National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for world oil refining

  1. World oil trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A. )

    1991-01-01

    This book provides data on many facets of the world oil industry topics include; oil consumption; oils share of energy consumption; crude oil production; natural gas production; oil reserves; prices of oil; world refining capacity; and oil tankers.

  2. Refiner Crude Oil Inputs

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of RBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of CBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of GTAB Blending ...

  3. EIA model documentation: World oil refining logistics demand model,``WORLD`` reference manual. Version 1.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-11

    This manual is intended primarily for use as a reference by analysts applying the WORLD model to regional studies. It also provides overview information on WORLD features of potential interest to managers and analysts. Broadly, the manual covers WORLD model features in progressively increasing detail. Section 2 provides an overview of the WORLD model, how it has evolved, what its design goals are, what it produces, and where it can be taken with further enhancements. Section 3 reviews model management covering data sources, managing over-optimization, calibration and seasonality, check-points for case construction and common errors. Section 4 describes in detail the WORLD system, including: data and program systems in overview; details of mainframe and PC program control and files;model generation, size management, debugging and error analysis; use with different optimizers; and reporting and results analysis. Section 5 provides a detailed description of every WORLD model data table, covering model controls, case and technology data. Section 6 goes into the details of WORLD matrix structure. It provides an overview, describes how regional definitions are controlled and defines the naming conventions for-all model rows, columns, right-hand sides, and bounds. It also includes a discussion of the formulation of product blending and specifications in WORLD. Several Appendices supplement the main sections.

  4. World Crude Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    World Crude Oil Prices (Dollars per Barrel) The data on this page are no longer available.

  5. Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis W.R. Grace, a leading provider of refining technologies, and Pacific ...

  6. ,"Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales ... "Back to Contents","Data 1: Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes" ...

  7. ,"U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes",2,"Monthly","5... "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes" ...

  8. EERE Success Story—Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    W.R. Grace and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are working to establish a bio-oil refining process that users existing petroleum refinery infrastructure.

  9. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state`s total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation`s energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska`s 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  10. Trends in heavy oil production and refining in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Pendergrass, R.A. II.

    1992-07-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production and is part of a study being conducted for the US Department of Energy. This report summarizes trends in oil production and refining in Canada. Heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production in California has increased from 20% of the state's total oil production in the early 1940s to 70% in the late 1980s. In each of the three principal petroleum producing districts (Los Angeles Basin, Coastal Basin, and San Joaquin Valley) oil production has peaked then declined at different times throughout the past 30 years. Thermal production of heavy oil has contributed to making California the largest producer of oil by enhanced oil recovery processes in spite of low oil prices for heavy oil and stringent environmental regulation. Opening of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills (CA) field in 1976, brought about a major new source of light oil at a time when light oil production had greatly declined. Although California is a major petroleum-consuming state, in 1989 the state used 13.3 billion gallons of gasoline or 11.5% of US demand but it contributed substantially to the Nation's energy production and refining capability. California is the recipient and refines most of Alaska's 1.7 million barrel per day oil production. With California production, Alaskan oil, and imports brought into California for refining, California has an excess of oil and refined products and is a net exporter to other states. The local surplus of oil inhibits exploitation of California heavy oil resources even though the heavy oil resources exist. Transportation, refining, and competition in the market limit full development of California heavy oil resources.

  11. World Oil Prices in AEO2007 (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01

    Over the long term, the Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO) projection for world oil prices -- defined as the average price of imported low-sulfur, light crude oil to U.S. refiners -- is similar to the AEO2006 projection. In the near term, however, AEO2007 projects prices that are $8 to $10 higher than those in AEO2006.

  12. PROP re-refined oil engine test performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linnard, R.E.

    1980-11-01

    Using conventional, commercially-available nonproprietary (to Phillips) additive treatments, engine test programs have successfully demonstrated Phillips Re-refined Oil Process (PROP) oils' compliance with the performance requirements of MIL-L-46152A and API Services SE/CC. This paper reports on the engine testing experience with PROP refined oils as produced in a full-scale 2 MM GPY PROP plant operating with Buyer-collected used oil feedstocks. Comment is also made on the status of the first two PROP plants, one built for the state of North Carolina and the other for Mohawk Oil Company, Ltd., Vancouver B.C., Canada.

  13. World Oil Transit Chokepoints

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2012-01-01

    Chokepoints are narrow channels along widely used global sea routes, some so narrow that restrictions are placed on the size of vessel that can navigate through them. They are a critical part of global energy security due to the high volume of oil traded through their narrow straits.

  14. EERE Success Story-Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum EERE Success Story-Refining Bio-Oil alongside Petroleum April 9, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis W.R. Grace, a leading provider of refining ...

  15. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  16. World Oil Prices in AEO2006 (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    World oil prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2006 (AEO) reference case are substantially higher than those in the AEO2005 reference case. In the AEO2006 reference case, world crude oil prices, in terms of the average price of imported low-sulfur, light crude oil to U.S. refiners, decline from current levels to about $47 per barrel (2004 dollars) in 2014, then rise to $54 per barrel in 2025 and $57 per barrel in 2030. The price in 2025 is approximately $21 per barrel higher than the corresponding price projection in the AEO2005 reference case.

  17. RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc.Commonwealth of Puerto Rico RFA-14-0001 - In the Matter of Commonwealth Oil Refining Company, Inc....

  18. Updated Hubbert curves analyze world oil supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanhoe, L.F.

    1996-11-01

    The question is not whether, but when, world crude oil production will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this event is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous Hubbert Curve that predicted the US (Lower 48 states, or US/48) 1970 oil production peak, there are strong indications that most of the world`s large exploration targets have now been found. Meanwhile, the earth`s population is exploding along with the oil needs of Asia`s developing nations. This article reviews Hubbert`s original analyses on oil discovery and production curves for the US/48 and projects his proven methodology onto global oil discoveries and production as of 1992. The world`s oil discovery curve peaked in 1962, and thence declined, as a Hubbert Curve predicts. However, global production was restricted after the 1973 Arab oil embargo. Otherwise, world production would have peaked in the mid-1990s. Two graphs show alternate versions of future global oil production.

  19. STEO January 2013 - world oil prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gap between U.S. and world oil prices to be cut by more than half over next two years The current wide price gap between a key U.S. and a world benchmark crude oil is expected to narrow significantly over the next two years. The spot price for U.S. benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude oil, also known as WTI , averaged $94 a barrel in 2012. That's $18 less than North Sea Brent oil, which is a global benchmark crude that had an average price of $112 last year. The new monthly forecast from the

  20. Benin: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports Ashland discovered additional oil reserves deeper than current production in Seme, Benin's only oil field. The field is on a steep decline, producing as little as 2,500 bopd, down from 7,671 bopd in 1984. In an effort to restart offshore exploration, three offshore blocks have been designated. Hardy Oil and Gas (UK) Ltd. has since acquired 20% interest in Blocks 1 and 2 from International Petroleum Ltd. (IPL). IPL completed seismic work during 1990 that identified two large channel prospects similar to those that produce offshore elsewhere in West Africa. The first well is expected in 1991.

  1. Bolivia: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that, reflecting the trend in some of its neighbors, Bolivia has been moving toward ending state oil company YPFB's dominance over E and P. YPFB has controlled two-thirds of the oil fields, but that figure may decline in the future. A new petroleum law due for enactment this year would allow foreign companies to work in landlocked Bolivia either as risk operators or as in association with YPFB. Once a field is declared commercial, YPFB would come in to participate, but operators would be able to repatriate their earnings.

  2. A technical and economic assessment of petroleum, heavy oil, shale oil and coal liquid refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sikonia, J.G.; Shah, B.R.; Ulowetz, M.A.

    1983-11-01

    Decreasing availability of conventional crude oil will result in the utilization of alternative raw materials for the production of transportation fuels. Based on currently available processes and as a result of detailed pilot plant studies, the differences in the technical and economic aspects of refining alternative feedstocks of heavy oil, coal liquids and shale oil have indicated that heavy, hydrogen-deficient materials require more complex and costly upgrading techniques. Compared to the base case of Arabian Light crude oil, the Mexican Maya heavy oil is worth about $4.35/B less, the coal liquid about $2.38/B less and the shale oil about $5.98/B less. All of these alternative fuels can be upgraded into high quality transportation fuels.

  3. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 295 Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  4. Philippines: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khin, J.A. )

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on the discovery of a major oil field in the West Linapacan area, plus encouraging signs from the Calauit 1B, both offshore Palawan, that have prompted foreign and local firms to increase exploration activity, which should result in the drilling of 22 wells this year, compared to only seven during 1990. The West Linapacan well is reported to have potential recoverable reserves of 109 million bbl, and a consortium led by Alcorn (Production) Philippines plans a two-phase development of the discovery, beginning with two or three follow-up wells. These will be part of the seven additional wells the Office of Energy Affairs has approved for 1991 or early 1992. The OEA expects production from West Linapacan to start by 1992 at an initial rate of 15,000 to 20,000 bopd.

  5. Bioremediation of petroleum wastes from the refining of lubricant oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prince, M.; Sambasivam, Y. )

    1993-02-01

    The results of an initial feasibility study on the bioremediation of sludge are presented. The sludge used in the study was taken from a site containing waste produced during the refining of lubricant oils to which sulfuric acid had been added. The effectiveness of bioremediation was examined using shake flask experiments with indigenous and other bacteria sources and nutrient supplementation. The initial results show limited effectiveness of biological treatment at conditions employing indigenous bacteria and low (2%) sludge concentrations in Bushnell-Haas media. In addition, the indigenous bacteria were seen to degrade the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons naphthalene, penanthrene and pyrene which are present at some locations at the site. No apparent degradation of material was seen using conditions of high (30%) sludge concentrations in Bushnell-Haas medium under a variety of conditions. In addition, nutrients were rapidly depleted at these sludge concentrations, with the exception of sulfates which were produced when high sludge concentrations were used. 23 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. World oil price behavior during oil supply disruptions: what can we learn from the past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdsall, T.H.

    1980-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to: (1) examine how world oil prices have behaved during past oil supply disruptions, (2) attempt to understand why world oil prices have behaved during disruptions as they have, and (3) see what history foretells, if anything, for the behavior of world oil prices during future oil supply disruptions.

  7. World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016 and 2017 Global oil inventories are expected to continue strong growth over the next two years which should keep oil ...

  8. Table 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    839.2 135.0 1,251.9 See footnotes at end of table. 46. Refiner No. 2 Distillate, Diesel Fuel, and Fuel Oil Volumes by PAD District and State Energy Information Administration ...

  9. Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Sulfur <= 1% Residual F.O., Sulfur > 1% No. 4 Fuel Oil Period-Unit: Monthly - Thousand Gallons per Day Annual - Thousand Gallons per Day Sales Type: Sales to End Users Sales for Resale Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History U.S. 4,103.1 3,860.0 4,053.4 4,238.4 3,888.8 3,799.0

  10. Implications of Increasing Light Tight Oil Production for U.S. Refining

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Implications of Increasing Light Tight Oil Production for U.S. Refining May 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Implications of Increasing Light Oil Production on the U.S. Refining System i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  11. U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product: Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Sulfur <= 1% Residual F.O., Sulfur > 1% No. 4 Fuel Oil Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Sales Type Area Jan-16 Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 View History Sales to End Users 4,103.1 3,860.0 4,053.4 4,238.4 3,888.8 3,799.0 1983-2016 Sales for Resale 9,292.6 9,338.0 9,180.7 8,984.8 9,875.7 8,936.2

  12. Gulf Canada donor refined bitumen heavy oil upgrading process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.P.; Souhrada, F.; Woods, H.J.

    1982-09-01

    The method is a moderate-pressure, noncatalytic alternative which has been shown to be applicable to a wide range of bitumens and heavy oils. It offers the potential of efficiency and reliability at a low capitalized investment and operating cost. The raw distillates are separated from the bitumen or heavy oil and the vacuum residuum is blended with an efficient hydrogen donor stream containing a high proportion of substituted tetralins, and is thermally cracking in the liquid phase. The exhausted donor is recovered from the middle distillate reactor product, reactivated by fixed bed hydrogenation before being recycled to the reactor. The process can be self-sufficient in donor and is independent of the metal content of the feed. The products are blanded with the raw distillates and further hydrogenated to high quality petroleum products. While the primary hydrogen consumption is low, the reconstituted naphtha, distillate and gas oil fractions require less hydrogen than the coker liquids to achieve acceptable refinery feed quality. 1 figure, 9 tables.

  13. World Oil Price Cases (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01

    World oil prices in Annual Energy Outlook 2005 are set in an environment where the members of OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) are assumed to act as the dominant producers, with lower production costs than other supply regions or countries. Non-OPEC oil producers are assumed to behave competitively, producing as much oil as they can profitability extract at the market price for oil. As a result, the OPEC member countries will be able effectively to set the price of oil when they can act in concert by varying their aggregate production. Alternatively, OPEC members could target a fixed level of production and let the world market determine the price.

  14. World oil - An essay on its spectacular 120-year rise (1859-1979), recent decline, and uncertain future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linden, H.R.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of the evolution of the oil security problems of import-dependent industrialized countries and of the rise and recent erosion of the market power of the major oil exporting countries, particularly those located in the Persian Gulf area. The counterproductive reaction of the United States and other large oil importers to the resulting oil supply and price instability, especially since the 1973-74 oil embargo, is critiqued. In addition, the synergism between the early commercialization of crude oil production and refining in the United States and the development of the automobile industry is discussed, and the long-term outlook for oil-base transportation fuels is assessed. OPEC's role in destabilizing the world oil market during the 1970s and its current efforts to restabilize it are evaluated, as is the likely future course of world oil prices and of U.S. and other non-OPEC production. An important finding of this study is that the share of oil in the world energy mix has peaked and will continue its downward trend and that recurring expectations for a sharp escalation of world oil prices and shortages are based on erroneous assessments of the fundamentals governing the oil business.

  15. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-08-07

    The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock tomore » OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.« less

  16. Stochastic Energy Deployment System (SEDS) World Oil Model (WOM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-08-07

    The function of the World Oil Market Model (WOMM) is to calculate a world oil price. SEDS will set start and end dates for the forecast period, and a time increment (assumed to be 1 year in the initial version). The WOMM will then randomly select an Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) oil price case and calibrate itself to that case. As it steps through each year, the WOMM will generate a stochastic supply shock to OPEC output and accept a new estimate of U.S. petroleum demand from SEDS. The WOMM will then calculate a new oil market equilibrium for the current year. The world oil price at the new equilibrium will be sent back to SEDS. When the end year is reached, the process will begin again with the selection of a new AEO forecast. Iterations over forecasts will continue until SEDS has completed all its simulation runs.

  17. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumptio...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact 578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was ...

  18. ,"U.S. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil",3,"Monthly","7/2016","1/15/1974" ,"Release Date:","9/1/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","10/3/2016" ,"Excel File

  19. Papua New Guinea: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on oil exploration which is booming in Papua New Guinea (PNG) following a rash of license applications and farm-ins. Most activity is onshore, but success is beginning to drift offshore. Currently, 40 petroleum prospecting licenses (PPL) and one producing license are active, and eight more PPL applications are being considered. PNG is expected to become an oil exporter by September 1992 when initial production is expected from Iagifu, Hedina and Agogo fields.

