of these results for solar policy are presented in the last chapter. (MCW)

  2. Electric power monthly with data for August 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the state, census division, and U.S. levels for net generation; fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity, and quality of fossil fuels; cost of fossil fuels; electricity retail sales; associated revenue; and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics on net generation are published by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The monthly update is summarized, and industry developments are briefly described. 1 fig., 63 tabs.

  3. Electric power monthly with data for October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and U.S. levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council regions. Statistics are published on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. A monthly utility update and summary of industry developments are also included. 63 tabs., 1 fig.

  4. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Trends in Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Part 1. Energy Consumption Data Tables Total Energy Intensity Intensity by Energy Source Background: Site and Primary Energy Trends in Energy Consumption and Energy Sources Part...

  5. Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3a. Natural Gas Consumption per Sq Ft Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas...

  6. Fact #706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Fact 706: December 19, 2011 Vocational Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards The National Highway Traffic Safety...

  7. Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South African Households Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Appliance Standby Power and Energy Consumption in South...

  8. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures This study investigates ...

  9. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  10. Fact #749: October 15, 2012 Petroleum and Natural Gas Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9: October 15, 2012 Petroleum and Natural Gas Consumption for Transportation by State, 2010 Fact 749: October 15, 2012 Petroleum and Natural Gas Consumption for Transportation by...

  11. Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Complex System Method to Assess Commercial Vehicle Fuel Consumption Two case studies for commercial vehicle ...

  12. Impact of Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different Powertrain, Component Sizes and Control Impact of Driving Behavior on PHEV Fuel Consumption for Different Powertrain, ...

  13. 2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey - User Needs Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2002 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: User-Needs Survey View current results. We need your help in designing the next Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) As our valued...

  14. 1991 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 Executive Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Summary The Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 report presents statistics about the energy consumption of the manufacturing sector, based on the 1991 Manufacturing Energy...

  15. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust...

  16. Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Resources Publications Market Studies Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption Residential Lighting End-Use Consumption The U.S. DOE Residential Lighting ...

  17. Table 5a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption...

  18. Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  19. Visualization of United States Energy Consumption | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Consumption Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Visualization of United States Energy Consumption AgencyCompany Organization: Energy Information...

  20. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (Btu) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (thousand Btu...

  1. Derived annual estimates of manufacturing energy consumption, 1974--1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-05

    This report presents a complete series of annual estimates of purchased energy used by the manufacturing sector of the US economy, for the years 1974 to 1988. These estimates interpolate over gaps in the actual data collections, by deriving estimates for the missing years 1982--1984 and 1986--1987. For the purposes of this report, ``purchased`` energy is energy brought from offsite for use at manufacturing establishments, whether the energy is purchased from an energy vendor or procured from some other source. The actual data on purchased energy comes from two sources, the US Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census`s Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) and EIA`s Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). The ASM provides annual estimates for the years 1974 to 1981. However, in 1982 (and subsequent years) the scope of the ASM energy data was reduced to collect only electricity consumption and expenditures and total expenditures for other purchased energy. In 1985, EIA initiated the triennial MECS collecting complete energy data. The series equivalent to the ASM is referred to in the MECS as ``offsite-produced fuels.``

  2. Electricity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AEO2011 report Full figure data for Figure 76. Reference Case Tables Table 1. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source - New England Table 2. Energy Consumption by Sector and Source...

  3. Electricity pricing as a demand-side management strategy: Western lessons for developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.J.

    1990-12-01

    Electric utilities in the Western world have increasingly realized that load commitments can be met not only by constructing new generating plants but also by influencing electricity demand. This demand-side management (DSM) process requires that electric utilities promote measures on the customer's side of the meter to directly or indirectly influence electricity consumption to meet desired load objectives. An important demand-side option to achieve these load objectives is innovative electricity pricing, both by itself and as a financial incentive for other demand-site measures. This study explores electricity pricing as a DSM strategy, addressing four questions in the process: What is the Western experience with DSM in general and electricity pricing in particular Do innovative pricing strategies alter the amount and pattern of electricity consumption Do the benefits of these pricing strategies outweigh the costs of implementation What are future directions in electricity pricing Although DSM can be used to promote increases in electricity consumption for electric utilities with excess capacity as well as to slow demand growth for capacity-short utilities, emphasis here is placed on the latter. The discussion should be especially useful for electric utilities in developing countries that are exploring alternatives to capacity expansion to meet current and future electric power demand.

