Sample records for world ecosystem complexes

  1. Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Navigating the complexities of dynamic ecosystem change Novel Ecosystems: Intervening in the New Ecological World www.wiley.com  The world’s ecosystems have always been 

  2. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  3. Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

  4. The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    The Online Ecosystem Promoting a Healthy IT Industry Microsoft and the Ecosystem In many ways, the Internet is an ecosystem. Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist in complex interrelationships, participants in the online ecosystem are deeply interdependent. These participants include consumers; online

  5. Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    CHAPTER 6 Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up." James A. Garfield CONTENTS Overview

  6. Our world is made up of complex systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. _ #12;A river is a system. gloBal water wIthdrawal has Increased sIxfold sInce the 1900s, twTHINK #12; _ Our world is made up of complex systems. _ #12;#12;#12;#12;To extract their full. As with any complex system, you need to analyze how work flows, how people interact and how processes can

  7. Integrating cultural services and social value: Novel directions for ecosystem service management, valuation, and complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallen, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied?Biodiversity?Sciences?Perspectives?Series? Advancing?Conservation?with?innovative?ideas?from?the?future?generation? ? Integrating?cultural?services?and?social?value:?Novel? directions?for?ecosystem?service?management,? valuation...?Kenneth?E.?Wallen?? ? ?? ? ? ? Suggested?citation:? Wallen,?K.?E.?(2013).?Integrating?cultural?services?and?social?value:?Novel? directions?for?ecosystem?service?management,?valuation,?and?complexity.? Applied?Biodiversity?Perspective?Series,?3(1)?1?13.? ? ? ? ? ABSTRACT...

  8. Ecosystem Stewardship as a Framework for Conservation in a Directionally Changing World T.R. Seastedt, K.N. Suding and F.S. Chapin III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    1 Ecosystem Stewardship as a Framework for Conservation in a Directionally Changing World T (Raudsepp-Hearne et al. 2010). All ecosystems on earth show the imprint of human actions. The resulting provided in this book (Chapter 6), hybrid and novel ecosystems dominate Earth's biotically active layer

  9. Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex business as we set out for the Hengill geothermal valley. You might think of Iceland as a cold, dark country up the breakdown of organic matter and nutrients are recycled more quickly, leading to more resources

  10. Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeal, Karen Sue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

  11. CHAPTER 4: THE DEEPWATER HORIZON OIL SPILL NATURAL RESOURCE INJURY ASSESSMENT.................1 4.1 The Injury Assessment Process: Assessing Injuries in a Complex, Interconnected Ecosystem ....1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1 The Injury Assessment Process: Assessing Injuries in a Complex, Interconnected Ecosystem ....1 4.2 Injuries the public with an overview of the potential impacts to resources in the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem caused

  12. Realtime Constraint-Based Cinematography for Complex Interactive 3D Worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, James C.

    Realtime Constraint-Based Cinematography for Complex Interactive 3D Worlds William H. Bares, creates cinematic goals for a constraint- based realtime 3D virtual cinematography plan- ner

  13. The Real Meaning of Complex Minkowski-Space World-Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Adamo; E. T. Newman

    2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with the study of shear-free null geodesics in Minkowski space, we investigate the real geometric effects in real Minkowski space that are induced by and associated with complex world-lines in complex Minkowski space. It was already known, in a formal manner, that complex analytic curves in complex Minkowski space induce shear-free null geodesic congruences. Here we look at the direct geometric connections of the complex line and the real structures. Among other items, we show, in particular, how a complex world-line projects into the real Minkowski space in the form of a real shear-free null geodesic congruence.

  14. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

  15. A Dorin and K B Korb: Network measures of ecosystem complexity, Proceedings of the Twelfth International Conference on the Synthesis and Simulation of Living Systems (Artificial Life XII), 19 August 2010 to 23 August 2010, The MIT Press,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorin, Alan

    A Dorin and K B Korb: Network measures of ecosystem complexity, Proceedings of the Twelfth to 23 August 2010, The MIT Press, Cambridge MA USA, pp. 323-328 Network Measures of Ecosystem Complexity be constructed to represent ecosystems may inform us about the open-endedness of the evolutionary systems

  16. Ecology of a vector-borne zoonosis in a complex ecosystem: trypanosomiasis in Serengeti, Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auty, Harriet K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unravelling the complexities of a disease with multiple wildlife host and multiple tsetse vector species is no easy task. After over a century of field observations, experimental studies, anecdotal evidence and conjecture, ...

  17. aerobic microbial ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    78 Ecosystem Viable Yields CERN Preprints Summary: The World Summit on Sustainable Development (Johannesburg, 2002) encouraged the application of the ecosystem approach by 2010....

  18. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  19. Efficiency of attack strategies on complex model and real-world networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellingeri, Michele; Vincenzi, Simone

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the efficiency of attack strategies to network nodes when targeting several complex model and real-world networks. We tested 5 attack strategies, 3 of which were introduced in this work for the first time, to attack 3 model (Erdos and Renyi, Barabasi and Albert preferential attachment network, and scale-free network configuration models) and 3 real networks (Gnutella peer-to-peer network, email network of the University of Rovira i Virgili, and immunoglobulin interaction network). Nodes were removed sequentially according to the importance criterion defined by the attack strategy. We used the size of the largest connected component (LCC) as a measure of network damage. We found that the efficiency of attack strategies (fraction of nodes to be deleted for a given reduction of LCC size) depends on the topology of the network, although attacks based on the number of connections of a node and betweenness centrality were often the most efficient strategies. Sequential deletion of nodes in decreasin...

  20. Creating win-wins from trade-offs? Ecosystem services for human well-being: A meta-analysis of ecosystem service trade-offs and synergies in the real world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, Caroline; Suich, Helen; Vira, Bhaskar; Mace, Georgina M.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    type of ecosystem trade-off or synergy (U Stakeholder type (where a stakeholder is an individual or group using a particular ecosystem service) Do the stakeholders hav the ecosystem service o companies have a priva timber, whereas the glo public... of the stakeholders have a private interest in one or more of the ES involved. For example, the sale of trees for timber (private interest) as opposed to their maintenance for climate regulation (public interest). In order to address these hypotheses we asked a number...

  1. Final Technical Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochlan, William P.

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  2. Final Activity Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trick, Charles Gordon [Western University

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  3. Using a complex system approach to address world challenges in Food and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Mil, H G J; Windhab, E J; Perrot, N; van der Linden, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World food supply is crucial to the well-being of every human on the planet in the basic sense that we need food to live. It also has a profound impact on the world economy, international trade and global political stability. Furthermore, consumption of certain types and amounts foods can affect health, and the choice of livestock and plants for food production can impact sustainable use of global resources. There are communities where insufficient food causes nutritional deficiencies, and at the same time other communities eating too much food leading to obesity and accompanying diseases. These aspects reflect the utmost importance of agricultural production and conversion of commodities to food products. Moreover, all factors contributing to the food supply are interdependent, and they are an integrative part of the continuously changing, adaptive and interdependent systems in the world around us. The properties of such interdependent systems usually cannot be inferred from the properties of its parts. In a...

  4. Design Innovation Global network of designers, engineers, and innovators challenging complex real world problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    and eight different countries. The course is now focused on teaching students the innovation methods multiple times, not only does it maximize student learning, it maximizes project insights for the student engineering students with real world engineering challenges, the course has evolved over the ages to meet

  5. Evaluation of the Nephrotoxicity of Complex Mixtures Containing Organics and Metals: Advantages and Disadvantages of the Use of Real-world Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane Ellen Simmons; Raymond S. H. Yang; Ezra Berman

    As part of a multidisciplinary health effects study, the nephrotoxicity of complex industrial waste mixtures was assessed. Adult, male Fischer 344 rats were gavaged with samples of complex industrial waste and nephrotoxicity evaluated 24 hr later. Of the 10 tested samples, 4 produced increased absolute or relative kidney weight, or both, coupled with a statistically significant alteration in at least one of the measured serum parameters (urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CREAT), and BUN/CREAT ratio). Although the waste samples had been analyzed for a number of organic chemicals and 7 of the 10 samples were analyzed also for 12 elemental metals and metalloids, their nephrotoxicity was not readily predicted from the partial chemical characterization data. Because the chemical form or speciation of the metals was unknown, it was not possible to estimate their contribution to the observed biological response. Various experimental approaches, including use of real-world complex mixtures, chemically defined synthetic mixtures, and simple mixtures, will be necessary to adequately determine the potential human health risk from exposure to complex

  6. Approaches for Planning and Implementing Sustainable Energy Growth in a Complex World: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, N.; Schwab, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of sustainable energy development has been widely discussed and debated in recent years. However, despite widespread interest, progress toward this goal has been limited. This paper will build on current thinking related to sustainable development, energy forecasting, and complexity theory and show how past roadmapping methodologies fall short. While proposing ways of thinking about our responses to global changes, we consider how we can create and discover the pathways through those unpredictable changes toward high global renewables penetration.

  7. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  8. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  9. World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals are presently driving rapid global change in emissions with complex conse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    395 World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goalsPollution Intercontinental transport of pollution between Asia, North America, and Europe takes place via the prevailing by the scientific community as a global pol- lutant for which regulation can best be accomplished by a global

  10. World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals are presently driving rapid global change in emissions with complex conse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    377 World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goalsPollution Intercontinental transport of pollution between Asia, North America, and Europe takes place via the prevailing by the scientific community as a global pol- lutant for which regulation can best be accomplished by a global

  11. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetlands has negative impacts on ecosystem services (i.e. ,economically quanti?able ecosystem bene?ts, such as rechargeincluded the loss of natural ecosystem functions and their

  12. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  13. Stability and Complexity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    and complexity of a commu- nity of interacting plants and animals, following the food web as a clue. Contrary in power. Stability and Complexity in Model Ecosystems played a key role in introducing nonlinear thinking, and current threats to biodiversity have made questions about the role of ecosystem complexity

  14. Ecosystem element cycling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    Ecosystem element cycling Introduction An ecosystem consists of all the biological organisms and the physical environments they occupy together within a defined area [1]. The actual boundaries of an ecosystem are generally defined by researchers studying the ecosystem, who are usually interested in understanding

  15. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystem Science SHARE Ecosystem Science Project the fate and function of ecosystems as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to...

  16. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food production affect the land...

  17. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  18. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  19. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  20. Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Projects Leads Nancy...

  1. EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Soil Composition http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebnewssoil-composition

  2. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  3. Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Frederick

    Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange David M. Blersch dblersch Shade of Blue and You 21 September 2010 #12;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through;National Science Foundation Ecosystem Restoration through Interdisciplinary Exchange UB's ERIE Program www

  4. The Loss of Ecosystem Services on the Yucatn Peninsula in the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    The Loss of Ecosystem Services on the Yucatán Peninsula in the 21st Century Case study: mangrove loss in Mexico (MX) & Belize (BZ) Natallia Leuchanka Environmental Science: Ecosystems; International Reardon #12;#12;Akumal, Mexico (MX) Sarteneja, Belize (BZ) #12;· Ecosystem: a dynamic complex of plant

  5. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  6. Monetising cultural ecosystem services? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinci, Igor

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT In the context of increasing degradation of the environment, the economic valuation of ecosystem services represents an attempt to quantify the contribution of nature to human wellbeing. This approach has been ...

  7. Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliaga, Daniel G.

    Urban Ecosystem Design Bedrich Benes Michel Abdul Massih Philip Jarvis Purdue University Daniel G. Aliaga Carlos A. Vanegas a) b) c) Figure 1: This example demonstrates the need for urban ecosystems. The image in a) shows a terrain occupied by a wild ecosystem and b) displays the same ecosystem grown over

  8. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems D. A. NEHER Department of Biology, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606, USA; E-mail: dneher, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i

  9. World-Systems as Dynamic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    World-Systems as Dynamic Networks Christopher Chase-Dunn Institute for Research on World-Systems on comparative world-systems for the workshop on `analyzing complex macrosystems as dynamic networks" at the Santa Fe Institute, April 29- 30, 2004. (8341 words) v. 4-22-04 1 #12;The comparative world-systems

  10. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  11. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  12. The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Michael

    The Galactic Ecosystem Michael Burton School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Australia. THE UNIVERSITY OF NEW SOUTH WALES DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICS SCHOOL OF PHYSICS Abstract Ecosystems are systems. Ecosystems operate autonomously, by a process of self-regulation. Their flows of energy mean they cannot

  13. Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystems of MongoliaEcosystems of Mongolia The vast area of the country contains a great array Desert steppe Desert ecosystems MainMain ecosystems of Mongolia High mountain ecosystemsHigh mountain ecosystems High mountain occupies 4.48% of the total territory of Mongolia. Mountain forest ecosystems

  14. Private Lands, Public Goods: Engaging Landowners in Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferranto, Shasta Patricia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    practice: implementing ecosystem management objectives in2009. Science for managing ecosystem services: Beyondthe Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. Proceedings of the

  15. Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography model version 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    Mechanistic scaling of ecosystem function and dynamics in space and time: Ecosystem Demography] Insights into how terrestrial ecosystems affect the Earth's response to changes in climate and rising contain detailed mechanistic representations of biological processes affecting terrestrial ecosystems

  16. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  17. Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 February 2009 #12;2 #12;3 Ecosystem Services and Environmental Benefits of the UC San Diego Campus Forest 10 buildings. By consuming solar energy in the process of evapotranspiration and blocking winter winds

  18. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ESTABLISHING AN IDENTITY ECOSYSTEM GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE THE DEPARTMENT an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure This page is intentionally left blank. #12;Recommendations for Establishing an Identity Ecosystem Governance Structure Foreword The Internet is one of the most

  19. Dilmaya's World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan, Macfarlane

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    burning on a funeral pyre. I had never lived for more than a day or in a world without toilets or toilet papers, where there was no central heating and no window glass to keep out the cold Himalayan winds. * * * Short of finding the very... not to film something because she felt that it was intrusive or time-wasting, though there must have been occasions when she thought both of these things. She did not show off in front of others, boast or use the filming to elevate her status. Nor did she...