  20. New Zealand: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that foreign oil firms may choose to leave for countries with friendlier tax climates, perhaps Southeast Asia or Papua New Guinea. New tax reform legislation became effective in October 1990 enraging the Petroleum Exploration Association of New Zealand (PEANZ) and disappointing petroleum explorers. Oil companies like Arco are already considering pulling out of future prospecting. Taxation Reform Bill 7 allows tax deductions only after prospects in a license are exhausted without success or allows costs to be written off over 10 years when a well comes on production. Exploration cost has to be capitalized, and farm-outs are taxed under the new regime.

  1. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L.; Bezdek, Roger; Wendling, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  2. Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2007 | Department of Energy 8: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 Fact #578: July 6, 2009 World Oil Reserves, Production, and Consumption, 2007 The United States was responsible for 8% of the world's petroleum production, held 2% of the world's crude oil reserves, and consumed 24% of the world's petroleum consumption in 2007. The Organization for Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) held 69% of the world's crude oil reserves and produced 41% of world

  3. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snead, Thomas E; Cohen, Steven A; Gildon, Demond L

    2015-04-07

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  4. Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per barrel in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO $ Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",1992,16.69,16.42999,16.9899,17.66,18.28,19.0599,19.89,20.72,21.65,22.61,23.51,24.29,24.9,25.6,26.3,27,27.64,28.16

  5. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.

    2016-03-15

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids. The methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin with an internal olefin in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin esters are formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having olefin esters.

  6. Future world oil supplies: There is a finite limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanhoe, L.F.

    1995-10-01

    The question is not whether, but when, world crude productivity will start to decline, ushering in the permanent oil shock era. While global information for predicting this ``event`` is not so straightforward as the data M. King Hubbert used in creating his famous curve that predicted the US oil production peak, there are indications that most of the large exploration targets have been found, at the same time that the world`s population is exploding. This theme and a discussion of ``reserve`` and ``resource`` definitions and use, or abuse, are the subjects of this article. Discussions and illustrations give one indication of where the world is in crude production and reserves, and where it is headed.

  7. Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth U.S. crude oil production reached 7 million barrels per day at the end of 2012 for the first time in two decades and is well on its way to topping 8 million barrels per day by 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects daily oil output will average 7.3 million barrels this year and then increase to 8.1 million barrels next year. The increase in U.S. and other North American oil production will account

  8. Methods of refining natural oils and methods of producing fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firth, Bruce E; Kirk, Sharon E; Gavaskar, Vasudeo S

    2015-11-04

    A method of refining a natural oil includes: (a) providing a feedstock that includes a natural oil; (b) reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a metathesized product that includes olefins and esters; (c) passivating residual metathesis catalyst with an agent selected from the group consisting of phosphorous acid, phosphinic acid, and a combination thereof; (d) separating the olefins in the metathesized product from the esters in the metathesized product; and (e) transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product and/or hydrogenating the olefins to form a fully or partially saturated hydrogenated product. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products produced in a metathesis reaction, and methods of producing fuel compositions are described.

  9. Methods of refining natural oils, and methods of producing fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firth, Bruce E.; Kirk, Sharon E.

    2015-10-27

    A method of refining a natural oil includes: (a) providing a feedstock that includes a natural oil; (b) reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a metathesized product that includes olefins and esters; (c) passivating residual metathesis catalyst with an agent that comprises nitric acid; (d) separating the olefins in the metathesized product from the esters in the metathesized product; and (e) transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product and/or hydrogenating the olefins to form a fully or partially saturated hydrogenated product. Methods for suppressing isomerization of olefin metathesis products produced in a metathesis reaction, and methods of producing fuel compositions are described.

  10. Methods of refining and producing isomerized fatty acid esters and fatty acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.; Beltran, Leslie V.; Kunz, Linda A.; Pals, Tessa M.; Quinn, Jordan R; Behrends, Jr., Raymond T.; Bernhardt, Randal J.

    2016-07-05

    Methods are provided for refining natural oil feedstocks and producing isomerized esters and acids. The methods comprise providing a C4-C18 unsaturated fatty ester or acid, and isomerizing the fatty acid ester or acid in the presence of heat or an isomerization catalyst to form an isomerized fatty ester or acid. In some embodiments, the methods comprise forming a dibasic ester or dibasic acid prior to the isomerizing step. In certain embodiments, the methods further comprise hydrolyzing the dibasic ester to form a dibasic acid. In certain embodiments, the olefin is formed by reacting the feedstock in the presence of a metathesis catalyst under conditions sufficient to form a metathesized product comprising olefins and esters, separating the olefins from the esters in the metathesized product, and transesterifying the esters in the presence of an alcohol to form a transesterified product having unsaturated esters.

  11. Table 3a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil, Projected vs. Actual Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per barrel in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 16.69 16.43 16.99 17.66 18.28 19.06 19.89 20.72 21.65 22.61 23.51 24.29 24.90 25.60 26.30 27.00 27.64 28.16 AEO 1995 1993 14.90 16.41 16.90 17.45 18.00 18.53 19.13 19.65 20.16 20.63

  12. Big questions cloud Iraq's future role in world oil market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tippee, B.

    1992-03-09

    This paper reports that Iraq raises questions for the world oil market beyond those frequently asked about when and under what circumstances it will resume exports. Two wars since 1981 have obscured encouraging results from a 20 year exploration program that were only beginning to come to light when Iraq invaded Kuwait in August 1990. Those results indicate the country might someday be able to produce much more than the 3.2 million b/d it was flowing before a United Nations embargo blocked exports. If exploratory potential is anywhere near what officials asserted in the late 1980s, and if Iraq eventually turns hospitable to international capital, the country could become a world class opportunity for oil companies as well as an exporter with productive capacity approaching that of Saudi Arabia. But political conditions can change quickly. Under a new, secular regime, Iraq might welcome non-Iraqi oil companies and capital as essential to economic recovery. It's a prospect that warrants a new industry look at what the country has revealed about its geology and exploration history.

  13. Projections of the impact of expansion of domestic heavy oil production on the U.S. refining industry from 1990 to 2010. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Ramzel, E.B.; Strycker, A.R.; Guariguata, G.; Salmen, F.G.

    1994-12-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity) production. This report provides a compendium of the United States refining industry and analyzes the industry by Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) and by ten smaller refining areas. The refining capacity, oil source and oil quality are analyzed, and projections are made for the U.S. refining industry for the years 1990 to 2010. The study used publicly available data as background. A linear program model of the U.S. refining industry was constructed and validated using 1990 U.S. refinery performance. Projections of domestic oil production (decline) and import of crude oil (increases) were balanced to meet anticipated demand to establish a base case for years 1990 through 2010. The impact of additional domestic heavy oil production, (300 MB/D to 900 MB/D, originating in select areas of the U.S.) on the U.S. refining complex was evaluated. This heavy oil could reduce the import rate and the balance of payments by displacing some imported, principally Mid-east, medium crude. The construction cost for refining units to accommodate this additional domestic heavy oil production in both the low and high volume scenarios is about 7 billion dollars for bottoms conversion capacity (delayed coking) with about 50% of the cost attributed to compliance with the Clean Air Act Amendment of 1990.

  14. OPEC and lower oil prices: Impacts on production capacity, export refining, domestic demand and trade balances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesharaki, F.; Fridley, D.; Isaak, D.; Totto, L.; Wilson, T.

    1988-12-01

    The East-West Center has received a research grant from the US Department of Energy's Office of Policy, Planning, and Analysis to study the impact of lower oil prices on OPEC production capacity, on export refineries, and petroleum trade. The project was later extended to include balance-of-payments scenarios and impacts on OPEC domestic demand. As the study progressed, a number of preliminary presentations were made at the US Department of Energy in order to receive feedback from DOE officials and to refine the focus of our analysis. During one of the presentations on June 4, 1987, the then Director of Division of Oil and Gas, John Stanley-Miller, advised us to focus our work on the Persian Gulf countries, since these countries were of special interest to the United States Government. Since then, our team has visited Iran, the United Arab Emirates, and Saudi Arabia and obtained detailed information from other countries. The political turmoil in the Gulf, the Iran/Iraq war, and the active US military presence have all worked to delay the final submission of our report. Even in countries where the United States has close ties, access to information has been difficult. In most countries, even mundane information on petroleum issues are treated as national secrets. As a result of these difficulties, we requested a one-year no cost extension to the grant and submitted an Interim Report in May 1988. As part of our grant extension request, we proposed to undertake additional tasks which appear in this report. 20 figs., 21 tabs.

  15. Table 5.21 Crude Oil Refiner Acquisition Costs, 1968-2011 (Dollars per Barrel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Crude Oil Refiner Acquisition Costs, 1968-2011 (Dollars per Barrel) Year Domestic Imported Composite Nominal 1 Real 2 Nominal 1 Real 2 Nominal 1 Real 2 1968E 3.21 14.57 [R] 2.90 13.16 [R] 3.17 14.39 [R] 1969E 3.37 14.58 [R] 2.80 12.11 [R] 3.29 14.23 [R] 1970E 3.46 14.22 [R] 2.96 12.16 [R] 3.40 13.97 [R] 1971E 3.68 14.40 [R] 3.17 12.41 [R] 3.60 14.09 [R] 1972E 3.67 13.77 [R] 3.22 12.08 [R] 3.58 13.43 [R] 1973E 4.17 14.82 [R] 4.08 14.50 [R] 4.15 14.75 [R] 1974 7.18 23.40 [R] 12.52 40.80 [R] 9.07

  16. Markets during world oil supply crises: an analysis of industry, consumer, and governmental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erfle, Stephen; Pound, John; Kalt, Joseph

    1981-04-01

    An analysis of the response of American markets to supply crises in world oil markets is presented. It addresses four main issues: the efficiency of the operation of American oil markets during oil supply crises; the problems of both economic efficiency and social equity which arise during the American adaptation process; the propriety of the Federal government's past policy responses to these problems; and the relationship between perceptions of the problems caused by world oil crises and the real economic natures of these problems. Specifically, Chapter 1 presents a theoretical discussion of the effects of a world supply disruption on the price level and supply availability of the world market oil to any consuming country including the US Chapter 2 provides a theoretical and empirical analysis of the efficiency of the adaptations of US oil product markets to higher world oil prices. Chapter 3 examines the responses of various groups of US oil firms to the alterations observed in world markets, while Chapter 4 presents a theoretical explanation for the price-lagging behavior exhibited by firms in the US oil industry. Chapter 5 addresses the nature of both real and imagined oil market problems in the US during periods of world oil market transition. (MCW)

  17. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2009 (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The oil prices reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO) represent the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil in 2007 dollars. Projections of future supply and demand are made for "liquids," a term used to refer to those liquids that after processing and refining can be used interchangeably with petroleum products. In AEO2009, liquids include conventional petroleum liquids -- such as conventional crude oil and natural gas plant liquids -- in addition to unconventional liquids, such as biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

  18. Implications of Increasing Light Tight Oil Production for U.S. Refining -

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum & Other Liquids Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Prices Crude reserves and production Refining and processing Imports/exports & movements Stocks Consumption/sales All petroleum & other liquids data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Consumption & sales Crude reserves & production Imports/exports & movements Prices Projections Recurring Refining & processing Stocks All reports Browse

  19. Third-Party Evaluation of Petro Tex Hydrocarbons, LLC, ReGen Lubricating Oil Re-refining Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compere, A L; Griffith, William {Bill} L

    2009-04-01

    This report presents an assessment of market, energy impact, and utility of the PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., ReGen process for re-refining used lubricating oil to produce Group I, II, and III base oils, diesel fuel, and asphalt. PetroTex Hydrocarbons, LLC., has performed extensive pilot scale evaluations, computer simulations, and market studies of this process and is presently evaluating construction of a 23 million gallon per year industrial-scale plant. PetroTex has obtained a 30 acre site in the Texas Industries RailPark in Midlothian Texas. The environmental and civil engineering assessments of the site are completed, and the company has been granted a special use permit from the City of Midlothian and air emissions permits for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

  20. Venezuelan projects advance to develop world`s largest heavy oil reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, G.; Stauffer, K.

    1996-07-08

    A number of joint venture projects at varying stages of progress promise to greatly increase Venezuela`s production of extra heavy oil. Units of Conoco, Chevron, Total, Arco, and Mobil have either signed agreements or are pursuing negotiations with affiliates of state-owned Petroleos de Venezuela SA on the development of huge reserves of 8--10{degree} gravity crude. Large heavy oil resources are present in the oil producing areas of eastern and western Venezuela, and the largest are in eastern Venezuela`s Orinoco heavy oil belt. The paper discusses the Orinoco heavy oil belt geology and several joint ventures being implemented.

  1. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2010 (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    In Annual Energy Outlook 2010, the price of light, low-sulfur (or "sweet") crude oil delivered at Cushing, Oklahoma, is tracked to represent movements in world oil prices. The Energy Information Administration makes projections of future supply and demand for "total liquids,"" which includes conventional petroleum liquids -- such as conventional crude oil, natural gas plant liquids, and refinery gain -- in addition to unconventional liquids, which include biofuels, bitumen, coal-to-liquids (CTL), gas-to-liquids (GTL), extra-heavy oils, and shale oil.

  2. Methods of refining and producing dibasic esters and acids from natural oil feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Snead, Thomas E.; Cohen, Steven A.; Gildon, Demond L.

    2016-06-14

    Methods and systems for making dibasic esters and/or dibasic acids using metathesis are generally disclosed. In some embodiments, the methods comprise reacting a terminal olefin ester with an internal olefin ester in the presence of a metathesis catalyst to form a dibasic ester and/or dibasic acid. In some embodiments, the terminal olefin ester or the internal olefin ester are derived from a renewable feedstock, such as a natural oil feedstock. In some such embodiments, the natural oil feedstock, or a transesterified derivative thereof, is metathesized to make the terminal olefin ester or the internal olefin ester.

  3. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

  4. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  5. The social costs to the US of monopolization of the world oil market, 1972--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.; Leiby, P.N.

    1993-03-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the US over the period 1972--1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the US and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel`s ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972--1991 period to a hypothetical ``more competitive`` world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader`s judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing US oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing theeconomic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy`s potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy`s inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972--1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US`s primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  6. U.S. Sales to End Users Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Volumes 4,103.1 3,860.0 4,053.4 4,238.4 3,888.8 3,799.0 1983-2016 Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% W NA NA W W W 1983-2016 Sulfur Greater Than 1% W 3,372.2 3,311.6 W W W 1983-2016 No. 4 Fuel Oil W - - W - W

  7. U.S. Sales for Resale Refiner Residual Fuel Oil and No. 4 Fuel Sales

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Volumes 9,292.6 9,338.0 9,180.7 8,984.8 9,875.7 8,936.2 1983-2016 Sulfur Less Than or Equal to 1% 977.1 1,152.2 725.0 1,176.1 1,267.5 632.8 1983-2016 Sulfur Greater Than 1% 8,315.6 8,185.7 8,455.8 7,808.7 8,608.2 8,303.5 1983-2016 No. 4 Fuel Oil 166.0 W 199.2 150.6 111.9 106.0

  8. Evaluation of heavy oil upgrading/refining process designs for HRI Dynacracking and UOP Aurabon Process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.; Adams, D.G.; Fox, J.V.

    1984-04-01

    The process designs examined consist of two non-commercialized heavy oil upgrading processes; namely, the Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. (HRI) Dynacracking Process and the UOP Process Division (UOP) Aurabon Process. The latter process design includes, besides the Aurabon Process, an integrated hydrotreating section which does have commercial stature. The Dynacracking Process designs cover six cases involving three heavy crude feedstocks. The Aurabon Complex designs are based on four cases, two for each of two heavy crude feedstocks. The engineering support services involved engineering review and assessment of data, drawings, reports and other information generated by the two process designers. Background information, the review and assessment methodology employed for evaluating the process designs, and a detailed discussion of the process design data generated by both process contractors are presented in this report. Significant findings for both processes may be summarized as follows: (1) The process designs were executed using sound engineering principles and practices; (2) Both processes may be deemed to perform in accordance with their process design; (3) a wide variety of heavy oil charge stocks can be upgraded by either process to products generally suitable for further refinery processing; (4) no insurmountable operating or environmental problems are anticipated; (5) the estimated capital investments and operating utility requirements are indicative of the increased cost to process contaminated heavy crudes; (6) the cost differential between the higher quantity lighter crudes and the poorer quality heavy crudes must be sufficient to justify these higher expenditures; and (7) both processes merit consideration by refiners contemplating contaminated heavy oil upgrading. 53 references, 40 tables.

  9. World oil and gas resources-future production realities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masters, C.D.; Root, D.H.; Attanasi, E.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Welcome to uncertainty was the phrase Jack Schanz used to introduce both layman and professionals to the maze of petroleum energy data that must be comprehended to achieve understanding of this critical commodity. Schanz was referring to the variables as he and his colleagues with Resources for the Future saw them in those years soon after the energy-awakening oil embargo of 1973. In some respects, the authors have made progress in removing uncertainty from energy data, but in general, we simply must accept that there are many points of view and many ways for the blindman to describe the elephant. There can be definitive listing of all uncertainties, but for this paper the authors try to underscore those traits of petroleum occurrence and supply that the author's believe bear most heavily on the understanding of production and resource availability. Because oil and gas exist in nature under such variable conditions and because the products themselves are variable in their properties, the authors must first recognize classification divisions of the resource substances, so that the reader might always have a clear perception of just what we are talking about and how it relates to other components of the commodity in question.

  10. World heavy oil and bitumen riches - update 1983: Part two, production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-06-08

    Despite world recession, overabundance of conventional oil and light product supplies, softer oil prices, and certain important reversals in development policies, worldwide production of heavy and extra-heavy crude oil increased 11.3% in 1982 compared to 1981; latest 1983 data confirm this trend. For the top ten heavy-oil-producing nations, the increase was 17.7% over the same period, mainly due to increases in Venezuela, Mexico, and Nigeria. In 1981, world heavy and extra-heavy crude production was 6.1% of world conventional oil production; in 1982 it increased to 7.2%. Bitumen production in Canada, the only country with 1982 production figures, increased 46% over 1981. It is probable that further technological advances and experimentation in other countries, including the Soviet Union, have resulted in other bitumen production increases as well. Although multinational cooperation in research for extraction, upgrading, and transportation of heavy crudes and bitumens has not grown to the extent that many industry experts had hoped, several broad areas of cooperation stand supported and many of them have been strengthened. Such progress in the face of economic and political uncertainties are demonstrations of world leadership for the next petroleum age. This issue presents the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for June 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  11. Natural gas: Governments and oil companies in the Third World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, A.; Hurst, C.; Mabro, R.

    1988-01-01

    It is asserted that oil companies claim to be generally receptive to gas development proposals; however, the lack of potential markets for gas, problems of foreign exchange convertibility, and lack of a legal framework often hinders their engagement. Governments, on the other hand, need to secure domestic energy supply and, if possible, gain some export earnings or royalties. An extensive discussion on the principles of pricing and fiscal regimes, potential points of disagreement is provided. A course of action is outlined from the managerial point of view to circumvent the most common pitfalls in planning and financing a gas project. Eight very detailed case studies are presented for Argentina, Egypt, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, Tanzania, Tunisia and Thailand.

  12. The domestic natural gas and oil initiative. Energy leadership in the world economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Two key overarching goals of this Initiative are enhancing the efficiency and competitiveness of U.S. industry and reducing the trends toward higher imports. These goals take into account new Federal policies that reflect economic needs, including economic growth, deficit reduction, job creation and security, and global competitiveness, as well as the need to preserve the environment, improve energy efficiency, and provide for national security. The success of this Initiative clearly requires coordinated strategies that range far beyond policies primarily directed at natural gas and oil supplies. Therefore, this Initiative proposes three major strategic activities: Strategic Activity 1 -- increase domestic natural gas and oil production and environmental protection by advancing and disseminating new exploration, production, and refining technologies; Strategic Activity 2 -- stimulate markets for natural gas and natural-gas-derived products, including their use as substitutes for imported oil where feasible; and Strategic Activity 3 -- ensure cost-effective environmental protection by streamlining and improving government communication, decision making, and regulation. Finally, the Initiative will reexamine the costs and benefits of increase oil imports through a broad new Department of Energy study. This study will form the basis for additional actions found to be warranted under the study.

  13. The Social Costs to the U.S. of Monopolization of the World Oil Market, 1972-1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1993-01-01

    The partial monopolization of the world oil market by the OPEC cartel has produced significant economic costs to the economies of the world. This paper reports estimates of the costs of monopolization of oil to the U.S. over the period 1972-1991. Two fundamental assumptions of the analysis are, (1) that OPEC has acted as a monopoly, albeit with limited control, knowledge, and ability to act and, (2) that the U.S. and other consuming nations could, through collective (social) action affect the cartel's ability to act as a monopoly. We measure total costs by comparing actual costs for the 1972-1991 period to a hypothetical ''more competitive'' world oil market scenario. By measuring past costs we avoid the enormous uncertainties about the future course of the world oil market and leave to the reader's judgment the issue of how much the future will be like the past. We note that total cost numbers cannot be used to determine the value of reducing U.S. oil use by one barrel. They are useful for describing the overall size of the petroleum problem and are one important factor in deciding how much effort should be devoted to solving it. Monopoly pricing of oil transfers wealth from US. oil consumers to foreign oil producers and, by increasing the economic scarcity of oil, reduces the economy's potential to produce. The actions of the OPEC Cartel have also produced oil price shocks, both upward and downward, that generate additional costs because of the economy's inherent inability to adjust quickly to a large change in energy prices. Estimated total costs to the United States from these three sources for the 1972-1991 period are put at $4.1 trillion in 1990$ ($1.2 T wealth transfer, $0.8 T macroeconomic adjustment costs, $2.1 T potential GNP losses). The cost of the US's primary oil supply contingency program is small ($10 B) by comparison.

  14. The North American Free Trade Agreement: Implications for the parties and world oil markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verleger, P.K. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    The proposed North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has been criticized because it failed to open Mexico`s hydrocarbon reserves to development by private parties. This failure is an economic tragedy. Consumer welfare will clearly be reduced as a consequence. However, the loss is confined to Mexico where economic growth rates may be reduced by as much as one half of one percent per year. Otherwise, the agreement will have insignificant impacts on the world oil market. Future levels of production and prices will be unaffected by the agreement. 24 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Wholesale Volumes 1995 Annual Averages Motor...

  16. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 3. U.S. Refiner Retail Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Retail Volumes 1997 Annual Averages Motor...

  17. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Wholesale Volumes 1997 Annual Averages Motor...

  18. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 3. U.S. Refiner Retail Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Retail Volumes 1995 Annual Averages Motor...

  19. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Day Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 3. U.S. Refiner Retail Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Retail Volumes 1996 Annual Averages Motor...

  20. Source: Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-782A, "Refiners...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Motor Gasoline No. 2 Distillate Residual Fuel Oil 5. U.S. Refiner Wholesale Petroleum Product Volumes Figure Percentages of Refiner Wholesale Volumes 1996 Annual Averages Motor...

  1. S. 42: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, First Session, January 25, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    S. 42 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products.

  2. Assessing world energy in the wake of the Iran/Iraq war: an oil shortage proves elusive. [Monograph

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randol, W.L.; Verleger, P.K. Jr.; Clayman, M.

    1981-01-01

    A reassessment of world energy supplies was made in the wake of curtailed exports during the Iran/Iraq war and the corresponding increase in world oil prices, the drop in oil consumption, the widening economic recession, and US decontrol of oil. The report concludes that present worldwide levels of oil production are adequate to satisfy projected levels of consumption through 1981. This leaves the world energy system in balance even if oil exports from Iran and Iraq remain at minimal levels for the year. Past overestimation of demand makes it more likely that this year's consumption will fall short of the projection. The way in which Saudi Arabia's output is cut will be the key to oil pricing in 1981, the authors feel, but the likely approach will be a gradual reduction in production that will allow the Saudis to regain control of OPEC. The effects of a receding demand for oil have been intensified by high US interest rates and the spreading recession. The effect of immediate decontrol of petroleum is likely to compound the trend for reduced consumption and a corresponding increase in efficiency. 2 figures, 2 tables.

  3. Impact and future of heavy oil produciton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K, )

    1996-01-01

    Heavy oil resources are becoming increaingly important in meeting world oil demand. Heavy oil accounts for 10% of the worlds current oil production and is anticipated to grow significantly. Recent narrowing of the price margins between light and heavy oil and the development of regional heavy oil markets (production, refining and marketing) have prompted renewed investment in heavy oil. Production of well known heavy oil resources of Canada, Venezuela, United States, and elsewhere throughout the world will be expanded on a project-by-project basis. Custom refineries designed to process these heavy crudes are being expanded. Refined products from these crudes will be cleaner than ever before because of the huge investment. However, heavy oil still remains at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production, transportation and refining have to compete with other investment opportunities available in the industry. Expansion of the U.S. heavy oil industry is no exception. Relaxation of export restrictions on Alaskan North Slope crude has prompted renewed development of California's heavy oil resources. The location, resource volume, and oil properties of the more than 80-billion barrel U.S. heavy oil resource are well known. Our recent studies summarize the constraints on production, define the anticipated impact (volume, location and time frame) of development of U.S. heavy oil resources, and examines the $7-billion investment in refining units (bottoms conversion capacity) required to accommodate increased U.S. heavy oil production. Expansion of Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil and tar sands production are anticipated to dramatically impact the U.S. petroleum market while displacing some imported Mideast crude.

  4. Impact and future of heavy oil produciton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K,

    1996-12-31

    Heavy oil resources are becoming increaingly important in meeting world oil demand. Heavy oil accounts for 10% of the worlds current oil production and is anticipated to grow significantly. Recent narrowing of the price margins between light and heavy oil and the development of regional heavy oil markets (production, refining and marketing) have prompted renewed investment in heavy oil. Production of well known heavy oil resources of Canada, Venezuela, United States, and elsewhere throughout the world will be expanded on a project-by-project basis. Custom refineries designed to process these heavy crudes are being expanded. Refined products from these crudes will be cleaner than ever before because of the huge investment. However, heavy oil still remains at a competitive disadvantage due to higher production, transportation and refining have to compete with other investment opportunities available in the industry. Expansion of the U.S. heavy oil industry is no exception. Relaxation of export restrictions on Alaskan North Slope crude has prompted renewed development of California`s heavy oil resources. The location, resource volume, and oil properties of the more than 80-billion barrel U.S. heavy oil resource are well known. Our recent studies summarize the constraints on production, define the anticipated impact (volume, location and time frame) of development of U.S. heavy oil resources, and examines the $7-billion investment in refining units (bottoms conversion capacity) required to accommodate increased U.S. heavy oil production. Expansion of Canadian and Venezuelan heavy oil and tar sands production are anticipated to dramatically impact the U.S. petroleum market while displacing some imported Mideast crude.

  5. Secretary Bodman Tours Refinery and Calls for More Domestic Refining...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Bodman today renewed the call for expanded oil refining capacity in the United States and ... and one way to do that is to strengthen and expand our domestic oil refining capacity. ...

  6. Rietveld Refinement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    profile Chi-squared value 4.944 Progress so far Inverse Modeling Method 2 Fourier Method Data Model Refined Structure 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 1000 2000 3000 4000...

  7. Refining New-Physics Searches in B→Dτν with Lattice QCD | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Series: Refiner Crude Oil Inputs Refiner Gross Inputs Refiner Operable Capacity (Calendar Day) Refiner Percent Operable Utilization Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of Motor Gasoline Blending Comp Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of RBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of CBOB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of GTAB Blending Components Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of All Other Blending Component Net Inputs (Refiner and Blender) of Fuel Ethanol

  8. U.S. Refining Capacity Utilization

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1995-01-01

    This article briefly reviews recent trends in domestic refining capacity utilization and examines in detail the differences in reported crude oil distillation capacities and utilization rates among different classes of refineries.

  9. War curbs oil exports by Iran and Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-29

    A discussion of the effects of the war between Iran and Iraq on oil exports from the area covers damage (extent unknown) to the Abadan, Iran, and Basra, Iraq, oil refineries, to the Iraqi petrochemical complex under construction at Basra, to oil export terminals at Kharg Island and Mina-al-Bakr, and to other oil facilities; war-caused reductions in oil production, refining, shipping, and export, estimated at 2.05-3.35 million bbl/day; the possible effects of the war on OPEC's decisions concerning oil production and pricing; the significance of the Strait of Hormuz for the export of oil by several countries in addition to the belligerents; the U.S. and non-Communist oil stocks which might enable the world to avoid an oil shortage if the war is ended in the near future; and the long-term effects of the war on Iran's and Iraq's oil industries.

  10. Oil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department works to ensure domestic and global oil supplies are environmentally sustainable and invests in research and technology to make oil drilling cleaner and more efficient.

  11. S. 65: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, January 21, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    S. 65 may be cited as the [open quotes]Domestic Petroleum Security Act of 1993.[close quotes] This Bill proposes a fee on imported crude oil or refined petroleum products. In general, Subtitle E of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is to be amended by adding at the end thereof the following new chapter: [open quotes]Chapter 55--Imported Crude Oil of Refined Petroleum Products.[close quotes] Section 5891 will be Imposition of Tax; Section 5892, Definitions; Section 5893, Registration; and Section 5894, Procedures, Returns, and Penalties.

  12. H. R. 838: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, February 4, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    H.R. 838 may be cited as the [open quotes]Energy Security Tax Act.[close quotes] The purpose of this Bill is to impose a fee on imported crude oil or refined petroleum products. In general, Subtitle E of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is to be amended by adding at the end thereof the following new chapter: [open quotes]Chapter 55--Imported Crude Oil, Refined Petroleum Products, and Petrochemical Feedstocks or Derivatives.[close quotes] Section 5886 will be concerned with Imposition of Tax; Section 5887 with Definitions; Section 5888 with Procedures, Returns, and Penalties; and Section 5890 with Adjustment for inflation.

  13. Refines Efficiency Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRI

    2002-05-15

    Refinery processes that convert heavy oils to lighter distillate fuels require heating for distillation, hydrogen addition or carbon rejection (coking). Efficiency is limited by the formation of insoluble carbon-rich coke deposits. Heat exchangers and other refinery units must be shut down for mechanical coke removal, resulting in a significant loss of output and revenue. When a residuum is heated above the temperature at which pyrolysis occurs (340 C, 650 F), there is typically an induction period before coke formation begins (Magaril and Aksenova 1968, Wiehe 1993). To avoid fouling, refiners often stop heating a residuum before coke formation begins, using arbitrary criteria. In many cases, this heating is stopped sooner than need be, resulting in less than maximum product yield. Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed innovative Coking Index concepts (patent pending) which can be used for process control by refiners to heat residua to the threshold, but not beyond the point at which coke formation begins when petroleum residua materials are heated at pyrolysis temperatures (Schabron et al. 2001). The development of this universal predictor solves a long standing problem in petroleum refining. These Coking Indexes have great potential value in improving the efficiency of distillation processes. The Coking Indexes were found to apply to residua in a universal manner, and the theoretical basis for the indexes has been established (Schabron et al. 2001a, 2001b, 2001c). For the first time, a few simple measurements indicates how close undesired coke formation is on the coke formation induction time line. The Coking Indexes can lead to new process controls that can improve refinery distillation efficiency by several percentage points. Petroleum residua consist of an ordered continuum of solvated polar materials usually referred to as asphaltenes dispersed in a lower polarity solvent phase held together by intermediate polarity materials usually referred to as

  14. S. 2886: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, September 27, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This bill amends Subtitle E of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. The bill inserts Chapter 54, which defines the rate of tax, procedures for its payment and for registration, and imposes penalties for non-compliance.

  15. S. 254: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil or refined petroleum products. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, January 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the text of a bill to impose import taxes on crude oil and refined petroleum products, petrochemical feedstock or petrochemical derivatives. Taxes will be paid by the first person who sells the product within the U.S. and by the person who uses the product.

  16. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes bandwidth.pdf (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications ITP ...

  17. ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in California: California Industries of the Future Program ITP Petroleum Refining: Profile of the Petroleum Refining Industry in ...

  18. Petroleum refining industry of developed capitalist countries in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prokhorova, A.A.

    1994-07-01

    Crude oil is the principal source of energy today and in the immediate future. The increases in the consumption of crude oil (1.7% per year up to 2005) will be offset mainly by additional supplies from the countries of the Near East. Data on the imports of oil by the developed capitalists countries are presented in Table 2. In the United States, according to a projection made by Conoco, by the year 2000 the volume of imports will be twice the volume of domestic production; according to another prediction, the amount of Near East crude will increase from 34% in 1990 to 42% in 2000. Since the mid-1980s, the energy policy of the USA has been based on importing so-called cheap crude. Laws have been passed to mandate not only energy saving, but also cuts in the oil and gas production on U.S. territory. The volume of U.S. oil production will be 20% lower in 2000 than in 1990. Some 90% of the worldwide demand for oil is met by light and medium-density crudes, but such crudes account for only 25% of the oil resources. Projections indicate that the oil supplied to refiners in the future will be heavier and will have higher sulfur contents. The U.S. production of low-sulfur crude will drop off sharply in the next 10-15 years. The drop in oil production of the CIS [former USSR] and the consequent drop in exports from these countries will have a destabilizing effect on the world market. The average price of the {open_quotes}market basket{close_quotes} of OPEC crudes in 1991 was $149/ton (in 1990 $178/ton), in comparison with a 1992 price of $148/ton. This report presents data on refining process capacities and the ratio of secondary capacity to primary distillation capacity.

  19. Oil Refund Decisions | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    During the period 1973 through 1981, the Federal government imposed price and allocation controls of crude oil and refined petroleum products, such as gasoline and heating oil. ...

  20. U.S. Crude Oil Export Policy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude Oil Export Policy EIA Energy Conference Jason Bordoff July 14, 2014 Washington, DC ... Cook Inlet. * Heavy California crude oil. * Exports connected to refining or ...

  1. Going Global: Tight Oil Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    GOING GLOBAL: TIGHT OIL PRODUCTION Leaping out of North America and onto the World Stage JULY 2014 GOING GLOBAL: TIGHT OIL PRODUCTION Jamie Webster, Senior Director Global Oil ...

  2. Have We Run Out of Oil Yet? Oil Peaking Analysis from an Optimist's Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Hopson, Dr Janet L; Li, Jia

    2005-01-01

    This study addresses several questions concerning the peaking of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range of uncertainty? What are the key determining factors? Will a transition to unconventional oil undermine or strengthen OPEC's influence over world oil markets? These issues are explored using a model combining alternative world energy scenarios with an accounting of resource depletion and a market-based simulation of transition to unconventional oil resources. No political or environmental constraints are allowed to hinder oil production, geological constraints on the rates at which oil can be produced are not represented, and when USGS resource estimates are used, more than the mean estimate of ultimately recoverable resources is assumed to exist. The issue is framed not as a question of "running out" of conventional oil, but in terms of the timing and rate of transition from conventional to unconventional oil resources. Unconventional oil is chosen because production from Venezuela's heavy-oil fields and Canada's Athabascan oil sands is already underway on a significant scale and unconventional oil is most consistent with the existing infrastructure for producing, refining, distributing and consuming petroleum. However, natural gas or even coal might also prove to be economical sources of liquid hydrocarbon fuels. These results indicate a high probability that production of conventional oil from outside of the Middle East region will peak, or that the rate of increase of production will become highly constrained before 2025. If world consumption of hydrocarbon fuels is to continue growing, massive development of unconventional resources will be required. While there are grounds for pessimism and optimism, it is certainly not too soon for extensive, detailed analysis of transitions to alternative energy sources.

  3. Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-10-01

    The petroleum refining energy bandwidth report analyzes the most energy-intensive unit operations used in U.S. refineries: crude oil distillation, fluid catalytic cracking, catalytic hydrotreating, catalytic reforming, and alkylation. The "bandwidth" provides a snapshot of the energy losses that can potentially be recovered through best practices and technology R&D.

  4. Step 3: Project Refinement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Project Refinement 2 1 Potential 3 Refinement 4 Implementation 5 Operations & Maintenance 2 Options 3 Refinement 1/28/2016 2 3 FUNDING AND FINANCING OPTIONS Project Ownership Financing structure is highly dependent on size of the project and the capital available for a given project: * Tribe owns the project (cash purchase or debt) * Tribe hosts the project and buys the electricity (power purchase agreement) * Tribe partners with private sector and co-owns the project (uncertainties about

  5. H. R. 4662: a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session, April 22, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    A bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 to impose a fee on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products was introduced and referred to the House Ways and Means Committee. The fee would apply to the first sale of crude or refined petroleum products following importation into the US and the first use. It exempts certain exports, but requires proof of eligibility for exemption. Sections of the bill outline procedures for determining prices and adjustments, the registration of affected parties, and penalties for non-compliance.

  6. Refiners trade hydroprocessing experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-16

    Hydrogen treating and conversion processes less severe than hydrocracking abound in most refineries and therefore were a subject of high interest at the National Petroleum Refiners Association question and answer session on refining technology. The present paper, which is the second abstract of the transcript of the most recent meeting, covers hydroprocessing and some of its mechanical, process, and catalytic aspects.

  7. Advances in heavy oil hydroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendizabal, O.B. )

    1988-06-01

    The world increase in heavy crudes has forced refiners to develop different processes that upgrade the yields and product properties recovered from these crudes. However, some of the optimized and new processes are not able to handle whole heavy crude oils, due to the high viscosity and corrosion of their long and short residues. The different processes for heavy crudes can be classified in two areas: physical (vg. Liquid Extraction) and chemical processes. The catalytic hydrotreating process, which belongs to this last classification, has demonstrated to be an economical upgrading process for heavy crude oil. This paper describes the development by the Mexican Petroleum Institute of the process to hydrotreat maya heavy crude. The effect of the operating conditions, the catalyst ---- development and the technical - economical analysis are presented. The product properties and yields are compared with the results obtained with light crude oil like isthmus.

  8. Genealogy of major U.S. refiners - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    See full Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Previous Release Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Release date: September 18, 2013 figre 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2040. The structure of the U.S. petroleum refining industry has changed substantially over the past several years. In the diagram the companies shown on the right side are presently active in U.S. refining. The transactions over the past 25 years that created these companies also are shown. The

  9. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  10. NAFTA opportunities: Petroleum refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) creates a more transparent environment for the sale of refined petroleum products to Mexico, and locks in access to Canada's relatively open market for these products. Canada and Mexico are sizable United States export markets for refined petroleum products, with exports of $556 million and $864 million, respectively, in 1992. These markets represent approximately 24 percent of total U.S. exports of these goods.

  11. Hawaii energy strategy project 2: Fossil energy review. Task 1: World and regional fossil energy dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breazeale, K.; Isaak, D.T.; Yamaguchi, N.; Fridley, D.; Johnson, C.; Long, S.

    1993-12-01

    This report in the Hawaii Energy Strategy Project examines world and regional fossil energy dynamics. The topics of the report include fossil energy characteristics, the world oil industry including reserves, production, consumption, exporters, importers, refining, products and their uses, history and trends in the global oil market and the Asia-Pacific market; world gas industry including reserves, production, consumption, exporters, importers, processing, gas-based products, international gas market and the emerging Asia-Pacific gas market; the world coal industry including reserves, classification and quality, utilization, transportation, pricing, world coal market, Asia-Pacific coal outlook, trends in Europe and the Americas; and environmental trends affecting fossil fuels. 132 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 59.29 76.69 101.87 100.93 100.49 92.02 1968-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 61.63 79.91 111.01 111.50 106.80 96.70 2004-2014 Midwest (PADD...

  13. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil - Composite

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Acquisition Type: Composite Domestic Imported Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Acquisition Type Area Feb-16 Mar-16 Apr-16 May-16 Jun-16 Jul-16 View History U.S. 28.53 33.82 37.71 42.88 45.95 42.90 1974-2016 East Coast (PADD 1) 31.36 36.91 40.32 45.24 48.11 2004-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) 27.01 32.80 37.04 42.47 45.80 2004-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 28.53 33.17 37.05 42.13 45.68

  14. Trends in petroleum refining process technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kowalczyk, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the 1990`s, the shift toward reformulated fuels and the unrelenting economic pressures on the petroleum refining industry have led to the ongoing development of a series of technological advances to improve fuels quality and industry operating efficiency. In this paper, ten of the most innovative and high impact recent developments in petroleum refining process technology will be highlighted. Process improvements and innovations have occurred in all facets of petroleum refining operations including fluid catalytic cracking, ether production, desulfurization, hydrocracking, gas processing, environmental control and heavy oil processing. Discussed will be the technical and economic impact of each of these new technologies on the petroleum refinery of the late 20th and early 21st century.

  15. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  16. World pipeline work set for rapid growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This paper reports on international pipeline construction which has entered a fast-growth period, accelerated by the new political and economic realities around the world and increasing demand for natural gas, crude oil and refined petroleum products. Many projects are under way or in planning for completion in the mid- to late 1990s in Europe, South America, Asia and the Middle East. Pipeline And Gas Journal's projection calls for construction or other work on 30,700 miles of new natural gas, crude oil and refined products pipelines in the 1992-93 period outside Canada and the U.S. These projects will cost an estimated $30 billion-plus. Natural gas pipelines will comprise most of the mileage, accounting for almost 23,000 miles at an estimated cost of $26.3 billion. Products pipelines, planned or under construction, will add another 5,800 miles at a cost of $2.8 billion. Crude oil pipelines, at a minimum, will total 1,900 new miles at a cost of slightly under $1 billion.

  17. Impacts of oil disturbances: lessons from experience. [1973-1974 Oil Crisis; 1978-1979 Iranian Revolution; 1980-1981 Iran-Iraq War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curlee, T R

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of the impacts of previous oil distrubances can be used to suggest the impacts of future oil disturbances. This paper reviews how the 1973-1974 Oil Crisis, the 1978-1979 Iranian Revolution, and the 1980-1981 Iran-Iraq War impacted the US and world oil markets. Various measures of impacts are considered, such as impacts on physical flows of crude and products, crude and product price changes on the US and world markets, impacts on stocks of crude and products, and impacts on refiners' inputs and outputs. Various macroeconomic indicators, such as gross national product, inflation rates, and unemployment, are also considered. Of particular interest in this study are the impacts that oil disturbances have had (and could have) on the availabilities of particular crude types and the abilities of US refiners to process crudes of various types in the short run. In addition, this paper reviews how the actions of the consuming countries and the major oil companies affected the impacts of past disturbances. The paper briefly discusses the likely causes and impacts of future oil distrubances and summarizes the lessons to be learned from past reactions to oil disturbances.

  18. Fact #676: May 23, 2011 U.S. Refiners Produce about 19 Gallons of Gasoline

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from a Barrel of Oil | Department of Energy 6: May 23, 2011 U.S. Refiners Produce about 19 Gallons of Gasoline from a Barrel of Oil Fact #676: May 23, 2011 U.S. Refiners Produce about 19 Gallons of Gasoline from a Barrel of Oil A standard U.S. barrel contains 42 gallons of crude oil which yields about 44 gallons of petroleum products. The additional 2 gallons of petroleum products come from refiner gains which result in an additional 6% of product. As shown in the figure below, a little more

  19. Oil-futures markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prast, W.G.; Lax, H.L.

    1983-01-01

    This book on oil futures trading takes a look at a market and its various hedging strategies. Growing interest in trading of commodity futures has spread to petroleum, including crude oil, and key refined products such as gasoline and heating oil. This book describes how the international petroleum trade is structured, examines the working of oil futures markets in the United States and the United Kingdom, and assesses the possible courses of further developments.

  20. Focus on Venezuelan heavy crude: refining margins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-25

    Of six crudes refined in the US Gulf Coast, heavy Venezuelan crude Lagunillas (15/sup 0/ API) provides the best margin per barrel. Data for end of December 1983 and the first three weeks of January show that margins on all crudes are on the rise in this market, due to a turnaround in product prices. The lighter crudes are showing the greatest increase in Gross Product Worth. This is having a modest shrinking effect on the margin differential between light and heavy crudes in this market. The domestic crude West Texas Intermediate, at 40/sup 0/ API, provides the highest GPW in this crude slate sample, over US $31 per barrel, compared to GPW of under US $28 per barrel for Lagunillas. Still, as Lagunillas cost about US $8 less than does WTI, refiners with sufficient residue conversion capacity can be earning about US $3.50 more in margin per barrel than they can with WTI. Although few refiners would be using a 15/sup 0/ API crude exclusively for any length of time, heavier oil's inclusion in modern refiners' diets is enhancing their competitive position more than any other single factor. This issue of Energy Detente presents the fuel price/tax series and industrial fuel prices for January 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere.

  1. Fire flood recovery process effects upon heavy oil properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichert, C.; Fuhr, B.; Sawatzky, H.; Lefleur, R.; Verkoczy, B.; Soveran, D.; Jha, K.

    1988-06-01

    The steady decline in proven conventional oil deposits world wide has increased the emphasis on the use of heavy oil and bitumen. Most of the heavy oil and oil sand deposits share the common problem of providing very little or no primary production. They require a reduction in viscosity of the oil to make it flow. The oil in place and the reservoir characteristics are generally studied carefully to determine the design of the recovery process most applicable to the deposit and to evaluate its potential. Many of these same characteristics are also used to evaluate the oil with respect to upgrading, refining and final usage in the form of products. A variety of processes have been developed most of which utilize heat either in the form of steam or combustion to mobolize the oil in the reservoir. These processes vary considerably from rather mild conditions for steam stimulation to quite severe for combustion recovery. Figure 1 shows a typical schematic of an insitu combustion process. Many variations of forward combustion are used in the field to produce oil. Depending upon the severity of the recovery process in the recovered oil may be similar to the oil in the deposit or may be highly modified (oxidized, polymerized or upgraded). A memorandum of Understanding was signed by the Governments of the United States of America, Canada and the Provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta to study different aspects of the problems related to the recovery of oil from heavy oil and sand deposits. One phase of the study is to determine the effects of different methods of in-situ recovery on the composition of recovered bitumen and heavy oils. This paper describes the findings from a study of fireflood process in a heavy oil deposit located in the Cummings formation of the Eyehill Field in Saskatchewan, Canada.

  2. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  3. CLAMR (Compute Language Adaptive Mesh Refinement)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CLAMR (Compute Language Adaptive Mesh Refinement) CLAMR (Compute Language Adaptive Mesh Refinement) CLAMR (Compute Language Adaptive Mesh Refinement) is being developed as a DOE...

  4. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This energy bandwidth analysis provides a realistic estimate of the energy that may be saved in petroleum refining processes by quantifying measures of energy consumption.

  5. North Dakota Refining Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Hill; Kurt Swenson; Carl Tuura; Jim Simon; Robert Vermette; Gilberto Marcha; Steve Kelly; David Wells; Ed Palmer; Kuo Yu; Tram Nguyen; Juliam Migliavacca

    2011-01-05

    According to a 2008 report issued by the United States Geological Survey, North Dakota and Montana have an estimated 3.0 to 4.3 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil in an area known as the Bakken Formation. With the size and remoteness of the discovery, the question became 'can a business case be made for increasing refining capacity in North Dakota?' And, if so what is the impact to existing players in the region. To answer the question, a study committee comprised of leaders in the region's petroleum industry were brought together to define the scope of the study, hire a consulting firm and oversee the study. The study committee met frequently to provide input on the findings and modify the course of the study, as needed. The study concluded that the Petroleum Area Defense District II (PADD II) has an oversupply of gasoline. With that in mind, a niche market, naphtha, was identified. Naphtha is used as a diluent used for pipelining the bitumen (heavy crude) from Canada to crude markets. The study predicted there will continue to be an increase in the demand for naphtha through 2030. The study estimated the optimal configuration for the refinery at 34,000 barrels per day (BPD) producing 15,000 BPD of naphtha and a 52 percent refinery charge for jet and diesel yield. The financial modeling assumed the sponsor of a refinery would invest its own capital to pay for construction costs. With this assumption, the internal rate of return is 9.2 percent which is not sufficient to attract traditional investment given the risk factor of the project. With that in mind, those interested in pursuing this niche market will need to identify incentives to improve the rate of return.

  6. Abu Dhabi National Oil Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    oil companies in the world. Abu Dhabi National Oil Company oversees many phases of oil and gas exploration and production, as well as other business activities. References...

  7. Petroleum Refining | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Petroleum Refineries in California (2004) ... Photo credit: iStockphoto.com15906809 Petroleum Refining The United States is the largest, most ...

  8. Table A3. Refiner/Reseller Prices of Distillate and Residual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A3. RefinerReseller Prices of Distillate and Residual Fuel Oils, by PAD District, 1983-Present (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Geographic Area Year No. 1 Distillate No. 2...

  9. Fact #676: May 23, 2011 U.S. Refiners Produce about 19 Gallons...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A standard U.S. barrel contains 42 gallons of crude oil which yields about 44 gallons of ... and 10 gallons of diesel fuel are produced from a barrel of crudeoil by U.S. refiners. ...

  10. Ecuador: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that there has been considerable turbulence in Ecuador's E and P sector over the last year. For instance, Energy Minister Diego Tramariz was replaced by the country's Congress after he raised subsidized fuel prices. Ecuadoran and U.S. environmentalists, meanwhile, raised a firestorm of controversy over the on-again, off- again development of Conoco's Block 16 in Yasuni National Park. Finally, Unocal and PetroCanada this spring terminated their respective drilling operations after fruitless multiwell efforts. New Energy Minister Donald Castillo certainly has his work cut out in attempting to maintain stability in upstream activity. To that end, Castillo has stated that one of his top priorities will be to maintain a good working relationship with foreign operators. He also expected a seventh round of exploratory blocks to be offered before summer's end to shore up activity. Castillo reiterated in public statements that he stands by the administration's existing energy policies, including development of Block 16.

  11. Iran: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that at the end of its war with Iraq, Iran embarked on an urgent program to restore its productive capacity. This effort has been hindered by lack of hard currency and, hence, technology, parts, equipment, etc. Iran has been trying to improve relations with the U.S, over the past two years. Recently, the embargo on importing Iranian crude into the U.S. was lifted. Over the past year and a half, Iran accumulated enough money to resume imports of U.S. and other foreign drilling equipment. However, drilling has remained at a low level. Also, efforts to boost output have been slowed by war damage both on and offshore---particularly the latter---and serious BHP declines in major onshore fields that can only be corrected by ultra- high cost gas injection projects. Currently, large injection projects are only operating in three major fields: Gachsaran, Ahwaz and Marun.

  12. Paraguay: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports on Paraguay's one well which was completed in 1990. Texaco's Mallorquin 1 wildcat was drilled to a 9,811-ft TD and abandoned as a dry hole. Located in Alto Parana province of southeastern Paraguay, the $3.6-million well was drilled with a slim hole rig in an area where poor seismic quality makes interpretation very difficult. No additional wells are planned.

  13. Italy: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    This paper reports that activity has picked up in Italy since the downturn of 1989. Agip has been the most active, drilling 56 exploration and development wells last year. The company plans to increase offshore drilling spending by about two-thirds to $200 million this year.

  14. Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies, Call Slides and Discussion Summary, March 29, 2012. During this webinar participants discussed how programs have adapted and refined their financing strategies based on initial implementation experience and learning.

  15. Crystal structure refinement with SHELXL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheldrick, George M., E-mail: gsheldr@shelx.uni-ac.gwdg.de [Department of Structural Chemistry, Georg-August Universitt Gttingen, Tammannstrae 4, Gttingen 37077 (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    New features added to the refinement program SHELXL since 2008 are described and explained. The improvements in the crystal structure refinement program SHELXL have been closely coupled with the development and increasing importance of the CIF (Crystallographic Information Framework) format for validating and archiving crystal structures. An important simplification is that now only one file in CIF format (for convenience, referred to simply as a CIF) containing embedded reflection data and SHELXL instructions is needed for a complete structure archive; the program SHREDCIF can be used to extract the .hkl and .ins files required for further refinement with SHELXL. Recent developments in SHELXL facilitate refinement against neutron diffraction data, the treatment of H atoms, the determination of absolute structure, the input of partial structure factors and the refinement of twinned and disordered structures. SHELXL is available free to academics for the Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems, and is particularly suitable for multiple-core processors.

  16. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Stephen Herring

    2010-01-08

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, lab

  17. Need for refining capacity creates opportunities for producers in Middle East

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.S.S. )

    1994-07-11

    Oil industry interest in refining has revived in the past few years in response to rising oil consumption. The trend creates opportunities, for countries in the Middle East, which do not own refining assets nearly in proportion to their crude oil reserved. By closing this gap between reserves and refining capacity, the countries can ease some of the instability now characteristic of the oil market. Some major oil producing countries have begun to move downstream. During the 1980s, Venezuela, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Libya, and other members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries acquired refining assets through direct total purchase or joint ventures. Nevertheless, the oil industry remains largely unintegrated, with the Middle East holding two thirds of worldwide oil reserves but only a small share downstream. As worldwide refining capacity swings from a period of surplus toward one in which the need for new capacity will be built. The paper discusses background of the situation, shrinking surplus, investment requirements, sources of capital, and shipping concerns.

  18. Electronic structure of superconductivity refined

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic structure of superconductivity refined Electronic structure of superconductivity refined A team of physicists propose a new model that expands on a little understood aspect of the electronic structure in high-temperature superconductors. July 10, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma

  19. Flexibility in heavy oil upgrading with unicracking/HDS technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hennig, H.; Baron, K.; Moorhead, E.L.; Smith, M.

    1984-03-01

    With petroleum reserves becoming heavier and the demand for bottom of the barrel products greatly reduced, refiners are increasing their capabilities to upgrade heavy oil. Many heavy oil upgrading options are available and the best strategy for each refiner is not obvious. The best approach will depend on the specific circumstances and goals of the refiner. This presentation discusses the relative merits of several heavy oil upgrading options utilizing the Unicracking/HDS process.

  20. Pollution prevention in the petroleum refining industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fromm, C.H.; White, S.L.

    1995-09-01

    Pollution prevention (P2) as applied to petroleum refining should seek opportunities to reduce waste by preventing oil/hydrocarbon loss, by decreasing consumption of auxiliary input materials, and by improving conversion of incoming impurities into useful products. This chapter will focus on P2 techniques that have found or could find applications in minimizing or eliminating reducible solid waste and wastewater from the petroleum refining process. Air emissions are not covered. The following commonly encountered wastes are considered in this chapter: oily sludges; spent caustics; spent catalysts; miscellaneous process wastes; wastewater; maintenance and materials handling wastes. Following a brief description of waste components and sources, specific P2 techniques are presented in tabular form for each of these wastestreams. None of the P2 techniques presented is discussed here in any detail--the intent is to give the reader a menu of potentially effective P2 options to consider, along with the references where a more detailed discussion may be found. Some of the options presented were advanced in the original references merely as suggestions or plans for improvement. No effort was made to verify their efficacy or applicability in this compilation.

  1. ,"U.S. Refiner Petroleum Product Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...EMAEPPRLPTGNUSDPG","EMAEPPRHPTGNUSDPG" "Date","U.S. Total Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Dollars per Gallon)","U.S. Aviation Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Dollars ...

  2. Renewable Energy Financial Instruments Guidance Tool (REFINe...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidance Tool (REFINe) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy Financial Instruments Guidance Tool (REFINe) Focus Area: Renewable Energy...

  3. MECS 2006 - Petroleum Refining | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint Petroleum Refining (123.98 KB) More Documents & Publications Petroleum Refining (2010 MECS) MECS 2006 - Alumina and Aluminum MECS 2006 - ...

  4. ,"U.S. Refiner Petroleum Product Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...AEPPRLPTGNUSDPG","EMAEPPRHPTGNUSDPG" "Date","U.S. Total Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Dollars per Gallon)","U.S. Aviation Gasoline Retail Sales by Refiners (Dollars ...

  5. Table 5.2 Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Well Productivity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... reports. * 1981-1994Independent Petroleum Association of America, The Oil Producing Industry in Your State. * 1995 forwardGulf Publishing Co., World Oil, February issues. ...

  6. Changing Trends in the Refining Industry (released in AEO2006)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    There have been some major changes in the U.S. refining industry recently, prompted in part by a significant decline in the quality of imported crude oil and by increasing restrictions on the quality of finished products. As a result, high-quality crudes, such as the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude that serves as a benchmark for oil futures on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), have been trading at record premiums to the OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) Basket price.

  7. heavy_oil | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heavy Oil Heavy oil is a vast U.S. oil resource that is underexploited because its highly viscous nature renders it difficult to produce and to refine. As higher-gravity crudes (lighter oil) become increasingly scarce in the U.S., American operators are looking more and more to low-gravity crudes (heavy oil) to prop up the Nation's declining oil output. Heavy oil generally is defined as having an API (American Petroleum Institute) gravity of 10-20 degrees. Oil sources with even lower gravities,

  8. Conversion of heavy hydrocarbon oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, N.Y.; Pelrine, B.P.; Yan, T.Y.

    1982-12-14

    This invention provides a process for upgrading a heavy hydrocarbon oil to motor fuel products. The heavy hydrocarbon oil is admixed with a metal halide catalyst and a solvent component under supercritical conditions to form (1) a dense-gas solvent phase which contains refined hydrocarbon crackate, and which is substantially free of metal halide catalyst content; and (2) a residual asphaltic phase.

  9. An Industrial Membrane System Suitable for Distributed Used Oil...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    such as thermal and chemical stability, including waste oil re-refining, coal tar oil clean-up, and FCC slurry upgrading. * In parallel, use these applications and know-how ...

  10. Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Reynolds, James W.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

  11. World Natural Gas Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    RAMSGAS, the Research and Development Analysis Modeling System World Natural Gas Model, was developed to support planning of unconventional gaseoues fuels research and development. The model is a scenario analysis tool that can simulate the penetration of unconventional gas into world markets for oil and gas. Given a set of parameter values, the model estimates the natural gas supply and demand for the world for the period from 1980 to 2030. RAMSGAS is based onmore » a supply/demand framwork and also accounts for the non-renewable nature of gas resources. The model has three fundamental components: a demand module, a wellhead production cost module, and a supply/demand interface module. The demand for gas is a product of total demand for oil and gas in each of 9 demand regions and the gas share. Demand for oil and gas is forecast from the base year of 1980 through 2030 for each demand region, based on energy growth rates and price-induced conservation. For each of 11 conventional and 19 unconventional gas supply regions, wellhead production costs are calculated. To these are added transportation and distribution costs estimates associated with moving gas from the supply region to each of the demand regions and any economic rents. Based on a weighted average of these costs and the world price of oil, fuel shares for gas and oil are computed for each demand region. The gas demand is the gas fuel share multiplied by the total demand for oil plus gas. This demand is then met from the available supply regions in inverse proportion to the cost of gas from each region. The user has almost complete control over the cost estimates for each unconventional gas source in each year and thus can compare contributions from unconventional resources under different cost/price/demand scenarios.« less

  12. Shale oil dearsenation process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brickman, F.E.; Degnan, T.F.; Weiss, C.S.

    1984-10-29

    This invention relates to processing shale oil and in particular to processing shale oil to reduce the arsenic content. Specifically, the invention relates to treating shale oil by a combination of processes - coking and water washing. Many shale oils produced by conventional retorting processes contain inorganic materials, such as arsenic, which interfere with subsequent refining or catalytic hydroprocessing operations. Examples of these hydroprocessing operations are hydrogenation, denitrogenation, and desulfurization. From an environmental standpoint, removal of such contaminants may be desirable even if the shale oil is to be used directly as a fuel. Hence, it is desirable that contaminants such as arsenic be removed, or reduced to low levels, prior to further processing of the shale oil or prior to its use as a fuel.

  13. GRAIN REFINEMENT OF URANIUM BILLETS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, L.

    1964-02-25

    A method of refining the grain structure of massive uranium billets without resort to forging is described. The method consists in the steps of beta- quenching the billets, annealing the quenched billets in the upper alpha temperature range, and extrusion upset of the billets to an extent sufficient to increase the cross sectional area by at least 5 per cent. (AEC)

  14. Method for refining contaminated iridium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heshmatpour, B.; Heestand, R.L.

    1982-08-31

    Contaminated iridium is refined by alloying it with an alloying agent selected from the group consisting of manganese and an alloy of manganese and copper, and then dissolving the alloying agent from the formed alloy to provide a purified iridium powder.

  15. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bandwidth for Petroleum Refining Processes Prepared by Energetics Incorporated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Industrial Technologies Program October 2006 Foreword The Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) is a research and development (R&D) program within the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). This program works in collaboration with U.S. industry to improve industrial energy efficiency and

  16. The cost of transportation`s oil dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Transportation is critical to the world`s oil dependence problem because of the large share of world oil it consumes and because of its intense dependence on oil. This paper will focus on the economic costs of transportation`s oil dependence.

  17. 9000 wells planned for heavy oil field. [Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Beginning in 1983, Esso Resources Canada Ltd. will begin drilling the first of an estimated 9000 directional crude bitumen wells in the tar sands at Cold Lake, Alberta, Canada, the final wells being drilled in the year 2008. The area, covering 50 sq miles of extreme E. Alberta along the Saskatchewan border, contains one of the richest deposits of heavy oil sands in Canada. The company and future partners will drill the bitumen wells directionally into the shallow clearwater formation, which can be reached at approx. 100 m (330 ft). The formation contains an estimated 80 billion bbl of crude bitumen at a rate of 60,000 bpd for 25 yr. This volume of crude will be refined in an upgrading plant to 140,000 bpd of synthetic crude oil. When completed, the Cold Lake project will be one of the largest facilities for producing crude bitumen from wells in the world.

  18. Crude Oil Analysis Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Shay, Johanna Y.

    The composition and physical properties of crude oil vary widely from one reservoir to another within an oil field, as well as from one field or region to another. Although all oils consist of hydrocarbons and their derivatives, the proportions of various types of compounds differ greatly. This makes some oils more suitable than others for specific refining processes and uses. To take advantage of this diversity, one needs access to information in a large database of crude oil analyses. The Crude Oil Analysis Database (COADB) currently satisfies this need by offering 9,056 crude oil analyses. Of these, 8,500 are United States domestic oils. The database contains results of analysis of the general properties and chemical composition, as well as the field, formation, and geographic location of the crude oil sample. [Taken from the Introduction to COAMDATA_DESC.pdf, part of the zipped software and database file at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain PDF documents and a large Excel spreadsheet. It will also contain the database in Microsoft Access 2002.

  19. Navy mobility fuels forecasting system report: World petroleum trade forecasts for the year 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.

    1991-12-01

    The Middle East will continue to play the dominant role of a petroleum supplier in the world oil market in the year 2000, according to business-as-usual forecasts published by the US Department of Energy. However, interesting trade patterns will emerge as a result of the democratization in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe. US petroleum imports will increase from 46% in 1989 to 49% in 2000. A significantly higher level of US petroleum imports (principally products) will be coming from Japan, the Soviet Union, and Eastern Europe. Several regions, the Far East, Japan, Latin American, and Africa will import more petroleum. Much uncertainty remains about of the level future Soviet crude oil production. USSR net petroleum exports will decrease; however, the United States and Canada will receive some of their imports from the Soviet Union due to changes in the world trade patterns. The Soviet Union can avoid becoming a net petroleum importer as long as it (1) maintains enough crude oil production to meet its own consumption and (2) maintains its existing refining capacities. Eastern Europe will import approximately 50% of its crude oil from the Middle East.

  20. Reformulated Gasoline Market Affected Refiners Differently, 1995

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    This article focuses on the costs of producing reformulated gasoline (RFG) as experienced by different types of refiners and on how these refiners fared this past summer, given the prices for RFG at the refinery gate.

  1. Conventional Energy (Oil, Gas, and Coal) Forum & Associated Vertical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CONVENTIONAL ENERGY (OIL, GAS & COAL) FORUM & ASSOCIATED VERTICAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT ... South, Las Vegas, NV 89119 The dynamic world of conventional energy (focusing on oil, gas ...

  2. Oil Market Assessment

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    Based on Energy Information Administration (EIA) contacts and trade press reports, overall U.S. and global oil supplies appear to have been minimally impacted by yesterday's terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

  3. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derbidge, T. Craig; Mulholland, James A.; Foster, Edward P.

    1986-01-01

    An air-purged burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired without the coking thereof on the burner components. The air-purged burner is designed for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal in a tangentially fired boiler.

  4. Running Out Of and Into Oil. Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L.; Hopson, Janet L.; Li, Jia

    2003-10-01

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value.

  5. March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968: Oil discovered on Alaska's North Slope March 13, 1968 The Atlantic Richfield Company and Humble Oil and Refining Company announce the discovery of oil on the North Slope of Alaska at Prudhoe Bay

  6. ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry (November 2007) ITP Petroleum Refining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Petroleum Refining Industry ...

  7. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1993 January ... 40.7 36.8 32.3 27.3 35.2 31.5 February ... 40.8 35.5 31.0 26.7 34.5 30.9 March ......

  8. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    39.1 37.9 33.3 40.2 36.6 February ... 43.7 37.1 38.2 33.3 39.8 35.4 March ... 43.4 38.3 39.6 35.2 40.5 37.0 April...

  9. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    39.9 30.0 29.5 24.3 32.9 27.4 April ... 35.2 29.4 29.5 25.8 31.1 27.5 May ... 35.9 31.7 31.1 27.5...

  10. Table 19. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    58.7 46.2 46.3 39.3 49.5 42.9 February ... 54.6 43.7 41.8 35.4 45.2 39.3 March ... 49.3 39.8 37.6 33.9 40.3 35.8 April...

  11. Table 20. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.6 4.4 9.2 6.7 13.7 11.1 August ... 4.0 5.2 9.0 4.1 13.0 9.3 September ... 2.6 5.8 9.2 5.7 11.9 11.5 October...

  12. Table 20. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Volumes

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4.9 8.6 11.6 10.8 16.5 19.3 August ... 4.8 7.2 13.0 9.2 17.8 16.5 September ... 3.2 5.3 9.8 12.2 13.0 17.4 October...

  13. Table 20. U.S. Refiner Residual Fuel Oil Volumes

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... 2.5 7.5 9.3 5.9 11.8 13.4 October ... 2.0 7.1 8.6 5.0 10.6 12.1 November ... 2.8 6.8 8.9 5.7 11.8 12.5...

  14. Residual Fuel Oil Sales to End Users Refiner Sales Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 8,544.1 7,556.6 6,422.8 5,516.8 5,179.4 4,602.6 1983-2014 PADD 1 2,890.4 2,080.3 1,414.7 1,057.0 961.0 646.3 1983-2014 New England W...

  15. U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History Composite 76.69 101.87 100.93 100.49 92.02 48.40 1968-2015 Domestic 78.01 100.71 100.72 102.91 94.05 49.95 1968-2015 Imported 75.86 ...

  16. U.S. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History Composite 44.38 44.78 41.43 35.63 30.01 28.47 1974-2016 Domestic 46.68 47.02 43.30 37.76 32.22 30.05 1974-2016 Imported 41.13 ...

  17. Refining Crude Oil - Energy Explained, Your Guide To Understanding...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Photovoltaics and Electricity Where Solar Is Found Solar Thermal Power Plants Solar Thermal Collectors Solar Energy & the Environment Secondary Sources Electricity The Science of ...

  18. ,"U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...22016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprirac2dcunusa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprirac2dcunusa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  19. Refiner and Blender Net Production of Distillate Fuel Oil

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4,918 4,940 4,739 4,939 4,849 4,973 1982-2016 PADD 1 320 348 301 348 357 358 1990-2016 PADD 2 1,091 1,090 988 987 1,073 1,121 1990-2016 PADD 3 2,781 2,727 2,741 2,841 2,626 2,687 1990-2016 PADD 4 185 188 176 173 178 190 1990-2016 PADD 5 542 589 533 590 616 618 1990

  20. ,"U.S. Total Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...12016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprirac2dcunusa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprirac2dcunusa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  1. ,"U.S. Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...12016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprirac2dcunusm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprirac2dcunusm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  2. Energy Efficiency Improvement in the Petroleum RefiningIndustry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Galitsky, Christina

    2005-05-01

    Information has proven to be an important barrier inindustrial energy efficiency improvement. Voluntary government programsaim to assist industry to improve energy efficiency by supplyinginformation on opportunities. ENERGY STAR(R) supports the development ofstrong strategic corporate energy management programs, by providingenergy management information tools and strategies. This paper summarizesENERGY STAR research conducted to develop an Energy Guide for thePetroleum Refining industry. Petroleum refining in the United States isthe largest in the world, providing inputs to virtually every economicsector, including the transport sector and the chemical industry.Refineries spend typically 50 percent of the cash operating costs (e.g.,excluding capital costs and depreciation) on energy, making energy amajor cost factor and also an important opportunity for cost reduction.The petroleum refining industry consumes about 3.1 Quads of primaryenergy, making it the single largest industrial energy user in the UnitedStates. Typically, refineries can economically improve energy efficiencyby 20 percent. The findings suggest that given available resources andtechnology, there are substantial opportunities to reduce energyconsumption cost-effectively in the petroleum refining industry whilemaintaining the quality of the products manufactured.

  3. Oil shale, tar sands, and related materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, H.C.

    1981-01-01

    This sixteen-chapter book focuses on the many problems and the new methodology associated with the commercialization of the oil shale and tar sand industry. Topics discussed include: an overview of the Department of Energy's oil shale R, D, and D program; computer simulation of explosive fracture of oil shale; fracturing of oil shale by treatment with liquid sulfur dioxide; chemistry of shale oil cracking; hydrogen sulfide evolution from Colorado oil shale; a possible mechanism of alkene/alkane production in oil shale retorting; oil shale retorting kinetics; kinetics of oil shale char gasification; a comparison of asphaltenes from naturally occurring shale bitumen and retorted shale oils: the influence of temperature on asphaltene structure; beneficiation of Green River oil shale by density methods; beneficiation of Green River oil shale pelletization; shell pellet heat exchange retorting: the SPHER energy-efficient process for retorting oil shale; retorted oil shale disposal research; an investigation into the potential economics of large-scale shale oil production; commercial scale refining of Paraho crude shale oil into military specification fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition; chemical characterization/physical properties of US Navy shale-II fuels; relation between fuel properties and chemical composition: stability of oil shale-derived jet fuel; pyrolysis of shale oil residual fractions; synfuel stability: degradation mechanisms and actual findings; the chemistry of shale oil and its refined products; the reactivity of Cold Lake asphaltenes; influence of thermal processing on the properties of Cold Lake asphaltenes: the effect of distillation; thermal recovery of oil from tar sands by an energy-efficient process; and hydropyrolysis: the potential for primary upgrading of tar sand bitumen.

  4. Financial Times-World Energy Council Energy Leaders Summit |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    aggressive action to achieve, is indeed critically important. First, let's look at our heavy reliance on oil. The growth in world oil consumption has been averaging about 1.8...

  5. Process for solvent refining of coal using a denitrogenated and dephenolated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A process is disclosed for the solvent refining of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures and pressure in a hydrogen atmosphere using a hydrocarbon solvent which before being recycled in the solvent refining process is subjected to chemical treatment to extract substantially all nitrogenous and phenolic constituents from the solvent so as to improve the conversion of coal and the production of oil in the solvent refining process. The solvent refining process can be either thermal or catalytic. The extraction of nitrogenous compounds can be performed by acid contact such as hydrogen chloride or fluoride treatment, while phenolic extraction can be performed by caustic contact or contact with a mixture of silica and alumina.

  6. International Oil and Gas Exploration and Development

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1993-01-01

    Presents country level data on oil reserves, oil production, active drilling rigs, seismic crews, wells drilled, oil reserve additions, and oil reserve to production ratios (R/P ratios) for about 85 countries, where available, from 1970 through 1991. World and regional summaries are given in both tabular and graphical form.

  7. Middle East oil and gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    The following subjects are covered in this publication: (1) position of preeminence of the Middle East; (2) history of area's oil operations for Iran, Iraq, Bahrain, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, neutral zone, Qatar, United Arab Emirates, Oman and Egypt; (3) gas operations of Saudi Arabia, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Iraq and United Arab Emirates; (4) changing relationships with producing countries; (5) a new oil pricing environment; (6) refining and other industrial activities; and (7) change and progress. 10 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Retrofitting heavy oil processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, G.L.; Fitzgerald, M.; D'Amico, V.

    1986-01-01

    Refiners, faced with the need to process the bottom end of the heavy high sulfur crude oil barrel in today's uncertain economic environment, are reluctant to commit large amounts of money to expensive upgrading processes. In order to conserve scarce capital while improving operating margins, additional valuable products can be produced by retrofits such as conversion of an idle crude unit to visbreaking, delayed coking or deasphalting service, or conversion of hydrodesulfurizers to mild hydrocracking.

  9. Emulsified industrial oils recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabris, T.

    1982-04-01

    The industrial lubricant market has been analyzed with emphasis on current and/or developing recycling and re-refining technologies. This task has been performed for the United States and other industrialized countries, specifically France, West Germany, Italy and Japan. Attention has been focused at emulsion-type fluids regardless of the industrial application involved. It was found that emulsion-type fluids in the United States represent a much higher percentage of the total fluids used than in other industrialized countries. While recycling is an active matter explored by the industry, re-refining is rather a result of other issues than the mere fact that oil can be regenerated from a used industrial emulsion. To extend the longevity of an emulsion is a logical step to keep expenses down by using the emulsion as long as possible. There is, however, another important factor influencing this issue: regulations governing the disposal of such fluids. The ecological question, the respect for nature and the natural balances, is often seen now as everybody's task. Regulations forbid dumping used emulsions in the environment without prior treatment of the water phase and separation of the oil phase. This is a costly procedure, so recycling is attractive since it postpones the problem. It is questionable whether re-refining of these emulsions - as a business - could stand on its own if these emulsions did not have to be taken apart for disposal purposes. Once the emulsion is separated into a water and an oil phase, however, re-refining of the oil does become economical.

  10. Improving the accuracy of macromolecular structure refinement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is challenging at low resolution. We compared refinement methods using synchrotron diffraction data of photosystem I at 7.4 resolution, starting from different initial models...

  11. Refiners Increasingly Employing Catalyst Regeneration as Alternative...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    million by the end of 2019. Refiners Benefit from Catalyst Regeneration Technology via Price Reductions and Lower Maintenance Costs The catalyst regeneration technology is the...

  12. Right rock: Finding/refining customer expectations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashby, R.

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on methods of finding customer expectations of software and then refining the documentation and software to fit these expectations.

  13. Midcourse Refinements of Financing Strategies | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    March 29, 2012. During this webinar participants discussed how programs have adapted and refined their financing strategies based on initial implementation experience and learning. ...

  14. Downstream Petroleum Mergers and Acquisitions by U.S. Major Oil Companies

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    A summary presentation of mergers and acquisitions by U.S. major oil companies (including the U.S. affiliates of foreign major oil companies). The presentation focuses on petroleum refining over the last several years through late 2009.

  15. National Iranian Oil Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Iranian Oil Company is located in Tehran, Iran About The NIOC is one the largest oil companies in the world. Currently, the company estimates 137 billion barrels of liquid...

  16. Oil and gas journal databook, 1987 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This book is an annual compendium of surveys and special reports reviewed by experts. The 1987 edition opens with a forward by Gene Kinney, co-publisher of the Oil and Gas Journal and includes the OGJ 400 Report, Crude Oil Assays, Worldwide Petrochemical Survey, the Midyear Forecast and Reviews, the Worldwide Gas Processing Report, the Ethylene Report, Sulfur Survey, the International Refining, Catalyst Compilation, Annual Refining Survey, Worldwide Construction Report, Pipeline Economics Report, Worldwide Production and Refining Report, the Morgan Pipeline Cost Index for Oil and Gas, the Nelson Cost Index, the Hughes Rig Count, the Smith Rig Count, the OGJ Production Report, the API Refinery Report, API Crude and Product Stocks, APU Imports of Crude and Products, and the complete Oil and Gas Journal 1986 Index of articles.

  17. BP Statistical Review of World Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI The BP Statistical Review of World Energy is an Excel spreadsheet which contains consumption and production data for Coal, Natural Gas, Nuclear, Oil, and Hydroelectric...

  18. The Oil and Gas Journal databook, 1986 edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This annual contains the following: Foreword by Gene Kinney; OGJ 400; Crude Oil Assays; Worldwide Petrochemical Survey; Midyear Forecast and Review; Worldwide Gas Processing Report; Ethylene Report; Sulfur Survey; International Refining; Catalyst Compilation; Pipeline Economics Report; Worldwide Production and Refining Report; Annual Refining Survey; Morgan Pipeline Cost Index, Oil and Gas; Nelson Cost Index; Hughes Rig Count; Smith Rig Count; OGJ Production Report and the API Refinery Reports. Also featured is the Oil and Gas Journal Index, which lists every article published in the Journal in 1985, referenced by article title or subject.

  19. Pneumatic conveying of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lennon, Dennis R.

    1984-11-06

    A method for pneumatically conveying solvent refined coal to a burner under conditions of dilute phase pneumatic flow so as to prevent saltation of the solvent refined coal in the transport line by maintaining the transport fluid velocity above approximately 95 ft/sec.

  20. World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector Gets an Upgrade

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World oil inventories forecast to grow significantly in 2016 and 2017 Global oil inventories are expected to continue strong growth over the next two years which should keep oil prices low. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said world oil stocks are likely to increase by 1.6 million barrels per day this year and by 600,000 barrels per day next year. The higher forecast for inventory builds are the result of both higher global oil production and less oil

  1. Opportunities for Biorenewables in Oil Refineries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, T.L.

    2005-12-19

    Abstract: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential for using biorenewable feedstocks in oil refineries. Economic analyses were conducted, with support from process modeling and proof of principle experiments, to assess a variety of potential processes and configurations. The study considered two primary alternatives: the production of biodiesel and green diesel from vegetable oils and greases and opportunities for utilization of pyrolysis oil. The study identified a number of promising opportunities for biorenewables in existing or new refining operations.

  2. Method for reclaiming waste lubricating oils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A method for purifying and reclaiming used lubricating oils containing additives such as detergents, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, extreme pressure agents and the like and other solid and liquid contaminants by preferably first vacuum distilling the used oil to remove water and low-boiling contaminants, and treating the dried oil with a solvent mixture of butanol, isopropanol and methylethyl ketone which causes the separation of a layer of sludge containing contaminants, unspent additives and oxidation products. After solvent recovery, the desludged oil is then subjected to conventional lubricating oil refining steps such as distillation followed by decolorization and deodorization.

  3. Crude Oil and Gasoline Price Monitoring

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    What drives crude oil prices? September 7, 2016 | Washington, DC An analysis of 7 factors that influence oil markets, with chart data updated monthly and quarterly price per barrel (real 2010 dollars) imported refiner acquisition cost of crude oil WTI crude oil price 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 0 25 50 75 100 125 150 Crude oil prices react to a variety of geopolitical and economic events September 7, 2016 2 Low spare capacity Iraq invades Kuwait Saudis abandon swing

  4. Heavy oil expansions gather momentum worldwide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moritis, G.

    1995-08-14

    Cold production, wormholes, foamy oil mechanism, improvements in thermal methods, and horizontal wells are some of the processes and technologies enabling expansion of the world`s heavy oil/bitumen production. Such processes were the focus of the International Heavy Oil Symposium in Calgary, June 19--21. Unlike conventional oil production, heavy oil/bitumen extraction is more a manufacturing process where technology enables the business and does not just add value. The current low price spreads between heavy oil/light oil indicate that demand for heavy oil is high. The paper first discusses the price difference between heavy and light oils, then describes heavy oil production activities in Canada at Cold Lake, in Venezuela in the Orinoco belt, and at Kern River in California.

  5. Controlling vanadium from high metals crude oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golden, S.W.; Martin, G.R.

    1995-09-01

    Processing heavier high metals crude oils continues to be an objective of many refiners. Refiners manage the vanadium and other contaminants with hydroprocessing and FCC catalysts that are more tolerant to metals. Although hydroprocessing and FCC catalyst formulations are critical and will be required for the bulk of the metals removal, many times primary distillation impacts on vanadium are ignored. Distillation system designs can significantly impact the metals content of the gas oil pool or the total gas yields for a targeted metals level. Commercial experience shows that total gas oil metals to the hydroprocessing unit can be reduced by 20 to 40% for a given gas yield or the total gas oil yield can be increased for a given metals target by optimizing primary distillation system performance. Total gas oil vanadium content has varied from 5 to 2 weight ppm depending on crude oil metals level, unit process design, distillation unit operation, and equipment design. An actual example using a 22.0 API Bochequero Field blend will be used to illustrate the points covered. The source of the vanadium in the various gas oil pool components will be evaluated and show potential gas oil quality improvements based on primary distillation system design and operation modifications. In the example, the refiner processes 145,000 bpd of crude oil through a conventional integrated atmospheric/vacuum unit and processes the vacuum residue in a delayed coker. The gas oil blend streams consists of atmospheric gas oil, light vacuum gas oil, and heavy vacuum gas oil from the crude unit and heavy coker gas oil from the delayed coker. All the modifications which will be discussed have been operating successfully for several years.

  6. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 228 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the reclamation and recycling of used lubricating oils. Topics include specific program descriptions, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil performance. Appropriate regulations, standards, and clean-up efforts at sites contaminated by waste oils or waste oil refineries are included. (Contains a minimum of 222 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  8. Firing of pulverized solvent refined coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lennon, Dennis R.; Snedden, Richard B.; Foster, Edward P.; Bellas, George T.

    1990-05-15

    A burner for the firing of pulverized solvent refined coal is constructed and operated such that the solvent refined coal can be fired successfully without any performance limitations and without the coking of the solvent refined coal on the burner components. The burner is provided with a tangential inlet of primary air and pulverized fuel, a vaned diffusion swirler for the mixture of primary air and fuel, a center water-cooled conical diffuser shielding the incoming fuel from the heat radiation from the flame and deflecting the primary air and fuel steam into the secondary air, and a watercooled annulus located between the primary air and secondary air flows.

  9. H. R. 93: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to impose a tax on the importation of crude oil and refined petroleum products. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth Second Congress, First Session, January 3, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    An excise tax would be imposed on crude oil or petroleum products imported into the US as an incentive to conserve this energy source. Whenever the average international price of crude oil is less than 24 dollars during a 4-week period, the excise tax would be imposed on products coming into the US during the following week. The tax would amount to the difference between the average price of crude oil and 24 dollars.

  10. Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron Refining

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Piping Experience in Chevron Refining Ned Niccolls Materials Engineer Chevron Energy Technology Company Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Outline 2 Overall perspectives from long term use of hydrogen piping in refining. Piping specifications and practices. The (few) problem areas. Related industry work: American Petroleum Institute corrosion and materials work on high temperature hydrogen attack. Overall Perspectives 3 Few problems with hydrogen piping operating at

  11. Unconventional Oil and Gas Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-09-15

    World oil use is projected to grow to 98 million b/d in 2015 and 118 million b/d in 2030. Total world natural gas consumption is projected to rise to 134 Tcf in 2015 and 182 Tcf in 2030. In an era of declining production and increasing demand, economically producing oil and gas from unconventional sources is a key challenge to maintaining global economic growth. Some unconventional hydrocarbon sources are already being developed, including gas shales, tight gas sands, heavy oil, oil sands, and coal bed methane. Roughly 20 years ago, gas production from tight sands, shales, and coals was considered uneconomic. Today, these resources provide 25% of the U.S. gas supply and that number is likely to increase. Venezuela has over 300 billion barrels of unproven extra-heavy oil reserves which would give it the largest reserves of any country in the world. It is currently producing over 550,000 b/d of heavy oil. Unconventional oil is also being produced in Canada from the Athabasca oil sands. 1.6 trillion barrels of oil are locked in the sands of which 175 billion barrels are proven reserves that can be recovered using current technology. Production from 29 companies now operating there exceeds 1 million barrels per day. The report provides an overview of continuous petroleum sources and gives a concise overview of the current status of varying types of unconventional oil and gas resources. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of the history of Oil and Natural Gas; an analysis of the Oil and Natural Gas industries, including current and future production, consumption, and reserves; a detailed description of the different types of unconventional oil and gas resources; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving the increased interest in unconventional resources; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the development of unconventional resources; profiles of key producing regions; and, profiles of key unconventional oil and gas producers.

  12. Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading of Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil (Bio-oil) March 22, 2015 Bio-Oil Technology Area Review Principal Investigator : Zia Abdullah Organization: Battelle Memorial Institute 1 Goal Statement * 1,000 hrs. TOS * H/C product 30% blendable with ASTM petroleum fuels * Compatibility with petroleum refining unit operations * Fast Pyrolysis * In-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis * Ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis * Hydropyrolysis * Hydrothermal liquefaction * Solvent liquefaction Addresses all FOA-

  13. New short contact time processes upgrade residual oils and heavy crudes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-12

    This paper reports on new short contact time carbon rejection technology developed for upgrading residual oils and converting heavier crudes into high-quality synthetic crudes. The process, called discriminatory destructive distillation, or 3D, has been demonstrated in a Kansas refinery on feedstocks ranging from 13.5 to 30.6{degrees} API. For the past year, Coastal Derby Refining Co. has been operating a revolutionary, according to Bartholic, circulating fluid solids processing apparatus that can be run as either a 3D process unit, to virtually eliminate the residual oil component of crude, or as an MSCC process unit, to upgrade VGO residual oils. Because both of these processes circulate a fluid solid in a manner similar to the well known and commercially accepted fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) process, existing FCC-type units can be easily and economically converted to either 3D or MSCC operation. The 3D process is a low-pressure, carbon-rejection residual oil treating process for preparation of gas oils for fluid catalytic cracking (or MSCC), hydrotreating, mild hydrocracking, or full hydrocracking, says Bartholic. The process is also applicable, he says to upgrading heavy crudes or tar sands bitumen to high-quality reconstituted crudes for world markets.

  14. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  15. International Oil Supplies and Demands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world's dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group's thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  16. A case study of energy conservation opportunities in copper refining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somers, W.E.; Hughen, M.L.; Kurylko, L.; Stone, J.R.

    1982-07-01

    A study of energy usage and distribution in a copper refinery was conducted in an attempt to determine possible cost savings in operations of the plant. The study covered those processes which were the major users of energy, namely, smelting, anode casting, electrolytic refining, steam generation and distribution, and electricity distribution. The study involved obtaining data of mass and energy flows in the refinery; identifying energy conservation opportunities (ECO's); obtaining price, operating costs, and saving potentials; for each conservation measure; and analyzing the economical viability of each conservation proposal. Potential cost savings were found to be substantial in heat recovery from slag and anode furnace hot gases, modification of the central steam supply system, control, and redistribution of electrical loads, insulation of electrolytic tanks, and changes in the atomization of oil.

  17. ,"U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ...

  18. ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impacts of Condition Assessment on Energy Use: Selected Applications in Chemicals Processing and Petroleum Refining ITP Petroleum Refining: Impacts of Condition Assessment on ...

  19. THE WORLD'S Biggest Fan Collection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WORLD'S Biggest Fan Collection If you only know the Big Ass Fan Company as the preeminent designer and manufacturer of high volume, low speed fans for factories and cows, it's time you get to know us better. While we continue to lead the way in industrial and agricultural air movement, we've also refined these designs to bring the same innovation and benefits of our famous fans to circulate an ocean of air in sound-sensitive commercial spaces and homes. And when our customers said they wanted

  20. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  1. Parallel tetrahedral mesh refinement with MOAB.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, David C.; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2008-12-01

    In this report, we present the novel functionality of parallel tetrahedral mesh refinement which we have implemented in MOAB. This report details work done to implement parallel, edge-based, tetrahedral refinement into MOAB. The theoretical basis for this work is contained in [PT04, PT05, TP06] while information on design, performance, and operation specific to MOAB are contained herein. As MOAB is intended mainly for use in pre-processing and simulation (as opposed to the post-processing bent of previous papers), the primary use case is different: rather than refining elements with non-linear basis functions, the goal is to increase the number of degrees of freedom in some region in order to more accurately represent the solution to some system of equations that cannot be solved analytically. Also, MOAB has a unique mesh representation which impacts the algorithm. This introduction contains a brief review of streaming edge-based tetrahedral refinement. The remainder of the report is broken into three sections: design and implementation, performance, and conclusions. Appendix A contains instructions for end users (simulation authors) on how to employ the refiner.

  2. Pdvsa maps ambitious Venezuelan oil plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-14

    Venezuela's national oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela SA (Pdvsa), is moving ahead with an ambitious investment program designed to substantially expand its activities in oil and gas exploration and production, refining, petrochemicals, and coal in the 1990s. The company, which has stakes in refining and marketing companies in the U.S., Europe, and the Caribbean, also is seeking new investment opportunities in U.S. and European markets as well as in the Far East. Pdvsa officials expect the company by 2000 to have developed a much stronger presence in the global energy market.

  3. Oil shale technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S. (Akron Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    Oil shale is undoubtedly an excellent energy source that has great abundance and world-wide distribution. Oil shale industries have seen ups and downs over more than 100 years, depending on the availability and price of conventional petroleum crudes. Market forces as well as environmental factors will greatly affect the interest in development of oil shale. Besides competing with conventional crude oil and natural gas, shale oil will have to compete favorably with coal-derived fuels for similar markets. Crude shale oil is obtained from oil shale by a relatively simple process called retorting. However, the process economics are greatly affected by the thermal efficiencies, the richness of shale, the mass transfer effectiveness, the conversion efficiency, the design of retort, the environmental post-treatment, etc. A great many process ideas and patents related to the oil shale pyrolysis have been developed; however, relatively few field and engineering data have been published. Due to the vast heterogeneity of oil shale and to the complexities of physicochemical process mechanisms, scientific or technological generalization of oil shale retorting is difficult to achieve. Dwindling supplied of worldwide petroleum reserves, as well as the unprecedented appetite of mankind for clean liquid fuel, has made the public concern for future energy market grow rapidly. the clean coal technology and the alternate fuel technology are currently of great significance not only to policy makers, but also to process and chemical researchers. In this book, efforts have been made to make a comprehensive text for the science and technology of oil shale utilization. Therefore, subjects dealing with the terminological definitions, geology and petrology, chemistry, characterization, process engineering, mathematical modeling, chemical reaction engineering, experimental methods, and statistical experimental design, etc. are covered in detail.

  4. World`s developing regions provide spark for pipeline construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.; True, W.R.

    1996-02-05

    This paper reviews the proposed construction of oil and gas pipelines which are underway or proposed to be started in 1996. It breaks down the projects by region of the world, type of product to be carried, and diameter of pipeline. It also provides mileage for each category of pipeline. Major projects in each region are more thoroughly discussed giving details on construction expenditures, construction problems, and political issues.

  5. History of western oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    The history of oil shale in the United States since the early 1900's is detailed. Research on western oil shale probably began with the work of Robert Catlin in 1915. During the next 15 years there was considerable interest in the oil shales, and oil shale claims were located, and a few recovery plants were erected in Colorado, Nevada, Utah, Wyoming, and Montana. Little shale soil was produced, however, and the major oil companies showed little interest in producing shale oil. The early boom in shale oil saw less than 15 plants produce a total of less than 15,000 barrels of shale oil, all but about 500 barrels of which was produced by the Catlin Operation in Nevada and by the US Bureau of Mines Rulison, Colorado operation. Between 1930 and 1944 plentiful petroleum supplies at reasonable prices prevent any significant interest in shale oil, but oil shortages during World War II caused a resurgence of interest in oil shale. Between 1940 and 1969, the first large-scale mining and retorting operations in soil shale, and the first attempts at true in situ recovery of shale oil began. Only 75,000 barrels of shale oil were produced, but major advancements were made in developing mine designs and technology, and in retort design and technology. The oil embargo of 1973 together with a new offering of oil shale leases by the Government in 1974 resulted in the most concentrated efforts for shale oil production to date. These efforts and the future prospects for shale oil as an energy source in the US are discussed.

  6. JAPAN: Refining options and liberalization plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Totto, L.; Isaak, D.T.

    1988-01-01

    The reformulation of Japan's petroleum import policy is important to Japan and to the international energy community. The technical and economic factors involved in opening the Japanese market is unknown. Assuming that foreign refiners have the technical capability to meet Japanese product specifications, the prices and volumes that will prove economical to both parties are also little known. Japanese refiners have been investigating the possibility of exporting gasoline and processing crude for China and Malaysia. The study demonstrates that under certain trade policies, Japan could become a significant product exporter. This study's purpose is to investigate the economic efficiency of alternative petroleum supply options, i.e., combining Japan's refining and product imports. An evaluation of the current import program and the technically feasible alternatives will play a major role in a new import policy. For this evaluation, a linear programming (LP) model of Japan's domestic refinery capacity and the petroleum import system was constructed. 3 figs., 23 tabs.

  7. Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Adaptive Mesh Refinement

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-09-29

    This is a simulation code involving an ALE (arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian) hydrocode with AMR (adaptive mesh refinement) and pluggable physics packages for material strength, heat conduction, radiation diffusion, and laser ray tracing developed a LLNL, UCSD, and Berkeley Lab. The code is an extension of the open source SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Interface) code/library. The code can be used in laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility. The code is alsi being appliedmore » to slurry flow (landslides).« less

  8. The strategic outlook for petroleum refiners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, C.

    1994-12-31

    After several years of acceptable and relatively reliable profitability, refiners were plunged into uncertainty once again following passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) in 1990. While many of the original uncertainties that attended these regulations have since been resolved, the industry now must prepare for the new manufacturing, distributions, and transportation challenges that undoubtedly will accompany the first stages of reformulated gasoline (RFG) compliance in early 1995. This impending challenge introduces several fundamental questions: (1) How has the industry changed and adjusted to respond to anticipated future needs? (2) What strategies are refiners employing today? (3) What are industry performance expectations over the next several years?

  9. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGraw, Jennifer

    2013-05-28

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGraw, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  11. Fact #742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth Fact 742: August 27, 2012 Oil Price and Economic Growth Major oil price shocks have disrupted world energy markets five times in ...

  12. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  13. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  15. Waste oil reclamation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning methods and equipment for reclamation and recycling of waste oils. Citations discuss recovery, disposal, and reuse of lubricating oils. Topics include economic analysis, programs assessment, re-refining techniques, chemical component analysis, and reclaimed oil evaluation. Regulations and standards for waste oil treatment and waste oil refineries are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. World Biofuels Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfstad,T.

    2008-10-01

    This report forms part of a project entitled 'World Biofuels Study'. The objective is to study world biofuel markets and to examine the possible contribution that biofuel imports could make to help meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The study was sponsored by the Biomass Program of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy. It is a collaborative effort among the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The project consisted of three main components: (1) Assessment of the resource potential for biofuel feedstocks such as sugarcane, grains, soybean, palm oil and lignocellulosic crops and development of supply curves (ORNL). (2) Assessment of the cost and performance of biofuel production technologies (NREL). (3) Scenario-based analysis of world biofuel markets using the ETP global energy model with data developed in the first parts of the study (BNL). This report covers the modeling and analysis part of the project conducted by BNL in cooperation with PI. The Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) energy system model was used as the analytical tool for this study. ETP is a 15 region global model designed using the MARKAL framework. MARKAL-based models are partial equilibrium models that incorporate a description of the physical energy system and provide a bottom-up approach to study the entire energy system. ETP was updated for this study with biomass resource data and biofuel production technology cost and performance data developed by ORNL and NREL under Tasks 1 and 2 of this project. Many countries around the world are embarking on ambitious biofuel policies through renewable fuel standards and economic incentives. As a result, the global biofuel demand is expected to grow very rapidly over

  17. Water issues associated with heavy oil production.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-28

    Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

  18. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--1990 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  19. International Oil Supplies and Demands. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The eleventh Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) working group met four times over the 1989--90 period to compare alternative perspectives on international oil supplies and demands through 2010 and to discuss how alternative supply and demand trends influence the world`s dependence upon Middle Eastern oil. Proprietors of eleven economic models of the world oil market used their respective models to simulate a dozen scenarios using standardized assumptions. From its inception, the study was not designed to focus on the short-run impacts of disruptions on oil markets. Nor did the working group attempt to provide a forecast or just a single view of the likely future path for oil prices. The model results guided the group`s thinking about many important longer-run market relationships and helped to identify differences of opinion about future oil supplies, demands, and dependence.

  20. Final report to the President on oil supply shortages during 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-07-01

    Stockpile levels at the beginning of 1979, imports during the first half of the year, and inventory management were primarily responsible for the oil supply shortage in the spring and summer of 1979. There was a 3.1% reduction in oil supply in May to July of 1979 relative to the same period in 1978, and a 0.2% reduction relative to 1977. The reduction in available oil between 1979 and previous years was even greater than the reduction in supply. Domestic production of crude oil declined between May to July of 1978 and the same period in 1979. This was consistent with the long-term trend. Free-world oil production dropped by about 2 million b/d during the first quarter of 1979 as a result of the loss of Iranian production. Production returned to pre-disruption levels by the middle of 1979. The US share of free-world oil supply dropped by 2% in the second quarter of 1979 compared to the 1977-78 average. Gasoline supplied to consumers during May to July 1979 was 8.5% less than in the same period in 1978, and 7 to 9% less than the amount that would have been consumed if there had been no supply restriction. Compared to 1978, reduced gasoline production during this period in 1979 accounted for 36% of the supply reduction, and reduced use of stocks accounted for 64% of the supply reduction. Refiners could have made more gasoline available during May to July of 1979 without reducing stocks below minimum operating levels. The yield of gasoline relative to other petroleum products went down in May to July of 1979 as compared to the same period in 1977 and 1978. Most of the increase was in production of petrochemical feedstocks. Refiners who were bound by DOE price controls or who were complying with CWPS guidelines could not have increased allowable revenues by delaying the sale of gasoline. Virtually all of the gasoline price increases that took place between January and August 1979 were based on cost increases.

  1. Technically Recoverable Shale Oil and Shale Gas Resources

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    EIA/ARI World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment May, 17, 2013 2-1 SHALE GAS AND SHALE OIL RESOURCE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY INTRODUCTION This report sets forth Advanced Resources' methodology for assessing the in-place and recoverable shale gas and shale oil resources for the EIA/ARI "World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment." The methodology relies on geological information and reservoir properties assembled from the technical literature and data from publically

  2. Running Out of and Into Oil: Analyzing Global Oil Depletion and Transition Through 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, D.L.

    2003-11-14

    This report presents a risk analysis of world conventional oil resource production, depletion, expansion, and a possible transition to unconventional oil resources such as oil sands, heavy oil and shale oil over the period 2000 to 2050. Risk analysis uses Monte Carlo simulation methods to produce a probability distribution of outcomes rather than a single value. Probability distributions are produced for the year in which conventional oil production peaks for the world as a whole and the year of peak production from regions outside the Middle East. Recent estimates of world oil resources by the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), the World Energy Council (WEC) and Dr. C. Campbell provide alternative views of the extent of ultimate world oil resources. A model of oil resource depletion and expansion for twelve world regions is combined with a market equilibrium model of conventional and unconventional oil supply and demand to create a World Energy Scenarios Model (WESM). The model does not make use of Hubbert curves but instead relies on target reserve-to-production ratios to determine when regional output will begin to decline. The authors believe that their analysis has a bias toward optimism about oil resource availability because it does not attempt to incorporate political or environmental constraints on production, nor does it explicitly include geologic constraints on production rates. Global energy scenarios created by IIASA and WEC provide the context for the risk analysis. Key variables such as the quantity of undiscovered oil and rates of technological progress are treated as probability distributions, rather than constants. Analyses based on the USGS and IIASA resource assessments indicate that conventional oil production outside the Middle East is likely to peak sometime between 2010 and 2030. The most important determinants of the date are the quantity of undiscovered oil, the rate at

  3. Oil Overcharge Refund Cases 1999 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1999 Oil Overcharge Refund Cases 1999 During the period 1973 through 1981, the Federal government imposed price and allocation controls of crude oil and refined petroleum products, such as gasoline and heating oil. During that period and for many years afterwards, the DOE had an enforcement program. When a firm was found to have overcharged, the DOE generally required the firm to make refunds to its customers. However, because of the price controls in place at the time and the manner in which

  4. Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-07-15

    SAMRAI is an object-oriented support library for structured adaptice mesh refinement (SAMR) simulation of computational science problems, modeled by systems of partial differential equations (PDEs). SAMRAI is developed and maintained in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) under ASCI ITS and PSE support. SAMRAI is used in a variety of application research efforts at LLNL and in academia. These applications are developed in collaboration with SAMRAI development team members.

  5. Refining quadrilateral and brick element meshes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneiders, R.; Debye, J.

    1995-12-31

    We consider the problem of refining unstructured quadrilateral and brick element meshes. We present an algorithm which is a generalization of an algorithm developed by Cheng et. al. for structured quadrilateral element meshes. The problem is solved for the two-dimensional case. Concerning three dimensions we present a solution for some special cases and a general solution that introduces tetrahedral and pyramidal transition elements.

  6. Heavy oil development in Canada - The need for upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, P.C.

    1987-01-01

    The author first reviews Canada's petroleum reserves, then summarizes the problem facing Canada regarding dwindling supplies of conventional light and medium crude oils and briefly describes Canada's refining capability. With that background, he attempts to analyze the problems that face heavy oil producers in attempting to market their product and propose a potential solution to these problems as illustrated by Husky Oil's approach - the construction of a heavy oil upgrader. He closes by sharing his views on the future of heavy oil development and the policy issues facing our governments.

  7. Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This assessment of the Venezuelan petroleum loss examines two areas. The first part of the analysis focuses on the impact of the loss of Venezuelan crude production on crude oil supply for U.S. refiners who normally run a significant fraction of Venezuelan crude oil. The second part of the analysis looks at the impact of the Venezuelan production loss on crude markets in general, with particular emphasis on crude oil imports, refinery crude oil throughput levels, stock levels, and the changes in price differences between light and heavy crude oils.

  8. Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,515 8,460 8,445 8,597 8,548 8,488 1983-2016 Lower 48 8,033 8,033 8,020 8,120 8,065 8,015 2003-2016 Alaska 482 427 425 477 483 473 2003

    Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf January - December 2015 | Release Date: February 29, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 2016 2015 Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Highlights It should be noted that several factors influence the source of a company's crude oil imports. For example, a company like Motiva, which is partly owned by Saudi Refining Inc.,

  9. Impact of oxygenates on petroleum refining, review and forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unzelman, G.H.

    1995-09-01

    During the coming decade, oxygenates will continue to impact light oil processing and will steadily change the composition of the US gasoline pool. There are several major driving forces that will sustain the gradual influx of oxygen to US gasoline toward the regulatory limits: (1) the positive environmental characteristics of oxygenated compounds, (2) the high-octane quality of ethers that promote elimination of less desirable hydrocarbons and (3) the competitive need for ultra-clean gasoline to compete with alternatives. From 1995 forward, conventional gasoline will gradually shift to RFG (reformulated gasoline) containing a minimum of 2 wt% oxygen and less aromatics. As a result some processing changes, already in motion in the refining industry, will continue. For example, less severe naphtha reforming and cracking innovations to yield more feed for etherification and alkylation. While alternative fuel and vehicle technology will continue to develop, oxygenates in US gasoline will contribute the major alternative dimension to transportation fuel in the foreseeable future. With RFG, internal-combustion engine emissions will be progressively less toxic and lower in photochemical reactivity. The oxygenate mix will favor methyl ethers in spite of the recent methanol price spike. Ethyl ethers will be used on a more limited basis for specific situations where lower volatility and feedstock economics are an advantage. Downstream blending of ethanol will supplement ethers blended at the refinery in situations where economics are more favorable than refinery ethers. Long-range survival of ethanol, as a direct blending agent or feedstock for refinery ethers, depends on one or more of several factors: future crude oil costs, longevity of subsidies and/or mandates, and new production technology based on cellulose yielding ethanol economically competitive with hydrocarbons.

  10. Diameter-Refined Metallic Carbon Nanotubes as Optically Tunable Transparent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conductors | ANSER Center | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory Diameter-Refined Metallic Carbon Nanotubes as Optically Tunable Transparent Conductors Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Diameter-Refined Metallic Carbon Nanotubes as Optically Tunable Transparent Conductors