  4. Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

    2004-03-15

    Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

  5. C:\MYDOCS\CBECS-FORM\CBECSFRM\ELECTRIC.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    A (8/12/97) Form Approval Electricity Usage OMB No: 1905-0145 Expires: July 31, 1998 Label IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS, PLEASE CALL 1-800-927-0589 TOLL FREE AND ASK FOR THE SUPPLIER SURVEY SPECIALIST. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY FOR 1995 BUILDING ELECTRICITY USAGE FORM Consumption data are to be provided for the entire building identified on the label. A copy of the authorization form signed by the building

  6. U.S. Energy Information Administration | State Energy Data 2013: Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Coal Consumption Physical units Coal in the United States is mostly consumed by the electric power sector. Data are collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) on Form EIA-923, "Power Plant Operations Report," and predecessor forms. "ZZ" in the variable name is used to represent the two-letter state code: CLEIPZZ = coal consumed by the electric power sector in each state, in thousand short tons. CLEIPUS = ΣCLEIPZZ Seven data series are used to estimate

  7. Renewable Electricity Use by the U.S. Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John; Bird, Lori; Heeter, Jenny; Gorham, Bethany

    2015-07-20

    The information and communication technology (ICT) sector continues to witness rapid growth and uptake of ICT equipment and services at both the national and global levels. The electricity consumption associated with this expansion is substantial, although recent adoptions of cloudcomputing services, co-location data centers, and other less energy-intensive equipment and operations have likely reduced the rate of growth in this sector. This paper is intended to aggregate existing ICT industry data and research to provide an initial look at electricity use, current and future renewable electricity acquisition, as well as serve as a benchmark for future growth and trends in ICT industry renewable electricity consumption.

  8. Table A13. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "

  9. Table A32. Total Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Consumption of Offsite-Produced Energy for Heat, Power, and" " Electricity Generation by Value of Shipment Categories, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,,,"Value of Shipments and Receipts(b)" ,,,," (million dollars)" ,," ","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ," "," ","

  10. Electric power monthly: October 1996, with data for July 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. This report contains approximately 60 tables.

  11. Electric power monthly, May 1999, with data for February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly (EPM) presents monthly electricity statistics for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead. This publication provides monthly statistics at the State, Census division, and US levels for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity retail sales, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatt hour of electricity sold. In addition, data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source; consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. 64 tabs.

  12. Economics of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Plug-In hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have gained significant attention in recent years, as concerns about energy, environmental, and economic securityincluding rising gasoline prices have prompted efforts to improve vehicle fuel economy and reduce petroleum consumption in the transportation sector. PHEVs are particularly well suited to meet these objectives, because they have the potential to reduce petroleum consumption both through fuel economy gains and by substituting electric power for gasoline use.

  13. Electric power annual 1994. Volume 2, Operational and financial data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    This year, the annual is published in two volumes. Volume I focused on US electric utilities and contained final 1994 data on net generation, fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost. This Volume II presents annual 1994 summary statistics for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are preliminary data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on form EIA-861) and for electric utility financial statistics, environmental statistics, power transactions, and demand- side management. Final 1994 data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity and gross generation, as well as supply and disposition information, are also provided in Volume II. Technical notes and a glossary are included.

  14. 1982 worldwide pipeline construction will top 21,900 miles, $9. 5 billion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.

    1982-07-01

    Reports that pipeline construction slowed slightly in 1982 because of lowered economic activity worldwide, with an upturn forecast for 1983. Explains that need for new pipelines to transport increasing amounts of oil and gas energy now being discovered, plus use of pipelines to transport other commodities in increasing amounts, has created a backlog of demand for facilities. Indicates that commodities suited for pipeline transport and getting consideration include crude oil; refined products; natural gas liquids; LPG; coal slurries; carbon dioxide (used for enhanced oil recovery); chemicals such as ammonia, ethane, ethylene, and similar petrochemical feedstocks; industrial gases such as oxygen, nitrogen; and solids slurries such as ores, wood chips, and other non-soluble minerals, even items such as wood chips and wood pulp for paper-making. Reveals that there are 10,396 miles of coal slurry pipeline planned for the US and 500 miles in Canada. Major US projects underway in the gas pipeline field include the 797-mile, 36-in. Trailblazer system in Nebraska, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah. Products/ LPG/NGL pipelines underway include 105 miles of dual 4 and 6-in. line in Kansas. Crude pipeline activity includes 100 miles of 12-in. in California and 80 miles of 4 thru 40-in. in Alaska on the North Slope. Updates plans in Canada, Scotland, Denmark, Ireland, France, the Middle East, Australia, Southeast Asia, Mexico, South America and the USSR.