  20. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  1. The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Kootenai Tribe's Kootenai River Ecosystem Restoration Project 1994-2012 Project # 199404900 · PURPOSE: TO ADDRESS FISHERIES RELATED PROBLEMS AT AN ECOSYSTEM LEVEL AND PROVIDE RESTORATION SOLUTIONS Kootenai River OBJ-2: Restore Ecosystem Productivity OBJ-3: Restore Ecosystem Productivity to Kootenay Lake

  2. Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith.hanna@naturalengland.org.uk #12;Ecosystem services Constituents of well-beingSupporting­ecologicalprocesses:nutrient cycling:opportunityto achievewhatanindividualvaluesdoingandbeing Simplified from Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, 2003 #12;Source: MEA (2003) #12;Ecosystems

  3. Third World Ballistic missiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolan, J.E.; Wheelon, A.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ballistic missiles and other means of long-range destruction, traditionally limited to a handful of industrialized nations, are fast becoming a fixture in many regional conflicts. The Third World military buildup is perhaps even more worrisome than its First World prototype, for it is far more likely to find expression in war. There are several reasons why this should be so. In the past decade the number of countries in the missile club has more than doubled, to 18. Many of the new members have been at war or are embroiled in disputes. Unlike the major powers, these countries have not had time enough to perfect systems of command and control over their new strategic forces. They have had little time to learn to manage the complexities of military brinksmanship. Finally, because many regional conflicts overlap, an escalation in the arms race tends to convey itself from one area of tension to another. For many years the big industrialized countries ignored the proliferation of ballistic missiles and sought political advantage by arming their clients. In doing so, they presumed that the bipolar alignment of power would restrain regional conflicts. The preoccupation with East-West issues overshadowed problems in the Third World. Smaller industrialized powers sold missiles to generate revenues to support their own military industries. Meanwhile the developing countries eagerly acquired missiles for the same reasons that had motivated their predecessors: to deter attack, intimidate enemies, build a technological base and win prestige.

  4. What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons? The overarching goal of Ecosystem Commons is to enhance the use of ecosystem services and related science in conservation at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information

  5. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  6. Intelligent spatial ecosystem modeling using parallel processors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, T.; Costanza, R. (Maryland International Inst. for Ecological Economics, Solomons (United States))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial modeling of ecosystems is essential if one's modeling goals include developing a relatively realistic description of past behavior and predictions of the impacts of alternative management policies on future ecosystem behavior. Development of these models has been limited in the past by the large amount of input data required and the difficulty of even large mainframe serial computers in dealing with large spatial arrays. These two limitations have begun to erode with the increasing availability of remote sensing data and GIS systems to manipulate it, and the development of parallel computer systems which allow computation of large, complex, spatial arrays. Although many forms of dynamic spatial modeling are highly amenable to parallel processing, the primary focus in this project is on process-based landscape models. These models simulate spatial structure by first compartmentalizing the landscape into some geometric design and then describing flows within compartments and spatial processes between compartments according to location-specific algorithms. The authors are currently building and running parallel spatial models at the regional scale for the Patuxent River region in Maryland, the Everglades in Florida, and Barataria Basin in Louisiana. The authors are also planning a project to construct a series of spatially explicit linked ecological and economic simulation models aimed at assessing the long-term potential impacts of global climate change.

  7. Columbia River Plume andColumbia River Plume and California Current Ecosystem:California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Fish, Wildlife, Ecosystem Monitoring and Evaluation Manager SUBJECT: Summary of Public and ISAB substitution), wildlife, habitat/ecosystem questions thereby balancing the currently predominant anadromous

  8. Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation by Oswald J. Schmitz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton-Smith, Elery

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation By Oswald J.Oswald J, Ecology and Ecosystem Conservation. Washington:when the protection of the ecosystem also extends outside of

  9. Size structuring of planktonic communities : biological rates and ecosystem dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taniguchi, Darcy Anne Akiko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and nutrient enriched ecosystems. Limnology and Oceanographyin the pelagic ecosystem. Helgol. Wiss. Meeresunters. 30:Size-structured planktonic ecosystems: constraints, controls

  10. azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

  11. Ecosystem-scale Selenium Model for the San Francisco Bay-Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration Implementation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rivers: implications for ecosystem restoration: Final reportto CALFED. Ecosystem Restoration Program Agreement No.support tools to guide ecosystem restoration planning and

  12. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    , Massachusetts Institute of Technology http://ocean.mit.edu/~mick/Downloads.html #12;What is the marine ecosystem limited Light limited Reveals environmental regulation of primary production #12;coccolithophores (CaCO3 of organic carbon Current Question: What regulatesC

  13. Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Andy

    Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

  14. Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview and ApproachesOverview and Approaches to Ecosystem Restorationto Ecosystem Restoration to restoreTo the extent possible, we need to restore historic conditions on the ecosystem scalehistoric conditions on the ecosystem scale to achieve these goalsto achieve these goals Habitat LossHabitat Loss #12

  15. Abstract--The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricci, Francesco

    Abstract-- The Digital Ecosystem (DES) paradigm and consequently Digital Business Ecosystems (DBE) are powerful emerging inter-company cooperative structures. One of the main advantages of an ecosystem companies of the ecosystem is an essential binding element among them. The intention of this paper

  16. Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services: A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Well being, forestry and ecosystem services Wellbeing, forestry and ecosystem services increasingly important in government policy in the last decade. Ecosystem services have also become a significant focus for government following the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA). Human wellbeing is a key

  17. Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bittner, Thomas

    Ontological Investigation of Ecosystem Hierarchies and Formal Theory for Multiscale Ecosystem ecosystems as a representative example of a geographic object. To achieve this goal we will develop a formalized framework for handling of the structure of ecosystem hierarchies. Our theory will be demonstrated

  18. Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    Changes in ecosystem resilience detected in automated measures of ecosystem metabolism during of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545; and c Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia) Environmental sensor networks are developing rapidly to as- sess changes in ecosystems and their services. Some

  19. Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead-ing to impairment of natural ecosystem structure and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    but coupling that potential with societal demands and eco- nomic feasibility.Valuation of ecosystem goods are ig- nored.Ascribing an economic value to some ecosystem goods and services,by contrastArticles Humans influence every ecosystem on Earth, lead- ing to impairment of natural ecosystem

  20. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions. climate variability coastal marine ecosystems coastal ocean upwelling marine ecology Equatorward winds along the eastern boundaries of the world's oceans drive offshore surface Ekman

  1. Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    -Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael Köster · CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael Köster · CIG, TU

  2. Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosby, Benjamin T.

    Anticipating Stream Ecosystem Responses to Climate Change: Toward Predictions that Incorporate, Pocatello, Idaho 83209, USA; 2 Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA; 3, and debris flows) and shift distributions of terrestrial ecosystems on a global basis. Although

  3. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam April 21- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States undertook ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific model

  4. essm.tamu.edu of Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    essm.tamu.edu Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life of Ecosystem Science and Management (ESSM) at Texas A&M University invites applications for graduate.D. students whose research will focus on the ecology and management of dryland ecosystems. James M. Carder

  5. Linking ecosystem and parasite Michel Loreau,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    13 CHAPTER 1 Linking ecosystem and parasite ecology Michel Loreau,1 Jacques Roy,2 and David Tilman3 Parasites are rarely considered in ecosystem studies. The current interest in the relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, however, has stimulated the emergence of new synthetic approaches

  6. A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management Ratana Chuenpagdee,1 * Lisa Liguori,2 Dave ABSTRACT Although ecosystem-based management can lead to sustainable resource use, its successful imple the ecosystems with stakeholders' preferences is therefore needed. We propose here a 'Public Sen- timent Index

  7. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  8. Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ecosystem Viable Yields Michel De Lara Eladio Oca~na Ricardo Oliveros-Ramos Jorge Tam November the appli- cation of the ecosystem approach by 2010. However, at the same Summit, the signatory States without ecosystemic dimension, since MSY is computed species by species, on the basis of a monospecific

  9. CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CANARY CURRENT LARGE MARINE ECOSYSTEM (CCLME) PROJECT CCLME Inception Workshop 2-3 November 2010. Two possible case studies are presented: the Imraguen social-ecosystem of the Banc d'Arguin National Park, the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate

  10. PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

  11. affect ecosystem metabolism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike 9 Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: and agricultural ecosystems;...

  12. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  13. Exploring the Future Role of Asia Utilizing A Scenario Matrix Architecture and Shared Socio-Ecosystem Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the implications of alternative pathways for human population and economic development for the role of Asia in both reference, no-climate-policy, scenarios and scenarios in which climate forcing is limited. We consider three different reference scenarios, which we refer to as Shared Socio-ecosystem Pathways (SSPs) and four different levels of limitation on climate forcing, which we refer to as Shared Policy Assumptions (SPAs). SSPs are differentiated by population and economic growth assumptions, while SPAs are differentiated on the level of radiative forcing in the year 2100. Regardless of the scenarios we examined Asia plays a central role in shaping the world’s future with nearly half of the world’s people and more than half of the world’s economic activity and energy consumption. The future of Asian and world are dramatically different across the various combinations of SSPs and SPAs. High population worlds place significant stress on Asian resources and ecosystems. In high population SSPs the poorest members of the population face high energy and food prices and the more stringent the level of emissions mitigation, the more stress poor populations experience, though the more stringent the emissions mitigation, the larger the area of unmanaged ecosystems that are preserved.

  14. Our definition of sustainability reflects what the UN and the World Wildlife Fund suggest as the process of improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting eco-systems. We use the definition where human, societa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    Our definition of sustainability reflects what the UN and the World Wildlife Fund suggest as the process of improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting eco are fundamentally integrated dimensions that are mutually reinforcing. The new School of Global Sustainability

  15. Rescuing ecosystems from extinction cascades through compensatory perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagar Sahasrabudhe; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Food-web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and habitat degradation often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions, posing considerable challenges to ecosystem conservation efforts. Here we devise a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions using a predictive modeling framework. We show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal or population suppression of other specific species, which is a counterintuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not evident from local predator-prey relationships. In numerous cases, even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. These compensatory perturbations only exploit resources available in the system, and illustrate the potential of human intervention combined with predictive modeling for ecosystem management.

  16. SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    derived from rangelands Link between the biophysical world and the social systems humans use Basic Fish Huntable or Catchable fish and wildlife Biofuels Fiber Biochemicals Genetic material #12 Assess biological, hydrological, atmospheric, and other physical resources (supply) Describe the market

  17. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work4/11Computational EarthDepartmentTriSolarEcosystem

  18. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  19. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  20. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  1. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  2. VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on and func9on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    VQ5. Ecosystem and Human Health How do changes in ecosystem composi9on Issue: ·Ecosystem condition affects the humans dependent on those ecosystems for life and livelihood. How do changes in ecosystem composition and function correlate with famine, exposure to harmful biotic

  3. Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Adena Rissman Assistant Professor, Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest Professor: 2009-present Human Dimensions of Ecosystem Management Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, Integrative Graduate Education and Research Training (IGERT). "Novel ecosystems, rapid change, and no

  4. Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact: current and future measures James the information needs of domain scientists, software component producers, infrastructure providers, and ecosystem conclude with policy recommendations #12;designed to improve insight into the scientific software ecosystem

  5. Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Environmental Benefits and Performance Measures: Defining National Ecosystem Restoration and how of Engineers #12;The Issue The Corps created an ecosystem restoration mission out of congressional authorities ecosystem services enough to reduce national welfare. Implementing projects under that mission requires

  6. Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Measures of the effects of agricultural practices on ecosystem services Virginia H. Dalea,, Stephen of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity

  7. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  8. Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report ARB Award No. 98 of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall University Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Mangement Ecosystem Sciences Division 151 Hilgard Hall

  9. Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Publishedbythe. ONeill, Harold A. Mooney, Osvaldo E. Sala, Amy J. Symstad, and David Tilman Biodiversity and Ecosystem Functioning: Maintaining Natural Life Support Processes Critical processes at the ecosystem level influence

  10. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study National Planning Center of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W Report Bubbly Creek Ecosystem Restoration Feasibility Study Prepared by Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus

  11. Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ForReview Only Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer change, community assembly, ecosystem functioning, New Zealand Nothofagus (beech) forests, priority dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities Tadashi Fukami1,2,3 , Ian A

  12. ENVS 4000, Spring (Jan-Apr) 2006 Monitoring Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    systems depend on ecosystems for food, materials, energy, purification, enjoyment, a sense of place challenges. Adaptive ecosystem management depends on knowledge of system states and dynamics, and therefore and models for ecosystem monitoring and management, including Environmental Benefit Analysis, Environmental

  13. World Views From fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................11 2. The Seven Components of a World View...................................................... 20 3. The Unity of the Seven Sub........................................... 25 5. The Purpose of the group `Worldviews

  14. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

  15. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  16. 5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for gasoline, diesel and other petroleum products. This chapter provides an overview of world oil trends agreements on export routes have limited development. Petroleum production in the United States, including half of petroleum supplies to the United States. OPEC petroleum production also increased in 1994

  17. What in the World are Possible Worlds?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dondero, Mark

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    talk of possible worlds? In this thesis, I will attempt to outline the most significant and well-recognized view in this debate: that of David Lewis. Through my discussion of him, I will find occasion to discuss some alternative views that have arisen...

  18. Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight from a cross-site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight Cruces, NM 88012, USA, 4 USDA ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX 76502, USA, 5 Abstract Climate change will result in reduced soil water availability in much of the world either due

  19. Complex Networked Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buildings, modern control systems are increasingly incorporating communication networks in feedback loops [5Complex Networked Control Systems W e live and operate in a networked world. We drive to work on the performance of feedback control systems [5], [6]. Signifi- cant attention is focused on devising local

  20. International Journal of Reliability, Quality and Safety Engineering World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    International Journal of Reliability, Quality and Safety Engineering ©World Scientific Publishing of Reliability, Quality and Safety Engineering ©World Scientific Publishing Company 2 Likewise, application Engineering and The Institute for Complex Engineered Systems Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue

  1. Beneficial Bees and Pesky Pests: Three Essays on Ecosystem Services to Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Brian James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    region considered. Ecosystem service valuations can usefullyand valuation of ecosystem functions, goods and services.

  2. Social Network Theory, Broadband and the World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sgroi, Daniel

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims to predict some possible futures for the World Wide Web based on several key network parameters: size, complexity, cost and increasing connection speed thorough the uptake of broadband technology. This is done through the production...

  3. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  4. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EB et al (2005) Valuing ecosystem services: toward bettershaping landscapes and ecosystems for human welfare. Scienceanalyzing, and managing ecosystem services. Front Ecol

  5. Data Mining in the Real World: Experiences, Challenges, and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Gary

    Data Mining in the Real World: Experiences, Challenges, and Recommendations Gary M. Weiss Department of Computer and Information Science, Fordham University, Bronx, NY, USA Abstract - Data mining- ceptance. However, applying data mining methods to complex real-world tasks is far from straightforward

  6. Levins and the Lure of Artificial Worlds Seth Bullock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levins and the Lure of Artificial Worlds Seth Bullock Institute for Complex Systems Simulation of empirical data on the real-world systems being simulated; that is, to treat simulations as `artificial). Others claim that simulations of artificial living systems are models, but that in the right

  7. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security Globalisation Climate Change Health Water Security Poverty Alleviation Finance Urbanisation Population Energy

  8. Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machine Learning in Ecosystem Informatics Thomas G. Dietterich Oregon State University, Corvallis. The emerging field of Ecosystem Informatics applies meth- ods from computer science and mathematics to address fundamental and applied problems in the ecosystem sciences. The ecosystem sciences are in the midst

  9. Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavaleta, Erika

    Sustaining multiple ecosystem functions in grassland communities requires higher biodiversity Erika (sent for review July 27, 2009) Society places value on the multiple functions of ecosystems from ecosystems to provide threshold levels of up to eight ecosystem functions simultaneously. Across years

  10. At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    EDITORIAL At Last: A Journal Devoted to Ecosystem Science The science and management of ecosystems to- gether is one of the most dynamic fields of contem- porary ecology. Ecosystem science has disciplines. The scope of ecosystem science encom- passes bounded systems like watersheds as well as spatially

  11. Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Ecosystem type affects interpretation of soil nematode community measures D.A. Neher a,*, J. Wu b understanding of performance among major ecosystem types is necessary before nematode community indices can and agricultural ecosystems; (2) compare nematode community composition among and within ecosystem types and report

  12. Volume 3 Number 2 2011 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Volume 3 · Number 2 · 2011 55 Modeling an Innovation Ecosystem with Adaptive Agents* Joseph Engler1 of innovation and its place in a global economy or ecosystem is presented. The model utilizes simple agents-based model of an innovation ecosystem is presented. The ecosystem is considered as an environment in which

  13. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S for the goods and services provided by natural ecosystems. However, relatively few studies have evalu- ated- ity to loss and their contributions to ecosystem functioning. ammonium diversity ecosystem function

  14. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

  15. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  16. World Cup Blues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi

    2010-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: World Cup. 1966. North Korea stuns soccer fans by becoming the first Asian team ever to advance to the quarterfinals where they go up 3-0 against Portugal before finally being defeated at the hands--or ...

  17. Around the World byprivatejet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    AngkorWat, Cambodia Petra or Wadi Rum, Jordan engeti Plain or rongoro Crater, Tanzania The Great Barrier cities of the ancient world at Petra, or explore the lunar-like landscape of Wadi Rum. Cambodia india

  18. Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 1 Ecosystem Biomass as a Framework for Predicting Habitat Fragmentation Effects Running Head: Edge effects across ecosystem types Key Words: biomass 59717-3460. hansen@montana.edu 25 February 2008 #12;Hansen et al. Edge effects across ecosystem types 2

  19. Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30 1 to integrate information and data on climate change and its impacts in a similar way for a number of sectors (climate, hydrology, ecosystems, agriculture, land use) among others through a web portal and integrated

  20. 15/07/12 5:47 AMA World Without Coral Reefs -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/opinion/a-world-without-coral-reefs.html?_r=2&hpw&pagewanted=print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    15/07/12 5:47 AMA World Without Coral Reefs - NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/opinion/a-world-without-coral-reefs.html?_r=2&hpw&pagewanted=print July 13, 2012 A World Without Coral of the world's coral reefs, the nurseries of tropical coastal fish stocks. They have become zombie ecosystems

  1. To Revalue the Rural? Transformation of the Mexican Federal Payments for Ecosystem Services Programs from Neoliberal Notion to Development Dogma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Elizabeth N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    goals and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecosystems 3:Kumar. 2008. Valuation of ecosystem services: A psycho-

  2. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  3. Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within a larger natural ecosystem. An Eco-Logical guide waschanges in the Great Lakes ecosystem from the introductionfor a State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) Pre-

  4. Evaluating Ocean Management Systems to Facilitate the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Oran R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Development of Ecosystem-Based Management Preparergovernance to assist ecosystem-based management initiativesCurrent Large Marine Ecosystem. This geographic scope

  5. Species diversity and foundation species: Potential indicators of fisheries yields and marine ecosystem functioning.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bracken, Matthew E.S.; Bracken, B. E.; Rogers-Bennett, Laura Dr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning: a consensus ofWood. 1995. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning: coastalSection 6. Biodiversity and ecosystem function: ecosys- tem

  6. Floodplain restoration planning for a changing climate: Coupling flow dynamics with ecosystem benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matella, Mary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear dynamics in ecosystem response to climatic change:alteration within ecosystems. Conservation Biology 10: 1163-Paruelo, 1998. The value of ecosystem services: putting the

  7. Hydraulic controls on river biota and the consequence for ecosystem processes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limm, Michael Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of macroinvertebrates in stream ecosystem function. Annualin marine and freshwater ecosystems. Canadian Journal ofanimals in freshwater ecosystems. Annual Review of Ecology

  8. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006. Eco-Logical: An Ecosystem Approach to Developinghabitat and essential ecosystems. There are a variety ofdo very little to promote ecosystem sustainability. Concern

  9. An Assessment of Ecosystem Services Provided by Street Trees in Bangkok, Thailand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOONSAWAD, NATTHANIJ

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the valuation of ecosystem services. Ecologicalquantification and valuation of ecosystem services using i-their valuation Although research on ecosystem services has

  10. Complex Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complex Dynamics Bernardo Da Costa, Koushik Ramachandran, Jingjing Qu, and I had a two semester learning seminar in complex analysis and potential ...

  11. Labyrinthine clustering in a spatial rock-paper-scissors ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juul, Jeppe; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial rock-paper-scissors ecosystem, where three species interact cyclically, is a model example of how spatial structure can maintain biodiversity. We here consider such a system for a broad range of interaction rates. When one species grows very slowly, this species and its prey dominate the system by self-organizing into a labyrinthine configuration in which the third species propagates. The cluster size distributions of the two dominating species have heavy tails and the configuration is stabilized through a complex, spatial feedback loop. We introduce a new statistical measure that quantifies the amount of clustering in the spatial system by comparison with its mean field approximation. Hereby, we are able to quantitatively explain how the labyrinthine configuration slows down the dynamics and stabilizes the system.

  12. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  13. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes) was conducted during 25 years and generated results that indicate that about 15% of #12;Ecosystems Biodiversity

  14. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and spatial distribution of ecosystems and users, the spatial relation- ships between them, and the presence; Millennium Ecosystem Assessment 2003). Despite their importance for human well-being, eco- system services

  16. ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

  17. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  18. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Randerson, J. T; Chapin, F. S; Harden, J. W; Neff, J. C; Harmon, M. E

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and F A. Bazzaz. August 2002 NET ECOSYSTEM PRODUCTION 1993.Net exchange of CO2 in a mid-latitude forest. ScienceN. , and E. -D. Schulze. 1999. Net CO, and H,O fluxes from

  19. Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature profiles using inverse methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling nighttime ecosystem respiration from measured CO2 concentration and air temperature ecosystem carbon budgets from micrometeorological methods remains nighttime ecosystem respiration theory to infer the two components of ecosystem respiration (aboveground and forest floor) from measured

  20. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  1. 5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 Ecosystem exchange measurement methods 5.3 Introduction To understand the behaviour of an ecosystem it is important to know its resource requirements. Though numerous resources are mobilized models have attempted to represent the growth of entire plants or of entire ecosystems based on physical

  2. Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Managing a Software Ecosystem Using a Multiple Software Product Line: a Case Study on Digital increases the number of software ecosystems: software platforms developed and maintained in a decentralized YourCast from a single system to a medium- scale ecosystem, we show how organizing it as a multiple

  3. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  4. Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Feeding TEL: Building an Ecosystem Around BuRST to Convey Publication Metadata Peter Kraker1, Austria {pkraker, afessl, phoefler, slind}@know-center.at Abstract. In this paper we present an ecosystem of this ecosystem, semantically enriched RSS feeds are used for dissemination. These feeds are complemented

  5. California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy Winter 2014 Mondays, 4 Applying reconciliation ecology to aquatic ecosystems in California. Peter Moyle and Melanie Truan, UC of Chief Counsel, State Water Resources Control Board Feb. 10 Reconciling ecosystem goals for San Francisco

  6. Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    Discovering Ecosystem Models from Time-Series Data Dileep George, 1 Kazumi Saito, 2 Pat Langley, 1. Ecosystem models are used to interpret and predict the in- teractions of species and their environment. In this paper, we address the task of inducing ecosystem models from background knowledge and time- series data

  7. Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Mikls Herdon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Drivers Miklós Herdon1 , Mária Raffai2 , Ádám of the Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE) has been come life in order to build an Internet-based environment in which businesses will be able to interact with each other more efficiently. In a Digital Ecosystem

  8. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 that time, ecosystem restoration has advanced from planning to implementation; progress in research has

  9. Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Texas A&M University Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review SelfStudy Document April, 2008 #12;ii Department of Ecosystem Science and Management Academic Program Review April, 2008 Table of Contents 1.0 Department of Ecosystem Science

  10. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    . Despite this uncertainty, new methods of ecosystem service valuation are suggesting that the economicRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1 benefits of restoration can outweigh costs. Payment for Ecosystem Service schemes could therefore provide

  11. The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

  12. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 1 16 .06.2008 Pastoral system and herders communities Professor D.Dorligsuren Programme Coordinator "Green Gold" Pasture Ecosystem Management Programme Swiss Agency for Cooperation and Development, Mongolia "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management

  13. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

  14. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3 Management Strategies4 5 Andrew James Hansen6 Ecology property, ecosystem energy levels, which,14 while once widely recognized as important, has received little

  15. Introduction Complexity &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonet, Blai

    Introduction Basics Complexity & Expressivity Analysis Techniques Special Classes of Nets Conclusion Petri Nets (for Planners) B. Bonet, P. Haslum ... from various places ... ICAPS 2011 #12;Introduction Basics Complexity & Expressivity Analysis Techniques Special Classes of Nets Conclusion

  16. WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL AND OIL UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR · FISH THIS REPORT IS A GENERAL ACCOUNT OF THE WORLD ' S PRO- DUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL AND OIL. IN 1959- DICATE WHAT IS INCLUDED BESIDES FISHMEAL AND FISH BODY OIL. #12;WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL

  17. Scientists from around the world use Fermilab's particle accelerator complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter PrincipalfuelTorus Experiment

  18. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  19. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  20. World Biofuels Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfstad,T.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report forms part of a project entitled 'World Biofuels Study'. The objective is to study world biofuel markets and to examine the possible contribution that biofuel imports could make to help meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The study was sponsored by the Biomass Program of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy. It is a collaborative effort among the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The project consisted of three main components: (1) Assessment of the resource potential for biofuel feedstocks such as sugarcane, grains, soybean, palm oil and lignocellulosic crops and development of supply curves (ORNL). (2) Assessment of the cost and performance of biofuel production technologies (NREL). (3) Scenario-based analysis of world biofuel markets using the ETP global energy model with data developed in the first parts of the study (BNL). This report covers the modeling and analysis part of the project conducted by BNL in cooperation with PI. The Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) energy system model was used as the analytical tool for this study. ETP is a 15 region global model designed using the MARKAL framework. MARKAL-based models are partial equilibrium models that incorporate a description of the physical energy system and provide a bottom-up approach to study the entire energy system. ETP was updated for this study with biomass resource data and biofuel production technology cost and performance data developed by ORNL and NREL under Tasks 1 and 2 of this project. Many countries around the world are embarking on ambitious biofuel policies through renewable fuel standards and economic incentives. As a result, the global biofuel demand is expected to grow very rapidly over the next two decades, provided policymakers stay the course with their policy goals. This project relied on a scenario-based analysis to study global biofuel markets. Scenarios were designed to evaluate the impact of different policy proposals and market conditions. World biofuel supply for selected scenarios is shown in Figure 1. The reference case total biofuel production increases from 12 billion gallons of ethanol equivalent in 2005 to 54 billion gallons in 2020 and 83 billion gallons in 2030. The scenarios analyzed show volumes ranging from 46 to 64 billion gallons in 2020, and from about 72 to about 100 billion gallons in 2030. The highest production worldwide occurs in the scenario with high feedstock availability combined with high oil prices and more rapid improvements in cellulosic biofuel conversion technologies. The lowest global production is found in the scenario with low feedstock availability, low oil prices and slower technology progress.

  1. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  2. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  3. Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: EnergyEastport,de Nantes JumpEcosystem Japan Co Ltd

  4. Building a World of Difference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

  5. alpine lake ecosystems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Lake Ecosystem Modelling: an Integrated Approach INTRODUCTION Anthropogenic eutrophication of water bodies and its consequences are of concern especially to Assess...

  6. anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Anthropogenic impacts such as fishing and eutrophication are significant challenges to the sustainable management of aquatic ecosystems....

  7. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  8. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  9. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  10. City ecosystem resilience analysis in case of disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asprone, D; Latora, V; Manfredi, G; Nicosia, V

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the tasks of urban and hazard planning is to mitigate the damages and minimize the costs of the recovery process after catastrophic events. The rapidity and the efficiency of the recovery process are referred to as resilience. A mathematical definition of the resilience of an urban community has not yet identified. In this paper we propose and test a methodology for the assessment of urban resilience a catastrophic event. The idea is to merge the concepts of the engineering resilience and the ecosystem resilience. As first step we suggest a way to model an urban community inside the framework of complex network theory. Hence, to model the city as a whole, we identify hybrid networks, composed by human elements, i.e. the citizens, and physical networks, i.e. urban lifelines and infrastructures. As second step, we define and evaluate a class of efficiency indexes on the hybrid networks. By modelling the disasters of the physical components and the subsequent recovery process, and by measuring the efficie...

  11. Toward a consistency cross-check of eddy covariance flux–based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    based and biometric estimates of ecosystem carbon balance S.Uncertainty of annual net ecosystem productivity estimatedand par- titioning of ecosystem respiration in a southern

  12. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationCA): Delta Regional Ecosystem Restoration ImplementationBay–Delta Program. 2000. Ecosystem Restoration Program:

  13. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous United States by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Lianhong

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    defensible annual sums of net ecosystem exchange. Agri. For.contrasting Florida ecosystems. Ecol. App. 9, 936- Clark,S. , 2002. Seasonality of ecosystem respiration and gross

  14. Near-surface remote sensing of canopy architecture and land-atmosphere interactions in an oak savanna ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryu, Youngryel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007). Reduction of ecosystem productivity and respirationR. (2005). On the separation of net ecosystem exchange intoassimilation and ecosystem respiration: review and improved

  15. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  16. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1993), Terrestrial ecosystem production – a process modeland H. L. Gholz (2005), Ecosystem and understory water andestimating per-pixel ecosystem C fluxes. Geophy. Res.

  17. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    locations in three ecosystems. Marine Biology 82 (2), 199–2009. Subtropical ocean ecosystem structure chang- es forcedrecent collapse of coastal ecosystems. Science 293, 629–637.

  18. SECOND WORLD WAR THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    RECORD OF SERVICE SECOND WORLD WAR THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA VANCOUVER #12;IN MEMORIAM #12$,T'r 113a,. #12;#12;RECORD OF SERVICE IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR THEUNIVERSITY OF BRITISHCOLUMBIA A Supplement to the University of British Columbia War Memorial Manuscript Record. Vancouver, Canada, 1955. #12;Printed

  19. WORLD CONFERENCE AND GENEALOGICAL SEMINAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen Jr., Dan R.

    WORLD CONFERENCE ON RECORDS AND GENEALOGICAL SEMINAR Salt Lake City, Utah, U.S.A. 5-8 August 1969 Research In Yugoslavia By Joze Zontar COPYRIGHT© 1969 THE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY OF THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER·DAY SAINTS, INC. AREA 0 -13 WORLD CONFERENCE ON RECORDS AND GENEALOGICAL SEMINAR Salt

  20. Physics World Archive Topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Physics World Archive Topological insulators Charles Kane, Joel Moore From Physics World February, how- ever, now uncovered a new electronic phase called a topological insulator. Putting the name; this "spin current" is a milestone in the realization of practical "spintronics". Topological insulators have

  1. Validating agent based models through virtual worlds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan H.; Lee, Jina [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Bier, Asmeret Brooke; Cardona-Rivera, Rogelio E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Bernstein, Jeremy Ray Rhythm [Gaikai, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the US continues its vigilance against distributed, embedded threats, understanding the political and social structure of these groups becomes paramount for predicting and dis- rupting their attacks. Agent-based models (ABMs) serve as a powerful tool to study these groups. While the popularity of social network tools (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) has provided extensive communication data, there is a lack of ne-grained behavioral data with which to inform and validate existing ABMs. Virtual worlds, in particular massively multiplayer online games (MMOG), where large numbers of people interact within a complex environ- ment for long periods of time provide an alternative source of data. These environments provide a rich social environment where players engage in a variety of activities observed between real-world groups: collaborating and/or competing with other groups, conducting battles for scarce resources, and trading in a market economy. Strategies employed by player groups surprisingly re ect those seen in present-day con icts, where players use diplomacy or espionage as their means for accomplishing their goals. In this project, we propose to address the need for ne-grained behavioral data by acquiring and analyzing game data a commercial MMOG, referred to within this report as Game X. The goals of this research were: (1) devising toolsets for analyzing virtual world data to better inform the rules that govern a social ABM and (2) exploring how virtual worlds could serve as a source of data to validate ABMs established for analogous real-world phenomena. During this research, we studied certain patterns of group behavior to compliment social modeling e orts where a signi cant lack of detailed examples of observed phenomena exists. This report outlines our work examining group behaviors that underly what we have termed the Expression-To-Action (E2A) problem: determining the changes in social contact that lead individuals/groups to engage in a particular behavior. Results from our work indicate that virtual worlds have the potential for serving as a proxy in allocating and populating behaviors that would be used within further agent-based modeling studies.

  2. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS; Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  3. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  4. EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

  5. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  6. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  7. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  8. Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Locatelli Carbon sequestration is recognised as a global ecosystem service (see box on next page such as the global climate (through carbon sequestration), the quantity and quality of water and the force of windsS Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store carbon, forests contribute

  9. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  10. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  11. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  12. DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

  13. Global mapping of ecosystem services and conservation priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and ecosystem services. biodiversity carbon hotspots Global 200 conservation planning Efforts to conserve wild: the goods and services from ecological systems that benefit people (e.g., water purification, carbon sequestration, and crop pollination). These ``ecosystem services'' are currently the focus of intensive re

  14. Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services and poverty and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework' Ecosystem Services, vol 7, pp. 34­45., 10.1016/j.ecoser.2013 services and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework$ Janet A. Fisher a,n , Genevieve Patenaude

  15. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  16. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  17. Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Valuation and Management (EVM) Semester 2, 2014 Tuesday of ecosystem services, its history and rise to prominence. We then explore the ways in which ecosystem services can be valued, measured and monetized by society, across

  18. Let's talk about symbiosis! 9:15 Matthias Horn, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science Welcome Session 1 9:30 Julie Klose Session 2 11:30 Buck Hanson, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science 13:30 Daryl Domman, Department of Microbiology and Ecosystem Science

  19. Fog Water and Ecosystem Function: Heterogeneity in a California Redwood Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inputs of nitrogen to forest ecosystems in south- ern Chile:forms, ?uxes, and sources. Ecosystems 3: 590–5.Ecosystems (2009) 12: 417–433 DOI: 10.1007/s10021-009-9232-x

  20. PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    PLANKTON PATCHINESS AND ECOSYSTEM STABILITY A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate Division rate functions of planktonic ecosystems has been hypothesized to add stability or persistence planktonic ecosystem, one indirect and two direct. 1) The indirect measure, copepod stage frequency

  1. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10.1029/2010JG001390, 2010 Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxesdioxide fluxes of black spruce ecosystems in eastern Northof a stand?replacing fire on ecosystem CO 2 exchange of a

  2. Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900-1300, ECCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Ecosystem Dynamics and Function Semester 1, 2013/14 Thursdays 0900 provided by ecosystems, from food and medicines to a stable climate, clean water and storm protection. This course provides an introduction to the ecosystem ecology

  3. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  4. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  5. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W. [Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Associates; 200 SW 35th St.; Corvallis; OR; 97333; USA; Wilson, John K. [Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Associates; 200 SW 35th St.; Corvallis; OR; 97333; USA

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3ºC difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5ºC) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5ºC, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2ºC). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

  6. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Phillips, Claire L.; Gregg, Jillian W.; Wilson, John K.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We reportmore »on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3ºC difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5ºC) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5ºC, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2ºC). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.« less

  7. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  8. California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor, Environmental Science, Policy and Management, MC 3110, University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    California Mediterranean Rangelands and Ecosystem Conservation Lynn Huntsinger, Professor Mediterranean species. In this changed ecosystem, grazing and pastoral practices can benefit native wildlife, and land, livestock, and ecosystem service markets. Keywords: transhumance, oak woodlands, ecosystem

  9. Figure 4. World Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. World Oil Prices" " (2007 dollars per barrel)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,2029,2030...

  10. The world price of coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant increase in the seaborne trade for coal over the past twenty years has unified formerly separate coal markets into a world market in which prices move in tandem. Due to its large domestic market, the United ...

  11. World Air Transport Sustainability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statement · Develop a quantitative model to assess the carbon footprint of world aviation, including #12;15 Alternative Fuels ­ Data Required · For each major pathway, we require life-cycle CO2 footprint

  12. At Work in The World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, Paul D. MD; Dolan, Brian PhD

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    history of one particular smelter, I also suggest that muchdeveloping world. Few lead smelters were less seen by theAlice Hamilton visited smelters in Arizona and Missouri, she

  13. WORLD ROBOTICS 2009 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    WORLD ROBOTICS 2009 IX EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of 1. World Robotics 2009 Industrial Robots 2. World Robotics 2009 Service Robots 1. World Robotics 2009 Industrial Robots 2008 World Robot Market ­ Already affected by the economical downturn In 2008, the worldwide sales of industrial robots stagnated at about

  14. Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise businesses that interacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

    Abstract--A digital ecosystem usually refers to a collection of small and medium enterprise ecosystems. We introduce the idea of creating an eco- system from a number of smart devices. This ecosystem is categorised as a micro ecosystem rather than macro ecosystem. The proposed model of this digital ecosystem

  15. World petroleum resources and reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riva, J.P. Jr.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 1965 the world produced and consumed only 10% of the oil available on this planet; between 1965 and 2040 we will use up 80% of the remaining reserves, leaving only 10% of the resource for the years to follow. Clearly, the epoch of petroleum is a transitory one. Nevertheless, petroleum is at present the most important component of the energy base supporting the industrialized world. This book describes and analyzes the geological basis for the current world petroleum situation. Mr. Riva exaplains the formation and accumulation of conventional and unconventional oil and gas, methods used by geologists in search for petroleum and petroleum-containing basins, and techniques for petroleum production. He then discusses the uneven distribution of the world's oil, focusing on the Arabian-Iranian basin, which contains half of the world's known recoverable reserves, and examines the petroleum prospects in several distinctly different areas of the world. The United States is presented as an example of an area in general decline already exhaustively explored. In contrast, the case study of the Soviet petroleum industry and a geological assessment of Soviet production prospects show a region at the peak of its oil production, with its decline about to begin. He chooses Indonesia as the focus for a typical Southeast Asian petroleum history and develops a profile of Mexico's petroleum situation as an example of an area with increasing production potential. Mr. Riva concludes with an assessment of the prospects for future world petroleum discoveries and a geologically based estimate of the earth's total original stock of recoverable petroleum.

  16. Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates World's Largest Concentrating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Dedicates World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Project Energy Secretary Moniz Dedicates World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Project February 13, 2014 - 5:00am Addthis...

  17. Berkeley Lab Compact Accelerator Sets World Record

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record Berkeley Lab Particle Accelerator Sets World Record Simulations at NERSC Help Validate Experimental Laser-Plasma Design December...

  18. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  19. Human machine collaborative decision making in a complex optimization system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malasky, Jeremy S

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerous complex real-world applications are either theoretically intractable or unable to be solved in a practical amount of time. Researchers and practitioners are forced to implement heuristics in solving such problems ...

  20. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  1. Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

  2. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute control during this interval. During the 1st year after harvest, K concentrations tripled in shallow soil

  3. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  4. arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

  5. Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

  6. Stakeholder value network analysis for the mobile services ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind, A. S. (Amarnath Sury)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobile services ecosystem has evolved and continues to evolve at a rapid pace adjusting to the different players competing to be part of the value creation and capture. This thesis attempts to capture a holistic view ...

  7. aquatic ecosystem restoration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. A. Aguirre 2006-01-01 124 Climate change as an ecosystem architect: Implications to rare plant ecology, conservation, and restoration CiteSeer Summary: Recent advances in...

  8. agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

  9. Evolutionary Dynamics of Complex Networks: Theory, Methods and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Alireza; Wigand, Rolf T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose new direction to understanding evolutionary dynamics of complex networks using two different types of collaboration networks: academic collaboration networks; and, disaster collaboration networks. The results show that academic collaboration network has all properties of small-world networks and can be considered a real small-world network with the result of its structural analysis maybe being extendable for other real-networks who share the common grounds of small-world properties.

  10. Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    Jampots: a Mashup System towards an E-Learning Ecosystem Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 , Lingzhi believed that an E-Learning ecosystem is the next generation E-Learning. Nowadays, the current trend of Web-Learning ecosystem. A mashup approach to an E-Learning ecosystem enhances the flourish and sustainability of E

  11. Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Diaz, David Tilman, Joseph Fargione

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Chapter 11 Biodiversity Regulation of Ecosystem Services Coordinating Lead Authors: Sandra Di.2.1 Ecosystem Resource Dynamics, with Emphasis on Primary Production 11.2.2 Ecosystem Stability, with Emphasis.3.5 Biodiversity Effects on Human Disease Regulation 11.4 Biodiversity Effects on the Provision of Marine Ecosystem

  12. Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Persistent effects of a discrete warming event on a polar desert ecosystem J . E . B A R R E over the previous decade and altered ecosystem properties in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems of melt-water had significant influences on Taylor Valley ecosystems that persisted for several years

  13. Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, David. S.

    Artificial ecosystem selection William Swenson, David Sloan Wilson*, and Roberta Elias Department ecosystems can also be shaped by artificial selection procedures. Ecosystems initiated in the laboratory vary phenotypically and a proportion of the variation is heritable, despite the fact that the ecosystems initially

  14. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature10282 High plant diversity is needed to maintain ecosystem services Forest , and there is consensus that this can decrease ecosystem functioning and services2­7 . It remains unclear, though, whether few8 or many9 of the species in an ecosystem are needed to sustain the provisioning of ecosystem

  15. Ris-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions Merete Bang Selsted Risø-PhD-63(EN) July 2010 #12;Author: Merete Bang Selsted Title: Ecosystem environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems

  16. Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America B. D. Amiro,1 A. G, and New Brunswick). Net ecosystem production (NEP) showed a carbon loss from all ecosystems following a standreplacing disturbance, becoming a carbon sink by 20 years for all ecosystems and by 10 years for most

  17. Chesapeake Bay ecosystem modeling program. Technical synthesis report 1993-94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, S.B.; Boynton, W.R.; Kemp, W.M.; Wetzel, R.; Bartleson, R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;Contents: Ecosystem models for management; Ecosystem regession models; Patuxent River Sav-Littoral Ecosystem Process Model; Lower Chesapeake Bay Polyhaline Sav Model; Emergent Intertidal Marsh Process Model; Plankton-Benthos Ecosystem Process Model; Fish Bioenergetics Models; Linking Water Quality with Fish Habitat; Data Visualization; Publications and Scientific Presentations Resulting From This Research.

  18. World Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld Energy Jump to:

  19. Enhanced Flow in Small-World Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Cláudio L N; Moreira, André A; Andrade, José S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The small-world property is known to have a profound effect on the navigation efficiency of complex networks [J. M. Kleinberg, Nature 406, 845 (2000)]. Accordingly, the proper addition of shortcuts to a regular substrate can lead to the formation of a highly efficient structure for information propagation. Here we show that enhanced flow properties can also be observed in these complex topologies. Precisely, our model is a network built from an underlying regular lattice over which long-range connections are randomly added according to the probability, $P_{ij}\\sim r_{ij}^{-\\alpha}$, where $r_{ij}$ is the Manhattan distance between nodes $i$ and $j$, and the exponent $\\alpha$ is a controlling parameter. The mean two-point global conductance of the system is computed by considering that each link has a local conductance given by $g_{ij}\\propto r_{ij}^{-\\delta}$, where $\\delta$ determines the extent of the geographical limitations (costs) on the long-range connections. Our results show that the best flow conditi...

  20. Mechanical generation of networks with surplus complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell Standish

    2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work I examined an information based complexity measure of networks with weighted links. The measure was compared with that obtained from by randomly shuffling the original network, forming an Erdos-Renyi random network preserving the original link weight distribution. It was found that real world networks almost invariably had higher complexity than their shuffled counterparts, whereas networks mechanically generated via preferential attachment did not. The same experiment was performed on foodwebs generated by an artificial life system, Tierra, and a couple of evolutionary ecology systems, EcoLab and WebWorld. These latter systems often exhibited the same complexity excess shown by real world networks, suggesting that the complexity surplus indicates the presence of evolutionary dynamics. In this paper, I report on a mechanical network generation system that does produce this complexity surplus. The heart of the idea is to construct the network of state transitions of a chaotic dynamical system, such as the Lorenz equation. This indicates that complexity surplus is a more fundamental trait than that of being an evolutionary system.

  1. WORLD ROBOTICS 2010 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    WORLD ROBOTICS 2010 VII EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of 1. World Robotics 2010 Industrial Robots 2. World Robotics 2010 Service Robots 1. World Robotics 2010 Industrial Robots Sales slump in 2009 In 2009, the worldwide economic and financial crisis caused a significant slump in the sales of industrial robots

  2. WORLD ROBOTICS 2011 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    WORLD ROBOTICS 2011 VII EXECUTIVE SUMMARY of 1. World Robotics 2011 Industrial Robots 2. World Robotics 2011 Service Robots 1. World Robotics 2011 Industrial Robots 2010: Strong comeback of the robotics and financial crisis caused a significant slump in the sales of industrial robots. Compared to 2008, considered

  3. SOFTWAREENGINEERING The World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, James

    SOFTWAREENGINEERING The World Wide Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning working group on the Web. WEBDAV: IETF Standard for Collaborative Authoring on the Web E. JAMES WHITEHEAD, JR. University remains to be done. What if instead you could simply edit Web documents (or any Web resource) in place

  4. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  5. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  6. Tore Bruland Building World Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tore Bruland Building World Event Representations From Linguistic Representations Thesis of Computer and Information Science c Tore Bruland ISBN 978-82-471-2 (printed version) ISBN 978-82-471-4292-9 (electronic version) ISSN 1503-8181 Doctoral thesis at NTNU, 2013:97 #12;For Kari Marie Bruland (1937

  7. WORLD ROBOTICS 2007 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Luca, Alessandro

    ,200 units, down 11% on 2005 World total stock of operational industrial robots: · 951,000 units,3% greater was down by 11% in 2006, at 112,203 newly supplied industrial robots. Nevertheless, developments were quite industry increased substantially. Figure 1 Estimated yearly shipments of industrial robots 0 10,000 20

  8. World Oil: Market or Mayhem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

  9. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  10. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  11. The world`s first commercial iron carbide plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prichard, L.C.; Schad, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper traces the development of Nucor`s investigation of clean iron unit processes, namely, direct reduction, and the decision to build and operate the world`s first commercial iron carbide plant. They first investigated coal based processes since the US has abundant coal reserves, but found a variety of reasons for dropping the coal-based processes from further consideration. A natural gas based process was selected, but the failure to find economically priced gas supplies stopped the development of a US based venture. It was later found that Trinidad had economically priced and abundant supplies of natural gas, and the system of government, the use of English language, and geographic location were also ideal. The cost estimates required modification of the design, but the plant was begun in April, 1993. Start-up problems with the plant are also discussed. Production should commence shortly.

  12. Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Peter M. Groffman is a Senior Scientist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies in Millbrook, NY, with research interests in ecosystem, soil, landscape and microbial ecology, with a focus on carbon and nitrogen) and a Convening Lead Author for the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment Chapter on Ecosystems, Biodiversity

  13. Complex networks and the WWW market Luis Lopez , Juan A. Almendral and Miguel A. F. Sanjuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

    : neurobiology [1], the metabolic pathways [2], the food webs in ecology [3], the World Wide Web (WWW) [4 in the Internet and other phenomena related to the World Wide Web [7]. The theory of complex networks emerges and novel nonlinear effects emerge in this kind of markets. Key words: Complex networks, competitive WWW

  14. Sequencing the fungal tree Terrestrial ecosystems host a complex array of interacting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    with heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms alike, and play an integral and growing role in the development in three areas: plant health, biorefinery and fungal diversity. Plant health depends on interactions

  15. Complex Network Framework Based Dependency Matrix of Electric Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Complex Network Framework Based Dependency Matrix of Electric Power Grid A. B. M. Nasiruzzaman, H, Australian power grid operated under the National Electricity Market (NEM) is the worlds longest scale analysis of power grid using complex network framework a network matrix is formed. The elements

  16. An internship at the Brazoria National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coltman, Suzanne Dale

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marsh. Salt Marsh. Refuge Staff 5 5 5 6 6 . 6 Paperwork. Biological. Waterfowl. Vegetation Survey. Other Vertebrates, Maintenance. Public Relations, REFUGE MANAGEMENT. Grassland Management Plan. Grazing Plan. Fire Management Plan... of the refuge complex divide into two distinct types. First, the goals related to wildlfe needs are: (1) to . preserve the salt marsh ecosystem in its natural state; (2) to provide high quality wintering habitat for migratory wat r fowl (geese and ducks...

  17. 321. Leadership Under Fire. (4:3:3) W Using intense real-world leadership situations to build skills in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    321. Leadership Under Fire. (4:3:3) W Using intense real-world leadership situations to build in military science. Special project staff work for joint Army/Air Force campus ceremonies, leadership labs, and coach others. Emphasizes leadership ethics. Lab included. Fee. 421. Leadership in a Complex World. (4

  18. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  19. Next Generation Lunch: Revealing the World’s First 3D Printed Car (text version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version for the Next Generation Lunch: Revealing the World’s First 3D Printed Car Video.

  20. Gabon: World Oil Report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on Gabon's largest oil field, Rabi Kounga, and a flurry of smaller reservoirs which have boosted production to 300,000 bopd. Regional geology is so complex that it generates a large discovery only once every twenty years, and operators come and go due to low discovery ratios, following market ups and downs. A hard core four remain: Elf first, Shell, British Gas, which bought Tenneco, and Amoco. Shell's Rabi Kounga discovery, which stretches from shore to shelf, boosted exploration and renewed interest for onshore licenses. The low discovery rate, however, reflects the complexity of Gabonese basins.

  1. Gras Dowr joins world`s FPSO fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gras Dowr, a floating production, storage, and offloading vessel (FPSD) for Amerada Hess Ltd.`s North Sea Durward and Dauntless fields, is one of the latest additions to the world`s growing FPSO fleet. The Gras Dowr, anchored in about 90 m of water, lies between the Durward (U.K. Block 21/16) and Dauntless (U.K. Block 21/11) fields, about 3.5 km from the subsea wellhead locations. The Gras Dowr`s main functions, according to Bluewater Offshore Production Systems Ltd., are to: receive fluids from well risers; process incoming fluids to separate the fluid into crude, water, and gas; store dry crude oil and maintain the required temperature; treat effluent to allow for water discharge to the sea; compress gas for gas lift as a future option; provide chemical injection skid for process chemical injection; use a part of the produced gas for fuel gas, and flare excess gas; inject treated seawater into the injection wells; house power generation for process and offloading operation and utilities; offload to a tandem moored shuttle tanker including receiving liquid fuel from the same tanker; provide accommodations for operating and maintenance crews; allow helicopters landings and takeoffs; allow handling and storage of goods transported by supply vessels; moor a shuttle tanker; and control the subsea wells.

  2. Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;This project is a collaboration with the authors and NAE. #12;Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education 2012 #12;2 Preface The aim

  3. Multiple Scales in Small-World Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasturirangan, Rajesh

    1999-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-world architectures may be implicated in a range of phenomena from networks of neurons in the cerebral cortex to social networks and propogation of viruses. Small-world networks are interpolations of regular and ...

  4. Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    JOUR 447: Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks Virtual Island Making #12;One element in the look and design of the virtual islands. JOUR 447: Online Games, Virtual Worlds, and Social Networks

  5. Big Data Ecosystems Enable Scientific Discovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Critchlow, Terence J.; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past 5 years, advances in experimental, sensor and computational technologies have driven the exponential growth in the volumes, acquisition rates, variety and complexity of scientific data. As noted by Hey et al in their 2009 e-book The Fourth Paradigm, this availability of large-quantities of scientifically meaningful data has given rise to a new scientific methodology - data intensive science. Data intensive science is the ability to formulate and evaluate hypotheses using data and analysis to extend, complement and, at times, replace experimentation, theory, or simulation. This new approach to science no longer requires scientists to interact directly with the objects of their research; instead they can utilize digitally captured, reduced, calibrated, analyzed, synthesized and visualized results - allowing them carry out 'experiments' in data.

  6. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  7. World frontiers beckon oil finders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the international aspects of the petroleum industry. Most who work in the industry agree that the possibilities for huge are found largely in international regions. Something that is helping fuel that possibility is the way countries are increasingly opening their doors to US oil industry involvement. Listed in this paper is a partial list of the reported projects now underway around the world involving US companies. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather an indication of how work continues despite a general lull atmosphere for the oil industry. These include Albania, Bulgaria, Congo, Czechoslovakia, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Ireland, Malta, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Panama, Paraquay, and Senegal.

  8. Sunergy World | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolar Jump to: navigation,SunElectra JumpSundance Power LLCSunergy World

  9. Wind World | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWind Power Energia JumpMaps.jpgWind World

  10. "Extreme Project Management" One World Trade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    "Extreme Project Management" One World Trade Center A special presentation with a discussion of managing multiple large projects at the World Trade Center site with multiple adjacencies, complicated 1984), PE, PMP, is the Program Director for One World Trade Center. Lynda Tollner, is a Program

  11. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal Lane

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  12. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Neal Lane

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  13. ThousandWorlds Collected Issue 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NDtfbRLDS COLLECTED Covers: Carol Walske Dedication Welcome to ThousandWorlds Background to ThousandWorlds cartoon It's A Man's World That Share of Glory/The Father The Gem of Harrrow (filk) That Share of Glory/The Uncles The Gdnvue Saga, Downport version...

  14. How important is diversity for capturing environmental-change responses in ecosystem models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowe, A. E. F.

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic plankton diversity. Diversity, however, may affect functions such as primary production ...

  15. Perennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    of ecosystem functions, promoting the creation of multifunctional agricultural landscapes. We foundPerennial grasslands enhance biodiversity and multiple ecosystem services in bioenergy landscapes, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824; b Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, US Department

  16. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  17. ELSEVIER Ecological Economics 14(1995) 143-159 Ecological economic modeling and valuation of ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -economicmodeling; Ecosystem models; Patuxent River basin; Spatial modeling; Land use 1. Introduction In its report, Reducing of ecological systems. Startingwith an existing spatially articulated ecosystem model of the Pqtuxent River

  18. Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

  19. Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

  20. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  1. Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

  2. Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem feedbacks arising from wind transport in drylands: Results from field experiments fire frequency Woody mortality Introduction of exotic grasses Is cover dominated by annuals or short intensity precipitation Low wind speeds Low P/PE High variability High intensity precipitation High wind

  3. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  4. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  5. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  6. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments ­ NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report December 31, 2011 A progress Dynamics Model Used to Design Permafrost Simulator 2 Details at a Glance 3 Progress and Accomplishments 3 sample in a sleeve of highly conductive copper foil (shown in red) and then cooling coils placed

  7. Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

  8. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  9. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis design. This paper explores how to support energy as a first-class operating system resource. En- ergy the limited energy resource among competing tasks. 1. INTRODUCTION Traditionally, the operating system plays

  10. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  11. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  12. Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

  13. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  14. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  15. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Genetically modified crops and aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    of genetically modified (GM) crops. The ERA for terrestrial agroecosystems is well-developed, whereas guidance for ERA of GM crops in aquatic ecosystems is not as well-defined. The purpose of this document studies are necessary to inform the risk assessment for a specific GM crop should be done on a case

  17. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  18. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), up and walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opgenoorth, Lars; Faith, Daniel P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    valuation, and accounting (3d)  Platform goal  Strengthen the science?policy interface for biodiversity and ecosystem services   

  19. CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a , Anthony C. Delany a , Steven P; accepted 15 February 2007 Abstract CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2- rich air was transported downslope

  20. Responding to complexity in socio-economic systems: How to build a smart and resilient society?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helbing, Dirk

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is changing at an ever-increasing pace. And it has changed in a much more fundamental way than one would think, primarily because it has become more connected and interdependent than in our entire history. Every new product, every new invention can be combined with those that existed before, thereby creating an explosion of complexity: structural complexity, dynamic complexity, functional complexity, and algorithmic complexity. How to respond to this challenge? And what are the costs?

  1. SEDIMENTS, SEC 4 SEDIMENT-ECOLOGY INTERACTIONS POSITION PAPER Anthropogenic pollutants affect ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ecosystem services of freshwater sediments: the need for a "triad plus x" approach Sabine Ulrike Gerbersdorf ecosystem services such as nutrient recycling or self-purification which extend beyond the aquatic systems, microbiological/molecular approaches to unravel changes of microbial ecosystems, up

  2. 2012 NSTIC/IDtrust Workshop: "Technologies and Standards Enabling the Identity Ecosystem"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    2012 NSTIC/IDtrust Workshop: "Technologies and Standards Enabling the Identity Ecosystem" March, Gartner 9:30 am Keynote Mapping the Global IDentity Ecosystem Speakers: Karen O'Donoghue, ISOC and Lucy Lynch, ISOC 10:00 am Panel: Gaps and Challenges for Advancing the Global Identity Ecosystem

  3. Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Predicted climate change alters the indirect effect of predators on an ecosystem process Janet R to occur with climate change will likely influence how predators indirectly affect an essential ecosystem and severity of droughts (1, 2). Changes in rainfall will likely affect ecosystem processes such as primary

  4. Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy-makers, society and scientists?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy-makers, society and scientists B., Martinez C., Imbach P., 2009. Ecosystem-based adaptation to climate change: what role for policy and livelihoods depend largely on ecosystem services, policies for adaptation to climate change should take

  5. Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term ecosystem level experiments at Toolik Lake, Alaska, and at Abisko, Northern Sweden: generalizations and differences in ecosystem and plant type responses to global change M . T. VA N W I J K *w , K, Darwin Building, King Buildings, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JU, UK, wThe Ecosystem Center, Marine

  6. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River ­ Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Restoration Planning Center Independent External Peer Review Report for the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet Ecosystem Restoration Plan

  7. Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Jian-Ping

    Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling Y. H. Spitz 2005; accepted 19 August 2005; published 22 October 2005. [1] Three-dimensional ecosystem response-based ecosystem model coupled to a high-resolution circulation model. We investigate, in particular, the influence

  8. Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Matthew

    1 Five Stages of the Alaskan Arctic Cold Season with Ecosystem Implications Peter Q. Olsson1 ecosystem processes. During the two autumnal stages (Early Snow and Early Cold) soils remain warm, unfrozen with the least amount of biological activity and have the least impact on the ecosystem. However, Early Snow

  9. A site-based approach to delivering rangeland ecosystem Joel BrownA,C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A site-based approach to delivering rangeland ecosystem services Joel BrownA,C and Neil Mac Range, Las Cruces, NM 88003-0003, USA. B CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, Brisbane, Qld 4102, Australia. C Corresponding author. Email: joelbrow@nmsu.edu Abstract. Rangeland ecosystems are capable of providing an array

  10. Anchoring policy development around stable points : an approach to regulating the co-evolving ICT ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    to regulating the co-evolving ICT ecosystem David D. Clark MIT Computer Science of the natural rates of change in different parts of the ecosystem, and examine why hinder its feasibility in the ICT ecosystem. As a means to achieve more

  11. Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses and error subspace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, John J.

    Lagoon of Venice ecosystem: Seasonal dynamics and environmental guidance with uncertainty analyses the seasonal ecosystem dynamics of the Lagoon of Venice and provide guidance on the monitoring and management stochastic ecosystem modeling components are developed to represent prior uncertainties in the Lagoon

  12. November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    November 2000 / Vol. 50 No. 11 BioScience 947 Soil as an Endangered Ecosystem More than 99% of food worldwide comes from the soil ecosystem. Rapid ero- sion of soil is reducing food production--and causing ecosystem. --DAVID PIMENTAL College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Cornell University Soil and biological

  13. How Do Developers React to API Deprecation? The Case of a Smalltalk Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    How Do Developers React to API Deprecation? The Case of a Smalltalk Ecosystem Romain Robbes PLEIAD extent and impact of these API changes in practice, on an entire software ecosystem associated effects across an entire ecosystem. Our case study subject is the development community gravitating around

  14. Viability Kernel for Ecosystem Management Models Eladio Oca~na Anaya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Viability Kernel for Ecosystem Management Models Eladio Oca~na Anaya Michel De Lara Ricardo task in general. We study the viability of nonlinear generic ecosystem models under preservation in the Peruvian upwelling ecosystem. Key words: control theory; state constraints; viability; predator

  15. Disturbance dynamics and ecosystem-based forest management KALEV JO~ GISTE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREFACE Disturbance dynamics and ecosystem-based forest management KALEV JO~ GISTE1 , W. KEITH and Analysis Program, St Paul, Minnesota, USA Ecosystem-based management is intended to bal- ance ecological ecosystem is usually defined through productivity, biodiversity, stability or other terms. However

  16. IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paparella, Francesco

    IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM SERVICES The impact of selective logging on Forest structure, Plant on the ecosystem, even though the available scientific literature is scanty and somewhat contradictory and other infestants. A simple mathematical model may explain these data. 1 IMPLICATIONS ON ECOSYSTEM

  17. Climate-sensitive ecosystem carbon dynamics along the soil chronosequence of the Damma glacier forefield,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Climate-sensitive ecosystem carbon dynamics along the soil chronosequence of the Damma glacier formation and ecosystem development. We determined soil carbon and nitrogen contents and their stable by small end moraines that resulted from two gla- cier re-advances. The net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB

  18. Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models Y. H; published 6 March 2003. [1] The behavior of three ecosystem models is analyzed for upwelling off the Oregon coast as a function of the number of model components. The first ecosystem model includes dissolved

  19. An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure Bo Dong1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haifei

    An E-learning Ecosystem Based on Cloud Computing Infrastructure Bo Dong1, 2 , Qinghua Zheng1, 2 that an e-learning ecosystem is the next generation e- learning. However, the current models of e-learning ecosystems lack the support of underlying infrastructures, which can dynamically allocate the required

  20. The trophic-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The trophic-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses Agrocampus ouest / INRA Ecologie et Sante´ des Ecosyste`mes, 65 rue de Saint Brieuc, CS 84215, 35042 Rennes-level-based ecosystem modelling approach: theoretical overview and practical uses. ­ ICES Journal of Marine Science, doi

  1. Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from Microbes to Jellyfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, John O.

    SYMPOSIUM Ecosystem Engineers in the Pelagic Realm: Alteration of Habitat by Species Ranging from, Engineering and Applied Science, Pasadena, CA, 91125, USA From the symposium ``Marine Ecosystem Engineers@si.edu Synopsis Ecosystem engineers are species that alter the physical environment in ways that create new

  2. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  3. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 30013002 A synthesis of soil biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ecosystem functioning in Victoria Land, Antarctica Since the 1970s, ecological research on the ice and nutritional resources. These ecosystems are taxonomically and functionally simple, thus providing and comprehensively than is normally the case for soils and to link soil species explicitly with ecosystem functioning

  4. Ecological Risk Assessment: A Tool for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, Marienne

    #12;#12;Ecological Risk Assessment: A Tool for Implementing an Ecosystem Approach for Southern Current Large Marine Ecosystem Programme (BCLME), the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) and Integrating Multiple Demands on Coastal Zones with Emphasis on Aquatic Ecosystems and Fisheries (INCOFISH

  5. Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) plantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex, 1998. We apportioned ecosystem respi- ration among heterotrophic, root, stem and foliage based on re respiration component at selected sampling points, and scaled the mea- surements up to the ecosystem based

  6. Balkanized research in ecological engineering revealed by a bibliometric analysis of earthworms and ecosystem services.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and ecosystem services. Manuel Blouin, Nicolas Sery, Daniel Cluzeau, Jean-Jacques Brun, Alain Bédécarrats are believed to be potentially useful organisms for managing ecosystem services, there is actually of the association of ,,earthworms and other terms such as ecosystem services (primary production, nutrient cycling

  7. Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Navigation and Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability by Battelle Memorial Institute Prepared for Department of the Army U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Ecosystem Independent External Peer Review Report Navigation and Ecosystem Sustainability Program, Project P2, Lock

  8. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Final Independent External Peer Review Report Cattaraugus Creek Watershed Ecosystem Restoration of Expertise for Ecosystem Restoration Mississippi Valley Division Contract No. W912HQ-10-D-0002 Task Order Watershed Ecosystem Restoration at Springville Dam, Draft Detailed Project Report/Environmental Assessment

  9. Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25° C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

  10. This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

  11. A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , and on topics related to urban ecosystem services and their valuation. This conference will once again provideACES 2014 A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making December, DC, USA 1 Welcome to ACES 2014! On behalf of A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) and our

  12. Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    Keywords: Ecosystem services Economic valuation Hedonic pricing Spatial econometrics a b s t r a c t A need. These include production function methods in which an ecosystem service or amenity is viewed as an inputEstimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic

  13. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  14. 13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dukes, Jeffrey

    humans (Daily 1997). In this chapter, we introduce concepts associated with the valuation of ecosystem services, and discuss how costs generated by invasions relate to impacts on ecosystem services.We link13 Impacts of Invasive Species on Ecosystem Services Heather Charles and Jeffrey S. Dukes 13

  15. BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1 Jess K in Caribbean ecosystems. Most (11) of the articles describe the responses of Caribbean forests to hurricane of the comparative responses of Caribbean ecosystems to different disturbances. Finally, we identify those areas

  16. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

  17. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

  18. Impact of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impact of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon significantly weaken under the influence of climate change. Here we investigate the response of this ecosystem

  19. World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Energy Information ... World Net Nuclear Electric ... Dataset Activity Stream World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 International data showing world net...

  20. Constructing an n-dimensional cell complex from a soup of (n -1)-dimensional faces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    a dimension independent algorithm to build an n-dimensional cellular complex with linear geometries from itsConstructing an n-dimensional cell complex from a soup of (n - 1)-dimensional faces Ken Arroyo in the use of higher-dimensional (>3D) digital objects in GIS that are built from complex real-world data

  1. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systemic risk in consumer finance Uncertain about risk HowComplexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-History of ResilienceRisk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane, Senior

  2. Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in sustaining life on Earth, providing food resources, providing mineral resources, supporting international unexplored. The World Resources Institute announced that there are 148 countries with coastlines out of 193. It is worth mentioning that the global coastline of the world is 356,000 Km. Recent studies estimate that more

  3. Geothermal California: California Claims the World's Highest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World's Highest Geothermal Power Output with Potential for Even More Production With Advanced Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  4. Keeping Tabs on the World's Dangerous Chemicals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sandia chemical engineer Nancy Jackson has worked in laboratories around the world to help ensure that chemicals are used safely and kept secure.

  5. Three Wishes for the World (with comment)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of cooperation. But once Hitler was gone, the world wasorganized at Nuremberg by Hitler and his cronies. Duringexperiences. Nevertheless, Hitler’s rallies were too big for

  6. Student's algorithm solves real-world problem

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    real-world problems," said David Kratzer of the Laboratory's High Performance Computer Systems group and the Supercomputing Challenge coordinator. The goal of the year-long...

  7. NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cost. Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable EnergyNREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms. Today's utility-scale wind turbine structures are more complex and their compo- nents more

  8. Response of South American ecosystems to precipitation variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL; Bras, Rafael L [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecosystem Demography Model 2 is a dynamic ecosystem model and land surface energy balance model. ED2 discretizes landscapes of particular terrain and meteorology into fractional areas of unique disturbance history. Each fraction, defined by a shared vertical soil column and canopy air space, contains a stratum of plant groups unique in functional type, size and number density. The result is a vertically distributed representation of energy transfer and plant dynamics (mortality, productivity, recruitment, disturbance, resource competition, etc) that successfully approximates the behaviour of individual-based vegetation models. In previous exercises simulating Amazonian land surface dynamics with ED2, it was observed that when using grid averaged precipitation as an external forcing the resulting water balance typically over-estimated leaf interception and leaf evaporation while under estimating through-fall and transpiration. To investigate this result, two scenario were conducted in which land surface biophysics and ecosystem demography over the Northern portion of South America are simulated over {approx}200 years: (1) ED2 is forced with grid averaged values taken from the ERA40 reanalysis meteorological dataset; (2) ED2 is forced with ERA40 reanalysis, but with its precipitation re-sampled to reflect statistical qualities of point precipitation found at rain gauge stations in the region. The findings in this study suggest that the equilibrium moisture states and vegetation demography are co-dependent and show sensitivity to temporal variability in precipitation. These sensitivities will need to be accounted for in future projections of coupled climate-ecosystem changes in South America.

  9. Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program AK-SG-99-01, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Approaches for Fisheries Management 609 Alaska Sea Grant College Program · AK-SG-99-01, 1999 Ecosystem Considerations and the Limitations of Ecosystem Models in Fisheries Management: Insights for the implementation of ecosystem approaches. The major criticism of single- species models is that they cannot predict

  10. 139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    139USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. The Role of Fire in Ecosystem Management1, in part or collectively, changed many forests. However well- meaning at the time, in some ecosystems the role of fire in ecosystem management and it answers these three questions: 1) what is ecosystem manage

  11. Technology Entrepreneurship Program Real-world practice with real-world technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Entrepreneurship Program Real-world practice with real-world technologies What it's all about Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Technology Entrepreneurship Program (TEP) provides university students with access to PNNL-developed available technologies. Laboratory staff work

  12. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  13. Managing Risk in the Modern World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenton, Norman

    Managing Risk in the Modern World Applications of Bayesian Networks A Knowledge Transfer Report By Norman Fenton and Martin Neil #12;13 MANAGING RISK IN THE MODERN WORLD Applications of Bayesian Networks of Agena, a company that specialises in risk management for critical systems. Norman is an Affiliated

  14. HISTORY 483 THE FIRST WORLD WAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    HISTORY 483 THE FIRST WORLD WAR Summer 2012 Saturday 9:00 ­ 14:30 ST139 Instructor: Paul Ramsey By far the most significant event of the twentieth century the legacy of the First World War continues, military, social, and economic spheres of the war ­ and the concept of `total war'. Students

  15. Exploring the World of Plants and Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Exploring the World of Plants and Soils 4-H Plant , Soils, and Entomology Curriculum 18 U.S.C. 707 Project Book 2 Publication 380-021 2014 #12;Exploring the World of Plants and Soil: Stems and Stamens ................................................................................................................. 3 Activity 1 The Stages of a Plant's Life

  16. OECD/IEA 2013 World Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    © OECD/IEA 2013 World Renewable Energy Outlook 2030-2050 Paolo Frankl Head, Renewable Energy 2030 2035 TWh Coal Renewables Gas Nuclear Oil Source: IEA World Energy Outlook 2012 New Policies important renewable energy source in industry in 2050 solar thermal contributes mainly to low

  17. Decentralized Probabilistic World Modeling with Cooperative Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Steven

    the multimodal sensing capabilities of modern personal devices, such a probabilistic world model can in the form of personal devices such as advanced mobile phones. Indeed, on a world-wide scale, the number of mobile phones now exceeds the number of more traditional computing devices such as PCs. These personal

  18. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  19. Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean P. Cornelius; William L. Kath; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of complex networks to perturbations is of utmost importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response, and cell reprogramming. A fundamental property of networks is that the perturbation of one node can affect other nodes, in a process that may cause the entire or substantial part of the system to change behavior and possibly collapse. Recent research in metabolic and food-web networks has demonstrated the concept that network damage caused by external perturbations can often be mitigated or reversed by the application of compensatory perturbations. Compensatory perturbations are constrained to be physically admissible and amenable to implementation on the network. However, the systematic identification of compensatory perturbations that conform to these constraints remains an open problem. Here, we present a method to construct compensatory perturbations that can control the fate of general networks under such constraints. Our approach accounts for the full nonlinear behavior of real complex networks and can bring the system to a desirable target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Applications to genetic networks show that compensatory perturbations are effective even when limited to a small fraction of all nodes in the network and that they are far more effective when limited to the highest-degree nodes. The approach is conceptually simple and computationally efficient, making it suitable for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of large complex networks in various domains.

  20. Insurgent strategies for creating inimitability within mature digital ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, John A. (John Alan)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rich software application functionality once constrained to the desktop is now available via the World Wide Web (WWW) with the introduction of emergent Web2.0 technologies. Leveraging the Softwareas- a-service (SaaS) model, ...

  1. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grebenkov, Denis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one whic...

  2. Consistent Cosmology, Dynamic Relativity and Causal Quantum Mechanics as Unified Manifestations of the Symmetry of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei P. Kirilyuk

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The universal symmetry, or conservation, of complexity underlies any law or principle of system dynamics and describes the unceasing transformation of dynamic information into dynamic entropy as the unique way to conserve their sum, the total dynamic complexity. Here we describe the real world structure emergence and dynamics as manifestation of the universal symmetry of complexity of initially homogeneous interaction between two protofields. It provides the unified complex-dynamic, causally complete origin of physically real, 3D space, time, elementary particles, their properties (mass, charge, spin, etc.), quantum, relativistic, and classical behaviour, as well as fundamental interaction forces, including naturally quantized gravitation. The old and new cosmological problems (including "dark" mass and energy) are basically solved for this explicitly emerging, self-tuning world structure characterised by strictly positive (and large) energy-complexity. A general relation is obtained between the numbers of world dimensions and fundamental forces, excluding plausible existence of hidden dimensions. The unified, causally explained quantum, classical, and relativistic properties (and types of behaviour) are generalised to all higher levels of complex world dynamics. The real world structure, dynamics, and evolution are exactly reproduced by the probabilistic dynamical fractal, which is obtained as the truly complete general solution of a problem and the unique structure of the new mathematics of complexity. We outline particular, problem-solving applications of always exact, but irregularly structured symmetry of unreduced dynamic complexity to microworld dynamics, including particle physics, genuine quantum chaos, real nanobiotechnology, and reliable genomics.

  3. Africa gaining importance in world LPG trade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun, R.R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Major LPG projects planned or under way in Africa will increase the importance of that region`s presence in world LPG trade. Supplies will nearly double between 1995 and 2005, at which time they will remain steady for at least 10 years. At the same time that exports are leveling, however, increasing domestic demand for PG is likely to reduce export-market participation by Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, and Libya. The growth of Africa`s participation in world LPG supply is reflected in comparisons for the next 15--20 years. Total world supply of LPG in 1995 was about 165 million metric tons (tonnes), of which Africans share was 7.8 million tonnes. By 2000, world supply will grow to slightly more than 200 million tonnes, with Africa`s share expected to increase to 13.2 million tonnes (6.6%). And by 2005, world LPG supply will reach nearly 230 million tonnes; Africa`s overall supply volumes by that year will be nearly 16.2 million tonnes (7%). World LPG supply for export in 1995 was on order of 44 million tonnes with Africa supply about 4 million tonnes (9%). By 2005, world export volumes of LPG will reach nearly 70 million tonnes; Africa`s share will have grown by nearly 10 million tonnes (14.3%).

  4. Changing patterns of world energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, S.H.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The substantial increases in oil prices since 1973 have had tremendous impacts on world energy, and particularly on oil consumption. These impacts have varied across regions and energy types. As shown in a table, from 1960 through 1973 the real price of internationally traded crude oil, as measured in constant US dollars, changed very little. In this stable oil price environment, Free World energy consumption grew at 5.3% per year and oil use rose at 7.5% per year, increasing its share of Free World energy consumption from 43 to 56%. 6 tables.

  5. World Meteorological Organization | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld Energy JumpWorld

  6. World Power Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld Energy JumpWorldNJ

  7. World Watch Institute Feed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld EnergyDiego,World Watch

  8. The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The controls on net ecosystem productivity along an Arctic transect: a model comparison with ¯ux , * J O S E P H P . M C F A D D E N ² and F . S T U A R T C H A P I N I I I ² 2 *The Ecosystems Center ecosystem CO2-exchange data along a transect in northern Alaska. We use an extant process-based model

  9. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

  10. Quantum Complex Minkowski Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

  11. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    smart grid landscape The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters,...

  12. Responses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    to a wide range of environmental variations. Photosynthesis is a nonlinear function of solar radiationResponses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

  13. Disturbance frequency and functional identity mediate ecosystem processes in prairie streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of stream ecosystem properties (algal form and biomass, invertebrate densities, metabolism and nutrient along a downstream gradient of increasing temperature and nutrient concentrations. Different results

  14. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  15. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  16. The Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), up and walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Opgenoorth, Lars; Faith, Daniel P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    methodologies on value, valuation, and accounting (3d)  Platform goal  Strengthen the science?policy interface for biodiversity and ecosystem services   

  17. Comparing aquatic and terrestrial grazing ecosystems: is the grass really greener?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkepile, Deron

    and kelp forests (Burkepile and Hay 2006). Likewise, in freshwater ecosystems, waterfowl, zooplankton and benthic invertebrates impact the rates of primary production and nutrient regeneration (Lamberti and Resh

  18. Navigating coastal values: Participatory mapping of ecosystem services for spatial planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    including cultural ecosystem services (CES) is fraught with challenges (Chan et al., 2012). These valuation methods generally at- tempt to express consumer or individual preferences without explicitly addressing

  19. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Managementactions. Habitats such as coral reefs are especiallyissue of cli- mate change, coral reef resilience, and marine

  20. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massmore suscep- tible to climate change stressors (Hughes and

  1. The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Rafael de Farias

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    side, three factors were decisive: the natural resources of these areas; technological development which made feasible the cultivation of soybeans in formerly incompatible agro-ecosystems; and, although small, investment in transportation....93 55.00 3.77 40.50 3.85 218.04 0.96 06/07 86.77 4.08 56.00 1.82 42.50 4.94 226.85 4.04 Average 70.48 3.97 37.02 8.58 23.77 9.89 163.91 5.24 Source: Foreign Agricultural Service/USDA (FAS/USDA, 2007a). 3 Table 2. World Soybean Exports...

  2. The impacts of improving Brazil's transportation infrastructure on the world soybean market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costa, Rafael de Farias

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    side, three factors were decisive: the natural resources of these areas; technological development which made feasible the cultivation of soybeans in formerly incompatible agro-ecosystems; and, although small, investment in transportation....93 55.00 3.77 40.50 3.85 218.04 0.96 06/07 86.77 4.08 56.00 1.82 42.50 4.94 226.85 4.04 Average 70.48 3.97 37.02 8.58 23.77 9.89 163.91 5.24 Source: Foreign Agricultural Service/USDA (FAS/USDA, 2007a). 3 Table 2. World Soybean Exports...

  3. Composites World 2013 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CW 2013 Oct 25 2013 12:00 AM - 04:00 PM Composites World - Carbon Fiber Knoxville, Tennessee Crowne Plaza Knoxville 401 W. Summit Hill Dr., Knoxville, TN 37902 CONTACT : Email:...

  4. Bell Inequality and Many-Worlds Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Vaidman

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that the lesson we should learn from Bell's inequalities is not that quantum mechanics requires some kind of action at a distance, but that it leads us to believe in parallel worlds.

  5. Improving the world through engineering OPPORTUNITY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    themes of Energy, Environment, Education and Transport and its vision of `Improving the world through-melted. However, for many other types of waste, recovering its value to provide electricity, heat and/or transport

  6. The World Distribution of Household Wealth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DAVIES, JAMES B; Shorrocks, Anthony; Sandstrom, Susanna; WOLFF, EDWARD N

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. B. (1993). ‘The Distribution of Wealth in Canada’.Estimating the World Distribution of Household Wealth’.Tide: Changes in the Distribution of Wealth in the US, 1989-

  7. World Class Boilers and Steam Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portell, V. P.

    “World class” is a term used to describe steam systems that rank in the top 20% of their industry based on quantitative system performance data and energy management for the facility. The rating is determined through a proceduralized assessment...

  8. Areliving in Hoboken and changing the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    is a breakthrough in reliable emergency communications in extreme situations when traditional channels fail. Our that make the world a safer place. We are training the cybersecurity professionals who help protect

  9. CARBON MARKETS AROUND THE WORLD Ashley Lawson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    CARBON MARKETS AROUND THE WORLD Ashley Lawson Senior Analyst, Thomson Reuters Point Carbon only pilot trading carbon 6 #12;Shenzhen · Policy ­ Intensity-based ETS started June 18, 2013

  10. Crowdfunding's Potential for the Developing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    ? While I am happy for innovative entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley, I am passionately focused on helping Rise of the Rest" globally What would the world look like if there were Silicon Valleys everywhere

  11. UbiWorld: An environment integrating virtual reality, supercomputing, and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Disz, T.; Papka, M.E.; Stevens, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UbiWorld is a concept being developed by the Futures Laboratory group at Argonne National Laboratory that ties together the notion of ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) with that of using virtual reality for rapid prototyping. The goal is to develop an environment where one can explore Ubicomp-type concepts without having to build real Ubicomp hardware. The basic notion is to extend object models in a virtual world by using distributed wide area heterogeneous computing technology to provide complex networking and processing capabilities to virtual reality objects.

  12. Vulnerability Analysis of Complex Networks from Transportation Networks to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    and Electric Power Supply Chains Anna Nagurney John F. Smith Memorial Professor Department of Finance to Dynamic Networks · Where Are We Now? An Empirical Case Study to Real-World Electric Power Supply ChainsVulnerability Analysis of Complex Networks from Transportation Networks to the Internet

  13. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  14. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  15. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  16. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  17. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

  18. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications ofecosystem service values and (2) to show how the valuationecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation

  19. Mapping Global Inequality with World Society Theory and Social Structural Analysis - Can Worlds Meet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diewald, Martin; Albert, Mathias

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sen, Amartya (1992): Inequality reexamined. OxfordCharles (1998): Durable Inequality. University of CaliforniaMapping Global Inequality with World Society Theory and

  20. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Grebenkov

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one which occurs in three dimensions. We present our recent results on restricted diffusion. We look into the role of geometrical complexity at different levels, from boundary microroughness to hierarchical structure and connectivity of the whole diffusion-confining domain. We develop a new approach which consists in combining fast random walk algorithms with spectral tools. The main focus is on studying diffusion in model complex geometries (von Koch boundaries, Kitaoka acinus, etc.), as well as on developing and testing spectral methods. We aim at extending this knowledge and at applying the accomplished arsenal of theoretical and numerical tools to structures found in nature and industry.

  1. Why Sweat the Small Stuff: the Importance of Microalgae in Hawaiian Stream Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julius, Matthew L.

    Why Sweat the Small Stuff: the Importance of Microalgae in Hawaiian Stream Ecosystems MATTHEW L: mljulius@stcloudstate.edu Abstract Microalgae are well known for their importance in aquatic ecosystems and for their utility as environ- mental indicators. These attributes are emphasized here for microalgae, especially

  2. Integrated observations and modelling of greenhouse gas budgets at the ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    at the ecosystem level in The Netherlands Eddy Moors | Han Dolman | Jan Elbers Arjan Hensen | Jan Duyzer | Petra at the ecosystem level in The Netherlands Authors Eddy Moors 6, Han Dolman 5, Jan Elbers 6, Arjan Hensen 1, Jan Kroon Elmar Veenendaal | Ko van Huissteden Fred Bosveld | Cor Jacobs | Wilma Jans Peter Kuikman | Linda

  3. The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands MarshallIslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands 387 MarshallIslands The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands Maria Beger1 , Dean Jacobson22 (1,940,000 mi2 ), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) is comprised of 1,225 islands

  4. North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem E. Di Lorenzo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change E. Di Lorenzo,1 N Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08607, doi:10 to explain physical and biological fluctuations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean [Lynn et al., 1998; Lavaniegos

  5. EcoGIS GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EcoGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management May 2009 NOAA TechnicalGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75. 38 Fisheries Science Centers, NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices, NatureServe's EBM Tools Network, and other

  6. Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 375392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synthesis of these concepts in order to address the issue of valuation of ecosystem services. We wantEcological Economics 41 (2002) 375­392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services is to elucidate concepts of value and methods of valuation that will assist in guiding human decisions vis

  7. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass haÃ?1 yrÃ?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

  8. Measuring and Modeling Interactions Between Groundwater, Soil Moisture, and Plant Transpiration in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    , reactive flow and transport code to describe the application of food-processing wastewater to agricultural in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems by Gretchen Rose Miller B.S. (University of Missouri, Rolla) 2002 M Transpiration in Natural and Agricultural Ecosystems © 2009 by Gretchen Rose Miller #12;1 Abstract Measuring

  9. 14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    + ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

  10. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  11. An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

  12. ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL PAPER Terrestrial subsidies to lake food webs: an experimental approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cucherousset, Julien

    approach Pia Bartels · Julien Cucherousset · Cristian Gudasz · Mats Jansson · Jan Karlsson · Lennart Cross-ecosystem movements of material and energy are ubiquitous. Aquatic ecosystems typically receive¨v Department of Ecology and Genetics/Limnology, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Uppsala

  13. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  14. Technology Transfer for Ecosystem Management1 Tim O'Keefe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    into the "ecosystem management" program. This new program is a belated effort to redirect public forest management). In response to the Thomas report, and growing public pressures for a diverse, sustainable management system management is composed of both biological (ecosystem sustainablitily and diversity) and sociological (public

  15. NREL/ESS Spring 2013 Seminar Series "Core Values of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    Energy Economy Title: "Sustainability as a Core Value" Feb 15 Dr. Melinda Laituri, Professor, ESS TitleNREL/ESS Spring 2013 Seminar Series "Core Values of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability-sponsored by the Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability and NREL, and kicks off the official start to the Bachelor

  16. RECOVERY OF POLLUTED ECOSYSTEMS: THE CASE FOR LONG-TERM STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power, Anne Marie

    in charting recovery from acute pollution incidents such as oil, chemical spills and pulses of mine1 RECOVERY OF POLLUTED ECOSYSTEMS: THE CASE FOR LONG-TERM STUDIES S. J. Hawkins1 , P. E. Gibbs1 , N, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK Recovery of marine ecosystems from known pollution has tended

  17. Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

  18. The Fantasy World of Private Finance for Transport via Public...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Fantasy World of Private Finance for Transport via Public Private Partnerships Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Fantasy World of Private Finance...

  19. Energy Department Applauds World's First Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    World's First Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Station in Orange County Energy Department Applauds World's First Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Station in Orange County August 16, 2011...

  20. association world congress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    VIBRATIONAL SET-UP FOR EDUCATI 16 Proceedings World Geothermal Congress 2010 Bali, Indonesia, 25-29 April 2010 Physics Websites Summary: Proceedings World Geothermal Congress...

  1. World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction July 15, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis...

  2. Making Development Climate Resilient: A World Bank Strategy for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Making Development Climate Resilient: A World Bank Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa AgencyCompany Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy,...

  3. Energy Advising Services in the Post-ARRA World | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    World Energy Advising Services in the Post-ARRA World Better Buildings Residential Network Workforce Business Partners Peer Exchange Call: Energy Advising Services in the...

  4. Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Fifteen...

  5. Agua Caliente, World's Largest Solar Photovoltaic Plant, Helps...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Agua Caliente, World's Largest Solar Photovoltaic Plant, Helps Advance America's Solar Leadership Agua Caliente, World's Largest Solar Photovoltaic Plant, Helps Advance America's...

  6. Navigating Fragmented Ocean Law in the California Current: Tools to Identify and Measure Gaps and Overlaps for Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekstrom, Julia A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    14. contamina*, 15. ecosystem, 16. mammal, 17. shellfish,of large marine ecosystems. University of Rhode Island,A Global Crisis for Seagrass Ecosystems. BioScience 56 :987-

  7. Ekstrom, Draft 11/14/08 California Current Large Marine Ecosystem: Publicly Available Dataset of State and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    : Engineering Informatics Group Structural Engineering and Geomechanics Civil & Environmental Engineering Jerry, ocean law, large marine ecosystem INTRODUCTION Historically, governments have managed ocean uses within approach, widely recognized as a major contributor to the deterioration of ocean ecosystems, has created

  8. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by distinct wet and dry seasons instead of uniform heavy rainfall year-around. HEAVILY fragmented and vanishing 24 Mediterranean · Hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. · Very popular climate with humans, landforms (esp. mountains) and wind. 4 Biomes, cont'd #12;2 5 World Biomes 6 7 "biomes" vs. "land cover

  9. Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. "Some companies are not aware of the need to ask. In many regions, however, illegal logging is having unsustainable impacts. Much of the illegal logging to make room for agriculture and ranching activities. This illegal logging contributes to deforestation

  10. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ") and oil shales · Estimates of total oil supply usually do not reflect large potential from unconventional of years old (most from the Carboniferous period, 286 - 360 mya) 2. Fossil fuels 8 Coal Oil Tar sands Oil shales Natural gas ·World coal deposits are vast, ten times greater than conventional oil and gas

  11. Conceptual Design Report for the Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Barnes; J. Beller; K. Caldwell; K. Croft; R. Cherry; W. Landman

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design supports the creation of Extreme Ecosystems Test Chambers, which will replicate deep subsurface and subocean environments characterized by high pressure (2,000 psi) and subfreezing to high temperature (-4 to 300 degrees F) with differing chemical and saturation conditions. The design provides a system to support research and development that includes heat transfer, phase change issues in porous media, microbiology in extreme environments, and carbon sequestration and extraction. The initial system design is based on the research needs to support the commercial production of methane hydrates from subsurface sediments. The design provides for three pressure vessels: a Down Hole Test Vessel, a Vertical Multi-phase Test Vessel, and a Horizontal Multi-phase Test Vessel.

  12. Coal-ash spills highlight ongoing risk to ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatterjee, R.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent large-scale spills of coal combustion waste have highlighted the old problem of handling the enormous quantity of solid waste produced by coal. Both spills happened at power plants run by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). In December 2008 a holding pond for coal ash collapsed at a power plant in Kingstom, Tenn., releasing coal-ash sludge onto farmland and into rivers: in January 2009 a break in a pipe removing water from a holding pond for gypsum caused a spill at Widows Creek Fossil Plant in Stevenson, Ala. The article discusses the toxic outcome of such disasters on ecosystems, quoting work by Willaim Hopkins at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and recommendations and reports of the US EPA. 2 photos.

  13. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  14. The NNSA Albuquerque Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Albuquerque Complex Transition Site National Nuclear Security Administration - Service Center Internet Site Skip to Content Click to make text smaller Click to make text larger...

  15. Information GRID in the Corporate World Information GRID in the Corporate World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information GRID in the Corporate World Information GRID in the Corporate World .Bogonikolos Zeus Ontology Grid) project, an EU project funded under the Information Society Technologies programme and EAI Tools is discussed. The COG (Corporate Ontology Grid) project addresses the problem of accessing

  16. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E- string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is a key to uplifting to 6 dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on local 1/2 K3 surface.

  17. The diameter of the world wide web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reka Albert; Hawoong Jeong; Albert-Laszlo Barabasi

    1999-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite its increasing role in communication, the world wide web remains the least controlled medium: any individual or institution can create websites with unrestricted number of documents and links. While great efforts are made to map and characterize the Internet's infrastructure, little is known about the topology of the web. Here we take a first step to fill this gap: we use local connectivity measurements to construct a topological model of the world wide web, allowing us to explore and characterize its large scale properties.

  18. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E- string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is a key to uplifting to 6 dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on local 1/2 K3 surface.

  19. Classification of multifluid CP world models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Thomas; Hartmut Schulz

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Various classification schemes exist for homogeneous and isotropic (CP) world models, which include pressureless matter (so-called dust) and Einstein's cosmological constant Lambda. We here classify the solutions of more general world models consisting of up to four non-interacting fluids, each with pressure P, energy density epsilon and an equation of state P = (gamma - 1) epsilon with 0 0) tends to yield the smoothest fits of the Supernova Ia data from Perlmutter et al. (1999). Adopting the SN Ia constraints, exotic negative energy density components can be fittingly included only if the universe consists of four or more fluids.

  20. Emergent Universe in Brane World Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asit Banerjee; Tanwi Bandyopadhyay; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of an emergent universe is obtained in brane world. Here the bulk energy is in the form of cosmological constant, while the brane consists of the Chaplygin gas with the modified equation of state such as $p=A\\rho-B/\\rho$. Initially the brane matter for the special choice $A=1/3$ may have negative or positive pressure depending on the relative magnitudes of the parameter $B$ and the cosmological constant of the bulk, while asymptotically in future the brane world approaches a $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  1. World Resources Institute (WRI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld Energy

  2. World Waste Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld EnergyDiego, California

  3. World Watch Institute (WWI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin:WorldWorld EnergyDiego,

  4. World Watch Institute (WWI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung'sWoongjin Polysilicon Co LtdWorld FuelTradeWorld

  5. The Causes of Trade Globalization: A Political-Economy and World-Systems Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Roy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington DC: World Bank. World Trade Organization.2010. World Trade Report2010: Trade in Natural Resources. Geneva, Switzerland: WTO

  6. 1 | Valuing Ecosystem Services provided by Edinburgh's Trees | Tony Hutchings, Vicki Lawrence & Andy Brunt | 06/03/2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 | Valuing Ecosystem Services provided by Edinburgh's Trees | Tony Hutchings, Vicki Lawrence & Andy Brunt | 06/03/2013 Estimating the Value of Edinburgh's Trees Estimating the Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Services provided by Edinburgh's Trees: Results of a 2011 Survey Estimating the Value of Edinburgh

  7. Are ecosystem carbon inputs and outputs coupled at short time scales? A case study from adjacent pine and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Are ecosystem carbon inputs and outputs coupled at short time scales? A case study from adjacent and responses of Rsoil have been found on time scales of hours to weeks for different ecosystems, but most ecosystems over six and four measurement years, respectively, using both autocorrelation analysis

  8. Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla Grundy (University of Zimbabwe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest transitions and ecosystem services in Zimbabwe Supervisors: Dr Casey Ryan (UoE), Dr Isla and a variety of other ecosystem services. However the expansion of agricultural land and the curing of tobacco is accelerating deforestation and forest degradation rates. These structural changes to the ecosystem threaten

  9. Representing the effects of alpine grassland vegetation cover on the simulation of soil thermal dynamics by ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    dynamics by ecosystem models applied to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau S. Yi,1 N. Li,2 B. Xiang,3 X. Wang,1 B. In ecosystem, permafrost, and hydrology models, the consideration of soil surface temperature is generally and atmospheric factors on the estimation of soil surface temperature for alpine grassland ecosystems

  10. Microsoft policy brief | executive suMMary m Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist, partici-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Microsoft policy brief | executive suMMary m Just as organisms in a natural ecosystem coexist, partici- pants in the Internet-based online ecosystem are interdepen- dent. These participants include providers and network equipment makers. The online ecosystem plays a significant and growing role

  11. Ecosystem water exchange and partitioning of evapotranspiration along vegetation gradients: Implications of projected dust-bowl climate in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Ecosystem water exchange and partitioning of evapotranspiration along vegetation gradients of water cycling have been identified to produce, among other effects, changes in ecosystem composition with changes associated with these ecosystem-climate interactions (Jacobs et al., 2005) One of the key water

  12. Ecosystem Informatics Strategic Initiative Final Report 2009 Julia Jones, Geosciences; Tom Dietterich, Computer Science; Enrique Thomann, Mathematics; Ed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    Ecosystem Informatics Strategic Initiative Final Report 2009 Julia Jones, Geosciences; Tom over the last five years. The Ecosystem Informatics program at Oregon State University has established a presence here at the University and on a global scale. The OSU Ecosystem Informatics IGERT Program (with

  13. Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

  14. Initial design for a fish bioenergetics model of Pacific saury coupled to a lower trophic ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Initial design for a fish bioenergetics model of Pacific saury coupled to a lower trophic ecosystem-0001, Japan ABSTRACT A fish bioenergetics model coupled with an ecosystem model was developed to reproduce ecosystem model were input to the bioenergetics model of saury as the prey densities. Although certain model

  15. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  16. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  17. World Wide Web Internet and Web Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    1 23 World Wide Web Internet and Web Information Systems ISSN 1386-145X World Wide Web DOI 10's request, provided it is not made publicly available until 12 months after publication. #12;World Wide Web worlds. Its detection is a typical use case of the broad-based Wisdom Web of Things (W2T) methodology

  18. Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calheiros, Rodrigo N.

    World Scientific Publishing Company http://ejournals.wspc.com.sg/ppl/ppl.shtml SCHEDULING AND MANAGEMENT

  19. Exponential Random Simplicial Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exponential random graph models have attracted significant research attention over the past decades. These models are maximum-entropy ensembles under the constraints that the expected values of a set of graph observables are equal to given values. Here we extend these maximum-entropy ensembles to random simplicial complexes, which are more adequate and versatile constructions to model complex systems in many applications. We show that many random simplicial complex models considered in the literature can be casted as maximum-entropy ensembles under certain constraints. We introduce and analyze the most general random simplicial complex ensemble $\\mathbf{\\Delta}$ with statistically independent simplices. Our analysis is simplified by the observation that any distribution $\\mathbb{P}(O)$ on any collection of objects $\\mathcal{O}=\\{O\\}$, including graphs and simplicial complexes, is maximum-entropy under the constraint that the expected value of $-\\ln \\mathbb{P}(O)$ is equal to the entropy of the distribution. W...

  20. The British Empire and the Natural World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    and the Orient, this book will interest scholars, students and teachers of ecological and environmental history-23573738 email: kolkata.in@oup.com CHENNAI Oxford House, 289 Anna Salai, Chennai 600006 Ph: 044-28112107; Fax. About the Book The British empire marked an exceptional ecological moment in world history. Between 1600

  1. Carbon Smackdown: Cookstoves for the developing world

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ashok Gadgil, Kayje Booker, and Adam Rausch

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this June 30, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, learn how efficient cookstoves for the developing world ? from Darfur to Ethiopia and beyond ? are reducing carbon dioxide emissions, saving forests, and improving health. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Kayje Booker, and Adam Rausch discuss why they got started in this great challenge and what's next.

  2. Earth Sciences Take on the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waikato, University of

    Earth Sciences Take on the world Career paths Earth Sciences graduate Gerard Bird. Careers Coastal engineer Environmental consultant Earth scientist Engineering geologist Environmental Email: science@waikato.ac.nz Visit: www.earth.waikato.ac.nz earth sCienCes Surrounded by diverse

  3. College of Engineering WORLD-CLASS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    College of Engineering WORLD-CLASS ENGINEERING in Learning, Discovery and Engagement 2014-2019 STRATEGY #12;College of Engineering PREAMBLE The College of Engineering at Penn State is a leading academy, research enterprise and service to the global engineering community. Innovation is a hallmark of Penn State

  4. Collaborative Approach World-Class Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    .5 million from the Department of Energy, along with additional funds from New York State, for an EnergyWCMC Collaborative Approach World-Class Facilities Research at Cornell /A Statistical Excerpt York 08 Funding Cornell's Research 09 Expending Research Dollars 10 Funding Graduate Education 12

  5. Powering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Gulf of Mexico's oil and gas production Conclusions ­ p.5/59 #12;Summary of Conclusions. . . The globalPowering the World: Offshore Oil & Gas Production Macondo post-blowout operations Tad Patzek that it may be on call for a further ordering." Technology is a "standing-reserve" of energy for humans

  6. BP Statistical Review of World Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chief executive's introduction 2 2011 in review 6 Oil 6 Reserves 8 Production and consumption 15 Prices in review Oil 6 Reserves 8 Production and consumption 15 Prices 16 Refining 18 Trade movements Natural gas an Excel workbook of the historical data. About BP BP is one of the world's largest oil and gas companies

  7. World Biodiesel Markets The Outlook to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Biodiesel Markets The Outlook to 2010 A special study from F.O. Licht and Agra CEAS This important new study provides a detailed analysis of the global biodiesel market and the outlook for growth, including the regulatory and trade framework, feedstock supply and price developments, biodiesel production

  8. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlatti, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  9. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Merlatti; G. Sabella

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  10. SINGAPORE SESSIONS IS A TRADEMARK OF SINGAPORE EDB Already hard at work in hospitals around the world, medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    ." acceleraTing change The learning curve for robot-assisted surgery is reportedly shorter than traditional the world, medical robots are enabling surgeons to perform complex operations with much success. Infact, these surgical robots equip doctors with extraordinary precision, providing heightened visual aid, controlled

  11. 1928 IEEE COMMUNICATIONS LETTERS, VOL. 17, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2013 A Small World Network Model for Energy Efficient Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkashlan, Maged

    for Energy Efficient Wireless Networks Tiankui Zhang, Jinlong Cao, Yue Chen, Laurie Cuthbert, and Maged Elkashlan Abstract--Wireless ad hoc networks can be modeled as small world networks based on the complex of the wireless links, and 2) the impact of a wireless node on the entire network. By adopting the proposed metric

  12. Advances in Complex Systems, Vol. 6, No. 4 (2003) 487505 c World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN ASTROPHYSICAL BASIS FOR A UNIVERSAL ORIGIN OF LIFE STIRLING A. COLGATE, STEEN RASMUSSEN and JOHNDALE C. SOLEM a large fraction of life, perhaps as much as half of the total biomass, exists in subsurface niches [33

  13. Emplacement and dewatering of the world's largest exposed sand injectite complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherry, Timothy J.; Rowe, Christie D.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    intrusions primed by silica diagenesis, Geology, 34, 917–R. E. Garrison (1990), Silica diagenesis in the Santa Cruzto the west. Silica diagenesis in the diatomaceous Monterey

  14. Emplacement and dewatering of the world's largest exposed sand injectite complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherry, Timothy J.; Rowe, Christie D.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation (UK North Sea), Sedimentology, 51, 503–529, doi:liesegang bands: Update, Sedimentology, 50(4), Minisini,cohesionless sedi- ments, Sedimentology, 58, 1693–1715, doi:

  15. Advances in Complex Systems, Vol. 4, No. 4 (2001) 407417 c World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flows of granular materials, that is flows confined to a surface layer on a static granular bed and storage of materials in systems such as rotary kilns, tumbling mixers, and feeding and discharge of silos

  16. Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-Comments Sign InNuclear Security Administration

  17. Y-12, Making the World a Safer Place | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contributeSecuritysupports neighbors's New Face,

  18. 70 years making the world safer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation507

  19. 70 years making the world safer: extended | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >InternshipDepartment ofAugustDecember8th MeetingAllocation507safer:

  20. Y-12 makes the world safer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat