Sample records for world ecosystem complexes

  1. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  2. The Biosphere: Anthropogenic Impact Biosphere: World's Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraco, Thomas

    : Abiotic, Biotic Components Energy, Nutrient Flux Ecological Diversity, Genetic Information #12;The;Land Transformation: Uncontested Levels 50% World's Land Surface Converted to Grazing or Crop Cultivation œ World's Forests Converted 17% of Land Area Not Human-Transformed Primary Force Driving Loss

  3. Interactive Visualization of Complex Plant Ecosystems Oliver Deussen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    a method for interactive rendering of large outdoor scenes. Complex polygonal plant models and whole plant most of the geometry drastically. With our system, we are able to interactively render very complex naturally. The importance of interactive yet realistic rendering of these very complex ecosystem models

  4. Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    CHAPTER 6 Ecosystem Component Characterization "Things don't turn up in this world until somebody turns them up." James A. Garfield CONTENTS Overview

  5. IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    IT Complexity Revolution: Intelligent Tools for the Globalised World Development Andrei Kirilyuk be used as a basis for the latter, in the form of "complexity revolution" in information systems-driven IT to various aspects of post-industrial civilisation dynamics, including intelligent communication, context

  6. Our world is made up of complex systems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. _ #12;A river is a system. gloBal water wIthdrawal has Increased sIxfold sInce the 1900s, twTHINK #12; _ Our world is made up of complex systems. _ #12;#12;#12;#12;To extract their full. As with any complex system, you need to analyze how work flows, how people interact and how processes can

  7. International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    9th INTECOL International Wetlands Conference WETLANDS IN A COMPLEX WORLD June 3-8, 2012 Orlando .................................................................................... 27 Society of Wetland Scientists (SWS) Section-Organized Symposia and Section-Sponsored Sessions.................................................................................................................. 222 #12;9 th INTECOL: International Wetlands Conference 2 WELCOME TO THE JOINT CONFERENCE OF: 9TH

  8. Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    Trout in hot water Understanding the effects of climate change on ecosystems is a complex business as we set out for the Hengill geothermal valley. You might think of Iceland as a cold, dark country up the breakdown of organic matter and nutrients are recycled more quickly, leading to more resources

  9. Understanding complex Earth systems: volatile metabolites as microbial ecosystem proxies and student conceptual model development of coastal eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeal, Karen Sue

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    research strands which contribute to the scientific and pedagogical understanding of complex Earth systems. In the first strand, a method that characterizes volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as ecological proxies of soil microbial ecosystems was validated...

  10. The Real Meaning of Complex Minkowski-Space World-Lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. M. Adamo; E. T. Newman

    2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In connection with the study of shear-free null geodesics in Minkowski space, we investigate the real geometric effects in real Minkowski space that are induced by and associated with complex world-lines in complex Minkowski space. It was already known, in a formal manner, that complex analytic curves in complex Minkowski space induce shear-free null geodesic congruences. Here we look at the direct geometric connections of the complex line and the real structures. Among other items, we show, in particular, how a complex world-line projects into the real Minkowski space in the form of a real shear-free null geodesic congruence.

  11. Design Innovation Global network of designers, engineers, and innovators challenging complex real world problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Design Innovation Global network of designers, engineers, and innovators challenging complex real world problems Stanford University Global Alliance for Research and Design #12;Our Course #12;The ever evolving Design Innovation Course ME310 is a year-long project-based design engineering course that began

  12. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

  13. Integrating cultural services and social value: Novel directions for ecosystem service management, valuation, and complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallen, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?between?biophysical,?economic,?and?social?dimensions.? Cultural?services?have?been?sidelined?by?their?intangible?characteristics?and?perceived? incommensurability?with?traditional?ecosystem?service?valuations?(ESV).?For?instance,? ecotourism?and?recreation?are?the...,?and?aesthetic?experience,?including,?e.g.,?knowledge?systems,?social? relations,?and?aesthetic?value?;?specifically,?this?includes??cultural?diversity,?spiritual?and? religious?values,?knowledge?systems,?educational?values,?inspiration,?aesthetic?values,?social? relations,?sense?of?place,?cultural?heritage?values,?recreation?and?ecotourism...

  14. Ecology of a vector-borne zoonosis in a complex ecosystem: trypanosomiasis in Serengeti, Tanzania 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auty, Harriet K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unravelling the complexities of a disease with multiple wildlife host and multiple tsetse vector species is no easy task. After over a century of field observations, experimental studies, anecdotal evidence and conjecture, ...

  15. Efficiency of attack strategies on complex model and real-world networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellingeri, Michele; Vincenzi, Simone

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the efficiency of attack strategies to network nodes when targeting several complex model and real-world networks. We tested 5 attack strategies, 3 of which were introduced in this work for the first time, to attack 3 model (Erdos and Renyi, Barabasi and Albert preferential attachment network, and scale-free network configuration models) and 3 real networks (Gnutella peer-to-peer network, email network of the University of Rovira i Virgili, and immunoglobulin interaction network). Nodes were removed sequentially according to the importance criterion defined by the attack strategy. We used the size of the largest connected component (LCC) as a measure of network damage. We found that the efficiency of attack strategies (fraction of nodes to be deleted for a given reduction of LCC size) depends on the topology of the network, although attacks based on the number of connections of a node and betweenness centrality were often the most efficient strategies. Sequential deletion of nodes in decreasin...

  16. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  17. Creating win-wins from trade-offs? Ecosystem services for human well-being: A meta-analysis of ecosystem service trade-offs and synergies in the real world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howe, Caroline; Suich, Helen; Vira, Bhaskar; Mace, Georgina M.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    type of ecosystem trade-off or synergy (U Stakeholder type (where a stakeholder is an individual or group using a particular ecosystem service) Do the stakeholders hav the ecosystem service o companies have a priva timber, whereas the glo public... of the stakeholders have a private interest in one or more of the ES involved. For example, the sale of trees for timber (private interest) as opposed to their maintenance for climate regulation (public interest). In order to address these hypotheses we asked a number...

  18. Final Technical Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochlan, William P.

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  19. Final Activity Report: The Effects of Iron Complexing Ligands on the Long Term Ecosystem Response to Iron Enrichment of HNLC waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trick, Charles Gordon [Western University

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial increases in the concentrations of the stronger of two Fe(III) complexing organic ligand classes measured during the mesoscale Fe enrichment studies IronEx II and SOIREE appeared to sharply curtailed Fe availability to diatoms and thus limited the efficiency of carbon sequestration to the deep. Detailed observations during IronEx II (equatorial Pacific Ocean) and SOIREE (Southern Ocean –Pacific sector) indicate that the diatoms began re-experiencing Fe stress even though dissolved Fe concentrations remained elevated in the patch. This surprising outcome likely is related to the observed increased concentrations of strong Fe(III)-complexing ligands in seawater. Preliminary findings from other studies indicate that diatoms may not readily obtain Fe from these chemical species whereas Fe bound by strong ligands appears to support growth of cyanobacteria and nanoflagellates. The difficulty in assessing the likelihood of these changes with in-situ mesoscale experiments is the extended monitoring period needed to capture the long-term trajectory of the carbon cycle. A more detailed understanding of Fe complexing ligand effects on long-term ecosystem structure and carbon cycling is essential to ascertain not only the effect of Fe enrichment on short-term carbon sequestration in the oceans, but also the potential effect of Fe enrichment in modifying ecosystem structure and trajectory.

  20. Using a complex system approach to address world challenges in Food and Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Mil, H G J; Windhab, E J; Perrot, N; van der Linden, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    World food supply is crucial to the well-being of every human on the planet in the basic sense that we need food to live. It also has a profound impact on the world economy, international trade and global political stability. Furthermore, consumption of certain types and amounts foods can affect health, and the choice of livestock and plants for food production can impact sustainable use of global resources. There are communities where insufficient food causes nutritional deficiencies, and at the same time other communities eating too much food leading to obesity and accompanying diseases. These aspects reflect the utmost importance of agricultural production and conversion of commodities to food products. Moreover, all factors contributing to the food supply are interdependent, and they are an integrative part of the continuously changing, adaptive and interdependent systems in the world around us. The properties of such interdependent systems usually cannot be inferred from the properties of its parts. In a...

  1. Evaluation of the Nephrotoxicity of Complex Mixtures Containing Organics and Metals: Advantages and Disadvantages of the Use of Real-world Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jane Ellen Simmons; Raymond S. H. Yang; Ezra Berman

    As part of a multidisciplinary health effects study, the nephrotoxicity of complex industrial waste mixtures was assessed. Adult, male Fischer 344 rats were gavaged with samples of complex industrial waste and nephrotoxicity evaluated 24 hr later. Of the 10 tested samples, 4 produced increased absolute or relative kidney weight, or both, coupled with a statistically significant alteration in at least one of the measured serum parameters (urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (CREAT), and BUN/CREAT ratio). Although the waste samples had been analyzed for a number of organic chemicals and 7 of the 10 samples were analyzed also for 12 elemental metals and metalloids, their nephrotoxicity was not readily predicted from the partial chemical characterization data. Because the chemical form or speciation of the metals was unknown, it was not possible to estimate their contribution to the observed biological response. Various experimental approaches, including use of real-world complex mixtures, chemically defined synthetic mixtures, and simple mixtures, will be necessary to adequately determine the potential human health risk from exposure to complex

  2. Approaches for Planning and Implementing Sustainable Energy Growth in a Complex World: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, N.; Schwab, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of sustainable energy development has been widely discussed and debated in recent years. However, despite widespread interest, progress toward this goal has been limited. This paper will build on current thinking related to sustainable development, energy forecasting, and complexity theory and show how past roadmapping methodologies fall short. While proposing ways of thinking about our responses to global changes, we consider how we can create and discover the pathways through those unpredictable changes toward high global renewables penetration.

  3. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L.Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:as well. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development is a strong

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic microbial ecosystems Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Starch Glucose Complex anaerobic... 12;Microbial Systems as Model Ecosystems P C R Energy Heat ... Source: Vallino, Joseph J. - Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological...

  5. World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals are presently driving rapid global change in emissions with complex conse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    395 World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals the average transport time is 2­3 weeks (Liu and Mauzerall 2005). Circumpolar trans- port of pollution around

  6. World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals are presently driving rapid global change in emissions with complex conse-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    377 World population growth, industrialization, energy demand, and environmental goals the average transport time is 2­3 weeks (Liu and Mauzerall 2005). Circumpolar trans- port of pollution around

  7. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  8. Stability and Complexity in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    and complexity of a commu- nity of interacting plants and animals, following the food web as a clue. Contrary in power. Stability and Complexity in Model Ecosystems played a key role in introducing nonlinear thinking, and current threats to biodiversity have made questions about the role of ecosystem complexity

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem restoration Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Ecosystem Prediction- Aquatic... In a world where the demand for fresh surface water increases every ... Source: Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, NOAA...

  10. Turbulence Considerations for Comparing Ecosystem Exchange over Old-Growth and Clear-Cut Stands For Limited Fetch and Complex Canopy Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Paw U, K T; Falk, M; Bible, K

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide, water vapor and energy fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC) methodology over three adjacent forests in southern Washington State to identify stand-level age-effects on ecosystem exchange. The sites represent Douglas-fir forest ecosystems at two contrasting successional stages: old-growth (OG) and early seral (ES). Here we present eddy flux and meteorological data from two early seral stands and the Wind River AmeriFlux old-growth forest during the growing season (March-October) in 2006 and 2007. We show an alternative approach to the usual friction velocity (u*) method for determining periods of adequate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) mixing based on the ratio of mean horizontal ({bar u}) and vertical ({bar w}) wind flow to a modified turbulent kinetic energy scale (uTKE). This new parameter in addition to footprint modeling showed that daytime CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE}) in small clear-cuts (< 10 hectares) can be measured accurately with EC if micrometeorological conditions are carefully evaluated. Peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -14.0 to -12.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) at OG were measured in April in both 2006 and 2007 before bud break when air and soil temperatures and vapor pressure deficit were relatively low, and soil moisture and light levels were favorable for photosynthesis. At the early seral stands, peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -11.0 to -8.7 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were measured in June and July while spring-time CO{sub 2} fluxes were much smaller (F{sub NEE} = -3.8 to -3.6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}). Overall, we measured lower evapotranspiration (OG = 230 mm; ES = 297 mm) higher midday F{sub NEE} (OG F{sub NEE} = -9.0 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}; ES F{sub NEE} = -7.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and higher Bowen ratios (OG {beta} = 2.0. ES {beta} = 1.2) at the old-growth forest than at the ES sites during the summer months (May-August). Eddy covariance studies such as ours add critical land-atmosphere exchange data for an abundant, but rarely studied Douglas-fir age class.

  11. Anthropogenic Impacts on Polar Bear Biology and the Arctic Ecosystem.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, John E.

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite its relative distance from most populated regions of the world, the Arctic has been significantly impacted by anthropogenic contamination and climate change. The entire Arctic ecosystem has been affected, with upper trophic level predators...

  12. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  13. Complexity in Big History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spier, Fred

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spier, Fred. “How Big History Works: Energy Flows and RiseSmil, Vaclav. Energy in World History. Boulder, CO: Westviewkg) Energy and complexity Spier: Complexity in Big History.

  14. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  15. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  16. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

  17. World-Systems as Dynamic Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    World-Systems as Dynamic Networks Christopher Chase-Dunn Institute for Research on World-Systems on comparative world-systems for the workshop on `analyzing complex macrosystems as dynamic networks" at the Santa Fe Institute, April 29- 30, 2004. (8341 words) v. 4-22-04 1 #12;The comparative world-systems

  18. better world Scientists and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    hazardous waste, control air pollution and promote environmental health. Because these fields are complex, environmental, mathematical and physical sciences. And Oregon State University is a great place to start building that experience. Here, you can study with world-renowned faculty, participate in groundbreaking

  19. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  20. Summary We estimated total ecosystem respiration from a ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) plantation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Forest ecosystems are important in global carbon cycling be- cause 80% of the carbon stored in terrestrial vegetation is for- est biomass and forest soil contains more than 70% of the world's soil carbon- aged not only for timber and non-timber products, but also for CO2 sequestration. Therefore, ecosystem

  1. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkowitz, Alan R.

    from the gas balance at night (when GPP is zero) and then GPP is calculated from Eq. 2. This gas COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  2. Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, A.; Hart, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TR- 272 2004 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project C. Hart A. McDonald Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University - 146 - 2003 Pecos River Ecosystem Monitoring Project... Charles R. Hart, Extension Range Specialist, Fort Stockton Alyson McDonald, Extension Assistant – Hydrology, Fort Stockton SUMMARY The Pecos River Ecosystem Project is attempting to minimize the negative impacts of saltcedar on the river ecosystem...

  3. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    partitioning among marine species (Kohn 1959). Facilitation, which occurs when one species improves envi- ronmental conditions for others, is well documented in such marine ecosystems as salt marshes, coral reefs, and kelp forests (Knowlton 1999; Bruno et al... food per acre as a commercial shrimp farm. These complex services are provided by thousands of plant, animal, and microbial species. (c) Kelp forests and (d) coral reefs are some of the most productive ecosystems on Earth. Recreational, commercial...

  4. World Ecosystem and Environmental Science and Policy 30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerson, Peter J.

    engine" · that drives air and ocean currents · Moving water transports heat · Moving air transports heat Engine:" Differential heating of the tropics causes warm air and water to move poleward and cold air out of a wet person. But when water vapor condenses, the latent heat becomes heat again; think steam

  5. Dilmaya's World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alan, Macfarlane

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    burning on a funeral pyre. I had never lived for more than a day or in a world without toilets or toilet papers, where there was no central heating and no window glass to keep out the cold Himalayan winds. * * * Short of finding the very... infancy to puberty in a remote Himalayan village. So Dilmaya allowed this, as well as encouraging our love for her sons and husband. All this was achieved while she looked after us physically and stretched her mind and body to the limits...

  6. 5 World Oil Trends WORLD OIL TRENDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 World Oil Trends Chapter 1 WORLD OIL TRENDS INTRODUCTION In considering the outlook for California's petroleum supplies, it is important to give attention to expecta- tions of what the world oil market. Will world oil demand increase and, if so, by how much? How will world oil prices be affected

  7. Ecosystem Science | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as they respond to a variety of stresses, ranging from contamination to climate change to energy extraction and conversion. ORNL researcher Ken Lowe with drill rig Ecosystem...

  8. Agent-based modeling of the effects of social norms on enrollment in payments for1 ecosystem services2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    norms5 8,304 words6 1Center for International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard7 2 Abstract19 Conservation investments are increasingly being implemented through payments for20 ecosystem services (PES) for the protection and restoration of ecosystem services around21 the world

  9. Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystems & Fisheries-Oceanography Coordinated Investigations · Healthy and productive coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Original Paradigm #12;We had Consumers & Coastal Communities Fishing Industry & Coastal Infrastructure Marine Ecosystem Control

  10. Third World Ballistic missiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nolan, J.E.; Wheelon, A.D.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ballistic missiles and other means of long-range destruction, traditionally limited to a handful of industrialized nations, are fast becoming a fixture in many regional conflicts. The Third World military buildup is perhaps even more worrisome than its First World prototype, for it is far more likely to find expression in war. There are several reasons why this should be so. In the past decade the number of countries in the missile club has more than doubled, to 18. Many of the new members have been at war or are embroiled in disputes. Unlike the major powers, these countries have not had time enough to perfect systems of command and control over their new strategic forces. They have had little time to learn to manage the complexities of military brinksmanship. Finally, because many regional conflicts overlap, an escalation in the arms race tends to convey itself from one area of tension to another. For many years the big industrialized countries ignored the proliferation of ballistic missiles and sought political advantage by arming their clients. In doing so, they presumed that the bipolar alignment of power would restrain regional conflicts. The preoccupation with East-West issues overshadowed problems in the Third World. Smaller industrialized powers sold missiles to generate revenues to support their own military industries. Meanwhile the developing countries eagerly acquired missiles for the same reasons that had motivated their predecessors: to deter attack, intimidate enemies, build a technological base and win prestige.

  11. Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the Southwest Ecosystem Vulnerability Assessment - Patterns of Climate Change Vulnerability in the...

  12. www.frontiersinecology.org The Ecological Society of America Global environmental change has moved our world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    summarizes findings of an assessment that was the first in the US to incorporate ecosystem services moved our world into a new geological era sometimes called the Anthropocene (Crutzen 2002). Ecosystems, including habitat loss and degradation, water resource demands, toxic contam- inants, and invasive species

  13. A world less green

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovejoy, T.E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation is continuing at an accelerating rate. Demands for timber and firewood result in the destruction of ecologically sensitive ecosystems, particularly those in the tropical forest. A serious consequence of deforestation is the creation of conditions favorable for desertification. Forest ecosystems must be conserved, as they play a vital role in the biological stability of the earth. (10 photos)

  14. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  15. QUICK FACTS Only 22% of the world's fisheries are sustainable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    QUICK FACTS Only 22% of the world's fisheries are sustainable Only 0.7% of the oceans are under from 0.5% to at 1.0% of GDP to increase access. · Adopt participatory ecosystem approach to fisheries.Increased large scale industrial fishing and poor regulations have worsen the problem. Lack of affordable access

  16. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C. [Tetra Tech, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States). Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science; Richmond, R.H. [Univ. of Guam, Mangilao (Guam). Marine Lab.; Power, E.A. [EVS Environment Consultants, Ltd., North Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  17. 15/07/12 5:47 AMA World Without Coral Reefs -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/opinion/a-world-without-coral-reefs.html?_r=2&hpw&pagewanted=print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    of biodiversity and fisheries supporting millions of the world's poor -- will cease to be. Overfishing, ocean of the world's coral reefs, the nurseries of tropical coastal fish stocks. They have become zombie ecosystems generation. There will be remnants here and there, but the global coral reef ecosystem -- with its storehouse

  18. azov coastal ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Software Ecosystems Mircea Lungua , Michele Lanzaa, research groups or even the open-source communities. We call these contexts software ecosystems of project ecosystems through...

  19. RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in the School of Resource and Environmental Management of Philosophy Title of Dissertation: Resolving Equivocality in Ecosystem Management Examining Committee: Chair. A case study approach compared information available for selecting protected areas for species-at-risk

  20. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions. climate variability coastal marine ecosystems coastal ocean upwelling marine ecology Equatorward winds along the eastern boundaries of the world's oceans drive offshore surface Ekman

  1. Invasive Species, Harmful Algae & Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: An Ecosystem Approach Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invasive Species, Harmful Algae & Hypoxia in the Great Lakes: An Ecosystem Approach Introduction. Hypoxia has occurred frequently in the summer in western Lake Erie. HABs have been responsible The Laurentian Great Lakes are a major resource to North America, containing 18% of the world's surface

  2. Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Way, Andy

    Space Complexity Algorithms & Complexity Space Complexity Nicolas Stroppa Patrik Lambert - plambert@computing.dcu.ie CA313@Dublin City University. 2008-2009. December 4, 2008 #12;Space Complexity Hierarchy of problems #12;Space Complexity NP-intermediate Languages If P = NP, then are there languages which neither in P

  3. Lessons from IT Ecosystems Michael Kster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    -Transport-Systems Smart-Energy-Systems etc. Smart Airport as a smaller instance of a Smart City Michael Köster · CIG, TU and interact massively. IT Ecosystem: analogue to biological ecosystems based on the balance between and continuously evolving IT Ecosystems requires deep understanding of this balance. Michael Köster · CIG, TU

  4. PERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Margaret A.

    , are not pro- viding all the services of healthy ecosystems (6, 7). Stream and river restoration projectsPERSPECTIVE Restoration of Ecosystem Services for Environmental Markets Margaret A. Palmer1,2 * and Solange Filoso1 Ecological restoration is an activity that ideally results in the return of an ecosystem

  5. Our definition of sustainability reflects what the UN and the World Wildlife Fund suggest as the process of improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting eco-systems. We use the definition where human, societa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, HĂŒseyin

    Our definition of sustainability reflects what the UN and the World Wildlife Fund suggest as the process of improving the quality of human life while living within the carrying capacity of supporting eco are fundamentally integrated dimensions that are mutually reinforcing. The new School of Global Sustainability

  6. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  7. Exploring the Future Role of Asia Utilizing A Scenario Matrix Architecture and Shared Socio-Ecosystem Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kim, Son H.; Kopp, Roberrt; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Moss, Richard H.; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the implications of alternative pathways for human population and economic development for the role of Asia in both reference, no-climate-policy, scenarios and scenarios in which climate forcing is limited. We consider three different reference scenarios, which we refer to as Shared Socio-ecosystem Pathways (SSPs) and four different levels of limitation on climate forcing, which we refer to as Shared Policy Assumptions (SPAs). SSPs are differentiated by population and economic growth assumptions, while SPAs are differentiated on the level of radiative forcing in the year 2100. Regardless of the scenarios we examined Asia plays a central role in shaping the world’s future with nearly half of the world’s people and more than half of the world’s economic activity and energy consumption. The future of Asian and world are dramatically different across the various combinations of SSPs and SPAs. High population worlds place significant stress on Asian resources and ecosystems. In high population SSPs the poorest members of the population face high energy and food prices and the more stringent the level of emissions mitigation, the more stress poor populations experience, though the more stringent the emissions mitigation, the larger the area of unmanaged ecosystems that are preserved.

  8. Rescuing ecosystems from extinction cascades through compensatory perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sagar Sahasrabudhe; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Food-web perturbations stemming from climate change, overexploitation, invasive species, and habitat degradation often cause an initial loss of species that results in a cascade of secondary extinctions, posing considerable challenges to ecosystem conservation efforts. Here we devise a systematic network-based approach to reduce the number of secondary extinctions using a predictive modeling framework. We show that the extinction of one species can often be compensated by the concurrent removal or population suppression of other specific species, which is a counterintuitive effect not previously tested in complex food webs. These compensatory perturbations frequently involve long-range interactions that are not evident from local predator-prey relationships. In numerous cases, even the early removal of a species that would eventually be extinct by the cascade is found to significantly reduce the number of cascading extinctions. These compensatory perturbations only exploit resources available in the system, and illustrate the potential of human intervention combined with predictive modeling for ecosystem management.

  9. World Elephant Centre:.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rota, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The World Elephant Centre tackles two problems of our time, in a global relevance framework. In fact, it is not only a typical case of… (more)

  10. What in the World are Possible Worlds?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dondero, Mark

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    talk of possible worlds? In this thesis, I will attempt to outline the most significant and well-recognized view in this debate: that of David Lewis. Through my discussion of him, I will find occasion to discuss some alternative views that have arisen...

  11. The Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    ) Reuse Wastewater Seepage Management Surface Water Storage Reservoir Removing Barriers to SheetflowThe Role of Science in Ecosystem Restoration and Management: The South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Initiative Frank J. Mazzotti University of Florida Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center

  12. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  13. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  14. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  15. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  16. Energy flow and ecosystem dynamics and wood energy in forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy flow and ecosystem dynamics and wood energy in forest ecosystems S.M.C.U.P. Subasinghe respectively. The forests are the most important ecosystems in wood energy aspect. Other than the energy all Originally published in the Proceedings of Workshop of Training of Trainers in Wood Energy Aspects in Sri

  17. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction: Is conservation the answer?" Paul van. Most ecosystems will change in the future. 2. Loss of species and biodiversity will continue to happen Energy Demand Urbanisation Climate Change Water Availability Infectious Diseases Biodiversity Loss #12

  18. Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Half day symposium ,,Theoretical of natural communities #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems Ecology Abstracts Carlos data sets and theory in a flexible framework. #12;Eawag GL search Theoretical Evolutionary Ecosystems

  19. COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Diversity Cascades in Alfalfa Fields: From Plant Quality to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Lee

    COMMUNITY AND ECOSYSTEM ECOLOGY Diversity Cascades in Alfalfa Fields: From Plant Quality abundance in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) Ă?elds. We modiĂ?ed arthropod communities using three nonfactorial corroborate previous studies in alfalfa that show complex indirect effects, such as trophic cascades, can

  20. Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight from a cross-site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Diana

    Soil animal responses to moisture availability are largely scale, not ecosystem dependent: insight Cruces, NM 88012, USA, 4 USDA ARS Grassland Soil and Water Research Laboratory, Temple, TX 76502, USA, 5 Abstract Climate change will result in reduced soil water availability in much of the world either due

  1. Around the World byprivatejet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    AngkorWat, Cambodia Petra or Wadi Rum, Jordan engeti Plain or rongoro Crater, Tanzania The Great Barrier cities of the ancient world at Petra, or explore the lunar-like landscape of Wadi Rum. Cambodia india

  2. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  3. Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise Projections Ecosystem-Based Management Tools Network Webinar: Community-Based Sea Level Rise...

  4. Modelled effects of precipitation on ecosystem carbon and water dynamics in different climatic zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service; Sowerby, ALWYN [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing changes in the global climate expose the world s ecosystems not only to increasing CO2 concentrations and temperatures but also to altered precipitation (P) regimes. Using four well-established process-based ecosystem models (LPJ, DayCent, ORCHIDEE, TECO), we explored effects of potential P changes on water limitation and net primary production (NPP) in seven terrestrial ecosystems with distinctive vegetation types in different hydroclimatic zones. We found that NPP responses to P changes differed not only among sites but also within a year at a given site. The magnitudes of NPP change were basically determined by the degree of ecosystem water limitation, which was quantified here using the ratio between atmospheric transpirational demand and soil water supply. Humid sites and/or periods were least responsive to any change in P as compared with moderately humid or dry sites/periods. We also found that NPP responded more strongly to doubling or halving of P amount and a seasonal shift in P occurrence than that to altered P frequency and intensity at constant annual amounts. The findings were highly robust across the four models especially in terms of the direction of changes and largely consistent with earlier P manipulation experiments and modelling results. Overall, this study underscores the widespread importance of P as a driver of change in ecosystems, although the ultimate response of a particular site will depend on the detailed nature and seasonal timing of P change.

  5. Restoring a disappearing ecosystem: the Longleaf Pine Savanna.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrington, Timothy B. [USFS; Miller, Karl V. [University of Georgia; Park, Noreen

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) savannas of the southeastern United States contain some of the worlds most diverse plant communities, along with a unique complement of wildlife. Their traditionally open canopy structure and rich understory of grasses and herbs were critical to their vigor. However, a long history of land-use practices such as logging, farming, and fire exclusion have reduced this once-widespread ecosystem to only 3 percent of its original range. At six longleaf pine plantations in South Carolina, Tim Harrington with the Pacific Northwest Research Station and collaborators with the Southern Research Station used various treatments (including prescribed burns, tree thinning, and herbicide applications) to alter the forest structure and tracked how successful each one was in advancing savanna restoration over a 14-year period. They found that typical planting densities for wood production in plantations create dense understory shade that excludes many native herbaceous species important to savannas and associated wildlife. The scientists found that although tree thinning alone did not result in sustained gains, a combination of controlled burning, thinning, and herbicide treatments to reduce woody plants was an effective strategy for recovering the savanna ecosystem. The scientists also found that these efforts must be repeated periodically for enduring benefits.

  6. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  7. Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Impacts World 2013, International Conference on Climate Change Effects, Potsdam, May 27-30 1 to integrate information and data on climate change and its impacts in a similar way for a number of sectors (climate, hydrology, ecosystems, agriculture, land use) among others through a web portal and integrated

  8. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  9. Digital Ecosystems: Evolving Service-Orientated Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optimisation technique inspired by natural ecosystems is presented, where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of services which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network, operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on evolutionary computing that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions to satisfy locally relevant constraints. Through this twofold process, the local search is accelerated and will yield better local optima, because the distributed optimisation already provides a good sampling of the search space by making use of computations already performed in other peers with similar constraints. We call this new distributed optimisation architecture a Digital Ecosystem, an Ecosystem Orientated Architecture (EOA) created by extending a Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) with Distributed Evolutionary Computing (DEC). The Digital Ecosystem will allow services to recombine and evolve over time, ...

  10. Ecosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , pollination Cultural: Aesthetic, spiritual, educational, recreational Security: personal safety, secureEcosystem services and human culture Judith Hanna (Social science principal specialist) Judith, happiness, social/community acceptance, recognition, etc) #12;Some problems: · ***What is `culture

  11. The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, C.

    to administer the project. Phase one of the project began in October 1999. During the initial meetings to begin planning the process of saltcedar removal, several major concerns emerged. First, the treatment method selected should provide a high rate...SR- 2004-01 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project Progress Report C. Hart Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University 1 2003 The Pecos River Ecosystem Project...

  12. Air pollutants effects on forest ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the effects of acid rain on forests. The conference was sponsored by the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP). Topics considered at the conference included the status of US research on acid deposition and its effects contributing factors to the decline of forests, evidence for effects on ecosystems, the effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems in North America and Europe, forest management, and future scientific research programs and management approaches.

  13. Economic Value of Ecosystem Services Provided by Agricultural Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demers, Nora Egan

    No reward for agricultural producers to provide ecosystem services 7 #12;Methods for Valuing Ecosystem's ecosystem service provision Contingent valuation: surveying people about their willingness-to-pay / accept in ecosystem service provision Replacement costs methods: costs of mitigating / replacing the service Factor

  14. World energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

  15. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  16. Complex Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Complex Dynamics Bernardo Da Costa, Koushik Ramachandran, Jingjing Qu, and I had a two semester learning seminar in complex analysis and potential ...

  17. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of all services for all FPZs combined. Table 1 includes only 5 of the 14 to 15 variables used to delineate FPZs in our river-typing methods, but these are sufficient to illustrate why ecosystem services should vary among FPZs. The first three.... Ecological Applications 13: 1762–1772. Loomis J, Kent P, Strange L, Fausch K, Covich A. 2000. Measuring the total economic value of restoring ecosystem services in an impaired river basin: Results from contingent valuation survey. Ecological Economics 33: 103...

  18. GEAR Tech-21 Hello World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    GEAR Tech-21 Hello World Throughout the activity, look for and record the definitions - Important Terms #12;GEAR Tech-21 Hello World Share what you did! What did you learn? Process what

  19. WCI - World Consensus Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert SouthwestTechnologies | Blandine Jerome VelenciaNews CareersStand by:VolunteerWorld

  20. GEAR Tech-21 Hello World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    GEAR Tech-21 Hello World 1 Established Goals Activity Outline Activity Timeline Equipment Needs and predictions that are based on data. At a Glance #12;GEAR Tech-21 Hello World 2 Key Knowledge and Skills;GEAR Tech-21 Hello World 3 Before the Session You must complete this activity before working with your

  1. World Biofuels Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alfstad,T.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report forms part of a project entitled 'World Biofuels Study'. The objective is to study world biofuel markets and to examine the possible contribution that biofuel imports could make to help meet the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The study was sponsored by the Biomass Program of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Department of Energy. It is a collaborative effort among the Office of Policy and International Affairs (PI), Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The project consisted of three main components: (1) Assessment of the resource potential for biofuel feedstocks such as sugarcane, grains, soybean, palm oil and lignocellulosic crops and development of supply curves (ORNL). (2) Assessment of the cost and performance of biofuel production technologies (NREL). (3) Scenario-based analysis of world biofuel markets using the ETP global energy model with data developed in the first parts of the study (BNL). This report covers the modeling and analysis part of the project conducted by BNL in cooperation with PI. The Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) energy system model was used as the analytical tool for this study. ETP is a 15 region global model designed using the MARKAL framework. MARKAL-based models are partial equilibrium models that incorporate a description of the physical energy system and provide a bottom-up approach to study the entire energy system. ETP was updated for this study with biomass resource data and biofuel production technology cost and performance data developed by ORNL and NREL under Tasks 1 and 2 of this project. Many countries around the world are embarking on ambitious biofuel policies through renewable fuel standards and economic incentives. As a result, the global biofuel demand is expected to grow very rapidly over the next two decades, provided policymakers stay the course with their policy goals. This project relied on a scenario-based analysis to study global biofuel markets. Scenarios were designed to evaluate the impact of different policy proposals and market conditions. World biofuel supply for selected scenarios is shown in Figure 1. The reference case total biofuel production increases from 12 billion gallons of ethanol equivalent in 2005 to 54 billion gallons in 2020 and 83 billion gallons in 2030. The scenarios analyzed show volumes ranging from 46 to 64 billion gallons in 2020, and from about 72 to about 100 billion gallons in 2030. The highest production worldwide occurs in the scenario with high feedstock availability combined with high oil prices and more rapid improvements in cellulosic biofuel conversion technologies. The lowest global production is found in the scenario with low feedstock availability, low oil prices and slower technology progress.

  2. Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

    Cycle 24 Dr. Longley gone to NPS Workshop 26 Surface H20 Environments . 31 Water Treatment Feb 2Pollution of Aquatic Ecosystems Spring 2006 Jan. 17 Introduction 19 Water Characteristics & Water Wastewater Treatment 7 Chlorination & other Treatment methods 9 San Marcos Treatment Plants tours 14 Species

  3. JIANGXIAO QIU Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    focus: Trade-offs and synergies among ecosystem services in an urbanizing agricultural landscape-Madison Project: NSF Water Sustainability and Climate (WSC)--Climate change, shifting land use, and urbanization Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Beijing China Thesis: Landscape pattern and urban morphology

  4. Soil as natural capital Ecosystem services and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    threats Decline in: Lead to: soil carbon soil erosion biological ac2 tool box Information on sustainable soil use incentives After Daiily et al 2009 "decision loop" #12;Soil is a natural capital Ecosystem services Nutrient retention Carbon storage Water retention

  5. ANTARCTIC CLIMATE & ECOSYSTEMS COOPERATIVE RESEARCH CENTRE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    , including economic damage or loss or injury to person or property, regardless of whether the Antarctic Centre Program. A U S T R A L I A ACE also has formal partnerships with the Department of the Environment be addressed to: The Manager Communications Antarctic Climate & Ecosystems Cooperative Research Centre Private

  6. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  7. Nuclear Weapons Complex reconfiguration study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortly after assuming duties as Secretary of Energy, I reviewed the Nuclear Weapons Complex Modernization Report'' submitted to the Congress in January 1989 as required by the National Defense Authorization Act of 1988 and 1989. My review showed that several of the report's assumptions needed to be re-evaluated. During this eighteen-month review, dramatic world changes forced further reassessments of the future Nuclear Weapons Complex. These changes are reflected in the new report. The new report presents a plan to achieve a reconfigured complex, called Complex-21. Complex-21 would be smaller, less diverse, and less expensive to operated than the Complex of today. Complex-21 would be able to safely and reliability support nuclear deterrent stockpile objectives set forth by the President and funded by the Congress. It would be consistent with realities of the emerging international security environment and flexible enough to accommodate the likely range of deterrent contingencies. In addition, Complex-21 would be constructed and operated to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local laws, regulations, and orders. Achieving Complex-21 will require significant resources. This report provides and organized approach toward selecting the most appropriate configuration for Complex-21, satisfying environmental requirements, and minimizing costs. The alternative -- to continue to use piecemeal fixes to run an antiquated complex -- will be more expensive and provide a less reliable Nuclear Weapons Complex. As a consequence, implementation of the Complex-21 plan is considered necessary to ensure continued viability of our nuclear deterrent.

  8. Use of partner agents in training systems for complex tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Joseph Michael

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex tasks are an important part of the world today, but training people to perform complex tasks is difficult. These kinds of tasks usually have variable cognitive loads on the trainee, and, once trained, different people have different...

  9. Scientists from around the world use Fermilab's particle accelerator complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear Physics (NP)DataScientistScientists

  10. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  11. The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Value of New Jersey's Ecosystem Services and Natural Capital Robert Costanza Matthew Wilson services are are mainly provided by ecosystems. Examples of ecosystem services ("ecoservices") include of ecoservices in a variety of locations using a variety of valuation methods and applies them to New Jersey

  12. White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    1 White Space Ecosystem: A Secondary Network Operator's Perspective Yuan Luo, Lin Gao, and Jianwei Huang Abstract--The successful deployment of a TV white space network requires the coordination-users), which form the White Space Ecosystem. In this paper, we study the white space ecosystem from

  13. RESEARCH ARTICLE Response of an aridland ecosystem to interannual climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on ecosystem structure and function. In the south- western US, interactions among regional climate drivers (e drivers strongly affect the distribution and composition of ecosystems worldwide. Indeed, potential to which increased climate variability will affect ecosystem processes requires long-term analysis

  14. Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcilwain, Jenny

    of U.S. and international coral reef ecosystems. The CRCA also required that the National OceanicStatus of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam By Val Porter, Trina Leberer, Mike Gawel, Jay Gutierrez Marine Laboratory Technical Report No. 113 October 2005 #12;Status of the Coral Reef Ecosystems of Guam

  15. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  16. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  17. SUSTAINABLE RESERVOIR OPERATION: CAN WE GENERATE HYDROPOWER AND PRESERVE ECOSYSTEM VALUES?y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Henriette I.

    and to quantify these relationships, (2) develop valuation methods to assess the total value of river health operation; hydropower; sustainability; riverine ecosystems; ecological valuation; natural flow regime, influence the health of the downstream ecosystem. Healthy riverine ecosystems provide ecosystem services

  18. Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production, and Tradeoffs at Landscape Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Modeling Multiple Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity Conservation, Commodity Production ECOSYSTEM SERVICES_ 4 o Modeling multiple ecosystem services, biodiversity conservation, commodity tradeoff between biodiversity conservation and J?l ecosystem services. Scenarios involving more development

  19. THE YEAR IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, 2009 Mapping and Valuing Ecosystem Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    society through unaccounted-for ecosystem services. A major challenge in mov- ing to a more ecosystem

  20. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  1. Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  2. Building a World of Difference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Waste?to?Energy Roadmapping Workshop Building a World of Difference Presentation by Patricia Scanlan, Director of Residuals Treatment Technologies, Black & Veatch

  3. Monsoons in a warming and more populous world: the question of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -largest killer #12;What Accounts for the Rise? · More people · Many ecosystems are now so frayed to the more disaster-prone coastal zones · More than œ the world's people will soon be living in cities ­ Many in the 1990's ­ 45% were in Asia ­ 30% in US ­ 10% in Europe · Human impact ­ 2 billion people affected ­ 400

  4. Effects of complex effluents on photosynthesis in Lake Erie and Lake Huron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bridgham, S.D.; McNaught, D.C.; Meadows, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phytoplankton are the base of the food chain in most large lake ecosystems; if affected by environmental pollutants, significant ecosystem changes can result with potential impact on higher trophic levels. The research determined the effects of a complex effluent discharge from the River Raisin in Monroe County, Michigan, on the Lake Erie ecosystem. The river flows through southern Michigan and has large nutrient and industrial inputs, especially in the Monroe Harbor area. The functional parameters measured were bacterial uptake rate of acetate, zooplankton feeding and reproduction rates, and primary production. The results of the effects of complex effluents on gross photosynthesis, measured as carbon-14 ((14)C) uptake, are presented in the paper.

  5. Physics World Archive Topological insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannesson, Henrik

    Physics World Archive Topological insulators Charles Kane, Joel Moore From Physics World February, how- ever, now uncovered a new electronic phase called a topological insulator. Putting the name; this "spin current" is a milestone in the realization of practical "spintronics". Topological insulators have

  6. WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL AND OIL UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR · FISH ON OF FISH MEAL AND OIL , ESPECIALLY DUR ING 1953 TO 1959, THE PRI NC IPAL MARKET S FOR THE PRODUCTS- DICATE WHAT IS INCLUDED BESIDES FISHMEAL AND FISH BODY OIL. #12;WORLD PRODUCTION AND TRADE IN FISH MEAL

  7. SECOND WORLD WAR THE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    RECORD OF SERVICE SECOND WORLD WAR THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA VANCOUVER #12;IN MEMORIAM #12$,T'r 113a,. #12;#12;RECORD OF SERVICE IN THE SECOND WORLD WAR THEUNIVERSITY OF BRITISHCOLUMBIA A Supplement to the University of British Columbia War Memorial Manuscript Record. Vancouver, Canada, 1955. #12;Printed

  8. Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Engineering Insights 2006 Complex Fluids Design Consortium (CFDC) www.mrl.ucsb.edu/cfdc Overview;Engineering Insights 2006 Objectives -- continued · Create a world-class center for complex fluid and soft and Research Highlights Glenn Fredrickson October 18, 2006 #12;Engineering Insights 2006 What is the CFDC

  9. Validating agent based models through virtual worlds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakkaraju, Kiran; Whetzel, Jonathan H.; Lee, Jina [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA; Bier, Asmeret Brooke; Cardona-Rivera, Rogelio E. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC; Bernstein, Jeremy Ray Rhythm [Gaikai, Inc., Aliso Viejo, CA

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the US continues its vigilance against distributed, embedded threats, understanding the political and social structure of these groups becomes paramount for predicting and dis- rupting their attacks. Agent-based models (ABMs) serve as a powerful tool to study these groups. While the popularity of social network tools (e.g., Facebook, Twitter) has provided extensive communication data, there is a lack of ne-grained behavioral data with which to inform and validate existing ABMs. Virtual worlds, in particular massively multiplayer online games (MMOG), where large numbers of people interact within a complex environ- ment for long periods of time provide an alternative source of data. These environments provide a rich social environment where players engage in a variety of activities observed between real-world groups: collaborating and/or competing with other groups, conducting battles for scarce resources, and trading in a market economy. Strategies employed by player groups surprisingly re ect those seen in present-day con icts, where players use diplomacy or espionage as their means for accomplishing their goals. In this project, we propose to address the need for ne-grained behavioral data by acquiring and analyzing game data a commercial MMOG, referred to within this report as Game X. The goals of this research were: (1) devising toolsets for analyzing virtual world data to better inform the rules that govern a social ABM and (2) exploring how virtual worlds could serve as a source of data to validate ABMs established for analogous real-world phenomena. During this research, we studied certain patterns of group behavior to compliment social modeling e orts where a signi cant lack of detailed examples of observed phenomena exists. This report outlines our work examining group behaviors that underly what we have termed the Expression-To-Action (E2A) problem: determining the changes in social contact that lead individuals/groups to engage in a particular behavior. Results from our work indicate that virtual worlds have the potential for serving as a proxy in allocating and populating behaviors that would be used within further agent-based modeling studies.

  10. arctic ecosystems dominated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by: Arctic Institute of North America Stable URL: http Vermont, University of 7 Improved Climate Prediction through a System Level Understanding of Arctic Terrestrial Ecosystems...

  11. arctic marine ecosystem: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Bamboung marine protected area social-ecosystem. Key words Social-ecological system, climate Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 6 Perfluoroalkyl Contaminants in an Arctic Marine...

  12. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  13. Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isbell, Forest Isaac

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species interactions,… (more)

  14. Processes that influence biodiversity, ecosystem functioning, and stability in grasslands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isbell, Forest Isaac

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Biodiversity is rapidly declining worldwide, and this may lead to subsequent declines in ecosystem functioning and stability. Here I consider whether: (i) stabilizing species… (more)

  15. Figure 4. World Oil Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. World Oil Prices" " (2007 dollars per barrel)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,2029,2030...

  16. World Air Transport Sustainability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statement · Develop a quantitative model to assess the carbon footprint of world aviation, including #12;15 Alternative Fuels ­ Data Required · For each major pathway, we require life-cycle CO2 footprint

  17. At Work in The World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, Paul D. MD; Dolan, Brian PhD

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    history of one particular smelter, I also suggest that muchdeveloping world. Few lead smelters were less seen by theAlice Hamilton visited smelters in Arizona and Missouri, she

  18. The world price of coal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant increase in the seaborne trade for coal over the past twenty years has unified formerly separate coal markets into a world market in which prices move in tandem. Due to its large domestic market, the United ...

  19. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William [Harvard University, SEAS] (ORCID:0000000210428452); Foster, David R. [Harvard University, Harvard Forest; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University, OEB

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  20. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  1. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  2. DECISION-MAKING AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    options is reviewed and applied to ecosystem-based management. The model recommends a public decision process unless developing new alternatives is not possible, in which case segmented public consultation question involves the kind of public participation strategy to use. For ecosystem-based management to reach

  3. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  4. A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    A Serpentinite-Hosted Ecosystem: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field Deborah S. Kelley,1 * Jeffrey A. Baross,1 Roger E. Summons,7 Sean P. Sylva4 The serpentinite-hosted Lost City hydrothermal field is a remarkable submarine ecosystem in which geological, chemical, and biological processes are intimately

  5. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 4934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  6. Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Ecology and Restoration of Invaded Ecosystems FOR 6934 (3 credits) Spring 2014 Course Description This advanced ecosystem management course will begin with an overview of the ecological basis for plant in ecology and applied plant science, graduate students in the Masters of Science, Ecological Restoration

  7. CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    CSPH 3101: ECOSYSTEMS OF WELLBEING UMORE Park Design Plan Envision a Dynamic Community of Wellbeing for innovation that can be exported outside of its boundaries. Umore Park: Ecosystems of Infrastructure it every day in the form of roads, buildings, power lines, stoplights, energy plants, water pipes, when

  8. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  9. EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EXPLORING ABORIGINAL FORESTRY AND ECOSYSTEM-BASED MANAGEMENT: A CASE STUDY OF COWICHAN TRIBES of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Exploring Aboriginal Forestry and Ecosystem-based Management aboriginal forestry will be required. First Nations share a common desire for control over their forest

  10. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  11. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  12. Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis Jr., William M.

    213 Introduction Hall and Tank (2005) present estimates of ecosystem metab- olism for Giltner in the estimation of ecosystem metabolism by open-channel methods (McCutchan et al. 2002; Hall and Tank 2005). To estimate metabolism in Giltner Spring Creek, Hall and Tank (2005) employ a mass-balance equation

  13. Accelerating Materials Discovery With World's Largest Database...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expanding the World's Largest Database of Elastic Properties Expanding the World's Largest Database of Elastic Properties NERSC, Materials Project Help Scientists Increase...

  14. Tourism destinations as digital business ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baggio, Rodolfo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tourism has been experiencing very relevant changes since when Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), in all their forms, have started to pervade the industry and the market. In the last decade, a new concept gained the attention of both researchers and practitioners, that of Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE). It can be considered as a technological infrastructure aimed at creating a digital environment to support and enhance networking between enterprises and stakeholders operating within a sector. Aim of this paper is to assess the extent to which the technological connection has affected the structural configuration of the tourism system and, specifically, of tourism destinations. The present study argues that two components can be considered when assessing the relationships among stakeholders within a tourism destination: a real and a virtual one. Further it shows how these two components are structurally strongly coupled and co-evolve forming a single system.

  15. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  16. Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Doug

    Principal Paper Sessions Cultivating Ecosystem Services from Agriculture (Scott M. Swinton, Michigan State University, Organizer) ECOSYSTEM SERVICES FROM AGRICULTURE: LOOKING BEYOND THE USUAL. The lens is especially revealing when applied to agriculture, the most widespread managed ecosystem

  17. Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    1 Running Head: Ecosystem Energy and Conservation1 2 Ecosystem Energy as a Framework energy levels as a strategic framework to help identify conservation priorities and22 those management of three energy levels to achieve conservation objectives. The24 #12;2 geographic distribution of each

  18. Modeled Interactive Effects of Precipitation, temperature, and [CO2] on Ecosystem Carbon and Water Dynamics in Different Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Gerten, Dieter [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Le Maire, Guerric [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Parton, William [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Zhou, Xuhuui [University of Oklahoma; Keough, Cindy [University of Colorado, Fort Collins; Beier, Claus [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Cramer, Wolfgang [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Dukes, Jeff [University of Massachusetts, Boston; Emmett, Bridget [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bangor, Gwynedd, United Kingdom; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Knapp, Alan [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Linder, Sune [Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Upsalla, Sweden; Nepstad, Daniel [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Rustad, Lindsey [USDA Forest Service

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactive effects of multiple global change factors on ecosystem processes are complex. It is relatively expensive to explore those interactions in manipulative experiments. We conducted a modeling analysis to identify potentially important interactions and to stimulate hypothesis formulation for experimental research. Four models were used to quantify interactive effects of climate warming (T), altered precipitation amounts [doubled (DP) and halved (HP)] and seasonality (SP, moving precipitation in July and August to January and February to create summer drought), and elevated [CO2] (C) on net primary production (NPP), heterotrophic respiration (Rh), net ecosystem production (NEP), transpiration, and runoff.We examined those responses in seven ecosystems, including forests, grasslands, and heathlands in different climate zones. The modeling analysis showed that none of the threeway interactions among T, C, and altered precipitation was substantial for either carbon or water processes, nor consistent among the seven ecosystems. However, two-way interactive effects on NPP, Rh, and NEP were generally positive (i.e. amplification of one factor s effect by the other factor) between T and C or between T and DP. A negative interaction (i.e. depression of one factor s effect by the other factor) occurred for simulated NPP between T and HP. The interactive effects on runoff were positive between T and HP. Four pairs of two-way interactive effects on plant transpiration were positive and two pairs negative. In addition, wet sites generally had smaller relative changes in NPP, Rh, runoff, and transpiration but larger absolute changes in NEP than dry sites in response to the treatments. The modeling results suggest new hypotheses to be tested in multifactor global change experiments. Likewise, more experimental evidence is needed for the further improvement of ecosystem models in order to adequately simulate complex interactive processes.

  19. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  20. Reduced diurnal temperature range does not change warming impacts on ecosystem carbon balance of Mediterranean grassland mesocosms

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Phillips, Claire L. [TERA; Gregg, Jillian W. [TERA; Wilson, John K. [TERA

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Daily minimum temperature (Tmin) has increased faster than daily maximum temperature (Tmax) in many parts of the world, leading to decreases in diurnal temperature range (DTR). Projections suggest these trends are likely to continue in many regions, particularly northern latitudes and in arid regions. Despite wide speculation that asymmetric warming has different impacts on plant and ecosystem production than equal-night-and-day warming, there has been little direct comparison of these scenarios. Reduced DTR has also been widely misinterpreted as a result of night-only warming, when in fact Tmin occurs near dawn, indicating higher morning as well as night temperatures. We report on the first experiment to examine ecosystem-scale impacts of faster increases in Tmin than Tmax, using precise temperature controls to create realistic diurnal temperature profiles with gradual day-night temperature transitions and elevated early morning as well as night temperatures. Studying a constructed grassland ecosystem containing species native to Oregon, USA, we found the ecosystem lost more carbon at elevated than ambient temperatures, but was unaffected by the 3șC difference in DTR between symmetric warming (constantly ambient +3.5șC) and asymmetric warming (dawn Tmin=ambient +5șC, afternoon Tmax= ambient +2șC). Reducing DTR had no apparent effect on photosynthesis, likely because temperatures were most different in the morning and late afternoon when light was low. Respiration was also similar in both warming treatments, because respiration temperature sensitivity was not sufficient to respond to the limited temperature differences between asymmetric and symmetric warming. We concluded that changes in daily mean temperatures, rather than changes in Tmin/Tmax, were sufficient for predicting ecosystem carbon fluxes in this reconstructed Mediterranean grassland system.

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for survival. Aquatic ecosystems consist of living organisms together... filled with rainwater, and is trans- formed from an aquatic ecosystem into a terrestrial one when......

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems final Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ECOSYSTEMS JOINT MODULE WITH UNIVERSITY OF COSTA RICA Summary: environments Fresh Water Ecosystems Aquatic policies Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Spanish Terrestrial... and...

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - animal ecosystem engineers Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the approach with regards to ecosystem engineering... in an engineered ecosystem (e.g., water purification, biomass production, etc.). In the short term, the objective......

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - anthropogenic ecosystem perturbations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes and functions How do we define and quantify relationships between biodiversity, ecosystem function and Summary: biodiversity, ecosystem function and services at...

  5. The FPGA Hello World Example Martin Schoeberl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoeberl, Martin

    The FPGA Hello World Example Martin Schoeberl martin@jopdesign.com August 4, 2006 1 Introduction `Hello World' example. What is the `Hello World' program in hardware, in an FPGA? The smallest project entity. In our case hello world 3. In the next dialog box the VHDL source files can be added

  6. Tore Bruland Building World Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tore Bruland Building World Event Representations From Linguistic Representations Thesis of Computer and Information Science c Tore Bruland ISBN 978-82-471-2 (printed version) ISBN 978-82-471-4292-9 (electronic version) ISSN 1503-8181 Doctoral thesis at NTNU, 2013:97 #12;For Kari Marie Bruland (1937

  7. Curating the CIA World Factbook 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buneman, Peter; Müller, Heiko; Rusbridge, Chris

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in danger of losing this history. This paper investigates the issues involved in capturing the history of an evolving database and its application to the CIA World Factbook. In particular it shows that there is substantial added value to be gained...

  8. World Oil: Market or Mayhem?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world oil market is regarded by many as a puzzle. Why are oil prices so volatile? What is OPEC and what does OPEC do? Where are oil prices headed in the long run? Is “peak oil” a genuine concern? Why did oil prices ...

  9. SOFTWAREENGINEERING The World Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitehead, James

    SOFTWAREENGINEERING The World Wide Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning working group on the Web. WEBDAV: IETF Standard for Collaborative Authoring on the Web E. JAMES WHITEHEAD, JR. University remains to be done. What if instead you could simply edit Web documents (or any Web resource) in place

  10. 3D World Building System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  11. 3D World Building System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This video provides an overview of the Sandia National Laboratories developed 3-D World Model Building capability that provides users with an immersive, texture rich 3-D model of their environment in minutes using a laptop and color and depth camera.

  12. The world`s first commercial iron carbide plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prichard, L.C.; Schad, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper traces the development of Nucor`s investigation of clean iron unit processes, namely, direct reduction, and the decision to build and operate the world`s first commercial iron carbide plant. They first investigated coal based processes since the US has abundant coal reserves, but found a variety of reasons for dropping the coal-based processes from further consideration. A natural gas based process was selected, but the failure to find economically priced gas supplies stopped the development of a US based venture. It was later found that Trinidad had economically priced and abundant supplies of natural gas, and the system of government, the use of English language, and geographic location were also ideal. The cost estimates required modification of the design, but the plant was begun in April, 1993. Start-up problems with the plant are also discussed. Production should commence shortly.

  13. Evolutionary Dynamics of Complex Networks: Theory, Methods and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbasi, Alireza; Wigand, Rolf T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose new direction to understanding evolutionary dynamics of complex networks using two different types of collaboration networks: academic collaboration networks; and, disaster collaboration networks. The results show that academic collaboration network has all properties of small-world networks and can be considered a real small-world network with the result of its structural analysis maybe being extendable for other real-networks who share the common grounds of small-world properties.

  14. Managing Complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Posse, Christian; Malard, Joel M.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today’s most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically-based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This paper explores the state of the art in the use physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and to deriving stable and robust control strategies for them. In particular we review and discussion applications of some analytic methods based on the thermodynamic metaphor according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood.

  15. arctic ecosystem final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FROST-BOIL ECOSYSTEMS A PROJECT SUMMARY The central goal of this project to changing climate. We focus on frost-boils because: (1) The processes that are involved in the self...

  16. Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Incorporating Representation of Agricultural Ecosystems and Management Within IBIS: The development of Agro-IBIS Chris Kucharik Department of Agronomy & Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment balance Soil and canopy physics Leaf physiology Minutes Phenology Budburst, senescence, dormancy Daily

  17. Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 Larry D. Bryant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livestock Management in the Riparian Ecosystem1 2 Larry D. Bryant (' Abstract.--Intensive, long at the North American Conference tthe University of Arizona, ~n, April 16-18, 1985]. Larry D. Bryant

  18. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  19. agro-ecosystems caratterizzazione biologica: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems Physics Websites Summary: Predicting and...

  20. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  1. California Water Policy Seminar Series Reconciling Ecosystem And Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    ; Hap Dunning and Richard Frank, UC Davis School of Law Feb. 24 Farms, floods, fowl and fish on the Yolo, Yolo County; others TBA Mar. 10 Science and ecosystem reconciliation for the Delta. Peter Goodwin

  2. STUART E.G. FINDLAY Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and K.A. Kuehn. 2002. Microbial growth and nitrogen retention in litter of Phragmites australis.M. Groffman and S. Dye. 2003. Trade-offs among ecosystem functions during restoration: Phragmites removal from

  3. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  4. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  5. 3D Corporate Tourism in the Marine Sciences: Application-Oriented Problem Solving in Marine and Coastal Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gebeshuber, Ille Christine; Esichaikul, Ranee; Macqueen, Mark; Majlis, Burhanuddin Yeop

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3D corporate tourism in the marine sciences is a solution-based approach to innovation in science, engineering and design. Corporate international scientists, engineers and designers work with local experts in Malaysian marine and coastal environments: they jointly discover, develop and design complex materials and designs inspired by nature directly on site (e.g. at the UKM Marine Ecosystem Research Centre EKOMAR and Malaysian Marine Parks) and construct initial biomimetic prototypes and novel designs. Thereby, new links, networks and collaborations are established between communities of thinkers in different countries. 3D tourism aims at mapping new frontiers in emerging engineering and design fields. This provides a novel way to foster and promote innovative thinking in the sciences, and considers the need for synergy and collaboration between marine sciences, engineering and design rather than segmentation and isolation. With the concept of 3D corporate tourism the potential of Malaysian marine ecosystems...

  6. Next Generation Lunch: Revealing the World’s First 3D Printed Car (text version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version for the Next Generation Lunch: Revealing the World’s First 3D Printed Car Video.

  7. Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napier, Terrence

    Infusing Real World Experiences into ENGINEERING EDUCATION #12;This project is a collaboration with the authors and NAE. #12;Infusing Real World Experiences into Engineering Education 2012 #12;2 Preface The aim

  8. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal Lane

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  9. Neal Lane: Science in a Flat World

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Neal Lane

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lane discusses the changes that have taken place in the world since World War II that have made it "flatter," referring to Thomas L. Friedman's book, The World is Flat. Friedman's main premise is that inexpensive telecommunications is bringing about unhampered international competition, the demise of economic stability, and a trend toward outsourcing services, such as computer programming, engineering and science research.

  10. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  11. Sequencing the fungal tree Terrestrial ecosystems host a complex array of interacting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbett, David S.

    with heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms alike, and play an integral and growing role in the development in three areas: plant health, biorefinery and fungal diversity. Plant health depends on interactions

  12. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  13. ENERGY CONTENT OF WORLD TRADE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gernot Wagner

    This paper constructs a comprehensive dataset of oil and total energy embedded in world trade of manufacturing goods for 73 countries from 1978 to 2000. Applying the data to debates on the dependency on foreign energy sources makes clear that achieving complete energy independence in the foreseeable future is unlikely to be feasible and may not be desirable. Applying it to the discussion of environmental Kuznets curves (EKCs) highlights an important distinction between production and consumption of energy. Richer countries use relatively less energy in their industrial production yet still consume relatively large amounts of energy indirectly. A further investigation largely excludes structural shifts of production in and out of the manufacturing sector as an explanation for the downward-sloping portion of the EKC. Country-level analyses add caveats but show tentative support for the cross-country conclusions.

  14. Stellar models in Brane Worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linares, Francisco X; Ureńa-Lopez, L Arturo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider here a full study of stellar dynamics from the brane-world point of view in the case of constant density and of a polytropic fluid. We start our study cataloguing the minimal requirements to obtain a compact object with a Schwarszchild exterior, highlighting the low and high energy limit, the boundary conditions, and the appropriate behavior of Weyl contributions inside and outside of the star. Under the previous requirements we show an extensive study of stellar behavior, starting with stars of constant density and its extended cases with the presence of nonlocal contributions. Finally, we focus our attention to more realistic stars with a polytropic equation of state, specially in the case of white dwarfs, and study their static configurations numerically. One of the main results is that the inclusion of the Weyl functions from braneworld models allow the existence of more compact configurations than within General Relativity.

  15. World Best Practice Energy Intensity Values for Selected Industrial Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Neelis, Maarten; Galitsky, Christina; Zhou, Nan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    world best practice energy intensity values for productionWorld best practice energy intensity values for productionWorld Best Practice Final Energy Intensity Values for Aluminium Production (

  16. Geothermal California: California Claims the World's Highest...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the World's Highest Geothermal Power Output with Potential for Even More Production With Advanced Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  17. Parallel Processing Letters World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Russ

    Parallel Processing Letters © World Scientific Publishing Company THE OPERATIONS DASHBOARD essential operational services, it is imperative that grid administrators can troubleshoot the problems

  18. RUNNING HEAD: A SCALED WORLD FOR APPLIED COGNITIVE RESEARCH Contending with complexity: Developing and Using a Scaled World in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Wayne

    submarine hiding in deep water. For Ned, we attempted to preserve the functional relationships inherent in deep water. Our trials and tribulations in analyzing this novel expertise are documented in Gray to the design of this workstation and is the goal of Project Nemo. This project has required a multi

  19. Neutrino telescopes in the World

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernenwein, J.-P. [GRPHE, Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino astronomy has rapidly developed these last years, being the only way to get specific and reliable information about astrophysical objects still poorly understood.Currently two neutrino telescopes are operational in the World: BAIKAL, in the lake of the same name in Siberia, and AMANDA, in the ices of the South Pole. Two telescopes of the same type are under construction in the Mediterranean Sea: ANTARES and NESTOR. All these telescopes belong to a first generation, with an instrumented volume smaller or equal to 0.02 km3. Also in the Mediterranean Sea, the NEMO project is just in its stag phase, within the framework of a cubic kilometer size neutrino telescope study. Lastly, the ICECUBE detector, with a volume reaching about 1 km3, is under construction on the site of AMANDA experiment, while an extension of the BAIKAL detector toward km3 is under study. We will present here the characteristics of these experiments, as well as the results of their observations.

  20. Valuing ecosystem services: A shadow price for net primary production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    , Boston University, Boston, MA 02215, United States c Center for Energy & Environmental Studies, Boston 2007 We analyze the contribution of ecosystem services to GDP and use this contribution to calculate production per unit output. The rate of technical substitution indicates that the quantity of capital needed

  1. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

  3. Fisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the Sierra National Forest, Fresno County, California, with fieldwork beginning in 1994 (Verner and Figure 1--The Kings River administrative study area in the Sierra National Forest in central California includesFisher Research and the Kings River Sustainable Forest Ecosystems Project: Current Results

  4. REVIEW PAPER Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering: A Review for Developing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    REVIEW PAPER Ecosystem Impacts of Geoengineering: A Review for Developing a Science Plan Lynn M September 2011 / Accepted: 31 January 2012 / Published online: 20 March 2012 Abstract Geoengineering methods and functioning in some regions. Two types of geoengineering activities that have been proposed are: carbon

  5. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    net C uptake by terrestrial Arctic ecosystems. Predicting the fate of permafrost- sequestered carbon of these changes in the carbon cycle will depend on climate-driven changes in Arctic biogeochemical, vegetation, and hydrological processes, creating a critical feedback loop. A goal of the NGEE project is to assess the CO2

  6. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  7. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I Graduate Education and Research Traineeship program € IGERT intends to € meet the challenges of educating U a cultural change in graduate education by establishing innovative new models for graduate education

  8. Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Regional Management of Mediterranean Ecosystems in Spain1 Jose A. Carrera, Estanislao de Simon Conservacion de la Naturaleza), Madrid, Spain. Abstract: Management of the fragile and greatly modified level studies on reforestation, hydrol- ogy, and desert control. Most of Spain has a typical

  9. BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 371, Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems Spring 2007 Credit: 3 hours Catalogue description: This is an introduction to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the roles interactions among hydrology, ecology, biogeochemistry, and human activities. This course focuses on surface and near

  10. BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    BEE 3710: Syllabus Spring 2013 01/21/13 Physical Hydrology for Ecosystems BEE 3710 www.hydrology: Physical Hydrology, second edition. S. Lawrence Dingman. 2002. Prentice Hall. pp. 600. Meeting: TR 9 to fundamental hydrology emphasizing physical hydrological processes and the interactions among hydrology

  11. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 16 .06.2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    desertification process; B) May affect economic and social resilience and further sustainable socio-economic right and organizations 5. Economic mechanisms of Self- governing Organizations "Green Gold" pasture to the changing conditions. "Green Gold" pasture ecosystem management programme 8 Community Development Processes

  12. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  13. Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Sensors for ecology Towards integrated knowledge of ecosystems CNRS Institut Ă?cologie et scales. This book provides an overview of current sensors for ecology and makes a strong case of practical ecological applications, this text is meant to be an invaluable resource for students, researchers

  14. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  15. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and afterTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute Sciences/US Department of Agriculture, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164, USA; 4 USDA

  16. Seasonal patterns in energy partitioning of two freshwater marsh ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). The study period included several wet and dry seasons and variable water levels, allowing us to gain better and affect the magnitude of seasonal change in water levels through water loss as LE (evapotranspiration (ET that produce considerable variation in the hydrologic cycle, affecting nutrient delivery, ecosystem primary

  17. Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    RESEARCH PAPER Climate change-induced shifts in fire for Mediterranean ecosystems Enric Batllori1 Climate change, climate uncertainty, fire-climate relationship, fire shifts, Mediterranean biome Mediterranean biome and identify potential shifts in fire activity under an ensemble of global climate

  18. Fire and Thinning Effects on Mixed-Conifer Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North, Malcolm

    for low-intensity underburns but is now estimated to be over 600 years. · Tree density has dramatically out of a key question raised in the Sierra Nevada Ecosystem Project: Critical Findings Section, 1996. · Old-growth has fairly stable carbon and nutrient pools. · Old forest conditions are often what

  19. Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance A. Mansour*1 of the most up-to-date innovations in sensor technology and sensor networks, our current project should as well as the second phase of the project which consists in analyzing living underwater micro

  20. Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    Functional consequences of realistic biodiversity changes in a marine ecosystem Matthew E. S, 2007) Declines in biodiversity have prompted concern over the conse- quences of species loss the functional consequences of realistic, nonrandom changes in biodiversity. Instead, most designs have used

  1. Restoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rey Benayas, José María

    , explicitly link the conservation of biodiversity with the provision of ecosys- tem services to support services might be at the expense of biodiversity conservation [8,9], whereas others have suggestedRestoration of ecosystem services and biodiversity: conflicts and opportunities James M. Bullock1

  2. Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and enjoying traction in places where ethical argu- ments for biodiversity conservation are given short shriftEditorial Ecosystem-Service Science and the Way Forward for Conservation Conservation biology began life as a crisis discipline, its central tenet to understand and help reverse losses of biodiversity

  3. Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂŒhlemann, Oliver

    Methane in lakes and wetlands Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance LAKES AND WETLANDS ­ A RELEVANT METHANE SOURCE Lakes and other wetlands are an important source of methane, the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. However, the absolute contribution

  4. Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating ecosystem processes in willow short rotation coppice bioenergy plantations R E B E C C and lit- ter decomposition varied between Short Rotation Coppice (SRC) willow bioenergy plantations., 2009). Willow (Salix spp) short rotation coppice (SRC) is one of the most widely planted second

  5. Original article Nutrient cycling in deciduous forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Castanea sativa chestnut coppice located in the Sierra de Gata mountains (Cen- tral System, western Spain coppice lie in the fact that in the latter ecosystem potentially more N, P, K, Mg, Na and Mn return). Additionally, the relative importance of some bioelements (N, P, K and Mn) in the chestnut coppice is different

  6. Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Dispersants Forum: Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill & Ecosystem Science Conference What have we & Restoration, Gulf of Mexico Disaster Response Center 2.3. Characterizing Dispersant and Dispersed Oil Effects The content for this workshop was developed in cooperation with the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (Go

  7. ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 Failing or nearby septic tank systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    ECOSYSTEM COMPONENT CHARACTERIZATION 461 · Failing or nearby septic tank systems · Exfiltration from sanitary sewers in poor repair · Leaking underground storage tanks and pipes · Landfill seepage or natural environment Leaks from underground storage tanks and pipes are a common source of soil

  8. Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Gary A.

    Restoring Stream Ecosystems: Lessons from a Midwestern State Ashley H. Moerke1,2 and Gary A. Lamberti1 Abstract Reach-scale stream restorations are becoming a common approach to repair degraded and nature of reach-scale stream restorations in this midwestern U.S. state. For 10 attempted restorations

  9. Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Luther

    Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

  10. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  11. Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    Ecosystem recovery after climatic extremes enhanced by genotypic diversity Thorsten B. H. Reusch with such climatic extremes is a question central to contem- porary ecology and biodiversity conservation. Previous, and it may buffer against extreme climatic events. In a manipulative field experiment, increasing

  12. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes. Nilsson and J. Svensson Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences Sweden 1. Introduction Wetlands filters in the landscape. Many kinds of wetlands and peatlands can be found, each with a particular

  13. Development and application of mass-balanced ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beas, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological network models for kelp forest ecosystems . . 1.23 Ecosystem-wide e?ects of giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera,3.2.6 Characterization of giant kelp biomass density

  14. Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Energy balance and partition in Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems with different land use types surface, including radiation balance, energy partitioning, aerodynamic characteristics, leaf area index records of the surface energy balance are currently available for grassland ecosystems, especially

  15. Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobos, Douglas Russell

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    and seasonal carbon cycles in these ecosystems as well as the response of these systems to environmental change. One convenient method for continuously measuring CER in remote ecosystems is tower-based conditional sampling. With conditional sampling, CER...

  16. SciTech Connect: Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Synthesis of Scrub-Oak Ecosystem Responses to Elevated CO2 This report...

  17. Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Matthew B.

    Community Page A Holistic Approach to Marine Eco-Systems Biology Eric Karsenti1 *, Silvia G. Acinas-year study of the global ocean ecosystem aboard the ship Tara. A unique sampling programme encompass

  18. Methane in lakes and wetlands -Microbiological production, ecosystem uptake, climatological significance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MĂŒhlemann, Oliver

    1 Methane in lakes and wetlands - Microbiological production, ecosystem ZĂŒrcher, Fortunat Joos Global methane emissions from wet ecosystems 9:50 - 10 Were tropical wetlands C4-dominated during the glacial? A view from methane

  19. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pollution of coastal watersheds can have far-reaching effects on marine ecosystems, for example, the Gulf of Mexico ‘‘

  20. BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    BIOTROPICA 28(4a): 414-423 1996 Introduction: Disturbance and Caribbean Ecosystems1 Jess K in Caribbean ecosystems. Most (11) of the articles describe the responses of Caribbean forests to hurricane of the comparative responses of Caribbean ecosystems to different disturbances. Finally, we identify those areas

  1. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened 25 years ago of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

  2. GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY -ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousseau, Timothy A.

    GLOBAL CHANGE ECOLOGY - ORIGINAL RESEARCH Ecosystems effects 25 years after Chernobyl: pollinators, pollinator abundance, fruit abundance and abundance of frugivores. Given that the Chernobyl disaster happened of a suppressed pollinator community on ecosystem functioning. Keywords Chernobyl Á Ecosystem functioning Á Fruits

  3. Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    Utilization of Biomass in Mediterranean-Type Ecosystems: A Summary and Synthesis1 C. Eugene Conrad of Mediterranean- type ecosystems to supply biomass as a supplemen- tal source of energy is a natural result to less than 25° C. Also, wet-season precip- itation approaches 1000 mm. Biomass from such ecosystems

  4. This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

  5. A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    , and on topics related to urban ecosystem services and their valuation. This conference will once again provideACES 2014 A Community on Ecosystem Services Linking Science, Practice and Decision Making December, DC, USA 1 Welcome to ACES 2014! On behalf of A Community on Ecosystem Services (ACES) and our

  6. Estimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fried, Jeremy S.

    Keywords: Ecosystem services Economic valuation Hedonic pricing Spatial econometrics a b s t r a c t A need. These include production function methods in which an ecosystem service or amenity is viewed as an inputEstimating the economic value of cultural ecosystem services in an urbanizing area using hedonic

  7. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    , such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

  8. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  9. CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a , Anthony C. Delany a , Steven P; accepted 15 February 2007 Abstract CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2- rich air was transported downslope

  10. Technology Entrepreneurship Program Real-world practice with real-world technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technology Entrepreneurship Program Real-world practice with real-world technologies What it's all about Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Technology Entrepreneurship Program (TEP) provides university students with access to PNNL-developed available technologies. Laboratory staff work

  11. The Brave New World of Buckytubes

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Richard Smalley

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a talk titled "The Brave New World of Buckytubes," Smalley discusses the basic science underlying the exotic chemical and physical properties, as well as the methods of production, purification, analysis, and assembly of buckytubes for solving real-world technological problems.

  12. HISTORY 483 THE FIRST WORLD WAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    HISTORY 483 THE FIRST WORLD WAR Summer 2012 Saturday 9:00 ­ 14:30 ST139 Instructor: Paul Ramsey By far the most significant event of the twentieth century the legacy of the First World War continues, military, social, and economic spheres of the war ­ and the concept of `total war'. Students

  13. Decentralized Probabilistic World Modeling with Cooperative Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Steven

    the multimodal sensing capabilities of modern personal devices, such a probabilistic world model can in the form of personal devices such as advanced mobile phones. Indeed, on a world-wide scale, the number of mobile phones now exceeds the number of more traditional computing devices such as PCs. These personal

  14. Constructing an n-dimensional cell complex from a soup of (n -1)-dimensional faces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    a dimension independent algorithm to build an n-dimensional cellular complex with linear geometries from itsConstructing an n-dimensional cell complex from a soup of (n - 1)-dimensional faces Ken Arroyo in the use of higher-dimensional (>3D) digital objects in GIS that are built from complex real-world data

  15. Travel and tourism: Into a complex network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguens, J I L

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is discussed how the worldwide tourist arrivals, about 10% of world's domestic product, form a largely heterogeneous and directed complex network. Remarkably the random network of connectivity is converted into a scale-free network of intensities. The importance of weights on network connections is brought into discussion. It is also shown how strategic positioning particularly benefit from market diversity and that interactions among countries prevail on a technological and economic pattern, questioning the backbones of traveling driving forces.

  16. Designed ecosystem services: application of ecological principles in wastewater treatment engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.; Smith, Val H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatment processes around the world. (a) Sewage stabilization ponds in Brazil. (b) Complex lagoon and stabilization pond treatment system in France. (c) Anaerobic digesters in England. (d) Trickling bio-filter bed (viewed from the side) in Canada. (e...) Conventional wastewater treatment plant digestion in the US, including primary treatment, secondary treatment, secondary clarifiers, and solids. (a) C ou rte sy of TP Cu rti s (b) C ou rte sy of Ec os ite ź (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) DW Graham and VH Smith...

  17. Designed ecosystem services: application of ecological principles in wastewater treatment engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, David W.; Smith, Val H.

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    treatment processes around the world. (a) Sewage stabilization ponds in Brazil. (b) Complex lagoon and stabilization pond treatment system in France. (c) Anaerobic digesters in England. (d) Trickling bio-filter bed (viewed from the side) in Canada. (e...) Conventional wastewater treatment plant digestion in the US, including primary treatment, secondary treatment, secondary clarifiers, and solids. (a) C ou rte sy of TP Cu rti s (b) C ou rte sy of Ec os ite ź (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) DW Graham and VH Smith...

  18. Africa gaining importance in world LPG trade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haun, R.R. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Otto, K.W.; Whitley, S.C. [Purvin and Gertz Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Major LPG projects planned or under way in Africa will increase the importance of that region`s presence in world LPG trade. Supplies will nearly double between 1995 and 2005, at which time they will remain steady for at least 10 years. At the same time that exports are leveling, however, increasing domestic demand for PG is likely to reduce export-market participation by Algeria, Nigeria, Egypt, and Libya. The growth of Africa`s participation in world LPG supply is reflected in comparisons for the next 15--20 years. Total world supply of LPG in 1995 was about 165 million metric tons (tonnes), of which Africans share was 7.8 million tonnes. By 2000, world supply will grow to slightly more than 200 million tonnes, with Africa`s share expected to increase to 13.2 million tonnes (6.6%). And by 2005, world LPG supply will reach nearly 230 million tonnes; Africa`s overall supply volumes by that year will be nearly 16.2 million tonnes (7%). World LPG supply for export in 1995 was on order of 44 million tonnes with Africa supply about 4 million tonnes (9%). By 2005, world export volumes of LPG will reach nearly 70 million tonnes; Africa`s share will have grown by nearly 10 million tonnes (14.3%).

  19. Changing patterns of world energy consumption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, S.H.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The substantial increases in oil prices since 1973 have had tremendous impacts on world energy, and particularly on oil consumption. These impacts have varied across regions and energy types. As shown in a table, from 1960 through 1973 the real price of internationally traded crude oil, as measured in constant US dollars, changed very little. In this stable oil price environment, Free World energy consumption grew at 5.3% per year and oil use rose at 7.5% per year, increasing its share of Free World energy consumption from 43 to 56%. 6 tables.

  20. Composites World 2013 | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CW 2013 Oct 25 2013 12:00 AM - 04:00 PM Composites World - Carbon Fiber Knoxville, Tennessee Crowne Plaza Knoxville 401 W. Summit Hill Dr., Knoxville, TN 37902 CONTACT : Email:...

  1. MARTIN PROSPERITY INSTITUTE is the world's leading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    , Social Innovation CANADA'S ANSWERS TO THE WORLD'S QUESTIONS WHY U OF T FOR SOCIAL INNOVATION? U of T: working together at the cutting edge of social innovation. Interdisciplinary research that improves

  2. Crowdfunding's Potential for the Developing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

    ? While I am happy for innovative entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley, I am passionately focused on helping Rise of the Rest" globally What would the world look like if there were Silicon Valleys everywhere

  3. Bell Inequality and Many-Worlds Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Vaidman

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is argued that the lesson we should learn from Bell's inequalities is not that quantum mechanics requires some kind of action at a distance, but that it leads us to believe in parallel worlds.

  4. Ireland's Global University MSc World Heritage Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for conservation · Cultural heritage, sustainable development and diversity · Global biodiversity and heritageIreland's Global University MSc World Heritage Conservation (Three Years Part Time) (Online facing conservation challenges, there is a growing need for professionals who understand how

  5. Improving the world through engineering OPPORTUNITY?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    themes of Energy, Environment, Education and Transport and its vision of `Improving the world through-melted. However, for many other types of waste, recovering its value to provide electricity, heat and/or transport

  6. World Class Boilers and Steam Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portell, V. P.

    WORLD CLASS BOILERS AND STEAM DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM Vernon P. Portell, Ph.D. Manager Armstrong Service, Inc. ABSTRACT categorizing, measuring, and comparing subjects which are of interest to us is the way we identify the "World class" is a... of information can also be obtained through an independent firm that provides third-party assessment of steam systems. One of these third parties, Armstrong Energy Certification, Inc., has used data gleaned from decades of industrial experience...

  7. Managing Risk in a Dynamic World Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Harold M.; Benson, Geoffrey A.; Rosson, C. Parr

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing Risk in a Dynamic World Economy Harold M. Harris, Jr., Geoffery A. Benson and Parr Rosson* U.S. agriculture has undergone dramatic change in the 1990s. New trade poli- cies under NAFTA and GATT opened markets previously closed to some U... major force in world trade, but some other Asian powerhouses fal- tered. Biotechnology offered early promise of new products and production meth- ods. Industry structure changed, with major growth in vertical integration, coordi- nation...

  8. Hyper Space Complex Number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanguang Tan

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A new kind of numbers called Hyper Space Complex Numbers and its algebras are defined and proved. It is with good properties as the classic Complex Numbers, such as expressed in coordinates, triangular and exponent forms and following the associative and commutative laws of addition and multiplication. So the classic Complex Number is developed from in complex plane with two dimensions to in complex space with N dimensions and the number system is enlarged also.

  9. Insurgent strategies for creating inimitability within mature digital ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, John A. (John Alan)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rich software application functionality once constrained to the desktop is now available via the World Wide Web (WWW) with the introduction of emergent Web2.0 technologies. Leveraging the Softwareas- a-service (SaaS) model, ...

  10. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fires often create a tremendous amount of air pollution in Third World cities. · Access to clean water births than deaths) driven by improved food supplies, better sanitation, and advances in medical care

  11. UbiWorld: An environment integrating virtual reality, supercomputing, and design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Disz, T.; Papka, M.E.; Stevens, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Mathematics and Computer Science Div.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UbiWorld is a concept being developed by the Futures Laboratory group at Argonne National Laboratory that ties together the notion of ubiquitous computing (Ubicomp) with that of using virtual reality for rapid prototyping. The goal is to develop an environment where one can explore Ubicomp-type concepts without having to build real Ubicomp hardware. The basic notion is to extend object models in a virtual world by using distributed wide area heterogeneous computing technology to provide complex networking and processing capabilities to virtual reality objects.

  12. Consistent Cosmology, Dynamic Relativity and Causal Quantum Mechanics as Unified Manifestations of the Symmetry of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei P. Kirilyuk

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The universal symmetry, or conservation, of complexity underlies any law or principle of system dynamics and describes the unceasing transformation of dynamic information into dynamic entropy as the unique way to conserve their sum, the total dynamic complexity. Here we describe the real world structure emergence and dynamics as manifestation of the universal symmetry of complexity of initially homogeneous interaction between two protofields. It provides the unified complex-dynamic, causally complete origin of physically real, 3D space, time, elementary particles, their properties (mass, charge, spin, etc.), quantum, relativistic, and classical behaviour, as well as fundamental interaction forces, including naturally quantized gravitation. The old and new cosmological problems (including "dark" mass and energy) are basically solved for this explicitly emerging, self-tuning world structure characterised by strictly positive (and large) energy-complexity. A general relation is obtained between the numbers of world dimensions and fundamental forces, excluding plausible existence of hidden dimensions. The unified, causally explained quantum, classical, and relativistic properties (and types of behaviour) are generalised to all higher levels of complex world dynamics. The real world structure, dynamics, and evolution are exactly reproduced by the probabilistic dynamical fractal, which is obtained as the truly complete general solution of a problem and the unique structure of the new mathematics of complexity. We outline particular, problem-solving applications of always exact, but irregularly structured symmetry of unreduced dynamic complexity to microworld dynamics, including particle physics, genuine quantum chaos, real nanobiotechnology, and reliable genomics.

  13. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grebenkov, Denis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one whic...

  14. Controlling Complex Networks with Compensatory Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean P. Cornelius; William L. Kath; Adilson E. Motter

    2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of complex networks to perturbations is of utmost importance in areas as diverse as ecosystem management, emergency response, and cell reprogramming. A fundamental property of networks is that the perturbation of one node can affect other nodes, in a process that may cause the entire or substantial part of the system to change behavior and possibly collapse. Recent research in metabolic and food-web networks has demonstrated the concept that network damage caused by external perturbations can often be mitigated or reversed by the application of compensatory perturbations. Compensatory perturbations are constrained to be physically admissible and amenable to implementation on the network. However, the systematic identification of compensatory perturbations that conform to these constraints remains an open problem. Here, we present a method to construct compensatory perturbations that can control the fate of general networks under such constraints. Our approach accounts for the full nonlinear behavior of real complex networks and can bring the system to a desirable target state even when this state is not directly accessible. Applications to genetic networks show that compensatory perturbations are effective even when limited to a small fraction of all nodes in the network and that they are far more effective when limited to the highest-degree nodes. The approach is conceptually simple and computationally efficient, making it suitable for the rescue, control, and reprogramming of large complex networks in various domains.

  15. Agua Caliente, World's Largest Solar Photovoltaic Plant, Helps...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Agua Caliente, World's Largest Solar Photovoltaic Plant, Helps Advance America's Solar Leadership Agua Caliente, World's Largest Solar Photovoltaic Plant, Helps Advance America's...

  16. World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California World's Largest Concentrating Solar Power Plant Opens in California February 19, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis Ivanpah,...

  17. Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures Comparison of Real World Energy Consumption to Models and DOE Test Procedures This study investigates...

  18. World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction World's Largest Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Project Begins Construction July 15, 2014 - 9:55am Addthis...

  19. Energy Advising Services in the Post-ARRA World | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    World Energy Advising Services in the Post-ARRA World Better Buildings Residential Network Workforce Business Partners Peer Exchange Call: Energy Advising Services in the...

  20. Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience Competition Provides Students with Real-World Engineering Experience April 10, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Fifteen...

  1. Fact #840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    40: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Fact 840: September 29, 2014 World Renewable Electricity Consumption is Growing Electricity generated...

  2. Microsoft Word - Wireless Automation World for OE FINAL.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Automation World Features New White Paper on Wireless Security, Interviews Authors April 16, 2009 The April 2009 issue of Automation World magazine features the white paper...

  3. Lean NOx Traps - Microstructural Studies of Real World and Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Traps - Microstructural Studies of Real World and Model Catalysts Lean NOx Traps - Microstructural Studies of Real World and Model Catalysts 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...

  4. Fact #839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    39: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption Continues to Rise despite Declines from the United States and Europe Fact 839: September 22, 2014 World Petroleum Consumption...

  5. Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio Water World: Success Stories and Tools for Water Use Reduction in Your Building Portfolio...

  6. Quantum Complex Minkowski Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzegorz Jakimowicz; Anatol Odzijewicz

    2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex Minkowski phase space has the physical interpretation of the phase space of the scalar massive conformal particle. The aim of the paper is the construction and investigation of the quantum complex Minkowski space.

  7. Complexity, Ecology, Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Morris Worm Complexity, Ecology, Finance The Pre-HistorySystemic Risk Complexity, Ecology, Finance Andrew Haldane,has called for more ecology in the study of finance ( read

  8. Comparing aquatic and terrestrial grazing ecosystems: is the grass really greener?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burkepile, Deron

    and kelp forests (Burkepile and Hay 2006). Likewise, in freshwater ecosystems, waterfowl, zooplankton and benthic invertebrates impact the rates of primary production and nutrient regeneration (Lamberti and Resh

  9. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, Paddy; Sloan, Victoria; Warren, Jeff; McGuire, Dave; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Norby, Richard; Iversen, Colleen; Walker, Anthony; Wullschleger, Stan

    A synthesis of the available literature on tundra root distribution and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic.

  10. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystemMaterial for Environmental genomics reveals a single speciesTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - alpine lake ecosystems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search results for: alpine lake ecosystems Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sustainable Sediment Management of ine oirs considering ecological and economical aspects Summary:...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystem including Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    submergedmacrophytes.Ecosystems9:112. Aquatic Ecology Laboratory at the Lake Erie Center (419) 530-4570; FAX: (419) 530... ... Source: Toledo, University of - Lake...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - arizona forest ecosystem Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Forest, Arizona (Photo by P.B. Shafroth) 12;Water Resources Research Center College... Riparian Ecosystem Restoration in the Gila River Basin: Opportunities and...

  14. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massmore suscep- tible to climate change stressors (Hughes and

  15. Litter-Carbon Dynamics: The Importance of Decomposition, Accretion, and Sequestration in Understanding Ecosystem Carbon Cycling.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kochsiek, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing since the industrial revolution. A proposed mitigation strategy is sequestering carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, either in plant… (more)

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - agro-ecosystems annual progress Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to allow time... .V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Agro-ecosystem; Bio-indicators; Farming systems; Micro Source: Adl, Sina - Department of Biology, Dalhousie University...

  17. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. Vendors of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) products (meters, communication units, and related...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems pollution Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for implementing aquatic ecosystem restoration projects pursuant to Section 206 of the Water Resources Development... for Section 206 projects (and separable elements thereof)...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquatic ecosystems endocrine Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collection: Geosciences 3 Executive Summary HEALTH OF THE FRASER RIVER AQUATIC ECOSYSTEM The purpose of the Fraser River Action Plan (FRAP) was to restore the environmental...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural landscapes ecosystem Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uncertainty in ecosystem and ... Source: Minnesota, University of - Department of Soil, Water and Climate, Biometeorology Group Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 5...

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - affect ecosystem metabolism Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    America Summary: . Stoichiometry of the net ecosystem metabolism in a coastal inlet affected by upwelling. The Ria de Arousa (NW... act as resource subsidies to many...

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - applied ecosystem analysis Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    life cycle assessment analysis (LCA), the article... of the problems with LCA. Linking industrial models with spatially explicit, dynamic and site-specific ecosystem......

  3. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massby direct effects of climate change including ocean warming,

  4. Complexity of Counting CSP with Complex Weights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Jin-Yi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give a complexity dichotomy theorem for the counting Constraint Satisfaction Problem (#CSP in short) with complex weights. To this end, we give three conditions for its tractability. Let F be any finite set of complex-valued functions, then we prove that #CSP(F) is solvable in polynomial time if all three conditions are satisfied; and is #P-hard otherwise. Our complexity dichotomy generalizes a long series of important results on counting problems: (a) the problem of counting graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single symmetric binary function in F; (b) the problem of counting directed graph homomorphisms is the special case when there is a single not-necessarily-symmetric binary function in F; and (c) the standard form of #CSP is when all functions in F take values in {0,1}.

  5. New world, New Worlds: Visual Analysis of Pre-Columbian Pictorial Collections.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odobez, Jean-Marc

    New world, New Worlds: Visual Analysis of Pre-Columbian Pictorial Collections. Daniel Gatica-Perez1, 2, Edgar Roman-Rangel1, 2, Jean-Marc Odobez1, 2, and Carlos Pallan3 1Idiap Research Institute of pre-Columbian collections of pic- torial materials ­ more specifically, of Maya hieroglyphics. We

  6. Information GRID in the Corporate World Information GRID in the Corporate World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Information GRID in the Corporate World Information GRID in the Corporate World .Bogonikolos Zeus Ontology Grid) project, an EU project funded under the Information Society Technologies programme and EAI Tools is discussed. The COG (Corporate Ontology Grid) project addresses the problem of accessing

  7. Emergent Universe in Brane World Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asit Banerjee; Tanwi Bandyopadhyay; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2007-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of an emergent universe is obtained in brane world. Here the bulk energy is in the form of cosmological constant, while the brane consists of the Chaplygin gas with the modified equation of state such as $p=A\\rho-B/\\rho$. Initially the brane matter for the special choice $A=1/3$ may have negative or positive pressure depending on the relative magnitudes of the parameter $B$ and the cosmological constant of the bulk, while asymptotically in future the brane world approaches a $\\Lambda$CDM model.

  8. The World of Dark Shadows Issue 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The World 01 llltfiK ~llltDaW~ 31 ~. 1 ~ I ­ ~ I ..\\ I I •~ J \\ .. ~ ! 1(18" !! ~ \\ 1 \\ U ;: 0 ~ I ' c " o'q~~\\ '0 l ~~ ", 9 I I r I - I ~ ( -;,­ ~l~ ~ . I ( ~"'"VW" " ) J!. d,.", .'\\ _C]~I ~ ~ ~ /';".!.t ~0-. THE WORLD OF DARK... ............ 60 Jayne Largent ........ 19. 36 Chri s Nokes .......... 13 Kathi Swan ........... 68 Val Verse .... .. .. .. .. 29. 37 Photos used on page 38 - upper left corner - Maria Barbosa lower 1eft corner - Ma rcy Robi n Pages 39 and 42. courtesy...

  9. Classification of multifluid CP world models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Thomas; Hartmut Schulz

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Various classification schemes exist for homogeneous and isotropic (CP) world models, which include pressureless matter (so-called dust) and Einstein's cosmological constant Lambda. We here classify the solutions of more general world models consisting of up to four non-interacting fluids, each with pressure P, energy density epsilon and an equation of state P = (gamma - 1) epsilon with 0 0) tends to yield the smoothest fits of the Supernova Ia data from Perlmutter et al. (1999). Adopting the SN Ia constraints, exotic negative energy density components can be fittingly included only if the universe consists of four or more fluids.

  10. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E- string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is a key to uplifting to 6 dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on local 1/2 K3 surface.

  11. Representation of Dormant and Active Microbial Dynamics for Ecosystem Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dormancy is an essential strategy for microorganisms to cope with environmental stress. However, global ecosystem models typically ignore microbial dormancy, resulting in notable model uncertainties. To facilitate the consideration of dormancy in these large-scale models, we propose a new microbial physiology component that works for a wide range of substrate availabilities. This new model is based on microbial physiological states and the major parameters are the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates of active microbes and the ratio of dormant to active maintenance rates. A major improvement of our model over extant models is that it can explain the low active microbial fractions commonly observed in undisturbed soils. Our new model shows that the exponentially-increasing respiration from substrate-induced respiration experiments can only be used to determine the maximum specific growth rate and initial active microbial biomass, while the respiration data representing both exponentially-increasing and non-exponentially-increasing phases can robustly determine a range of key parameters including the initial total live biomass, initial active fraction, the maximum specific growth and maintenance rates, and the half-saturation constant. Our new model can be incorporated into existing ecosystem models to account for dormancy in microbially-driven processes and to provide improved estimates of microbial activities.

  12. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  13. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  14. Soil ecosystem functioning under climate change: plant species and community effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kardol, Paul [ORNL; Cregger, Melissa [ORNL; Campany, Courtney E [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to climate change depend on soil ecosystem dynamics. Soil ecosystems can directly and indirectly respond to climate change. For example, warming directly alters microbial communities by increasing their activity. Climate change may also alter plant community composition, thus indirectly altering the microbial communities that feed on their inputs. To better understand how climate change may directly and indirectly alter soil ecosystem functioning, we investigated old-field plant community and soil ecosystem responses to single and combined effects of elevated [CO2], warming, and water availability. Specifically, we collected soils at the plot level (plant community soils), and beneath dominant plant species (plant-specific soils). We used microbial enzyme activities and soil nematodes as indicators for soil ecosystem functioning. Our study resulted in two main findings: 1) Overall, while there were some interactions, water, relative to increases in [CO2] and warming, had the largest impact on plant community composition, soil enzyme activities, and soil nematodes. Multiple climate change factors can interact to shape ecosystems, but in this case, those interactions were largely driven by changes in water availability. 2) Indirect effects of climate change, via changes in plant communities, had a significant impact on soil ecosystem functioning and this impact was not obvious when looking at plant community soils. Climate change effects on enzyme activities and soil nematode abundance and community structure strongly differed between plant community soils and plant-specific soils, but also within plant-specific soils. In sum, these results indicate that accurate assessments of climate change impacts on soil ecosystem functioning require incorporating the concurrent changes in plant function and plant community composition. Climate change-induced shifts in plant community composition will likely modify or counteract the direct impact of climate change on soil ecosystem functioning, and hence, these indirect effects should be taken into account when predicting how climate change will alter ecosystem functioning.

  15. Parallel Processing Letters fc World Scientific Publishing Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calheiros, Rodrigo N.

    World Scientific Publishing Company http://ejournals.wspc.com.sg/ppl/ppl.shtml SCHEDULING AND MANAGEMENT

  16. World Wide Web Internet and Web Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    1 23 World Wide Web Internet and Web Information Systems ISSN 1386-145X World Wide Web DOI 10's request, provided it is not made publicly available until 12 months after publication. #12;World Wide Web worlds. Its detection is a typical use case of the broad-based Wisdom Web of Things (W2T) methodology

  17. Collaborative Approach World-Class Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    .5 million from the Department of Energy, along with additional funds from New York State, for an EnergyWCMC Collaborative Approach World-Class Facilities Research at Cornell /A Statistical Excerpt York 08 Funding Cornell's Research 09 Expending Research Dollars 10 Funding Graduate Education 12

  18. Earth Sciences Take on the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waikato, University of

    Earth Sciences Take on the world Career paths Earth Sciences graduate Gerard Bird. Careers Coastal engineer Environmental consultant Earth scientist Engineering geologist Environmental Email: science@waikato.ac.nz Visit: www.earth.waikato.ac.nz earth sCienCes Surrounded by diverse

  19. JOURNAL OF THE WORLD AQUACULTURE SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a twin screw extruder using a 2 mm die at 190 rpm, and a 3 mm die at 348 rpm. Analyses of the extrudatesJOURNAL OF THE WORLD AQUACULTURE SOCIETY Vol. 41, No. S1 February, 2010 Twin Screw Extrusion, soybean oil, vitamin and mineral mix). The blends were moisture balanced to 15% db, then extruded

  20. Lens x block : World as construction kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Jay (Jay Saul)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose and meaning of the physical world can be re-assigned and re-made by individuals as they go rather than being pre-fixed by people who came before them. But this mindset is more rare than it should be if we want an ...

  1. Materials that Power Our World Nanostructured Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    application #12;Strong Earnings Potential · Positive outlook for energy and electronics · Proprietary Cnano-c 1 Materials that Power Our World Nanostructured Carbon 22nd NREL Growth Forum (modified presentation) #12;Nanostructured Carbon Mission critical component in advanced energy & electronic devices 2

  2. College of Engineering WORLD-CLASS ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    College of Engineering WORLD-CLASS ENGINEERING in Learning, Discovery and Engagement 2014-2019 STRATEGY #12;College of Engineering PREAMBLE The College of Engineering at Penn State is a leading academy, research enterprise and service to the global engineering community. Innovation is a hallmark of Penn State

  3. Carbon Smackdown: Cookstoves for the developing world

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ashok Gadgil, Kayje Booker, and Adam Rausch

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this June 30, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, learn how efficient cookstoves for the developing world ? from Darfur to Ethiopia and beyond ? are reducing carbon dioxide emissions, saving forests, and improving health. Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil, Kayje Booker, and Adam Rausch discuss why they got started in this great challenge and what's next.

  4. PAVING THE WAY TO A SMARTER WORLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    PAVING THE WAY TO A SMARTER WORLD: CREATIVITY IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION SANTOSH KURINEC Department of Microelectronic Engineering Kate Gleason College of Engineering Rochester Institute of Technology WEDNESDAY, MARCH 28 3:00 ­ 4:30 P.M. CAMPUS CENTER ATRIUM Imagination and creativity have long energized technological

  5. The World of Youthful Drug Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumer, Herbert; Sutter, Alan; Smith, Roger; Ahmed, Samir

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    they meet the fact that the use of drugs is illegal and exposes them to arrest and criminal prosecution. It was obvious that such kinds of information could be secured: only from the youths who were themselves in the drug using world. We could not rely on a...

  6. Spallation Neutron Sources Around the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Spallation Neutron Sources Around the World Bernie Riemer Thanks to others for the many shamelessly Laboratory #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Spallation Neutron Source Facilities Spallation Neutron Source Facilities Serve Neutron Science Programs · Neutron beams to suites

  7. The British Empire and the Natural World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    and the Orient, this book will interest scholars, students and teachers of ecological and environmental history-23573738 email: kolkata.in@oup.com CHENNAI Oxford House, 289 Anna Salai, Chennai 600006 Ph: 044-28112107; Fax. About the Book The British empire marked an exceptional ecological moment in world history. Between 1600

  8. World Biodiesel Markets The Outlook to 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Biodiesel Markets The Outlook to 2010 A special study from F.O. Licht and Agra CEAS This important new study provides a detailed analysis of the global biodiesel market and the outlook for growth, including the regulatory and trade framework, feedstock supply and price developments, biodiesel production

  9. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlatti, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  10. World Volume Action for Fractional Branes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Merlatti; G. Sabella

    2001-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the world volume action of fractional Dp-branes of type IIA string theory compactified on the orbifold T^4/Z_2. The geometric relation between these branes and wrapped branes is investigated using conformal techniques. In particular we examine in detail various scattering amplitudes and find that the leading low-energy interactions are consistent with the boundary action derived geometrically.

  11. Mapping ecosystem functions to the valuation of ecosystem services: implications of species–habitat associations for coastal land-use decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchirico, James N.; Mumby, Peter

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methodsecosystem service values that, in turn, will impact coastal land-use decisions. While refining valuation methods

  12. Surveying Diffusion in Complex Geometries. An Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Grebenkov

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The surrounding world surprises us by the beauty and variety of complex shapes that emerge from nanometric to macroscopic scales. Natural or manufactured materials (sandstones, sedimentary rocks and cement), colloidal solutions (proteins and DNA), biological cells, tissues and organs (lungs, kidneys and placenta), they all present irregularly shaped "scenes" for a fundamental transport "performance", that is, diffusion. Here, the geometrical complexity, entangled with the stochastic character of diffusive motion, results in numerous fascinating and sometimes unexpected effects like diffusion screening or localization. These effects control many diffusion-mediated processes that play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis, biochemical mechanisms, electrochemistry, growth phenomena, oil recovery, or building industry. In spite of a long and rich history of academic and industrial research in this field, it is striking to see how little we know about diffusion in complex geometries, especially the one which occurs in three dimensions. We present our recent results on restricted diffusion. We look into the role of geometrical complexity at different levels, from boundary microroughness to hierarchical structure and connectivity of the whole diffusion-confining domain. We develop a new approach which consists in combining fast random walk algorithms with spectral tools. The main focus is on studying diffusion in model complex geometries (von Koch boundaries, Kitaoka acinus, etc.), as well as on developing and testing spectral methods. We aim at extending this knowledge and at applying the accomplished arsenal of theoretical and numerical tools to structures found in nature and industry.

  13. Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development. "Some companies are not aware of the need to ask. In many regions, however, illegal logging is having unsustainable impacts. Much of the illegal logging to make room for agriculture and ranching activities. This illegal logging contributes to deforestation

  14. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by distinct wet and dry seasons instead of uniform heavy rainfall year-around. HEAVILY fragmented and vanishing 24 Mediterranean · Hot, dry summers and cool, moist winters. · Very popular climate with humans, landforms (esp. mountains) and wind. 4 Biomes, cont'd #12;2 5 World Biomes 6 7 "biomes" vs. "land cover

  15. Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    11 Green River Lake and Dam interim plan benefits ecosystem By John Hickey Hydrologic Engineering that water is released from Green River Dam in Kentucky. In May 2006, the interim plan was approved shown that operation of Green River Dam can be changed in ways that improve ecosystems while continuing

  16. Long-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extending now for more than 14 years (2­5). The release of 42 million liters of Alaskan North Slope crudeLong-Term Ecosystem Response to the Exxon Valdez Oil Spill Charles H. Peterson,1 * Stanley D. Rice The ecosystem response to the 1989 spill of oil from the Exxon Valdez into Prince William Sound, Alaska, shows

  17. 14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    + ) = the incident solar irradiance in relative energy units; F = factor modifying that flux as a function of ozone14 Climate control of biological UV exposure in polar and alpine aquatic ecosystems Warwick F in these ecosystems may also be more vulnerable to UV toxicity because of the inhibiting effects of cold tempera

  18. An Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    should NOAA value where? What valuation methods should be used? Is a NOAA valuation strategy evenAn Inventory of Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Micah Effron, NOAA's Office of Program Planning and Integration 5/22/13 #12; What are ecosystem services? How are they valued? NOAA drivers for valuations

  19. North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem E. Di Lorenzo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    North Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change E. Di Lorenzo,1 N Pacific Gyre Oscillation links ocean climate and ecosystem change, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L08607, doi:10 to explain physical and biological fluctuations in the Northeast Pacific Ocean [Lynn et al., 1998; Lavaniegos

  20. Technology Transfer for Ecosystem Management1 Tim O'Keefe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    into the "ecosystem management" program. This new program is a belated effort to redirect public forest management). In response to the Thomas report, and growing public pressures for a diverse, sustainable management system management is composed of both biological (ecosystem sustainablitily and diversity) and sociological (public

  1. EcoGIS GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EcoGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management May 2009 NOAA TechnicalGIS ­ GIS Tools for Ecosystem Approaches to Fisheries Management. NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 75. 38 Fisheries Science Centers, NOAA Fisheries Regional Offices, NatureServe's EBM Tools Network, and other

  2. Ecological Economics 41 (2002) 375392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services: Integrating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    synthesis of these concepts in order to address the issue of valuation of ecosystem services. We wantEcological Economics 41 (2002) 375­392 SPECIAL ISSUE: The Dynamics and Value of Ecosystem Services is to elucidate concepts of value and methods of valuation that will assist in guiding human decisions vis

  3. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions and global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai

    Carbon and nitrogen dynamics in bioenergy ecosystems: 2. Potential greenhouse gas emissions) from bioenergy ecosystems with a biogeochemical model AgTEM, assuming maize (Zea mays L.), switchgrass haĂ?1 yrĂ?1 . Among all three bioenergy crops, Miscanthus is the most biofuel productive and the least

  4. Linkages between leaf traits and productivity in two resource-limited ecosystems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinchilla Soto, Isabel

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of ecosystem level processes such as nutrient cycling and carbon allocation. To explore the linkages between leaf traits and productivity, we worked in two resource-limited ecosystems (a grassland and a forest), and used leaf traits to understand how species...

  5. FOR 4110/5159 Ecology and Restoration of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    FOR 4110/5159 Ecology and Restoration of the Longleaf Pine Ecosystem 3 credits Spring 2013 Instructors: Dr. Debbie Miller, Ph.D. Associate Professor Wildlife Ecology and Conservation 5988 Hwy. 90, Bldg description: History, structure, function and ecological and economic importance of longleaf pine ecosystems

  6. NREL Fall 2013 Seminar Series "Using Aquatic Ecosystem Science to Inform Freshwater Resource Use and Sustainability"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    affected by the combination of physical, biological and chemical transformations within aquatic ecosystems Freshwater Ecosystems" Dec 6 Ted Stets, US Geological Survey Title: "Century of Trends: Historical Perspectives on the Evolution of Water Quality in the US" Dec 13 Brian Bledsoe, CSU's Department of Civil

  7. Lake Ecosystems Nelson G Hairston Jr, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fussman, Gregor

    are inland bodies of water that lack any direct exchange with an ocean. Lake ecosystems are made up water, waste removal, fisheries, agricultural irrigation, industrial activity and recreationLake Ecosystems Nelson G Hairston Jr, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA Gregor F Fussmann

  8. Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudela, Raphael M.

    Influence of ocean winds on the pelagic ecosystem in upwelling regions Ryan R. Rykaczewski-rich, subsurface water sustains high produc- tivity in the ocean's eastern boundary currents. These ecosystems.g., poultry, swine, and tuna) industries that depend on the fisheries' landings for income and feed. Because

  9. Why Sweat the Small Stuff: the Importance of Microalgae in Hawaiian Stream Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julius, Matthew L.

    Why Sweat the Small Stuff: the Importance of Microalgae in Hawaiian Stream Ecosystems MATTHEW L: mljulius@stcloudstate.edu Abstract Microalgae are well known for their importance in aquatic ecosystems and for their utility as environ- mental indicators. These attributes are emphasized here for microalgae, especially

  10. IT Revolutions in the Industry: From the Command Economy to the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulieru, Mihaela

    IT ­ Revolutions in the Industry: From the Command Economy to the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem of the traditional hierarchy ­ as backbone of last Century's Industrial Revolution - towards the eNetworked Industrial Ecosystem ­ as backbone for this Century's on-going IT-Revolution. Socio-cultural and economic

  11. Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

  12. Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 FACTORS REGULATING NET METHANE FLUX IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovett, Gary M.

    Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies 1 FACTORS REGULATING NET METHANE FLUX IN URBAN FORESTS Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, NY 12545 USA Abstract. Methane is a potent greenhouse investigated four factors that could be causing this inhibition; reduced diffusion of methane into soils

  13. SINGAPORE SESSIONS IS A TRADEMARK OF SINGAPORE EDB Already hard at work in hospitals around the world, medical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    ." acceleraTing change The learning curve for robot-assisted surgery is reportedly shorter than traditional the world, medical robots are enabling surgeons to perform complex operations with much success. Infact, these surgical robots equip doctors with extraordinary precision, providing heightened visual aid, controlled

  14. Humboldt Bay Initiative: Adaptive Management in a Changing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlosser, Susan

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    climate change and sea level rise: potential losses ofday at the beach: sea level rise, ecosystem loss, and public2009. The impacts of sea-level rise on the California coast.

  15. NATURAL ATTENUATION FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN NY/NJ HARBOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VAN DER LELIE,D.JONES,K.W.REID-GREEN,J.D.STERN,E.A.

    2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the feasibility of using natural attenuation methods for ecosystem restoration in New York/New Jersey Harbor. Measurements were made of the most probable number of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) in native sediments and in samples, which had been supplemented with an appropriate electron donor and electron acceptor. The results showed that the activity of the endogenous microbial population in the native sediment was high enough to make possible adequate chemical transformation rates. The bioavailability of the zinc in the sediments was measured using the BIOMET biosensor technique. The bioavailability of the zinc was effectively eliminated following the microbial activities. We concluded that natural attenuation could be used effectively in treating sediments from Newark Bay and surrounding waters and that the resultant materials could likely be used in environmental restoration projects of the type proposed for construction in South Kearny, NJ.

  16. Emplacement and dewatering of the world's largest exposed sand injectite complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherry, Timothy J.; Rowe, Christie D.; Kirkpatrick, James D.; Brodsky, Emily E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Formation (UK North Sea), Sedimentology, 51, 503–529, doi:liesegang bands: Update, Sedimentology, 50(4), Minisini,cohesionless sedi- ments, Sedimentology, 58, 1693–1715, doi:

  17. The challenges facing the world are great and growing more complex by the day. Addressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    and sustainability, the SEQ connects via a palm-lined lane to the renowned Main Quad.The new buildings set a modern fairs, small group meetings and other Stanford-sponsored activities. Sustainable Features SEQ buildings meet stringent sustainability standards. Each building uses just half the power--and one

  18. 70 years making the world safer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe ÎČ- Decay Evaluated7-ID Home PageAug.safer

  19. 70 years making the world safer: extended | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience hands-onASTROPHYSICSHe ÎČ- Decay Evaluated7-ID Home

  20. Y-12 makes the world safer | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNL Home SRNL

  1. Securing NNSA's Nuclear Weapons Complex in a Post-9/11 World | National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted forHighlights Nuclear PhysicsDoDepartment ofSecrets

  2. Y-12, Making the World a Safer Place | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste andAnniversary, part 2 Continuing the 70 thbegins As early,

  3. Ekstrom, Draft 11/14/08 California Current Large Marine Ecosystem: Publicly Available Dataset of State and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    : Engineering Informatics Group Structural Engineering and Geomechanics Civil & Environmental Engineering Jerry, ocean law, large marine ecosystem INTRODUCTION Historically, governments have managed ocean uses within approach, widely recognized as a major contributor to the deterioration of ocean ecosystems, has created

  4. Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Author(s): WILL R. TURNER, KATRINA BRANDON, THOMAS M. BROOKS, ROBERT COSTANZA,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Global Conservation of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services Author(s): WILL R. TURNER, KATRINA, to analyze poten- tial synergies between conserving biodiversity and safe- guarding ecosystem services. Global-scale prioritization for biodiversity conservation is essential because biodiversity, threats

  5. Money flows in the Internet ecosystem : strategic opportunities for telecom operators and other Internet agents in the digital age

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin Vinagrero, Israel

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The question about where the money goes is something really interesting for all the companies in the Internet ecosystem. While there is a huge interest, no clear answers have been provided, partially because the ecosystem ...

  6. On the benefits of an integrated nuclear complex for Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blink, J.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Halsey, W.G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated nuclear complex is proposed for location at the Nevada Test Site. In addition to solving the nuclear waste disposal problem, this complex would tremendously enhance the southern Nevada economy, and it would provide low cost electricity to each resident and business in the affected counties. Nuclear industry and the national economy would benefit because the complex would demonstrate the new generation of safer nuclear power plants and revitalize the industry. Many spin-offs of the complex would be possible, including research into nuclear fusion and a world class medical facility for southern Nevada. For such a complex to become a reality, the cycle of distrust between the federal government and the State of Nevada must be broken. The paper concludes with a discussion of implementation through a public process led by state officials and culminating in a voter referendum.

  7. Solar system tests of brane world models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian G. Boehmer; Tiberiu Harko; Francisco S. N. Lobo

    2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for the Dadhich, Maartens, Papadopoulos and Rezania (DMPR) solution of the spherically symmetric static vacuum field equations in brane world models. For this solution the metric in the vacuum exterior to a brane world star is similar to the Reissner-Nordstrom form of classical general relativity, with the role of the charge played by the tidal effects arising from projections of the fifth dimension. The existing observational solar system data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the bulk tidal parameter and of the brane tension.

  8. UK now claims world's top discovery rate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UK explorers are a bit more cheerful these days even though no one has discovered a giant field or anything elephant-sized. The reason is a benign tax regime and a growing confidence among industry explorers. This last has resulted in discovery of many smaller fields - particularly gas, some potentially commercial. It is claimed that the UK's discovery rate is now the highest in the world.

  9. The Two Worlds of University Publishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shugg, Roger W.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ten years ago, Jacques Barzun warned a convention of history professors that all their tinkering to improve graduate programs and courses would not raise the caliber of young historians they were training, because, as he bluntly said, "There just... rich legacy from the history and culture of the American Indians 12 Two Worlds of would have been irretrievably lost without the consistently brilliant program of the University of Oklahoma Press." Regional publishing has suffered in respectability...

  10. WORLD WIDE WEB 2.3 Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markatos, Evangelos P.

    H I2 C WORLD WIDE WEB 1996 #12; 1. 1.1 I2 Cnet 1.2 1.3 WWW 2 2.1 2.2 2.3 Web 2.4 3 O 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 O Web browsers. 4. 4.1 4.2 4 File System 9.6 10 A. Web browser HTT . B A #12

  11. Low Carbon World | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climateJunoMedanos Energy Center LLCUnit Agency/CompanyWorld

  12. PV World Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPP Equipment CorporationPV World Co Ltd Place:

  13. World Bio Markets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,InstitutesEnergyWeatherstrippingWhereNoraBacaConferencesWorld Bio

  14. ClearWorld Now | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan, MissouriWebsterElectric CoopClearWorld Now Jump to:

  15. World launch! Hot-Steam Aerostat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische UniversitÀt

    Info HeiDAS UH World launch! Hot-Steam Aerostat #12;"If you intend to view the land, if you plan Verne: "Fife weeks on a balloon". HeiDAS stands for HeiĂ?DampfAeroStat (Hot-Steam AeroStat) and it refers to the first operable balloon ever that became buoyant by means of superheated steam. The performance of Hei

  16. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world`s major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  17. Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River Basins of North-Central

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    ................................................................................................... 37 Appendix C. Ecosystem Service Valuation Studies Focused on North Florida1 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee and Santa Fe River: Mark Long) #12;2 Economic Contributions and Ecosystem Services of Springs in the Lower Suwannee

  18. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  19. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  20. Exponential Random Simplicial Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exponential random graph models have attracted significant research attention over the past decades. These models are maximum-entropy ensembles under the constraints that the expected values of a set of graph observables are equal to given values. Here we extend these maximum-entropy ensembles to random simplicial complexes, which are more adequate and versatile constructions to model complex systems in many applications. We show that many random simplicial complex models considered in the literature can be casted as maximum-entropy ensembles under certain constraints. We introduce and analyze the most general random simplicial complex ensemble $\\mathbf{\\Delta}$ with statistically independent simplices. Our analysis is simplified by the observation that any distribution $\\mathbb{P}(O)$ on any collection of objects $\\mathcal{O}=\\{O\\}$, including graphs and simplicial complexes, is maximum-entropy under the constraint that the expected value of $-\\ln \\mathbb{P}(O)$ is equal to the entropy of the distribution. W...

  1. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2013 Timothy P. Boyer, John I. Antonov, Olga K. Baranova, World Ocean Database 2013. Sydney Levitus, Ed.; Alexey Mishonov, Technical Ed.; NOAA Atlas NESDIS 72........................................................................................................... 14 1.1.1. History

  2. REPORT from 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY ,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT from 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY , DALIAN, CHINA Dr. Efstratios Kalogirou Earth of SYNERGIA (WTERT Greece) participated in the successful 1st Annual World Congress of BIOENERGY, held between

  3. Besa: Muslims Who Saved Jews in World War II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Luann

    Besa: Muslims Who Saved Jews in World War II The Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed fleeing the Nazis. His illustrated volume, Besa: Muslims Who Saved Jews in World War II, offers a haunting

  4. 37th World Energy Engineering Congress | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Congress 37th World Energy Engineering Congress October 1, 2014 12:00PM EDT to October 3, 2014 9:00PM EDT Washington, DC World Energy Engineering Congress...

  5. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 6: Chlorophyll Margarita E. Conkright Todd D. O.I. Antonov , 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 6: Chlorophyll. Ed. S. Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 54, U

  6. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 1: Temperature Cathy Stephens John I. Antonov.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 49, U

  7. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 2: Salinity Timothy P. Boyer Cathy Stephens John.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 1: Salinity. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 50, U

  8. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 5: Plankton Todd D. O'Brien Margarita E.E. Garcia, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 5: Plankton. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 53, U

  9. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 4: Nutrients Margarita E. Conkright Hernan E.I. Antonov , 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 4: Nutrients. Ed. S. Levitus, NOAA Atlas NESDIS 52, U

  10. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2001 VOLUME 3: Oxygen Ricardo A. Locarnini Todd D. O. Stephens, 2002: World Ocean Atlas 2001, Volume 3: Oxygen. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 51, U

  11. NERSC's Hopper is Among World's Top 10 Fastest Computers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hopper Among World's Top 10 Fastest Computers Hopper Among World's Top 10 Fastest Computers One of only 10 Petaflops Systems Worldwide June 17, 2011 | Tags: Hopper, NERSC Linda Vu,...

  12. The Theological Significance of Hegel's Four World-Historical Realms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Von Der Luft, Eric

    The Theological Significance of Hegel's Four World-Historical Realms1 ERIC VON DER LUFT Villanova University The major problem concerning Hegel's four world- historical realms is this: How are we to view them—as categories of historical...

  13. Renewable, Green LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landill Gass...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable, Green LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landill Gass to LNG Plant Renewable, Green LNG: Update on the World's Largest Landill Gass to LNG Plant Presentation at the...

  14. Senior DOE Officials in Spain to Participate in World Petroleum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Senior DOE Officials in Spain to Participate in World Petroleum Congress, July 1, 2008 Senior DOE Officials in Spain to Participate in World Petroleum Congress, July 1, 2008 Senior...

  15. Building America: Research for Real-World Results | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building America: Research for Real-World Results Building America: Research for Real-World Results December 17, 2014 3:00PM to 4:30PM EST For 20 years, the U.S. Department of...

  16. Keeping Tabs on the World's Dangerous Chemicals | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on the World's Dangerous Chemicals March 20, 2013 - 5:07pm Addthis Sandia chemical engineer Nancy Jackson has worked in laboratories around the world to help ensure that...

  17. Toward a nuclear weapons free world?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maaranen, S.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Center for International Security Affairs

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Doubts about the wisdom of relying on nuclear weapons are as old as nuclear weapons themselves. But despite this questioning, nuclear weapons came to be seen as the indispensable element of American (indeed Western) security during the Cold War. By the 1970s and 1980s, however, discontent was growing about the intense US-Soviet nuclear arms competition, as it failed to provide any enduring improvement in security; rather, it was seen as creating ever greater risks and dangers. Arms control negotiations and limitations, adopted as a means to regulate the technical competition, may also have relieved some of the political pressures and dangers. But the balance of terror, and the fears of it, continued. The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) under President Reagan was a very different approach to escaping from the precarious protection of nuclear weapons, in that it sought a way to continue to defend the US and the West, but without the catastrophic risks of mutual deterrence. As such, SDI connoted unhappiness with the precarious nuclear balance and, for many, with nuclear weapons in general. The disappearance of the Warsaw Pact, the disintegration of the Soviet Union, and the sudden end of the Cold War seemed to offer a unique opportunity to fashion a new, more peaceful world order that might allow for fading away of nuclear weapons. Scholars have foreseen two different paths to a nuclear free world. The first is a fundamental improvement in the relationships between states such that nuclear weapons are no longer needed. The second path is through technological development, e.g., missile defenses which could provide effective protection against nuclear attacks. The paper discusses nuclear weapon policy in the US, views of other nuclear states, the future of nuclear weapons, and issues in a less-nuclear world.

  18. Toward a defense-dominated world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, L.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the large-scale peace in a defense-dominated world necessarily will require not only passive but also active defenses against large-scale aggression that are technically feasible, practical and easy to employ -- and robust against perversion into support of aggression. Such peace maintenance tool-sets will feature means for effectively rebuking aggression as well as providing timely and very widely available seaming of aggression underway anywhere. This report discusses the technology base which currently exists to provide world-wide, high-quality imagery at moderate (5--10 meter) spatial resolution or imagery of 1% of the Earth`s land surface at high ({le} 1 meter) resolution no less frequently than daily, at a total cost of the order of $1 B, with operational capability in the later `90s. Such systems could provide timely warning of aggressive actions anywhere. Similarly, space-based means of defeating aggression conducted with even quite short-range ballistic missiles anywhere in the world could be brought into existence by the end of the `90s for a total cost of about $10 B, and small high-altitude, long flight-duration robotic aircraft carrying high-performance sensors and interceptor missilery could provide both seaming and active defenses against attacks conducted with very short range ballistic missiles, as well as attacks launched with air-breathing threats such as bombers and cruise missiles, for a cost per defended area of the order of $10/km{sup 2}. It appears that all of the associated sensors can find apt dual-use as high-performance systems for monitoring physical aspects of the human environment.

  19. America and the Misshaping of a New World Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunn, Giles; Gutiérrez-Jones, Carl

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the World Tribunal on Iraq (WTI) held in Istanbul in Juneinternational criminal law. The WTI heard testimony from ?

  20. World Wide Web( WWW ) Greenberg Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirai, Kiyoaki

    WWW 1 World Wide Web( WWW ) WWW Web Web Greenberg Web 30% [1] Web WWW Web WWW [2] [3] WWW 2 2.1 WWW Web 1 1: · 1 · 1 #12;· Web Web 2: 2 2 Web 2.2 Web Web URL URL .html / Yahoo http://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=2 0011205-00000101-yom-soci URL onmouseover on- mouseout JavaScript 2.1 2.3 URL URL 1. Web HTML 2. 1

  1. SolarWorld AG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACA Region - France)SolarHub Jump to:SolarWorld AG Jump

  2. WorldScan | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamsonWoodson County,Worden, Montana:WorldScan Jump to:

  3. World Resources Institute Feed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWood FuelHealthWorld

  4. World Trade Organization | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWood FuelHealthWorldTrade

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - addressing complex health Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystems and Society, ... Source: Aukema, Brian - ukema, Brian - Canadian Forest Service & Ecosystem Science and Management Program, University of Northern British...

  6. SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 15 INSTRUCTION MANUAL Serial No._____________________ 8/94 World Precision Instruments, Inc. SP100i Syringe Pump Digital Infusion Syringe Pump #12;SP100i Syringe Pump WORLD PRECISION INSTRUMENTS 1 Contents GENERAL DESCRIPTION

  7. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 1: Temperature Silver Spring, MD March 2010 U. Johnson, 2010. World Ocean Atlas 2009, Volume 1: Temperature. S. Levitus, Ed., NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68, U URL: http://www.nodc.noaa.gov/ #12;NOAA Atlas NESDIS 68 WORLD OCEAN ATLAS 2009 Volume 1: Temperature

  8. A World of Research REPORT ON RESEARCH 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    A World of Research REPORT ON RESEARCH 2007 #12;REPORT ON RESEARCH 2007 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Health 10 Engaging Student Researchers 12 Connecting with the Commonwealth 15 Impacting the World 18, the nation and the world. The Office of the Vice Provost for Research provides services in support

  9. espite concern about the state of the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Dapeng Oliver

    #12;office of research D espite concern about the state of the world economy, the contin- ued the envy of the world. Far from stagnating, the science and engineering occurring today at our universities's recovery from World War II, U.S. university research has been at the heart of the nation's economic

  10. The Future of Government Lessons Learned from around the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    i The Future of Government Lessons Learned from around the World A Discussion Paper Global Agenda and Lessons Learned Singapore: E-Government Strategy United Arab Emirates: An Evolving Holistic Approach of Government: Lessons Learned from around the World, a discussion paper elaborated by the World Economic Forum

  11. A TIME WARP IMPLEMENTATION OF SHARKS WORLD Matthew T. Presley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    implementation of the Sharks World simulation, a simple simulation of sharks and fish swimming through a toroidal World is a simulation of sharks and fish swimming through a two­dimensional toroidal world. When a shark and a fish are within a certain distance, the shark will eat the fish, causing the fish to disappear from

  12. Persistence of chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination in a California marine ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, D.R.; Gossett, R.W.; Heesen, T.C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite major reductions in the dominant DDT and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) input off Los Angeles (California, U.S.A.) in the early 1970s, the levels of these pollutants decreased only slightly from 1972 to 1975 both in surficial bottom sediments and in a flatfish bioindicator (Dover sole, Microstomus pacificus) collected near the submarine outfall. Concentrations of these pollutants in the soft tissues of the mussel Mytilus californianus, collected intertidally well inshore of the highly contaminated bottom sediments, followed much more closely the decreases in the outfall discharges. These observations suggest that contaminated sediments on the seafloor were the principal (although not necessarily direct) cause of the relatively high and persistent concentrations of DDT and PCB residues in tissues. The study indicated that residues of the higher-molecular-weight chlorinated hydrocarbons, such as DDT and PCB, can be highly persistent once released to coastal marine ecosystems and that their accumulation in surficial bottom sediments is the most likely cause of this persistence observed in the biota of the discharge zone.

  13. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  14. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  15. The Lifecycles of Apps in a Social Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloumann, Isabel; Kleinberg, Jon; Wu, Shaomei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apps are emerging as an important form of on-line content, and they combine aspects of Web usage in interesting ways --- they exhibit a rich temporal structure of user adoption and long-term engagement, and they exist in a broader social ecosystem that helps drive these patterns of adoption and engagement. It has been difficult, however, to study apps in their natural setting since this requires a simultaneous analysis of a large set of popular apps and the underlying social network they inhabit. In this work we address this challenge through an analysis of the collection of apps on Facebook Login, developing a novel framework for analyzing both temporal and social properties. At the temporal level, we develop a retention model that represents a user's tendency to return to an app using a very small parameter set. At the social level, we organize the space of apps along two fundamental axes --- popularity and sociality --- and we show how a user's probability of adopting an app depends both on properties of t...

  16. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement at Mountaintop Mining Sites Symposium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D. Courtney; Lawson, Peter; Morgan, John; Maggard, Randy; Schor, Horst; Powell, Rocky; Kirk, Ed. J.

    2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to this symposium which is part of the ongoing effort to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding mountaintop mining and valley fills. The EIS is being prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Office of Surface Mining, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, in cooperation with the State of West Virginia. Aquatic Ecosystem Enhancement (AEE) at mountaintop mining sites is one of fourteen technical areas identified for study by the EIS Interagency Steering Committee. Three goals were identified in the AEE Work Plan: 1. Assess mining and reclamation practices to show how mining operations might be carried out in a way that minimizes adverse impacts to streams and other environmental resources and to local communities. Clarify economic and technical constraints and benefits. 2. Help citizens clarify choices by showing whether there are affordable ways to enhance existing mining, reclamation, mitigation processes and/or procedures. 3. Ide identify data needed to improve environmental evaluation and design of mining projects to protect the environment. Today’s symposium was proposed in the AEE Team Work Plans but coordinated planning for the event began September 15, 1999 when representatives from coal industry, environmental groups and government regulators met in Morgantown. The meeting participants worked with a facilitator from the Canaan Valley Institute to outline plans for the symposium. Several teams were formed to carry out the plans we outlined in the meeting.

  17. Complex System Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Christopher

    2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of terms such as “Engineering Systems”, “System of systems” and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

  18. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  19. World energy: Building a sustainable future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Meyers, S.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the 20th century draws to a close, both individual countries and the world community face challenging problems related to the supply and use energy. These include local and regional environmental impacts, the prospect of global climate and sea level change associated with the greenhouse effect, and threats to international relations in connection with oil supply or nuclear proliferation. For developing countries, the financial cost of providing energy to provide basic needs and fuel economic development pose an additional burden. To assess the magnitude of future problems and the potential effectiveness of response strategies, it is important to understand how and why energy use has changed in the post and where it is heading. This requires study of the activities for which energy is used, and of how people and technology interact to provide the energy services that are desired. The authors and their colleagues have analyzed trends in energy use by sector for most of the world's major energy-consuming countries. The approach we use considers three key elements in each sector: the level of activity, structural change, and energy intensity, which expresses the amount of energy used for various activities. At a disaggregated level, energy intensity is indicative of energy efficiency. But other factors besides technical efficiency also shape intensity.

  20. Asymptotically Lifshitz brane-world black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranjbar, Arash, E-mail: a_ranjbar@sbu.ac.ir; Sepangi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: hr-sepangi@sbu.ac.ir; Shahidi, Shahab, E-mail: s_shahidi@sbu.ac.ir

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gravity dual of a Lifshitz field theory in the context of a RSII brane-world scenario, taking into account the effects of the extra dimension through the contribution of the electric part of the Weyl tensor. We study the thermodynamical behavior of such asymptotically Lifshitz black holes. It is shown that the entropy imposes the critical exponent z to be bounded from above. This maximum value of z corresponds to a positive infinite entropy as long as the temperature is kept positive. The stability and phase transition for different spatial topologies are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studying the gravity dual of a Lifshitz field theory in the context of brane-world scenario. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studying the thermodynamical behavior of asymptotically Lifshitz black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Showing that the entropy imposes the critical exponent z to be bounded from above. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussing the phase transition for different spatial topologies.

  1. Thermal optimality of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide and underlying mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    Energy Division, Risű National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark, P Department of Physical Geography and Ecosystems Analysis, Lund University, 223 62 Lund, Sweden; 9 Atmospheric, Switzerland; 16 European Commission, Joint Research Center, Institute for Environment and Sustainability

  2. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 120 Economic and environmental threats of alien plant,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 84 (2001) 1­20 Economic and environmental threats of alien. Precise economic costs associated with some of the most ecologically damaging alien species; Animals; Alien; Economic; Ecology; Environment; Agriculture; Non-indigenous 1. Introduction Quantifying

  3. Environmental genomics reveals a single species ecosystem deep within the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chivian, Dylan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecosystem deep within the Earth Dylan Chivian 1,2 *, Eoin L.and Survival, Berkeley, CA Earth Sciences Division, Lawrenceecosystem deep within the Earth Dylan Chivian 1,2* , Eoin L.

  4. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  5. Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    .2.1.4 Deep Water................................................................................................. 143 1.2.3.4 Deep WaterMEFEPO Making European Fisheries Ecosystem Plans Operational EC FP7 project # 212881 Work Package 1

  6. Landscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    rust by examining changes in the spatial scale of significant stress and mortality clusters computedLandscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - african lake ecosystems Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Record amounts of dissolved phosphorus hit Lake Erie Algae blooms could threaten Lake Erie... ecosystem (http:www.youtube.comwatch?v5TlXQazNx00) Oil disaster in the...

  8. Chesapeake Bay Eutrophication: Scientific Understanding, Ecosystem Restoration, and Challenges for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesapeake Bay Eutrophication: Scientific Understanding, Ecosystem Restoration, and Challenges'scultural eutrophication and extensive efforts to reduce nutrient inputs. In 1987 a commitment was made to reduce of eutrophication were incompletely known. research, policies, and concerted management action Subsequent research

  9. Sustaining Healthy Freshwater EcosystemsIssuesinEcologyPublishedbytheEcologicalSocietyofAmericaNumber10,Winter2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    commodities and services to society. These services include flood control, transportation, recreation. · Aquatic ecosystems additionally require that sediments and shorelines, heat and light properties, chemical restoration efforts using well-grounded ecological principles as guidelines. 5) Maintaining and protecting

  10. Improving parameterization of scalar transport through vegetation in a coupled ecosystem-atmosphere model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Link, Percy Anne

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several regional-scale ecosystem models currently parameterize subcanopy scalar transport using a rough-wall boundary eddy diffusivity formulation. This formulation predicts unreasonably high soil evaporation beneath tall, ...

  11. The Human Capital Ecosystem Underlying the PLA’s Network Weapons Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McREYNOLDS, Joe; RAGLAND, Leigh A.; CHANG, Amy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem Underlying the PLA’s Network Weapons Developmentthe People’s Liberation Army (PLA). Although China’s networkdevelopment and some of the key PLA institutes that appear

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - african millennium ecosystem Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bank Kew, UK. The uniqueness of the area's plant biodiversity... I to IV). THE SHIMBA HILLS In Kenya, the Coastal Forest ecosystem is mainly confined to a relatively Source:...

  13. Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Cory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual ecosystem respiration Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 CO2Exchange(umolCO2m2 duringdaytime) Summary: respiration. Ecosystem carbon and water exchange are not affected by the watering event. In April, however... carbon flux ...

  15. An Eco-system of Nurturing Talent--MSRA Guest Professorship Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    An Eco-system of Nurturing Talent--MSRA Guest Professorship Program When Microsoft researchers for their internship program, and builds good relation- ships with technology faculty throughout China. "We know well

  16. Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

  17. Trading places : the development of markets for ecosystem services in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Maasakkers, Mattijs J. (Mattijs Johannes)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of ecosystem services has become ubiquitous in environmental planning and policy. One way of turning the insight that society depends on nature for a wide range of benefits into practice is by creating markets ...

  18. ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of species-led conservation on ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Biodiversity conservation organisations have recently begun to consider a wider ecosystem services context targeted biodiversity conservation initiatives have been successful at con- serving species and habitats) demonstrates that biodiversity conservation often loses out to other interests (Wilcove et al. 1998

  19. Land conversion in Amazonia and Northern South America : influences on regional hydrology and ecosystem response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knox, Ryan Gary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical model of the terrestrial biosphere (Ecosystem Demography Model) is compbined with an atmospheric model (Brazilian Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) to investigate how land conversion in the Amazon and ...

  20. The evolution of business ecosystems : interspecies competition in the steel industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathur, Akshat

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis contributes toward the building of a theory of the evolution of business ecosystems by exploring the applicability of Piepenbrock's' theoretical framework to a commodity industrial setting, namely the U.S. steel ...

  1. Population ecology of rodents in a mixed coniferous forest ecosystem, North Rim, Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruffner, George Andrew

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    POPULATION ECOLOGY OF RODENTS IN A MIXED CONIFEROUS FOREST ECOSYSTEM, NORTH RIM, ARIZONA A Thesis by GEORGE ANDREW RUFPNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences POPULATION ECOLOGY OF RODENTS IN A MIXED CONIFEROUS FOREST ECOSYSTEM, NORTH RIM, ARIZONA A Thesis by GEORGE ANDREW RUFFNER Approved as to style and content by: (Cha n...

  2. Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments NGEE Arctic Quarterly Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clips 10 Appendix 11 #12;2 Can Microbial Community Composition be Incorporated into Earth System Models? Accurate projections of greenhouse gas fluxes by Earth System Models require that they contain process and to mechanistically represent the complex plant-microbe-soil system in Earth System Models. Xu et al. (2011) Feedback

  3. Received: 1 October 2009, Revised: 21 June 2010, Accepted: 5 August 2010, Published online in Wiley Online Library: 10 February 2011 Ecosystem valuation: some principles and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and adapt definitions of ecosystem services in order to make an operational link to valuation methods. We clarification to practitioners on important considerations in ecosystem services valuation. We first review where valuation fits into the overall ecosystem services framework and discuss ecosystem service

  4. FSC has 'failed the world's forests' say critics FSC has 'failed the world's forests' say critics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a variety of environmental organizations. The FSC is an international not-for-profit organization for slipping standards The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) has come under increasingly harsh criticisms from environmental organizations like World Rainforest Movement and Ecological Internet are putting the organization

  5. 1 When the Third World Fell Behind 1.1 The World Economic Order in 1960

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for it must be before the industrial revolution. And we see it over the long century 1700 to 1820, where capita income and living standards between what this book will call the rich industrial core and the poor pre-industrial periphery. The second characteristic of the world economic order was that the poor

  6. Application of sewage sludge to non-agricultural ecosystems: Assessment of contaminant risks to wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sample, B.E.; Efroymson, R.A.; Barnthouse, L.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Daniel, F.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Office of Research and Development

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a larger study evaluating nutrient and contaminant impacts associated with the land application of biosolids in four non-agricultural ecosystems: Pacific Northwest forests, semi-arid rangelands, eastern deciduous forests, and southeasternpine plantations. Because contaminants in biosolids may be taken up by biota and transferred through the food web, they may present a risk to wildlife. Biosolids application scenarios that reflect actual practices in each ecosystem were developed. Concentrations of contaminants in biosolids were obtained from the US EPA`s 1988 National Sewage Sludge Survey. Soil-biota uptake factors for contaminants in sludge were developed from contaminant studies performed in each ecosystem type. Where ecosystem-specific data were unavailable, more generalized factors were used. Endpoints were selected that reflected species expected to be present in each ecosystem. Four trophic groups were considered: herbivores (e.g., deer) vermivores (earthworm-consumers; e.g., shrews), insectivores (e.g., songbirds), and carnivores (e.g., fox). Contaminant concentrations in wildlife foods were estimated using the uptake factors. These estimates were then incorporated into models to estimate the contaminant exposure for endpoints in each trophic group in each ecosystem. Exposure estimates were then compared to NOAELs and LOAELs to determine the nature and magnitude of risks that biosolids may present to wildlife.

  7. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J.(Penn State)

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  8. Hydridomethyl iridium complex

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Buchanan, J. Michael (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Stryker, Jeffrey M. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141); Wax, Michael J. (P.O. Box 7141, San Francisco, CA 94120-7141)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for functionalizing methane comprising: (a) reacting methane with a hydridoalkyl metal complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]H(R.sub.2) wherein Cp represents a cyclopentadienyl or alkylcyclopentadienyl radical having from 1 to 5 carbon atoms; Ir represents an iridium atom; P represents a phosphorus atom; R.sub.1 represents an alkyl group; R.sub.2 represents an alkyl group having at least two carbon atoms; and H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of a liquid alkane R.sub.3 H having at least three carbon atoms to form a hydridomethyl complex of the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]HMe where Me represents a methyl radical. (b) reacting said hydridomethyl complex with an organic halogenating agent such as a tetrahalomethane or a haloform of the formulas: CX'X"X'"X"" or CHX'X"X'"; wherein X', X", X"', and X"" represent halogens selected from bromine, iodine and chlorine, to halomethyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpIr[P(R.sub.1).sub.3 ]MeX: (c) reacting said halomethyl complex with a mercuric halide of the formula HgX.sub.2 to form a methyl mercuric halide of the formula HgMeX; and (d) reacting said methyl mercuric halide with a molecular halogen of the formula X.sub.2 to form methyl halide.

  9. Real-World Hydrogen Technology Validation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Eudy, L.; Saur, G.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy, the Department of Defense's Defense Logistics Agency, and the Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration have funded learning demonstrations and early market deployments to provide insight into applications of hydrogen technologies on the road, in the warehouse, and as stationary power. NREL's analyses validate the technology in real-world applications, reveal the status of the technology, and facilitate the development of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, manufacturing, and operations. This paper presents the maintenance, safety, and operation data of fuel cells in multiple applications with the reported incidents, near misses, and frequencies. NREL has analyzed records of more than 225,000 kilograms of hydrogen that have been dispensed through more than 108,000 hydrogen fills with an excellent safety record.

  10. Synchronization in complex networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  11. Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Letschert, Virginie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paris IEA (2006). World Energy Outlook, International EnergyAgency. IEA (2002). World Energy Outlook, Internationalprimarily in the IEA’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2002 (2000

  12. ThePortugalMillenniumEcosystemAssessment(ptMA)(http://ecossistemas.org) is analyzing the condition of ecosystem services in Portugal, recent trends in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pereira, Henrique Miguel

    , cultivated, and urban. Montado, which is not a global MA system, is an ecolog- ical and economically the users interacted with the scientists, and how the scientists interacted with the local population into ecosystems based on the global MA systems: marine, coastal, inland water, forest, montado, island, mountain

  13. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raymond, Kenneth N; Corneillie, Todd M; Xu, Jide

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  14. An Evidence-Based Evaluation of the Cumulative Effects of Tidal Freshwater and Estuarine Ecosystem Restoration on Endangered Juvenile Salmon in the Columbia River: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Woodley, Christa M.; Weitkamp, Laurie A.; Buenau, Kate E.; Kropp, Roy K.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The listing of 13 salmon and steelhead stocks in the Columbia River basin (hereafter collectively referred to as “salmon”) under the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended, has stimulated tidal wetland restoration in the lower 235 kilometers of the Columbia River and estuary for juvenile salmon habitat functions. The purpose of the research reported herein was to evaluate the effect on listed salmon of the restoration effort currently being conducted under the auspices of the federal Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Linking changes in the quality and landscape pattern of tidal wetlands in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE) to salmon recovery is a complex problem because of the characteristics of the ecosystem, the salmon, the restoration actions, and available sampling technologies. Therefore, we designed an evidence-based approach to develop, synthesize, and evaluate information to determine early-stage (~10 years) outcomes of the CEERP. We developed an ecosystem conceptual model and from that, a primary hypothesis that habitat restoration activities in the LCRE have a cumulative beneficial effect on juvenile salmon. There are two necessary conditions of the hypothesis: • habitat-based indicators of ecosystem controlling factors, processes, and structures show positive effects from restoration actions, and • fish-based indicators of ecosystem processes and functions show positive effects from restoration actions and habitats undergoing restoration. Our evidence-based approach to evaluate the primary hypothesis incorporated seven lines of evidence, most of which are drawn from the LCRE. The lines of evidence are spatial and temporal synergies, cumulative net ecosystem improvement, estuary-wide meta-analysis, offsite benefits to juvenile salmon, landscape condition evaluation, and evidence-based scoring of global literature. The general methods we used to develop information for the lines of evidence included field measurements, data analyses, modeling, meta-analysis, and reanalysis of previously collected data sets. We identified a set of 12 ancillary hypotheses regarding habitat and salmon response. Each ancillary hypothesis states that the response metric will trend toward conditions at relatively undisturbed reference sites. We synthesized the evidence for and against the two necessary conditions by using eleven causal criteria: strength, consistency, specificity, temporality, biological gradient, plausibility, coherence, experiment, analogy, complete exposure pathway, and predictive performance. Our final evaluation included cumulative effects assessment because restoration is occurring at multiple sites and the collective effect is important to salmon recovery. We concluded that all five lines of evidence from the LCRE indicated positive habitat-based and fish-based responses to the restoration performed under the CEERP, although tide gate replacements on small sloughs were an exception. Our analyses suggested that hydrologic reconnections restore access for fish to move into a site to find prey produced there. Reconnections also restore the potential for the flux of prey from the site to the main stem river, where our data show that they are consumed by salmon. We infer that LCRE ecosystem restoration supports increased juvenile salmon growth and enhanced fitness (condition), thereby potentially improving survival rates during the early ocean stage.

  15. 2010 19th World Congress of Soil Science, Soil Solutions for a Changing World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    underestimated in parts of northwestern and central Russia (Boyd et al., 2009). Soil contaminated from smelter concentrations. Native plants like berries and mushrooms growing 3000 km2 around the smelter complex contain

  16. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Ensheng [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Weile [NASA Ames Research Center; Wang, Han [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Hastings, Alan [University of California, Davis; Schimel, David [NEON Inc.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

  17. Complex Systems and Brain Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Charles E. Schmidt College of Science www.ccs.fau.edu #12;Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences Our Mission The mission of the Center for Complex Systems and Brain Sciences is to understand the principles and mechanisms underlying complex behavior

  18. Alan Turing and the Origins of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel-Angel Martin-Delgado

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The 75th anniversary of Turing's seminal paper and his centennial year anniversary occur in 2011 and 2012, respectively. It is natural to review and assess Turing's contributions in diverse fields in the light of new developments that his thoughts has triggered in many scientific communities. Here, the main idea is to discuss how the work of Turing allows us to change our views on the foundations of Mathematics, much like quantum mechanics changed our conception of the world of Physics. Basic notions like computability and universality are discussed in a broad context, making special emphasis on how the notion of complexity can be given a precise meaning after Turing, i.e., not just qualitative but also quantitative. Turing's work is given some historical perspective with respect to some of his precursors, contemporaries and mathematicians who took up his ideas farther.

  19. Alan Turing and the Origins of Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin-Delgado, Miguel-Angel

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 75th anniversary of Turing's seminal paper and his centennial year anniversary occur in 2011 and 2012, respectively. It is natural to review and assess Turing's contributions in diverse fields in the light of new developments that his thoughts has triggered in many scientific communities. Here, the main idea is to discuss how the work of Turing allows us to change our views on the foundations of Mathematics, much like quantum mechanics changed our conception of the world of Physics. Basic notions like computability and universality are discussed in a broad context, making special emphasis on how the notion of complexity can be given a precise meaning after Turing, i.e., not just qualitative but also quantitative. Turing's work is given some historical perspective with respect to some of his precursors, contemporaries and mathematicians who took up his ideas farther.

  20. Energy and the Evolution of World-Systems: Fueling Power and Environmental Degradation, 1800-2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Kirk Steven

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    percentage of world energy consumption over the two decades,82 percent of total world energy consumption, as produced byof world GDP % of world energy consumption As is common in

  1. Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall Lectures Feature Life of Einstein; Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Sept. 22, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's first 2010 Fall Science Series lecture,...

  2. Jefferson Lab Fall Lecture: Exploring Our World With Particle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fall Lecture: Exploring Our World With Particle Accelerators NEWPORT NEWS, Va., Nov. 9, 2010 - Jefferson Lab's 2010 Fall Science Lecture Series concludes on Tuesday, Nov. 23, with...

  3. Power Builds Ships Northwest Hydropower Helps Win World War II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power-Builds-Ships-Northwest-Hydropower-Helps-Win-World-War-II Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives...

  4. Scientists use world's fastest computer to model materials under...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials under extreme conditions Scientists use world's fastest computer to model materials under extreme conditions Materials scientists are for the first time attempting to...

  5. Networking and the Web World-Wide Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    Networking and the Web #12;World-Wide Web · Wide use of computers Web · Key components of the web ­ Computer Communica8on Networks

  6. Renewable Energy World Conference and Expo North America

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable Energy World Conference & Expo North America will be co-located with Power Generation Week, providing networking opportunities with 20,000+ professionals and key decision makers.

  7. World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed target experiments. The second is to maintain circulating beams, either for synchrotron light sources or for colliding beam experiments. Given the differing requirements, these two uses led to rather different implementations and, in particular, different average operating gradients. A second difference in the implementation is the speed of the particle being accelerated. Electrons are sufficiently relativistic at low beam energies (> {approx} 5 MeV) that cavities designed for relativistic beams can also function acceptably at low energy. This is not the case for protons or ion accelerators so, until recently, copper cavities were used to cover the first {approx} 100 MeV. Superconducting cavities are now also being proposed to cover this energy range as well using a series of superconducting cavities, each of which is matched to the particle velocity.

  8. World Energy Projection System model documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutzler, M.J.; Anderson, A.T.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The World Energy Projection System (WEPS) was developed by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting within the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent statistical and analytical agency of the US Department of Energy. WEPS is an integrated set of personal computer based spreadsheets containing data compilations, assumption specifications, descriptive analysis procedures, and projection models. The WEPS accounting framework incorporates projections from independently documented models and assumptions about the future energy intensity of economic activity (ratios of total energy consumption divided by gross domestic product GDP), and about the rate of incremental energy requirements met by natural gas, coal, and renewable energy sources (hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and other renewable resources). Projections produced by WEPS are published in the annual report, International Energy Outlook. This report documents the structure and procedures incorporated in the 1998 version of the WEPS model. It has been written to provide an overview of the structure of the system and technical details about the operation of each component of the model for persons who wish to know how WEPS projections are produced by EIA.

  9. World copper smelter sulfur balance-1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Towle, S.W. (Bureau of Mines, Denver, CO (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989, the US Bureau of Mines initiated a contract to gather engineering, operating, and environmental cost data for 1988 for 30 major foreign primary copper smelters in market economy countries. Data were collected for 29 of the designated smelters together with information on applicable environmental regulations. Materials balance data obtained were used with available data for the eight US smelters to determine the approximate extent of copper smelter sulfur emission control in 1988. A broad characterization of the status of sulfur emission control regulation was made. The 37 US and foreign smelters represented roughly 73.2% of world and 89.3% of market economy primary copper production in 1988. The 29 non-US smelters attained 55.3% control of their input sulfur in 1988. Combined with the 90.4% control of US smelters, an aggregate 63.4% sulfur control existed. Roughly 1,951,100 mt of sulfur was emitted from the 37 market economy smelters in 1988. Identifiable SO[sub 2] control regulations covered 72.4% of the 29 foreign smelters, representing 65.5% of smelting capacity. Including US smelters, 78.4% of the major market economy smelters were regulated, representing 73.1% of smelting capacity. Significant changes since 1988 that may increase sulfur emission control are noted.

  10. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

  11. Microbial and viral genomics of surface ocean communities within the Southern California Bight and adjacent California Current Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeigler, Lisa Ann

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current Ecosystem by Lisa Ann Zeigler Doctor of Philosophyin Oceanography by Lisa Ann Zeigler Committee in Charge:Subramaniam Copyright Lisa Ann Zeigler, 2011 All rights

  12. Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.

    1990-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A proposal for continuation of research on net ecosystem carbon dioxide and methane flux and sampling and analysis of soil samples from arctic tundra regions is presented.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation predicting real-world Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Classification Problems From The Real World Microarray Classification Heart Attack Prediction Phoneme... Classification Problems From The Real World Microarray...

  14. Complexity Classifications for Propositional Abduction in Post's Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creignou, Nadia; Thomas, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate the complexity of abduction, a fundamental and important form of non-monotonic reasoning. Given a knowledge base explaining the world's behavior it aims at finding an explanation for some observed manifestation. In this paper we consider propositional abduction, where the knowledge base and the manifestation are represented by propositional formulae. The problem of deciding whether there exists an explanation has been shown to be \\SigPtwo-complete in general. We focus on formulae in which the allowed connectives are taken from certain sets of Boolean functions. We consider different variants of the abduction problem in restricting both the manifestations and the hypotheses. For all these variants we obtain a complexity classification for all possible sets of Boolean functions. In this way, we identify easier cases, namely \\NP-complete, \\coNP-complete and polynomial cases. Thus, we get a detailed picture of the complexity of the propositional abduction problem, hence highlighting s...

  15. Your World Magazine - Microbes: Parts and Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biotechnology Institute

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms are tiny, but together, they make up more than 60 percent of the earth's living matter. Often people think only of bacteria when they talk about microbes, but viruses, fungi, protozoa, and microalgae are also microbes. Scientists estimate that there are 2 to 3 billion species of microorganisms. By learning what genes microbes contain and how they are arranged, what they do, and how they are expressed, researchers get a better grasp on how microbes have evolved, new possibilities for diagnosing and treating diseases, and ideas for ways to clean up the environment and produce energy. You can be a part of this exciting work in many ways. Figuring out the genes in microbes, or microbial genomics, is a field that gets a lot of help from computer science and mathematics. You could go into bioinformatics, which uses computers to collect and sort information about living matter. Or you could try computational modeling and help develop simple models of what an organism would look like and how it would function. Researchers want to understand microbes genetics well enough to build useful ones. As we move toward that possibility, we need to think about how that ability can be used wisely or poorly. Enjoy learning about microbial genomics in this issue of Your World, and think about what part you'd like to take in exploring this vital field. Some current uses of microbes are: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) - produces the CO{sub 2} that makes bread rise and is also used to make beer; (2) Streptomyces - soil bacteria that make streptomycin, an antibiotic, used to treat infections; (3) Pseudomonas putida - one of many microbes used to clean wastes from sewage at water treatment plants; (4) Escherichia coli - one of many kinds of microbes that live in your gut and help digest your food; and (5) Bacillus thuringiensis - a common soil bacterium that acts as a natural pest-killer in gardens and on crops.

  16. Fish Migration, Dams, and Loss of Ecosystem Services in the Mekong Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugan, Patrick J. [WorldFish Center; Barlow, Chris [Australian Center for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR); Agostinho, Angelo A. [Fundacao University, Parana Brazil; Baran, Eric [WorldFish Center; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Chen, Daqing [Yangtze River Fisheries Research Institute, People's Republic of China; Cowx, Ian G. [Hull International Fisheries Research Institute, England; Ferguson, John W. [North West Fisheries Science Center, Seattle, WA; Jutagate, Tuantong [Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand; Mallen-Cooper, Martin [Fishway Consulting Service, Australia; Marmulla, Gerd [Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), Rome, Italy; Nestler, John [USA Corps Engineers, Concord, MA USA; Petrere, Miquel [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, Brazil; Winemiller, Kirk O. [Texas A& M University

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past decade has seen increased international recognition of the importance of the services provided by natural ecosystems. It is unclear however whether such international awareness will lead to improved environmental management in many regions. We explore this issue by examining the specific case of fish migration and dams on the Mekong river. We determine that dams on the Mekong mainstem and major tributaries will have a major impact on the basin's fisheries and the people who depend upon them for food and income. We find no evidence that current moves towards dam construction will stop, and consider two scenarios for the future of the fisheries and other ecosystems of the basin. We conclude that major investment is required in innovative technology to reduce the loss of ecosystem services, and alternative livelihood strategies to cope with the losses that do occur

  17. Creating a Digital Ecosystem: Service Orientated Architectures with Distributed Evolutionary Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optimisation technique inspired by natural ecosystems is presented where the optimisation works at two levels: a first optimisation, migration of services which are distributed in a decentralised peer-to-peer network operating continuously in time; this process feeds a second optimisation based on a genetic algorithm that operates locally on single peers and is aimed at finding solutions satisfying locally relevant constraints. Through this twofold process, the local search is sped up and yields better local optima as the distributed optimisation already provides a good sampling of the search space by making use of computations already performed in other peers with similar constraints. We call this new distributed optimisation architecture a Digital Ecosystem, which is created by extending a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) with Distributed Evolutionary Computing (DEC). The EvE Digital Ecosystem will contain services specially supported by application software written to take advantage of the ecosy...

  18. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  19. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  20. Global vegetation model diversity and the risks of climate-driven ecosystem shifts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is modifying global biogeochemical cycles, and is expected to exert increasingly large effects in the future. How these changes will in turn affect and interact with the structure and function of particular ecosystems is unclear, however, both because of scientific uncertainties and the very diversity of global vegetation models in use. Writing in Environmental Research Letters, Warszawski et al. (1) aggregate results from a group of models, across a range of emissions scenarios and climate data, to investigate these risks. Although the models frequently disagree about which specific regions are at risk, they consistently predict a greater chance of ecosystem restructuring with more warming; this risk roughly doubles between 2 and 3 °C increases in global mean temperature. The innovative work of Warszawski et al. represents an important first step towards fully consistent multi-model, multi-scenario assessments of the future risks to global ecosystems.

  1. Extending the Reach of Augmented Cognition To Real-World Decision Making Tasks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this paper is on the critical challenge of bridging the gap between psychophysiological sensor data and the inferred cognitive states of users. It is argued that a more robust behavioral data collection foundation will facilitate accurate inferences about the state of the user so that an appropriate mitigation strategy, if needed, can be applied. The argument for such a foundation is based on two premises: (1) To realize the envisioned impact of augmented cognition systems, the technology should be applied to a broad, and more cognitively complex, range of real-world problems. (2) To support identifying cognitive states for more complex, real-world tasks, more sophisticated instrumentation will be needed for behavioral data collection. It is argued that such instrumentation would enable inferences to be made about higher-level semantic aspects of performance. The paper describes how instrumentation software developed to support information analysis R&D may serve as an integration environment that can provide additional behavioral data, in context, to facilitate inferences of cognitive state that will enable the successful augmenting of cognitive performance.

  2. Interim Results from a Study of the Impacts of Tin (II) Based Mercury Treatment in a Small Stream Ecosystem: Tims Branch, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); BryanJr., Larry [Savannah River Ecology Laboratory; Mathews, Teresa J [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Jett, Robert T [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A research team is assessing the impacts of an innovative mercury treatment system in Tims Branch, a small southeastern stream. The treatment system, installed in 2007, reduces and removes inorganic mercury from water using tin(II) (stannous) chloride addition followed by air stripping. The system results in discharge of inorganic tin to the ecosystem. This screening study is based on historical information combined with measurements of contaminant concentrations in water, fish, sediment, biofilms and invertebrates. Initial mercury data indicate that first few years of mercury treatment resulted in a significant decrease in mercury concentration in an upper trophic level fish, redfin pickerel, at all sampling locations in the impacted reach. For example, the whole body mercury concentration in redfin pickerel collected from the most impacted pond decreased approximately 72% between 2006 (pre-treatment) and 2010 (post-treatment). Over this same period, mercury concentrations in the fillet of redfin pickerel in this pond were estimated to have decreased from approximately 1.45 {micro}g/g (wet weight basis) to 0.45 {micro}g/g - a decrease from 4.8x to 1.5x the current EPA guideline concentration for mercury in fillet (0.3 {micro}g/g). Thermodynamic modeling, scanning electron microscopy, and other sampling data for tin suggest that particulate tin (IV) oxides are a significant geochemical species entering the ecosystem with elevated levels of tin measured in surficial sediments and biofilms. Detectable increases in tin in sediments and biofilms extended approximately 3km from the discharge location. Tin oxides are recalcitrant solids that are relatively non-toxic and resistant to dissolution. Work continues to develop and validate methods to analyze total tin in the collected biota samples. In general, the interim results of this screening study suggest that the treatment process has performed as predicted and that the concentration of mercury in upper trophic level fish, as a surrogate for all of the underlying transport and transformation processes in a complex ecosystem, has declined as a direct result of the elimination of inorganic mercury inputs. Inorganic tin released to the ecosystem has been found in compartments where particles accumulate with notable levels measured in biofilms.

  3. Response of tundra ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. [Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oechel, W.C.; Grulke, N.E.

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Our past research shows that arctic tussock tundra responds to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with marked increases in net ecosystem carbon flux and photosynthetic rates. However, at ambient temperatures and nutrient availabilities, homeostatic adjustments result in net ecosystem flux rates dropping to those found a contemporary CO{sub 2} levels within three years. Evidence for ecosystem-level acclimation in the first season of elevated CO{sub 2} exposure was found in 1987. Photosynthetic rates of Eriophorum vaginatum, the dominant species, adjusts to elevated CO{sub 2} within three weeks. Past research also indicates other changes potentially important to ecosystem structure and function. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatment apparently delays senescence and increases the period of positive photosynthetic activity. Recent results from the 1987 field season verify the results obtained in the 1983--1986 field seasons: Elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in increased ecosystem-level flux rates. Regressions fitted to the seasonal flux rates indicate an apparent 10 d extension of positive CO{sub 2} uptake reflecting a delay of the onset of plant dormancy. This delay in senescence could increase the frost sensitivity of the system. Major end points proposed for this research include the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and the interaction of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with elevated soil temperature and increased nutrient availability on: (1) Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (2) Net photosynthetic rates; (3) Patterns and resource controls on homeostatic adjustment in the above processes to elevated CO{sub 2}; (4) Plant-nutrient status, litter quality, and forage quality; (5) Soil-nutrient status; (6) Plant-growth pattern and shoot demography.

  4. 18 Science and the Modern World Steven Shapin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapin, Steven

    18 Science and the Modern World Steven Shapin O Science Made the Modern World, and it's science then and whose obviousness has, if anything, become even more pronounced over time. Science continues to Make society, the knowledge economy--it's science that's understood to be their motive force. It's science

  5. NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Atlas NESDIS 66 WORLD OCEAN DATABASE 2009 Timothy P. Boyer John I. Antonov Olga K. Baranova. Mishonov, T. D. O'Brien, D. Seidov, I. V. Smolyar, M. M. Zweng, 2009. World Ocean Database 2009. S. Levitus ................................................................................................. 18 1.1.1. History

  6. 2013 Team UniSA-Australia World class thinking.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    2013 Team UniSA-Australia guide World class thinking. World class talent. #12;Intoduction A message from Patrick Jonker, Team UniSA-Australia Ambassador Rider Profiles > Bernard Sulzberger > Adam Phelan and contacts 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Team UniSA-Australia contents #12;3 Team UniSA-Australia A modern, vibrant

  7. Mobile Interaction with Web Services through Associated Real World Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobile Interaction with Web Services through Associated Real World Objects 1 Gregor Broll, 2 John to access and interact with Web Services through mobile interaction with real world objects. The demonstration will put a focus on the front-end of the framework that comprises augmented posters for mobile

  8. China in the World Trade Organization: Antidumping and Safeguards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    China in the World Trade Organization: Antidumping and Safeguards Patrick A. Messerlin China finds of antidumping measures, but (so far) one of the smallest users of such measures. China's World Trade China's recent antidumping enforcement; how China could minimize its exposure to foreign antidumping

  9. World Wide WebWWWDeep Web Web Deep Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deep Web Web World Wide WebWWWDeep Web Web Deep Web Deep Web Deep Web Deep Web Deep Web 1 World Wide Web [1] Web 200,000TB Web Web Web Internet Web Web Web "" Surface Web Deep Web Surface Web 21.3% Surface Web Deep Web [2] Deep Web Web Crawler Deep Web 1 Web

  10. Horizon 2020 Societal Challenge 6 Europe in a changing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schettini, Raimondo

    + Horizon 2020 ­ Societal Challenge 6 Europe in a changing world ­ Inclusive, Innovative dal gruppo di lavoro SSH di DG R&I SSH in H2020 Focalizzate in "Europe in a changing world Research and the Bioeconomy 3. Secure, Clean and Efficient Energy 4. Smart, Green and Integrated Transport

  11. Roadmap for Real World Internet applications Socioeconomic scenarios

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