  15. Survey of Worldwide Light Water Reactor Experience with Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowell, B.S.; Fisher, S.E.

    1999-02-01

    The US and the Former Soviet Union (FSU) have recently declared quantities of weapons materials, including weapons-grade (WG) plutonium, excess to strategic requirements. One of the leading candidates for the disposition of excess WG plutonium is irradiation in light water reactors (LWRs) as mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel. A description of the MOX fuel fabrication techniques in worldwide use is presented. A comprehensive examination of the domestic MOX experience in US reactors obtained during the 1960s, 1970s, and early 1980s is also presented. This experience is described by manufacturer and is also categorized by the reactor facility that irradiated the MOX fuel. A limited summary of the international experience with MOX fuels is also presented. A review of MOX fuel and its performance is conducted in view of the special considerations associated with the disposition of WG plutonium. Based on the available information, it appears that adoption of foreign commercial MOX technology from one of the successful MOX fuel vendors will minimize the technical risks to the overall mission. The conclusion is made that the existing MOX fuel experience base suggests that disposition of excess weapons plutonium through irradiation in LWRs is a technically attractive option.

  16. A Computing Environment to Support Repeatable Scientific Big Data Experimentation of World-Wide Scientific Literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlicher, Bob G; Kulesz, James J; Abercrombie, Robert K; Kruse, Kara L

    2015-01-01

    A principal tenant of the scientific method is that experiments must be repeatable and relies on ceteris paribus (i.e., all other things being equal). As a scientific community, involved in data sciences, we must investigate ways to establish an environment where experiments can be repeated. We can no longer allude to where the data comes from, we must add rigor to the data collection and management process from which our analysis is conducted. This paper describes a computing environment to support repeatable scientific big data experimentation of world-wide scientific literature, and recommends a system that is housed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in order to provide value to investigators from government agencies, academic institutions, and industry entities. The described computing environment also adheres to the recently instituted digital data management plan mandated by multiple US government agencies, which involves all stages of the digital data life cycle including capture, analysis, sharing, and preservation. It particularly focuses on the sharing and preservation of digital research data. The details of this computing environment are explained within the context of cloud services by the three layer classification of Software as a Service , Platform as a Service , and Infrastructure as a Service .

  17. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey - Office Buildings

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at this building type as reported in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings are the most common type of commercial building and they consumed more than 17% of all energy in the commercial buildings sector in 2003. This special report provides characteristics and energy consumption data by type of office building (e.g. administrative office, government office, medical office) and information on some of the types of equipment found in office buildings: heating and cooling equipment, computers, servers, printers, and photocopiers.

  18. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  19. 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by

  20. US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air conditioning, or water heating. * Colorado homes are typically newer than homes in other parts of the country. ...

  1. End use energy consumption data base: transportation sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooker, J.N.; Rose, A.B.; Greene, D.L.

    1980-02-01

    The transportation fuel and energy use estimates developed a Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the End Use Energy Consumption Data Base are documented. The total data base contains estimates of energy use in the United States broken down into many categories within all sectors of the economy: agriculture, mining, construction, manufacturing, commerce, the household, electric utilities, and transportation. The transportation data provided by ORNL generally cover each of the 10 years from 1967 through 1976 (occasionally 1977 and 1978), with omissions in some models. The estimtes are broken down by mode of transport, fuel, region and State, sector of the economy providing transportation, and by the use to which it is put, and, in the case of automobile and bus travel, by the income of the traveler. Fuel types include natural gas, motor and aviation gasoline, residual and diesel oil, liuqefied propane, liquefied butane, and naphtha- and kerosene-type jet engine fuels. Electricity use is also estimated. The mode, fuel, sector, and use categories themselves subsume one, two, or three levels of subcategories, resulting in a very detailed categorization and definitive accounting.

  2. The Reality and Future Scenarios of Commercial Building Energy Consumption in China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Lin, Jiang

    2007-08-01

    While China's 11th Five Year Plan called for a reduction of energy intensity by 2010, whether and how the energy consumption trend can be changed in a short time has been hotly debated. This research intends to evaluate the impact of a variety of scenarios of GDP growth, energy elasticity and energy efficiency improvement on energy consumption in commercial buildings in China using a detailed China End-use Energy Model. China's official energy statistics have limited information on energy demand by end use. This is a particularly pertinent issue for building energy consumption. The authors have applied reasoned judgments, based on experience of working on Chinese efficiency standards and energy related programs, to present a realistic interpretation of the current energy data. The bottom-up approach allows detailed consideration of end use intensity, equipment efficiency, etc., thus facilitating assessment of potential impacts of specific policy and technology changes on building energy use. The results suggest that: (1) commercial energy consumption in China's current statistics is underestimated by about 44%, and the fuel mix is misleading; (2) energy efficiency improvements will not be sufficient to offset the strong increase in end-use penetration and intensity in commercial buildings; (3) energy intensity (particularly electricity) in commercial buildings will increase; (4) different GDP growth and elasticity scenarios could lead to a wide range of floor area growth trajectories , and therefore, significantly impact energy consumption in commercial buildings.

  3. Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2002

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption, 2002; " " Level: National and Regional Data;" " Row: Energy Sources;" " Column: Consumption Potential;" " Unit: Physical Units." ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Energy Sources","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" ,"Total United States" "RSE Column

  4. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,6946 32554,5655 32582,6202 32613,3723 32643,1899 32674,1020 32704,744 32735,695 32766,745 32796,1338 32827,2823 32857,6866 32888,8535...

  5. Global Cooling: Increasing World-Wide Urban Albedos to Offset CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2008-01-14

    Modification of urban albedos reduces summertime urban temperatures, resulting in a better urban air quality and building air-conditioning savings. Furthermore, increasing urban albedos has the added benefit of reflecting some of the incoming global solar radiation and countering to some extent the effects of global warming. In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). Using reflective materials, both roof and the pavement albedos can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60% (a U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills). On a global basis, our preliminary estimate is that increasing the world-wide albedos of urban roofs and paved surfaces will induce a negative radiative forcing on the earth equivalent to removing {approx} 22-40 Gt of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. Since, 55% of the emitted CO{sub 2} remains in the atmosphere, removal of 22-40 Gt of CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere is equivalent to reducing global CO{sub 2} emissions by 40-73 Gt. At {approx} $25/tonne of CO{sub 2}, a 40-73 Gt CO{sub 2} emission reduction from changing the albedo of roofs and paved surfaces is worth about $1,000B to 1800B. These estimated savings are dependent on assumptions used in this study, but nevertheless demonstrate considerable benefits that may be obtained from cooler roofs and pavements.

  6. Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

  7. Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Peer Review | Department of Energy Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO Peer Review Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Objective The partners involved in the Lighting Energy Efficiency in Parking (LEEP) campaign, along with private and public entities, advocate for and install energy-efficient lighting in public parking lots to foster significant reductions in participants' energy consumption. The

  8. Organotin intake through fish consumption in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Airaksinen, Riikka; Rantakokko, Panu; Turunen, Anu W.; Vartiainen, Terttu; Vuorinen, Pekka J.; Lappalainen, Antti; Vihervuori, Aune; Mannio, Jaakko; Hallikainen, Anja

    2010-08-15

    Background: Organotin compounds (OTCs) are a large class of synthetic chemicals with widely varying properties. Due to their potential adverse health effects, their use has been restricted in many countries. Humans are exposed to OTCs mostly through fish consumption. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe OTC exposure through fish consumption and to assess the associated potential health risks in a Finnish population. Methods: An extensive sampling of Finnish domestic fish was carried out in the Baltic Sea and freshwater areas in 2005-2007. In addition, samples of imported seafood were collected in 2008. The chemical analysis was performed in an accredited testing laboratory during 2005-2008. Average daily intake of the sum of dibutyltin (DBT), tributyltin (TBT), triphenyltin (TPhT) and dioctyltin (DOT) ({Sigma}OTCs) for the Finnish population was calculated on the basis of the measured concentrations and fish consumption rates. Results: The average daily intake of {Sigma}OTCs through fish consumption was 3.2 ng/kg bw day{sup -1}, which is 1.3% from the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI) of 250 ng/kg bw day{sup -1} set by the European Food Safety Authority. In total, domestic wild fish accounted for 61% of the {Sigma}OTC intake, while the intake through domestic farmed fish was 4.0% and the intake through imported fish was 35%. The most important species were domestic perch and imported salmon and rainbow trout. Conclusions: The Finnish consumers are not likely to exceed the threshold level for adverse health effects due to OTC intake through fish consumption.

  9. Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 Sales data for various models of electric and hybrid electric vehicles from December 2010 through June 2013. File Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (Excel) File Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Sales: December 2010 - June 2013 (CSV) Image icon Chart of Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle

  10. Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) program : implementing physical security to protect large radioactive sources worldwide.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, Daniel L.

    2004-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Radiological Threat Reduction (RTR) Program strives to reduce the threat of a Radiological Dispersion Device (RDD) incident that could affect U.S. interests worldwide. Sandia National Laboratories supports the RTR program on many different levels. Sandia works directly with DOE to develop strategies, including the selection of countries to receive support and the identification of radioactive materials to be protected. Sandia also works with DOE in the development of guidelines and in training DOE project managers in physical protection principles. Other support to DOE includes performing rapid assessments and providing guidance for establishing foreign regulatory and knowledge infrastructure. Sandia works directly with foreign governments to establish cooperative agreements necessary to implement the RTR Program efforts to protect radioactive sources. Once necessary agreements are in place, Sandia works with in-country organizations to implement various security related initiatives, such as installing security systems and searching for (and securing) orphaned radioactive sources. The radioactive materials of interest to the RTR program include Cobalt 60, Cesium 137, Strontium 90, Iridium 192, Radium 226, Plutonium 238, Americium 241, Californium 252, and Others. Security systems are implemented using a standardized approach that provides consistency through out the RTR program efforts at Sandia. The approach incorporates a series of major tasks that overlap in order to provide continuity. The major task sequence is to: Establish in-country contacts - integrators, Obtain material characterizations, Perform site assessments and vulnerability assessments, Develop upgrade plans, Procure and install equipment, Conduct acceptance testing and performance testing, Develop procedures, and Conduct training. Other tasks are incorporated as appropriate and commonly include such as support of reconfiguring infrastructure, and developing security plans, etc. This standardized approach is applied to specific country and regional needs. Recent examples (FY 2003-2004) include foreign missions to Lithuania, Russian Federation Navy, Russia - PNPI, Greece (joint mission with IAEA), Tanzania, Iraq, Chile, Ecuador, and Egypt. Some of the ambitions and results of the RTR program may be characterized by the successes in Lithuania, Greece, and Russia.

  11. Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap - Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric...

  12. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells This study, completed by...

  13. Electrical safety guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Electrical Safety Guidelines prescribes the DOE safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety standards and guidance for DOE installations in order to affect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of these guidelines are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  14. DOE handbook electrical safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Electrical Safety Handbook presents the Department of Energy (DOE) safety standards for DOE field offices or facilities involved in the use of electrical energy. It has been prepared to provide a uniform set of electrical safety guidance and information for DOE installations to effect a reduction or elimination of risks associated with the use of electrical energy. The objectives of this handbook are to enhance electrical safety awareness and mitigate electrical hazards to employees, the public, and the environment.

  15. Medium Duty Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Robin J. D.

    2015-05-31

    The Smith Electric Vehicle Demonstration Project (SDP) was integral to the Smith business plan to establish a manufacturing base in the United States (US) and produce a portfolio of All Electric Vehicles (AEV’s) for the medium duty commercial truck market. Smith focused on the commercial depot based logistics market, as it represented the market that was most ready for the early adoption of AEV technology. The SDP enabled Smith to accelerate its introduction of vehicles and increase the size of its US supply chain to support early market adoption of AEV’s that were cost competitive, fully met the needs of a diverse set of end users and were compliant with Federal safety and emissions requirements. The SDP accelerated the development and production of various electric drive vehicle systems to substantially reduce petroleum consumption, reduce vehicular emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), and increase US jobs.

  16. Edison Electric Institute Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the Edison Electric Institute (EEI) and the current electricity landscape.

  17. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Electric Power Sector comprises electricity-only and combined heat and power (CHP) plants within the North American Industrial Classification System 22 category whose...

  18. DOE Electricity Advisory Committee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Advisory Committee March 2015 1 MEMORANDUM TO: Honorable Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Department of ...

  19. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See all Electricity Reports Electricity Monthly Update With Data for November 2014 | Release Date: Jan. 26, 2015 | Next Release Date: Feb. 24, 2015 Previous Issues Issue:...

  20. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of electricity. End-use data is the first "data page" based on the assumption that information about retail electricity service is of greatest interest to a general...

  2. Annual Power Electric

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, Actual Table 8.6.B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability ...

  3. Integrating Electricity Subsector

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrating Electricity Subsector Failure Scenarios into a Risk Assessment Methodology ... Executive, Cyber Security Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) For more information on ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,652 34 Electric...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,758 26 Electric...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 39,918 6 Electric...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,255 50 Electric...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,329 41 Electric utilities...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,828 16 Electric...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,801 19 Electric...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 109,584 1 Electric...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,342 23 Electric...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,128 11 Electric...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 18,997 22 Electric...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 43,040 5 Electric...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,449 36 Electric utilities...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,384 48 Electric...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 23,300 17 Electric...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric...