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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

E-Print Network 3.0 - absorbing catalyst dispersion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

catalyst through- out the matrix. The use of catalyst microspheres resulted... syringe filters and the concentration of catalyst in each solution was measured by UV-vis...

2

E-Print Network 3.0 - active homogeneous catalyst Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

activity Develop lower temperature reforming catalysts Evaluate different feedstocks (pyrolysis vapors... Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass ... Source:...

3

E-Print Network 3.0 - ansa-zirconocene polymerization catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Materials Science 23 FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Summary: FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM...

4

E-Print Network 3.0 - anode catalyst pathway Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Polyols 16 Water-Gas Shift Catalysis via Mesoporous Catalysts 20 Pd on ceriasilica aerogel... and ceriasilica xerogel catalysts for WGS 23 Hydrogen Production in...

5

E-Print Network 3.0 - anode catalysts prepared Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel cells, by modifying both the anode and the cathode catalysts that will enable PEM fuel cell... catalyst as a separate phase - as nanoparticles. 2. ... Source: DOE Office of...

6

E-Print Network 3.0 - assisted catalyst system Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

30 to December 31, 2006 Summary: and F-T Catalysts Supported on CeriaSilica Aerogels 14 Hydrogen production by carbon assisted... catalyst supports for WGS and F-T were...

7

E-Print Network 3.0 - adding crabtrees catalyst Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

; Chemistry 13 FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Summary: ) are shown in Table 2a. Table 2b describes each...

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional catalysts include Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 FLUIDIZABLE CATALYSTS FOR PRODUCING HYDROGEN BY STEAM REFORMING BIOMASS PYROLYSIS LIQUIDS Summary: had unimpregnated support material in addition to...

9

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile catalyst recycling Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile catalyst recycling Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 SUPPLIERS WITHIN AN ECOLOGICALLY...

10

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced heterogeneous catalysts Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Hydrogen Summary: Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using Co and Ru supported on silica aerogels as catalysts 21 Metal impregnation... Hexane Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over an...

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerogel based catalysts Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing and Compressive Properties of AerogelEpoxy Composites Summary: of aerogels are observed in battery electrodes 2, catalysts 3 and electronic devices 4....

12

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonia synthesis catalyst Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Hydrogen Summary: Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using Co and Ru supported on silica aerogels as catalysts 21 Metal impregnation... Hexane Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis over an...

13

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative silp-scr catalysts Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Abstract The catalytic cracking of methane over supported nickel catalysts Source: zur Loye, Hans-Conrad - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina...

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohols catalyst names Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

synthesized catalysts for alcohol synthesis. We focus on structural... the use of biogas to create alcohol for fuel. Higher alcohols ... Source: Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. -...

15

E-Print Network 3.0 - alcohol synthesis catalysts Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

synthesized catalysts for alcohol synthesis. We focus on structural... the use of biogas to create alcohol for ... Source: Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. - Department of Materials...

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid catalysts synthesized Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

report for period September 30 to December 31, 2006 Summary: . Syntheses of iron aerogels doped with Co have been carried out for use as FT catalysts. 5. EMR and XRD... . This...

17

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous-phase rh-norbos catalysts Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pt-99 wt.% Al2O3... Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using Co and Ru supported on silica aerogels as catalysts 21 Metal impregnation Source: Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science, C1...

18

WORKING PAPER N 2013 22 The long Term Effects of the Printing Press in Sub Saharan Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WORKING PAPER N° 2013 ­ 22 The long Term Effects of the Printing Press in Sub Saharan Africa Julia-00844446,version1-15Jul2013 #12;THE LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF THE PRINTING PRESS IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA Julia Cag of the newspaper and came to employ it as the chief weapon by which they were to exercise their power

19

academic reference works: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to Get References into RefWorks Engineering Websites Summary: time. Type in your search terms. 5. Import from a text file. This method works for some onlineWorks function is...

20

assessment work plan: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pushing Working Families into Poverty: Assessing the New Haven Plan to Privatize the Public Schools, Amherst March 2011 12;Pushing Working Families into Poverty: Assessing the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Researchers hope better catalysts lead to better ways of converting...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Researchers hope better catalysts lead to better ways of converting biomass to fuel By Jared Sagoff * August 7, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint ARGONNE, Ill. - Scientists and entrepreneurs...

22

auditory working memory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

requires not only attention Sturm, Alexandra Noelle 2013-01-01 9 Working Memory and Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: Recent research has demonstrated that dyslexic children suffer...

23

annual working conference: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

139 Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA CAS Working Conference Physics Websites Summary: Conference Library and Information...

24

assessment working group: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 47 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

25

airp work group: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 35 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

26

aer working group: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(PV) Systems June 2012 First Edition 12;California Solar Permitting Guidebook2 37 DOE Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Renewable Energy Websites Summary: DOE Hydrogen...

27

Oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

Ceyer, Sylvia T. (Cambridge, MA); Lahr, David L. (Cambridge, MA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Molecularly engineering homogenous catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quickly. To attempt to 1G overcome this problem, Bergbreiter's group began work on synthesis of palladacycles in an attempt to find a more robust catalyst. The group was spurred to do this by the success of Denmark using chiral bis (oxazoline) palladium... (II) catalysts that proved to be active. Denmark's use of oxazoline ligands avoided the problem of phosphine oxidation. They were also inspired by Milstein and coworkers description of a phosphorus-carbon-phosphorus (PCP)-type tridentate ligand...

Hughes, Reagan Rebekah

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

29

Aerogels as catalysts and catalyst supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels have been used as catalysts since the 1930`s. These materials are interesting because their high surface area means more active sites for gas/ solid interactions. Aerogels have important applications as catalyst supports and are stable as well, which is a real advantage for designing catalytic materials. The author discusses some recent work in his laboratory on developing aerogels as catalytic materials. An important step in preparing these materials is supercritical extraction with CO{sub 2}. Preparation and properties of titania, niobia, and titania-zirconia systems are discussed.

Ko, E.I. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Oxyhydrochlorination catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalyst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HCl and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Printing 3D Catalytic Devices | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Printing 3D Catalytic Devices Ames Laboratory scientist Igor Slowing discusses using 3D printers to create new materials, including catalysts...

32

Photo-oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Liu, Ping (Irvine, CA); Smith, R. Davis (Golden, CO)

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

33

90 Seconds of Discovery: Biofuel Catalyst Life and Plugs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scientist at PNNL are working to extend the life of the catalysts used in the production of biomass fuels.

Zacher, Alan; Olarte, Mariefel

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

90 Seconds of Discovery: Biofuel Catalyst Life and Plugs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Scientist at PNNL are working to extend the life of the catalysts used in the production of biomass fuels.

Zacher, Alan; Olarte, Mariefel

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Challenges for PEMFC Catalysts in Automotive Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Stephen Campbell for the 2013 DOE Catalysis Working Group Meeting on PEMFC catalysts in automotive applications.

36

Catalyst activator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst activator particularly adapted for use in the activation of metal complexes of metals of Group 3-10 for polymerization of ethylenically unsaturated polymerizable monomers, especially olefins, comprising two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms and a ligand structure including at least one bridging group connecting ligands on the two Group 13 metal or metalloid atoms.

McAdon, Mark H. (Midland, MI); Nickias, Peter N. (Midland, MI); Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Schwartz, David J. (Lake Jackson, TX)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Excellent Sulfur Resistance of Pt/BaO/CeO2 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NOx Trap Catalysts. Excellent Sulfur Resistance of PtBaOCeO2 Lean NOx Trap Catalysts. Abstract: In this work, we investigated the NOx storage behavior of Pt-BaOCeO2 catalysts,...

38

CatalystFall 2013 Volume 8 Issue 2 COLLEGE OF CHEMISTRY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2013 Catalyst 2 3 d e a n ' s d e s k It is a great pleasure for me to be writing my first column@berkeley.edu design Alissar Rayes Design printing Dome Printing Catalyst c o n t e n t s ON THE COVER Tomatoes from engineering are fields that nour- ish and sustain society. Moreover, solving many of the major challenges

Cohen, Ronald C.

39

Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Engineering Division Catalysts for autothermal reforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,110,861) awarded Oct 2000: CRADA w/H2Fuel to commercialize reformer Aug 2001: Began work on perovskite catalysts Feb 2002: CRADA w/Süd-Chemie to optimize catalyst performance Oct 2002: Demonstrated conversion

40

Applications of hydrogenation and dehydrogenation on noble metal catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogenation and dehydrogenation on Pd- and Pt- catalysts are encountered in many industrial hydrocarbon processes. The present work considers the development of catalysts and their kinetic modeling along a general and rigorous approach. The first...

Wang, Bo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

E-Print Network 3.0 - ad hoc working Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

works, an adaptive wireless communication infrastructure between power... , and self-sustaining ad hoc Grid frame- work. Although an ad hoc Grid must support structure-,...

42

catalyst beds | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

catalyst beds catalyst beds Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a candidate...

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-cancer drug works Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

has its own shape or color. This does not affect how it works. For example, Cipro... as a brand name drug: It works the same way in the body It is as safe. It has the same use. It...

44

E-Print Network 3.0 - action work plan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

work plan Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: action work plan Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The two faces of plan repair Roman van der...

45

E-Print Network 3.0 - action plan work Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

work Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: action plan work Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The two faces of plan repair Roman van der Krogt...

46

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual work plan Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

School of Management Working Professional MBA Program. ... Source: Ferrara, Katherine W. - Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, Davis Collection:...

47

E-Print Network 3.0 - attention working memory Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AND ATTENTIONAL CAPTURE 12... ;Working ... Source: Lavie, Nilli - Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience & Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London...

48

auditory-verbal working memory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Memory 4 Percept Result of filtering Memphis, University of 4 Working Memory and Dyslexia CiteSeer Summary: Recent research has demonstrated that dyslexic children suffer...

49

E-Print Network 3.0 - administrative intersectoral working Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working condition Behaviour Health and wellbeing HEALTH EQUITY Adapted from Graham and Kelly, 2004 Health Source: Wood, James B. - Bermuda Biological Station for Research...

50

E-Print Network 3.0 - athletic trainers working Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

We work under the direct supervision of our Team Physician(s). The athlete must... . Head Athletic Trainer Tom Monagan, MS, ATC, LAT Sport Responsibility: Men's Soccer, MW...

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternatives study working Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8... Statement This procedure must be followed when employees request approval to work at ... Source: Texas A&M University, Spatial Sciences Laboratory Collection:...

52

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids malignancies working Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

malignant and fibrous tissues with 93% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Although previous work shows... * Abstract--Nonmalignant ( 36) and malignant ( 20) tissue samples were...

53

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects working patterns Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Communications of the EASST Volume X (2010) Summary: and environment support. Our earlier work on abstract design pattern specification, DPML, has been reported... Formalisms for...

54

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis working group Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Student-Selected Groups: A View from Inside Summary: approach. Deep approaches to work allocation were based on an initial group analysis of the project... ABSTRACT: This...

55

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic work capacity Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

This publication provides a general overview of anaero- Summary: lost some of its biogas production potential. Anaerobic digesters work best when the digestion pro... at...

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - assurance working party Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Standards and Technology Collection: Chemistry 2 Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area Summary: . The credibility of the work of...

57

Electrochemical catalyst recovery method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: (a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; (b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; (c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and (d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications. 3 figs.

Silva, L.J.; Bray, L.A.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - adifor working note Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for 6 of 17 experimental studies Experiment 1 3 4 5 8 16 Summary: 710 425 425 650 850 tAD .0004377 .0005021 .0005797 .0005536 .0001747 .0002190 relative work ratio (t......

59

E-Print Network 3.0 - alignment works generacion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Blat, F. Garcia, S. Grau, D. Griol, E. Sanchis, E. Segarra, F. Torres Summary: alogo. Abstract: In this work we describe a dialog system developed into the DIHANA project. This...

60

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative work schedules Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Branch Delay Ivan D. Baev and Waleed M. Meleis Summary: that the branch does not transfer control to another scheduling region before x completes its work. For example... on how...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Printing a Car: A Team Effort in Innovation (Text Version) |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

video Printing a Car: A Team Effort in Innovation highlighting the demonstration of 3D printing to create a working electric vehicle, live during the International Manufacturing...

62

Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection during Transient Conditions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Working Group Meeting: June 2014 DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports...

63

Catalytic Transformation of C7-C9 Methyl Benzenes over USY-based FCC Zeolite Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the petrochemical market. Most of the currently working isomerization plants are using zeolite based catalysts. One

Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

64

Tungsten Cathode Catalyst for PEMFC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report for project to evaluate tungsten-based catalyst as a cathode catalyst for PEM cell applications.

Joel B. Christian; Sean P. E. Smith

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

How 3D Printers Work | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

How 3D Printers Work How 3D Printers Work June 19, 2014 - 9:28am Addthis How does 3D printing work? Watch a 3D printing timelapse video and read on below to learn everything you...

66

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

Davis, B.H.

1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

67

High-oxidation-state molybdenum and tungsten monoalkoxide pyrrolide alkylidenes as catalysts for olefin metathesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 describes work toward solid-supported W olefin metathesis catalysts. Attempts to tether derivatives of the known Z-selective catalyst W(NAr)(C?H?)(pyr)(OHIPT) (Ar = 2,6- diisopropylphenyl, pyr = pyrrolide; HIPT ...

Townsend, Erik Matthew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Noble metal catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of precious metals and platinum group metals as catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas is an active area of study. To date, field studies have recently focused on gold and palladium catalysts installed at pilot-scale. In this work, we introduce bench-scale results for gold, platinum, and palladium catalysts tested in realistic simulated flue gas. Initial results reveal intriguing characteristics of catalytic mercury oxidation and provide insight for future research.

Presto, A.A.; Granite, E.J.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

EMSL - catalyst beds  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

catalyst-beds en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-defe...

70

Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

Gorte, Raymond J.

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of a stable cobalt-ruthenium Fisher-Tropsch catalyst. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reverse micelle catalyst preparation method has been used to prepare catalysts on four supports: magnesium oxide, carbon, alumina- titania and steamed Y zeolite. These catalysts were not as active as a reference catalyst prepared during previous contracts to Union Carbide Corp. This catalyst was supported on steamed Y zerolite support and was impregnated by a pore-filling method using a nonaqueous solvent. Additional catalysts were prepared via pore- filling impregnation of steamed Y zeolites. These catalysts had levels of cobalt two to three and a half times as high as the original Union Carbide catalyst. On a catalyst volume basis they were much more active than the previous catalyst; on an atom by atom basis the cobalt was about of the same activity, i.e., the high cobalt catalysts` cobalt atoms were not extensively covered over and deactivated by other cobalt atoms. The new, high activity, Y zerolite catalysts were not as stable as the earlier Union Carbide catalyst. However, stability enhancement of these catalysts should be possible, for instance, through adjustment of the quantity and/or type of trace metals present. A primary objective of this work was determination whether small amounts of ruthenium could enhance the activity of the cobalt F-T catalyst. The reverse micelle catalysts were not activated by ruthenium, indeed scanning transmission electronic microscopy (STEM) analysis provided some evidence that ruthenium was not present in the cobalt crystallites. Ruthenium did not seem to activate the high cobalt Y zeolite catalyst either, but additional experiments with Y zeolite-supported catalysts are required. Should ruthenium prove not to be an effective promoter under the simple catalyst activation procedure used in this work, more complex activation procedures have been reported which are claimed to enhance the cobalt/ruthenium interaction and result in activity promotion by ruthenium.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Hydrocarbon cracking catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalyst composition for cracking hydrocarbons to maximize gasoline comprising: rare earth exchanged ''Y'' crystalline faujasite dispersed in a clay containing matrix material; and which has been subsequently further ion exchanged to contain 0.20 to 3.0 wt% yttrium, calculated as the oxide, whereby the yttrium is chemically combined in the catalyst composition.

Lochow, C.F.; Kovacs, D.B.

1988-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

Nanostructured catalyst supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Reducible oxide based catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

75

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

conducted by E. de Smit, I. Swart, C. Morin, B.M. Weckhuysen, and F.M.F. de Groot (Utrecht University, The Netherlands); J.F. Creemer, G.H. Hoveling, P.J. Kooyman, and H.W....

76

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff NUGWedged

77

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff NUGWedgedNanoscale Chemical

78

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff NUGWedgedNanoscale

79

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohn F. Geisz,AerialStaff NUGWedgedNanoscaleNanoscale

80

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplications -Battery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplications -BatteryNanoscale

82

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplications

83

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplicationsNanoscale Chemical

84

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplicationsNanoscale

85

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of a Working Catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData andFleet TestAccountsNanoparticleApplicationsNanoscaleNanoscale

86

Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Sopchak, David A. (Livermore, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Reynolds, John G. (San Ramon, CA); Satcher, Joseph H. (Patterson, CA); Gash, Alex E. (Brentwood, CA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

87

Epoxidation catalyst and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

Linic, Suljo (Ann Arbor, MI); Christopher, Phillip (Ann Arbor, MI)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Catalysts and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

Taylor, Charles E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Noceti, Richard P. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilication, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanidation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical. 2 figs.

Angelici, R.J.; Gao, H.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

90

CATALYSTS NHI Thermochemical Systems FY 2009 Year-End Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiscal Year 2009 work in the Catalysts project focused on advanced catalysts for the decomposition of sulfuric acid, a reaction common to both the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) cycle and the Hybrid Sulfur cycle. Prior years’ effort in this project has found that although platinum supported on titanium oxide will be an acceptable catalyst for sulfuric acid decomposition in the integrated laboratory scale (ILS) project, the material has short comings, including significant cost and high deactivation rates due to sintering and platinum evaporation. For pilot and larger scale systems, the catalyst stability needs to be improved significantly. In Fiscal Year 2008 it was found that at atmospheric pressure, deactivation rates of a 1 wt% platinum catalyst could be reduced by 300% by adding either 0.3 wt% iridium (Ir) or 0.3 wt% ruthenium (Ru) to the catalyst. In Fiscal Year 2009, work focused on examining the platinum group metal catalysts activity and stability at elevated pressures. In addition, simple and complex metal oxides are known to catalyze the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. These metal oxides could offer activities comparable to platinum but at significantly reduced cost. Thus a second focus for Fiscal Year 2009 was to explore metal oxide catalysts for the sulfuric acid decomposition reaction. In Fiscal Year 2007 several commercial activated carbons had been identified for the HI decomposition reaction; a reaction specific to the S-I cycle. Those materials should be acceptable for the pilot scale project. The activated carbon catalysts have some disadvantages including low activity at the lower range of reactor operating temperature (350 to 400°C) and a propensity to generate carbon monoxide in the presence of water that could contaminate the hydrogen product, but due to limited funding, this area had low priority in Fiscal Year 2009. Fiscal Year 2009 catalyst work included five tasks: development, and testing of stabilized platinum based H2SO4 catalysts, development and testing of metal oxide based H2SO4 catalysts, support of the ILS for catalyst studies, conducting a long term catalyst stability test at anticipated operating temperatures and pressures, and developing capabilities for conducting pressurized catalyst tests.

Daniel M. Ginosar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Plasmatron-catalyst system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

Bromberg, Leslie (Sharon, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Rabinovich, Alexander (Swampscott, MA); Alexeev, Nikolai (Moscow, RU)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Crystalline titanate catalyst supports  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A series of new crystalline titanates (CT) are shown to have considerable potential as catalyst supports. For Pd supported catalyst, the catalytic activity for pyrene hydrogenation was substantially different depending on the type of CT, and one was substantially more active than Pd on hydrous titanium oxide (HTO). For 1-hexene hydrogenation the activities of the new CTs were approximately the same as for the hydrous metal oxide supports.

Anthony, R.G.; Dosch, R.G.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nanotube/Nanowire Based ORR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation about nanotube or nanowire-based oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts, presented by Yushan Yan, University of Delaware, at the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

94

Hydrous metal oxide catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed at Sandia under a CRADA with Shell Development of Houston, Texas aimed at developing hydrous metal oxide (HMO) catalysts for oxidation of hydrocarbons. Autoxidation as well as selective oxidation of 1-octene was studied in the presence of HMO catalysts based on known oxidation catalysts. The desired reactions were the conversion of olefin to epoxides, alcohols, and ketones, HMOs seem to inhibit autoxidation reactions, perhaps by reacting with peroxides or radicals. Attempts to use HMOs and metal loaded HMOs as epoxidation catalysts were unsuccessful, although their utility for this reaction was not entirely ruled out. Likewise, alcohol formation from olefins in the presence of HMO catalysts was not achieved. However, this work led to the discovery that acidified HMOs can lead to carbocation reactions of hydrocarbons such as cracking. An HMO catalyst containing Rh and Cu that promotes the reaction of {alpha}-olefins with oxygen to form methyl ketones was identified. Although the activity of the catalyst is relatively low and isomerization reactions of the olefin simultaneously occur, results indicate that these problems may be addressed by eliminating mass transfer limitations. Other suggestions for improving the catalyst are also made. 57 refs.

Miller, J.E.; Dosch, R.G.; McLaughlin, L.I. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Process Research Dept.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Computational Design of Lignin Depolymerization Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lignin is a major component of plant cell walls that is typically underutilized in selective conversion strategies for renewable fuels and chemicals. The mechanisms by which thermal and catalytic treatments deconstruct lignin remain elusive, for which quantum mechanical calculations can offer fundamental insights. In this work, a computational approach has been used to elucidate the reductive deconstruction pathway of a ruthenium-catalyzed system. Transition states have been computed to determine the rate-limiting steps for a catalyst that cleaves arylether linkages. Our calculations are supported by experimental synthesis and kinetic and thermodynamic measurements of the deconstruction of model lignin dimers by a ruthenium catalyst with the ultimate objective of designing new catalysts to eventually utilize lignin in biorefineries.

Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Paton, R. S.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Highly Active and Stable MgAl2O4 Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts for Methane Steam Reforming: A Combined Experimental and Abstract: In this work we present a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of...

97

Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

Towards improved iron-based catalysts for direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron-based catalysts for direct coal liquefaction (DCL) have several advantages: they are cheap and environmentally benign, and have a reasonable activity in the sulfide form. Work in this area has recently been collected and published. work in our laboratory has focussed on catalysts made with ferric sulfide as a precursor. This material is unstable even at room temperature, and disproportionates to form pyrite (FeS{sub x}; PY) , non-stoichiometric pyrrhotite (FeS{sub x}, x {approx} 1; PH) , and elemental S. The value of x and the relative amounts of PY and PH depend upon the time and temperature of disproportionation. Materials from hydrothermal disproportionation at 200{degrees}C for 1 h have roughly equal amounts of PH and PY (on an iron basis), and these materials appear to make the most active and selective catalysts for DCL. These catalyst precursors and catalyst materials have been characterized by atomic adsorption spectroscopy (AA), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). The characterizations have been correlated to the reactions of Fe during disproportionation and to the performance of the catalysts. Improvements in these catalysts can be made in two ways: by altering the active sites, and by decreasing the particle sizes. In the present work, we present examples of both types. The active sites are altered by using small amounts of a second metal. The particle sizes are reduced by using an aerosol technique for preparation.

Dadyburjor, D.B.; Stiller, A.H.; Stinespring, C.D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

99

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over iron-rhodium alloy catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To investigate the nature of iron-rhodium alloy catalysts during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, a combination of experimental techniques were applied. Infrared spectroscopy was mainly used to extract direct information on the surface of catalysts under the reaction conditions. In addition, Mossbauer spectroscopy was employed to study the iron alloy catalysts. Further characterization of the catalysts was performed by chemisorption measurements. Hydrocarbon products of the CO + H/sub 2/ synthesis reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography. The working surface of a silica-supported rhodium catalyst was found to be saturated with molecular carbon monoxide. The intensity of the linear carbonyl absorption band remained constant compared to that for room temperature CO adsorption, while that of the bridge-bonded carbonyl absorption band was drastically reduced during the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The bridge-bonded adsorption sites are assumed to be the active sites for dissociating carbon monoxide. The hydrogenation rate of the linearly adsorbed carbon monoxide was much slower than the steady state reaction rate. The alloy catalyst did not form a bulk carbide, but the presence of surface carbon was suggested by the large shift of the linear carbonyl absorption band. On the other hand, infrared spectra on an iron catalyst showed only weak bands, indicating a high degree of CO dissociation. On a silica-supported iron-rhodium alloy catalyst, surface analysis by infrared spectroscopy presents evidence of well-mixed alloy formation. Three models of carbon monoxide adsorption were identified.

Choi, S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Process of making supported catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oxide supported metal catalysts have an additional metal present in intimate association with the metal catalyst to enhance catalytic activity. In a preferred mode, iridium or another Group VIII metal catalyst is supported on a titania, alumina, tungsten oxide, silica, or composite oxide support. Aluminum ions are readsorbed onto the support and catalyst, and reduced during calcination. The aluminum can be added as aluminum nitrate to the iridium impregnate solution, e.g. chloroiridic acid.

Schwarz, James A. (Fayetteville, NY); Subramanian, Somasundaram (Melvindale, MI)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Aerogel derived catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

1996-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Autothermal reforming catalyst and process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High activity steam reforming catalysts are described particularly adapted for use in autothermal reforming processes. A rhodium catalyst on a calcium oxide impregnated alumina substrate allow the autothermal reforming process to take place with substantially no carbon plugging at oxygen to carbon ratios below what had been considered critical for avoiding carbon plugging of the catalyst in the past.

Setzer, H. J.; Karavolis, S.; Lesieur, R. R.; Wnuck, W. G.

1984-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Zinc sulfide liquefaction catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for the liquefaction of carbonaceous material, such as coal, is set forth wherein coal is liquefied in a catalytic solvent refining reaction wherein an activated zinc sulfide catalyst is utilized which is activated by hydrogenation in a coal derived process solvent in the absence of coal.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal LIquefaction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the fourth six month period of this three year grant under the University Coal Research program. During this period, we have begun the synthesis of precipitated catalysts using a bench-top spray dryer. The influence of binders on particle strength was also studied using the ultrasonic fragmentation approach to derive particle breaking stress. A similar approach was used to derive particle strength of catalysts obtained from Mr. Robert Gormley at FETC. Over the next six month period, this work will be continued while the catalysts prepared here will be examined by TPR to determine reducibility and the extent of adverse iron-silica interactions. A fundamental study of Fe/silica interactions has been performed using temperature programmed reaction and TEM to provide understanding of how the silica binders influence the activity of Fe catalysts. To understand differences in the reducibility of the iron phase caused by silica, we have set up a temperature programmed reduction facility. TPR in H, as well as in CO was performed of Fe/ SiO, catalysts prepared by impregnation as well as by precipitation. What is unique about these studies is that high resolution TEM was performed on samples removed from the reactor at various stages of reduction. This helps provide direct evidence for the phase changes that are detected by TPR. We have continued the analysis of catalysts received from slurry reactor runs at Texas A&M university (TAMU) and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) by x-ray diffraction. The purpose of the XRD analysis was to determine the phase composition of catalysts derived from a slurry reaction run using Fe Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. We had previously described how catalyst removed in the hot wax may oxidize to magnetite if the wax is air-exposed. We have now received catalysts from CAER that were removed under a protective inert blanket, and we are in the process of analyzing them, but preliminary work presented here shows very little oxide by XRD. However, the catalyst that was used in these runs at CAER was a different composition than that used in previous runs, so the protective effect of an inert blanket will need further study. Finally, we point out how the interference by the wax can make it difficult in some cases to analyze the phases in a Fe catalyst. Several approaches have been used to remove the interference from the wax and we come to the surprising conclusion that Fe may be present in a working slurry reactor despite the high CO/ H{sub 2} ratio. Further work is underway to corroborate this finding.

Datye, A.K.

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

105

Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

Alonso, Gabriel (Chihuahua, MX); Chianelli, Russell R. (El Paso, TX); Fuentes, Sergio (Ensenada, MX); Torres, Brenda (El Paso, TX)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

106

The generation of efficient supported (Heterogeneous) olefin metathesis catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past decade, a new family of homogeneous metathesis catalysts has been developed that will tolerate most organic functionalities as well as water and air. These homogeneous catalysts are finding numerous applications in the pharmaceutical industry as well as in the production of functional polymers. In addition the catalysts are being used to convert seed oils into products that can substitute for those that are now made from petroleum products. Seed oils are unsaturated, contain double bonds, and are a ready source of linear hydrocarbon fragments that are specifically functionalized. To increase the number of applications in the area of biomaterial conversion to petrol chemicals, the activity and efficiency of the catalysts need to be as high as possible. The higher the efficiency of the catalysts, the lower the cost of the conversion and a larger number of practical applications become available. Active supported catalysts were prepared and tested in the conversion of seed oils and other important starting materials. The outcome of the work was successful and the technology has been transferred to a commercial operation to develop viable applications of the discovered systems. A biorefinery that converts seed oils is under construction in Indonesia. The catalysts developed in this study will be considered for the next generation of operations.

Grubbs, Robert H

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

107

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fluorination process using catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

1983-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fluorination process using catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

Hochel, Robert C. (Aiken, SC); Saturday, Kathy A. (Aiken, SC)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Binary ferrihydrite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered. 3 figs.

Huffman, G.P.; Zhao, J.; Feng, Z.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

111

Binary ferrihydrite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing a catalyst precursor comprises dissolving an iron salt and a salt of an oxoanion forming agent, in water so that a solution of the iron salt and oxoanion forming agent salt has a ratio of oxoanion/Fe of between 0.0001:1 to 0.5:1. Next is increasing the pH of the solution to 10 by adding a strong base followed by collecting of precipitate having a binary ferrihydrite structure. A binary ferrihydrite catalyst precursor is also prepared by dissolving an iron salt in water. The solution is brought to a pH of substantially 10 to obtain ferrihydrite precipitate. The precipitate is then filtered and washed with distilled water and subsequently admixed with a hydroxy carboxylic acid solution. The admixture is mixed/agitated and the binary ferrihydrite precipitate is then filtered and recovered.

Huffman, Gerald P. (Lexington, KY); Zhao, Jianmin (Lexington, KY); Feng, Zhen (Lexington, KY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

O'Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O'Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

114

Catalyst systems and uses thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

Ozkan, Umit S. (Worthington, OH); Holmgreen, Erik M. (Columbus, OH); Yung, Matthew M. (Columbus, OH)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Elucidation of the inorganic chemistry of hydrotreating catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental regulations are making it necessary to developed improved hydrotreating catalysts for the removal of sulfur, nitrogen and aromatics from refinery streams. In order to develop better catalysts, the authors must gain a more detailed understanding of the inorganic chemistry of these catalysts. Commercial catalysts typically contain ca. 15 wt% molybdenum or tungsten oxides and ca. 4 wt% nickel or cobalt. Additives, such as phosphate and fluoride, are often added to improve the catalytic activity. However, the role of these additives is not fully understood. The authors have, therefore, carried out studies on alumina supported phosphate and flouride materials using FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR ({sup 31}P, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 1}H). The results of this work have enabled the authors to determine the structures of the various compounds formed on the alumina system when fluoride or phosphate is present.

DeCanio, E.C.; Edwards, J.C.; Storm, D.A. [Texaco, Inc., Beacon, NY (United States); Bruno, J.W. [Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are conducting research to investigate the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is tasked with obtaining commercially available or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. Commercially available catalysts and the most promising experimental catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. From the standpoint of producing C2+ alcohols as the major product, it appears that the rhodium catalyst is the best choice in terms of both selectivity and space-time yield (STY). However, unless the rhodium catalyst can be improved to provide minimally acceptable STYs for commercial operation, mixed alcohol synthesis will involve significant production of other liquid coproducts. The modified Fischer-Tropsch catalyst shows the most promise for providing both an acceptable selectivity to C2+ alcohols and total liquid STY. However, further optimization of the Fischer-Tropsch catalysts to improve selectivity to higher alcohols is highly desired. Selection of a preferred catalyst will likely entail a decision on the preferred coproduct slate. No other catalysts tested appear amenable to the significant improvements needed for acceptable STYs.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, James F.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

117

Novel Attrition-Resistant Fischer Tropsch Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a strong national interest in the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process because it offers the possibility of making liquid hydrocarbon fuels from reformed natural gas or coal and biomass gasification products. This project explored a new approach that had been developed to produce active, attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that are based on glass-ceramic materials and technology. This novel approach represented a promising solution to the problem of reducing or eliminating catalyst attrition and maximizing catalytic activity, thus reducing costs. The technical objective of the Phase I work was to demonstrate that glass-ceramic based catalytic materials for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis have resistance to catalytic deactivation and reduction of particle size superior to traditional supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials. Additionally, these novel glass-ceramic-based materials were expected to exhibit catalytic activity similar to the traditional materials. If successfully developed, the attrition-resistant Fischer-Tropsch catalyst materials would be expected to result in significant technical, economic, and social benefits for both producers and public consumers of Fischer-Tropsch products such as liquid fuels from coal or biomass gasification. This program demonstrated the anticipated high attrition resistance of the glass-ceramic materials. However, the observed catalytic activity of the materials was not sufficient to justify further development at this time. Additional testing documented that a lack of pore volume in the glass-ceramic materials limited the amount of surface area available for catalysis and consequently limited catalytic activity. However, previous work on glass-ceramic catalysts to promote other reactions demonstrated that commercial levels of activity can be achieved, at least for those reactions. Therefore, we recommend that glass-ceramic materials be considered again as potential Fischer-Tropsch catalysts if it can be demonstrated that materials with adequate pore volume can be produced. During the attrition resistance tests, it was learned that the glass-ceramic materials are very abrasive. Attention should be paid in any further developmental efforts to the potential for these hard, abrasive materials to damage reactors.

Weast, Logan, E.; Staats, William, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Novel Reforming Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous phase reforming is useful for processing oxygenated hydrocarbons to hydrogen and other more useful products. Current processing is hampered by the fact that oxide based catalysts are not stable under high temperature hydrothermal conditions. Silica in the form of structured MCM-41 is thermally a more stable support for Co and Ni than conventional high surface area amorphous silica but hydrothermal stability is not demonstrated. Carbon nanotube supports, in contrast, are highly stable under hydrothermal reaction conditions. In this project we show that carbon nanotubes are stable high activity/selectivity supports for the conversion of ethylene glycol to hydrogen.

Pfefferle, Lisa D; Haller, Gary L

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

Molecular water oxidation catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dimeric composition of the formula: ##STR1## wherein L', L", L'", and L"" are each a bidentate ligand having at least one functional substituent, the ligand selected from bipyridine, phenanthroline, 2-phenylpyridine, bipyrimidine, and bipyrazyl and the functional substituent selected from carboxylic acid, ester, amide, halogenide, anhydride, acyl ketone, alkyl ketone, acid chloride, sulfonic acid, phosphonic acid, and nitro and nitroso groups. An electrochemical oxidation process for the production of the above functionally substituted bidentate ligand diaqua oxo-bridged ruthenium dimers and their use as water oxidation catalysts is described.

Gratzel, Michael (St. Sulpice, CH); Munavalli, Shekhar (Bel Air, MD); Pern, Fu-Jann (Lakewood, CO); Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Materials - Efficient catalysts... | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials - Efficient catalysts... Reduction of pollution from vehicles and power plants relies, in large part, on how effectively catalysts can oxidize nitric oxide (NO)....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Treatment The overlap among theory, structure, and fully formed catalysts form the foundation of this study deer09narula.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalyst by Design -...

122

Doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A supported oxidation catalyst includes a support having a metal oxide or metal salt, and mixed metal particles thereon. The mixed metal particles include first particles including a palladium compound, and second particles including a precious metal group (PMG) metal or PMG metal compound, wherein the PMG metal is not palladium. The oxidation catalyst may also be used as a gas sensor.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A zeolite based catalyst for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C.sub.2 + hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL); Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Pasterczyk, James W. (Westmont, IL); Winterer, Markus (Westmont, IL); Krause, Theodore R. (Lisle, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Transition metal sulfide loaded catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A zeolite-based catalyst is described for activation and conversion of methane. A zeolite support includes a transition metal (Mo, Cr or W) sulfide disposed within the micropores of the zeolite. The catalyst allows activation and conversion of methane to C[sub 2]+ hydrocarbons in a reducing atmosphere, thereby avoiding formation of oxides of carbon.

Maroni, V.A.; Iton, L.E.; Pasterczyk, J.W.; Winterer, M.; Krause, T.R.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

125

A study of aluminophosphate supported Ni-Mo catalysts for hydrocracking bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

H-Oil and LC-Fining processes utilize a combination of thermal and catalytic hydroprocessing reactions to achieve high yields of distillate in upgrading bitumen or heavy oil residua. The processes are based on a well mixed (ebullated bed) reactor from which deactivated catalyst is continuously withdrawn and fresh catalyst is added to maintain yields. Catalyst activity and lifetime are two key factors controlling the economics of these processes. Catalyst deactivation occurs due to the deposition of coke and metals on the catalyst surface. The choice of catalyst is usually a compromise between two extremes: small pore catalyst with low metals capacity but higher activity that deactivates rapidly because of metals deposition and wide pore catalyst that has high metals deposition capacity but lower activity due to low surface area. Recently, aluminophosphate materials with large pores (< 10 nm--1,000 nm) and high surface areas (100--500 m{sup 2}/g) have been reported. The actual pore size distribution and surface area obtained depend on the Al/P ratio, preparation method and the calcination procedure. These materials are also thermally stable. The purpose of the present work was to determine if such materials, as a result of their pore size distribution and surface area, could decrease the rate of catalyst deactivation, increase catalyst activity and provide sufficient pore volume for high capacity of metals deposition during the upgrading of heavy oil residue.

Smith, K.J. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Lewkowicz, L. [Alberta Research Council, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Oballa, M.C.; Krzywicki, A. [Novacor Research and Technology Corp., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Supported molten-metal catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An entirely new class of catalysts called supported molten-metal catalysts, SMMC, which can replace some of the existing precious metal catalysts used in the production of fuels, commodity chemicals, and fine chemicals, as well as in combating pollution. SMMC are based on supporting ultra-thin films or micro-droplets of the relatively low-melting (<600.degree. C.), inexpensive, and abundant metals and semimetals from groups 1, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16, of the periodic table, or their alloys and intermetallic compounds, on porous refractory supports, much like supported microcrystallites of the traditional solid metal catalysts. It thus provides orders of magnitude higher surface area than is obtainable in conventional reactors containing molten metals in pool form and also avoids corrosion. These have so far been the chief stumbling blocks in the application of molten metal catalysts.

Datta, Ravindra (Iowa City, IA); Singh, Ajeet (Iowa City, IA); Halasz, Istvan (Iowa City, IA); Serban, Manuela (Iowa City, IA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

HYBRID HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HYBRID HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE Lucia M. Petkovic, Harry W. Rollins, Daniel M. Ginosar, and Kyle C. Burch Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 Introduction Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide, a gas often associated with global warming, have increased considerably since the beginning of the industrial age.1 In the U.S., stationary CO2 sources, such as electricity generation plants, produce about one-third of the anthropogenic CO2 generation. Reports2 indicate that the power required to recover 90% of the CO2 from an integrated coal-fired power-plant is about 10% of the power-plant capacity. This energy requirement can be reduced to less than 1% if the recovered CO2 is applied to the production of synthetic fuels. However, the lack of efficient catalysts along with the costs of energy and hydrogen has prevented the development of technologies for direct hydrogenation of CO2.3 Although the cost of hydrogen for hydrogenating CO2 is not economically attractive at present, the future production of hydrogen by nuclear power sources could completely change this scenario.2 Still, an efficient catalyst will be essential for commercial application of those processes. The objective of the work presented here was the development of hybrid catalysts for one-step carbon dioxide hydrogenation to liquid fuels. The hybrid catalysts, which were prepared by two novel techniques, included a copper/zinc oxide catalytic function distributed within an acidic zeolitic matrix. Results of catalyst activity and selectivity studies at atmospheric pressure are presented in this contribution. Experimental Catalysts were prepared by two novel techniques and under several different conditions to produce copper/zinc oxide/zeolite materials. Once synthesized, samples were pelletized and the fraction between 40-60 mesh was utilized for the experiments. Two hundred milligrams of catalyst were loaded in a U-tube stainless steel reactor and a flow of 100 cm3/min of a 10:90 H2:Ar mixture was passed through the catalyst bed while the temperature was increased from room temperature to 513 K at 1.8 K/min and held at 513 K for 15 h. A reactant gas mixture composed by 10 cm3/min of CO2 and 30 cm3/min of H2 was then passed through the catalyst bed and the reaction products monitored by on-line gas chromatographic analyses using an SRI Multiple Gas Analyzer #2 equipped with 3 columns (MoleSieve 13X, Hayesep-D, and MXT-1) and 3 detectors (TCD, FID, and FID-methanizer). This GC system allowed for quantification of inert gases, CO, CO2, methanol, dimethylether, higher alcohols, water, and hydrocarbons up to C20. One hundred milligrams of a commercial syngas-to-methanol catalyst along with the same amount of a commercial zeolite catalyst was utilized under the same reaction conditions for comparison purposes. These catalysts were utilized either in two-layers (Com1) or mixed together (Com2). Results and Discussion Under the conditions applied in this study, the main reaction products were CO, CH3OH, CH3OCH3, and H2O. Methanol and dimethylether production rates and selectivities with respect to CO formation are presented in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. Although the activity of the synthesized catalysts did not surpass the commercial catalysts, the selectivity to oxygenates with respect to CO on most of the synthesized catalysts were better than on the commercial catalysts. For example, cat

Licia M. Petkovic; Harry W. Rollins; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Minutes of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

procedure but one that leads to precise control of catalyst loading. This process also works better for the highly-water-swollen membranes. Following the description of the...

129

Modeling of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide with ammonia using four modern catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, the steady-state performance of zeolite-based Cu-ZSM-5, vanadium based honeycomb monolith catalysts (V), vanadium-titanium based pillared inter layered clay catalyst (V-Ti PLIC) and vanadium-titanium-tungsten-based honeycomb monolith...

Sharma, Giriraj

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Achieving DOE�¢����s stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

Vivek S. Murthi (Primary Contact), Elise Izzo, Wu Bi, Sandra Guerrero and Lesia Protsailo

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

131

Slurry phase iron catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. First semi-annual progress report, July 5, 1995--January 4, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives are to study factors controlling attrition resistance of slurry phase Fe catalysts, synthesize novel precipitated catalysts that overcome some of the limitations of current generation catalysts, and study catalyst-binder interactions using model catalysts. A study of Fe/silica (binder) interactions has been started. Study of effects of Cu on reducibility of Fe catalysts showed that small amounts of Cu can facilitate reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {alpha}-Fe. Work with Nancy Jackson (Sandia) on carbon deposits in Fe F-T catalysts showed good correlation between peak temperature in TPR and the carbon as seen by TEM. Analyses of samples from Dr. Burtron Davis (U. KY) by XRD and TEM showed that the active catalyst contains small crystallites of iron carbide while the deactivated catalyst had significant transformation into large magnetite crystals. It is felt that improper passivation of these catalysts can lead to mis-identification of the phase in working F-T catalysts.

Datye, A.K.

1996-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

132

Development of a Novel Catalyst for No Decomposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NOx emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N2 will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO2 catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO2 catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the research that is being undertaken is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO2 catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O2, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO2 catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions were done. It is also planned to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the previous reporting periods, runs were made with catalysts containing 15% Pt and 10% Pt on SnO2 were done. Catalysts containing 10% Pt resulted in significantly lower actgivities than 15% PT catalysts. Therefore, in the following tests 15% Pt/SnO2 catalysts were used. Runs to elucidate the effects of temperature, oxygen, water vapor, pretreatment temperature, and space velocity on NO dissociation were completed. It was found that the presence of oxygen and water vapor did not affect the activation energy of the NO dissociation reaction indicating the presence of the same rate controlling step for all feed compositions. Activation energy was higher for higher gas velocities suggesting the presence of mass transfer limitations at lower velocities. Presence of oxygen in the feed inhibited the NO decomposition. Having water vapor in the feed did not significantly affect the catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 373 K, but significantly reduced catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 900 K. In this reporting period, since no release time was available, no laboratory work was undertaken. Focus was on obtaining equilibrium data on various feed mixtures at temperatures up to 1000 K.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

Chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst and a membrane electrode assembly for fuel cells that includes such a cathode catalyst. The cathode catalyst includes a support having at least one transition metal in elemental form and a chalcogen disposed on the support. Methods of making the cathode catalyst and membrane electrode assembly are also described.

Zelenay, Piotr (Los Alamos, NM); Choi, Jong-Ho (Los Alamos, NM); Alonso-Vante, Nicolas (France, FR); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL); Cao, Dianxue (Urbana, IL)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

The role of 3D printing in biological anthropology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The following work explores the role of 3D printing in biological anthropology. A case study approach is used to provide an understanding of two different… (more)

Allard, Travis T.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Investigation of syngas interaction in alcohol synthesis catalysts. Quartery technical progress report, July 1, 1995--September 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the work done on {open_quotes}Investigation of Syngas Interaction in Alcohol Synthesis Catalysts{close_quotes} during the last three months. In this report the results of the work done on the effect of CO adsorption on the magnetic character of cobalt in the Cu/Co/Cr catalysts is discussed.

Akundi, M.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Pyrochem Catalysts for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedlesAdvancedJanuary 13,Putting veterans to workPyrochem Catalysts

137

New hydrocracking catalysts increase throughput, run length  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved, second-stage hydrocracking catalyst has been developed by combining stabilized Y zeolites with amorphous silica alumina cracking components. A commercial application of this catalyst, along with a new, first-stage zeolitic hydrocracking catalyst, resulted in increased unit throughput and cycle length. The paper discusses the hydrocracking process, first-stage catalysts, second-stage catalysts, hydrogenation process, commercial results, and product properties.

Huizinga, T. [Shell Internationale Petroleum Mij., The Hague (Netherlands); Theunissen, J.M.H. [Rayong Refinery Co. Ltd., Rayong (Thailand); Minderhoud, H.; Veen, R. van [Koninklijke/Shell-Lab., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

138

Printing Tiny Batteries | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Researchers use sophisticated 3D printing techniques to create batteries the size of a grain of sand. This work, featured in...

139

as Catalyst in Public Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crisis as Catalyst in Public Health Immigration Reform and the Threat of Rhetorical Violence look at immigration reform and the impact of public discourse focused on this topic. The panel

Bushman, Frederic

140

Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation Catalysts for Diesel Emission Control Rational Catalyst Design Applied to Development of Advanced Oxidation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A Methanol and Hydrogen Peroxide Fuel Cell Using Non-Noble Catalysts in Alkaline Solution.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A primary goal of this work is to develop a novel liquid-based microscale fuel cell using non-noble metal catalysts. The developed fuel cell is based… (more)

Sung, Woosuk

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Technology Development for Iron and Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States agency thereof. #12;2 Abstract CAER Tight control of catalyst distribution within SBCRs should . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kentucky, University of

143

Hydrocarbon conversion catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.35A, a water absorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of at least 8% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; an alumina binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Water+works : a new ecological infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the global water crisis as catalyst, Water+Works acts as a model for a localized water initiative that will mitigate flooding and provide a freshwater resource in times of crisis, while enriching urban ecosystems and ...

Hedstrom, Lisa Kristin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane was investigated. Unpromoted and promoted catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than the other metals (Rh, Li, K, Na, Zn, and Sn) for the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study. The effectiveness of the promoter increased with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. Among the catalysts tested, the Cu1Ce3 catalyst promoted with 1 weight % Mn was found to be the best catalyst for the SCR of NO with methane. This catalyst was subjected to long-term testing at the facilities of our industrial partner TDA Research. TDA report indicated that the performance of this catalyst did not deteriorate during 100 hours of operation and the activity and selectivity of the catalyst was not affected by the presence of SO{sub 2}. The conversions obtained by TDA were significantly lower than those obtained at Hampton University due to the transport limitations on the reaction rate in the TDA reactor, in which 1/8th inch pellets were used while the Hampton University reactor contained 250-425-{micro}m catalyst particles. The selected catalyst was also tested at the TDA facilities with high-sulfur heavy oil as the reducing agent. Depending on the heavy oil flow rate, up to 100% NO conversions were obtained. The temperature programmed desorption studies a strong interaction between manganese and cerium. Presence of manganese not only enhanced the reduction rate of NO by methane, but also significantly improved the N{sub 2} selectivity. To increase the activity of the Mn-promoted catalyst, the manganese content of the catalyst need to be optimized and different methods of catalyst preparation and different reactor types need to be investigated to lower the transport limitations in the reactor.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Catalyst for coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved catalyst for a coal liquefaction process; e.g., the H-Coal Process, for converting coal into liquid fuels, and where the conversion is carried out in an ebullated-catalyst-bed reactor wherein the coal contacts catalyst particles and is converted, in addition to liquid fuels, to gas and residual oil which includes preasphaltenes and asphaltenes. The improvement comprises a catalyst selected from the group consisting of the oxides of nickel molybdenum, cobalt molybdenum, cobalt tungsten, and nickel tungsten on a carrier of alumina, silica, or a combination of alumina and silica. The catalyst has a total pore volume of about 0.500 to about 0.900 cc/g and the pore volume comprises micropores, intermediate pores and macropores, the surface of the intermediate pores being sufficiently large to convert the preasphaltenes to asphaltenes and lighter molecules. The conversion of the asphaltenes takes place on the surface of micropores. The macropores are for metal deposition and to prevent catalyst agglomeration. The micropores have diameters between about 50 and about 200 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 50 to about 80% of the pore volume, whereas the intermediate pores have diameters between about 200 and 2000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume, and the macropores have diameters between about 2000 and about 10,000 angstroms (.ANG.) and comprise from about 10 to about 25% of the pore volume. The catalysts are further improved where they contain promoters. Such promoters include the oxides of vanadium, tungsten, copper, iron and barium, tin chloride, tin fluoride and rare earth metals.

Huibers, Derk T. A. (Pennington, NJ); Kang, Chia-Chen C. (Princeton, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Zeolite based catalysts for hydrodenitrogenation of quinoline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Reactor Reproducibility in HDN of quinoline at 648K Results for Comparison Between Comm. Catalyst in Oxide Form And Sulfided Commercial Catalyst at 648K 58 59 17 Result for Comparison of HDN Activity of Different Zeolite Based Catalyst at 648K.... Comparison of HDN Activity of Sulfided form of Commercial Catalyst and Zeolite Based E Catalyst at 648 K and Cold Hydrogen Pressure of 1400 psig. 71 17. Distribution of Nitrogen Compounds in HDN of Quinoline for Commercial Catalyst at 648 K and Cold Hydrogen...

Sanghvi, Bhavyen Suman

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Homogeneous catalysts in hypersonic combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density and residence time both become unfavorably small for efficient combustion of hydrogen fuel in ramjet propulsion in air at high altitude and hypersonic speed. Raising the density and increasing the transit time of the air through the engine necessitates stronger contraction of the air flow area. This enhances the kinetic and thermodynamic tendency of H/sub 2/O to form completely, accompanied only by N/sub 2/ and any excess H/sub 2/(or O/sub 2/). The by-products to be avoided are the energetically expensive fragment species H and/or O atoms and OH radicals, and residual (2H/sub 2/ plus O/sub 2/). However, excessive area contraction raises air temperature and consequent combustion-product temperature by adiabatic compression. This counteracts and ultimately overwhelms the thermodynamic benefit by which higher density favors the triatomic product, H/sub 2/O, over its monatomic and diatomic alternatives. For static pressures in the neighborhood of 1 atm, static temperature must be kept or brought below ca. 2400 K for acceptable stability of H/sub 2/O. Another measure, whose requisite chemistry we address here, is to extract propulsive work from the combustion products early in the expansion. The objective is to lower the static temperature of the combustion stream enough for H/sub 2/O to become adequately stable before the exhaust flow is massively expanded and its composition ''frozen.'' We proceed to address this mechanism and its kinetics, and then examine prospects for enhancing its rate by homogeneous catalysts. 9 refs.

Harradine, D.M.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Pack, R.T.; Schott, G.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged Y zeolite in a silica-alumina matrix. X-ray fluorescence analyses showed that the rare earths used in preparing the catalysts were a mixture of lanthanum and cerium. Antimony found in the spent catalyst was added during operation of the FCC unit as a way to suppress the adverse effects of deposited nickel. The fresh HDS samples consisted of sulfided nickel and molybdenum on an alumina support. The spent catalyst showed nearly 10% vanadium on the catalyst and a modest increase in nickel and sulfur on the catalyst as a result of operations. Hydrocracking catalysts were not available for this study.

CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

Catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Catalyst for the production of methane from carbon and/or coal by means of catalytic gasification. The catalyst compostion containing at least two alkali metal salts. A particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used.

McKee, Douglas W. (Burnt Hills, NY); Spiro, Clifford L. (Scotia, NY); Kosky, Philip G. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Attrition resistant catalysts for slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. Iron-based (Fe) catalysts are preferred catalysts for F-T because they are relatively inexpensive and possess reasonable activity for F-T synthesis (FTS). Their most advantages trait is their high water-gas shift (WGS) activity compared to their competitor, namely cobalt. This enables Fe F-T catalysts to process low H{sub 2}/CO ratio synthesis gas without an external shift reaction step. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment, make the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult if not impossible, an d result in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. The objectives of this research were to develop a better understanding of the parameters affecting attrition of Fe F-T catalysts suitable for use in SBCRs and to incorporate this understanding into the design of novel Fe catalysts having superior attrition resistance.

K. Jothimurugesan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

STUDY OF SOLVENT AND CATALYST INTERACTIONS IN DIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several aspects of the Direct Coal Liquefaction process which are not fully understood and which if better understood might lead to improved yields and conversions. Among these questions are the roles of the catalyst and the solvent. While the solvent is known to act by transfer of hydrogen atoms to the free radicals formed by thermal breakdown of the coal in an uncatalyzed system, in the presence of a solid catalyst as is now currently practiced, the yields and conversions are higher than in an uncatalyzed system. The role of the catalyst in this case is not completely understood. DOE has funded many projects to produce ultrafine and more active catalysts in the expectation that better contact between catalyst and coal might result. This approach has met with limited success probably because mass transfer between two solids in a fluid medium i.e. the catalyst and the coal, is very poor. It is to develop an understanding of the role of the catalyst and solvent in Direct Liquefaction that this project was initiated. Specifically it was of interest to know whether direct contact between the coal and the catalyst was important. By separating the solid catalyst in a stainless steel basket permeable to the solvent but not the coal in the liquefaction reactor, it was shown that the catalyst still maintains a catalytic effect on the liquefaction process. There is apparently transfer of hydrogen atoms from the catalyst through the basket wall to the coal via the solvent. Strong hydrogen donor solvents appear to be more effective in this respect than weak hydrogen donors. It therefore appears that intimate contact between catalyst and coal is not a requirement, and that the role of the catalyst may be to restore the hydrogen donor strength to the solvent as the reaction proceeds. A range of solvents of varying hydrogen donor strength was investigated. Because of the extensive use of thermogravimetric analysis in this laboratory in was noted that the peak temperature for volatile evolution from coal was a reliable measure of coal rank. Because of this observation, a wide variety of coals of a wide range of ranks was investigated. It was shown in this work that measuring the peak temperature for volatile evolution was quite a precise indicator of rank and correlated closely wit the rank values obtained by measuring vitrinite reflectance, a more difficult measurement to make. This prompted the desire to know the composition of the volatile materials evolved as a function of coal rank. This was then measured by coupling a TGA to a mass spectrometer using laser activation and photoionization detection TG-PI-MS. The predominant species in volatiles of low rank coal turned out to be phenols with some alkenes. As the rank increases, the relative amount of alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons increases and the oxygenated species decrease. It was shown that these volatiles were actually pyrolitic products and not volatilization products of coal. Solvent extraction experiments coupled with TG-PI-MS indicates that the low oiling and more extractable material are essentially similar in chemical types to the non-extractable portions but apparently higher molecular weight and therefor less extractable.

Michael T. Klein

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Argonne National Laboratory 2004deermarshall.pdf More Documents & Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic...

155

On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

Preston, Jr., John L. (Hebron, CT)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Attrition resistant catalysts and sorbents based on heavy metal poisoned FCC catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heavy metal poisoned, spent FCC catalyst is treated by chemically impregnating the poisoned catalyst with a new catalytic metal or metal salt to provide an attrition resistant catalyst or sorbent for a different catalytic or absorption process, such as catalysts for Fischer-Tropsh Synthesis, and sorbents for removal of sulfur gases from fuel gases and flue-gases. The heavy metal contaminated FCC catalyst is directly used as a support for preparing catalysts having new catalytic properties and sorbents having new sorbent properties, without removing or passivating the heavy metals on the spent FCC catalyst as an intermediate step.

Gangwal, S.; Jothimurugesan, K.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

Separation of regenerated catalyst from combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for separating regenerated catalyst from gaseous combustion products within a regenerator. The apparatus comprises a downcomer within the regenerator vessel through which the catalyst and gaseous combustion products flow. Means are provided at the lower end of the downcomer for utilizing the momentum of the catalyst particles to separate them from the gaseous combustion products.

Benslay, R. M.

1984-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Perovskites of the structure A[sub 2]B[sub 2]C[sub 3]O[sub 10] are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, K.D.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

Garg, D.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

Campbell, Kenneth D. (Charleston, WV)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

as Catalyst in Public Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crisis as Catalyst in Public Health Alex's Lemonade Stand and the Fight Against Childhood Cancer, Medical Director, Pediatric Advanced Care Team, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia For more information, survivorship, and palliative care. We will also explore the impact that individuals can make on medical

Bushman, Frederic

163

Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with methane. Since the replacement of ammonia by methane is commercially very attractive, in this project, it was planned to investigate the effect of promoters on the activity and selectivity of copper oxide/cerium oxide-based catalysts and to obtain data on the reaction mechanism for the SCR with methane. The investigation of the reaction mechanism will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations. The last component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium. In the current reporting period, the screening of the promoted catalysts were completed, sufficient amount of the selected catalysts were prepared and delivered to TDA for long term deactivation testing.

Dr. Ates Akyurlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

Krumpel, Michael (Naperville, IL); Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL)

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Creating Works-Like Prototypes of Mechanical Objects Bongjin Koo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of creating works-like prototypes. Designers are increasingly turning to 3D printing as a tool for fab Graphics]: Computational Ge- ometry and Object Modeling--Geometric algorithms. Keywords: fabrication, 3D printing, sketch-based modeling Links: DL PDF WEB VIDEO 1 Introduction Creating physical prototypes

Agrawala, Maneesh

167

Improving catalysts | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation for planning experimental workImproving

168

Congressionally Directed Project for Passive NOx Removal Catalysts Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recipient proposes to produce new scientific and technical knowledge and tools to enable the discovery and deployment of highly effective materials for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from lean combustion exhaust. A second goal is to demonstrate a closely coupled experimental and computational approach to heterogeneous catalysis research. These goals will be met through the completion of four primary technical objectives: First, an in-depth kinetic analysis will be performed on two prominent classes of NOx SCR catalysts, Fe- and Cu-exchanged beta and ZSM-5 zeolites, over a wide range of catalyst formulation and under identical, high conversion conditions as a function of gas phase composition. Second, the nanoscale structure and adsorption chemistry of these high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) catalysts will be determined using in situ and operando spectroscopy under the same reaction conditions. Third, first-principles molecular simulations will be used to model the metal-zeolite active sites, their adsorption chemistry, and key steps in catalytic function. Fourth, this information will be integrated into chemically detailed mechanistic and kinetic descriptions and models of the operation of these well- defined NOx SCR catalysts under practically relevant reaction conditions. The new knowledge and models that derive from this work will be published in the scientific literature.

Schneider, William

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

169

Slurry phase iron catalysts for indirect coal liquefaction. Second semi-annual progress report, January 5, 1996--July 4, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this period, work was continued on understanding the attrition of precipitated iron catalysts and work initiated on synthesizing catalysts containing silica binders. Use of a sedigraph particle size analyzer with an ultrasonic probe provides a simple method to test the strength of catalyst agglomerates, allowing the strength comparison of silica and hematite catalysts (the former is considerably stronger). Study of Fe/silica interactions was continued. Addition of a colloidal silica precursor to calcined Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst had no detrimental effect on reducibility of the hematite to {alpha}-Fe. XRD and electron microscopy will be used to analyze the crystal structure and types of C present in samples from long Fischer-Tropsch runs.

Datye, A.K.

1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Supported fischer-tropsch catalyst and method of making the catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst and a method of making the catalyst for a Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas, is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Orefield, PA); Withers, Howard P. (Douglassville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Catalyst for selective conversion of synthesis gas and method of making the catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst, a method of making the catalyst and an F-T process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consists of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of an F-T metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Catalyst for hydrotreating carbonaceous liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst for denitrogenating and desulfurating carbonaceous liquid such as solvent refined coal includes catalytic metal oxides impregnated within a porous base of mostly alumina with relatively large pore diameters, surface area and pore volume. The base material includes pore volumes of 0.7-0.85 ml/g, surface areas of 200-350 m.sup.2 /g and pore diameters of 85-200 Angstroms. The catalytic metals impregnated into these base materials include the oxides of Group VI metals, molybdenum and tungsten, and the oxides of Group VIII metals, nickel and cobalt, in various combinations. These catalysts and bases in combination have effectively promoted the removal of chemically combined sulfur and nitrogen within a continuous flowing mixture of carbonaceous liquid and hydrogen gas.

Berg, Lloyd (Bozeman, MT); McCandless, Frank P. (Bozeman, MT); Ramer, Ronald J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Cascading of fluid cracking catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for conversion of hydrocarbon feedstocks by cascading a cracking catalyst containing zeolite in an acidic matrix from one hydrocarbon processing unit to another, wherein there are at least three different interconnected hydrocarbon processing units comprising a first unit having a regeneration zone and a riser zone, a second unit having having a regeneration zone and a riser zone, and a third unit having a riser zone and a regeneration zone, each unit having different processing conditions.

Kovach, S.M.; Miller, C.B.

1986-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

174

Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalyst composition. It comprises: a modified Y zeolite having a unit cell size below about 24.45 {angstrom}, a degree of crystallinity which is at least retained at increasing SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratios, a SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} molar ratio between about 8 to about 15, a water adsorption capacity at (25{degree}C and a p/p{sub {ital o}} value of 0.2) of between about 10--15% by weight of modified zeolite and a pore volume of at lest about 0.25 ml/g. Between about 10 to about 40% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least about 8 nm; an amorphous cracking component comprising a silica-alumina containing 50--95% by weight of silica; a binder comprising alumina; from about 0.05 to about 10 percent by weight of nickel and from about 2 to about 40 percent by weight of tungsten, calculated as metals per 100 parts by weight of total catalyst. The modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component comprises about 60--85% by weight of the total catalyst, the binder comprises about 15--40% by weight of the total catalyst and the amount of modified Y zeolite ranges between about 10--75% of the combined amount of modified Y zeolite and amorphous cracking component.

Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

175

Copper-containing zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, is formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl{sub 2}, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

Price, G.L.; Kanazirev, V.

1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

176

Copper-containing zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst useful in the conversion of nitrogen oxides or in the synthesis of nitriles or imines from amines, formed by preparing an intimate mechanical mixture of a copper (II)-containing species, such as CuO or CuCl.sub.2, or elemental copper, with a zeolite having a pore mouth comprising 10 oxygen atoms, such as ZSM-5, converting the elemental copper or copper (II) to copper (I), and driving the copper (I) into the zeolite.

Price, Geoffrey L. (Baton Rouge, LA); Kanazirev, Vladislav (Sofia, BG)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

Catalyst Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalyst Renewables Jump to: navigation, search Name:

180

Co-Production of Electricity and Hydrogen Using a Novel Iron-based Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to develop a hydrogen production technology for gasification applications based on a circulating fluid-bed reactor and an attrition resistant iron catalyst. The work towards achieving this objective consisted of three key activities: • Development of an iron-based catalyst suitable for a circulating fluid-bed reactor • Design, construction, and operation of a bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production • Techno-economic analysis of the steam-iron and the pressure swing adsorption hydrogen production processes. This report describes the work completed in each of these activities during this project. The catalyst development and testing program prepared and iron-based catalysts using different support and promoters to identify catalysts that had sufficient activity for cyclic reduction with syngas and steam oxidation and attrition resistance to enable use in a circulating fluid-bed reactor system. The best performing catalyst from this catalyst development program was produced by a commercial catalyst toll manufacturer to support the bench-scale testing activities. The reactor testing systems used during material development evaluated catalysts in a single fluid-bed reactor by cycling between reduction with syngas and oxidation with steam. The prototype SIP reactor system (PSRS) consisted of two circulating fluid-bed reactors with the iron catalyst being transferred between the two reactors. This design enabled demonstration of the technical feasibility of the combination of the circulating fluid-bed reactor system and the iron-based catalyst for commercial hydrogen production. The specific activities associated with this bench-scale circulating fluid-bed reactor systems that were completed in this project included design, construction, commissioning, and operation. The experimental portion of this project focused on technical demonstration of the performance of an iron-based catalyst and a circulating fluid-bed reactor system for hydrogen production. Although a technology can be technically feasible, successful commercial deployment also requires that a technology offer an economic advantage over existing commercial technologies. To effective estimate the economics of this steam-iron process, a techno-economic analysis of this steam iron process and a commercial pressure swing adsorption process were completed. The results from this analysis described in this report show the economic potential of the steam iron process for integration with a gasification plant for coproduction of hydrogen and electricity.

Hilaly, Ahmad; Georgas, Adam; Leboreiro, Jose; Arora, Salil; Head, Megann; Trembly, Jason; Turk, Brian; Gupta, Raghubir

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

RefWorks for Business: Basics Ways to Get References into RefWorks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time. Type in your search terms. 5. Import from a text file. This method works for some onlineWorks function is located along side the print, e-mail, save and download functions. 2. Manually enter references. Search and import from an online catalogue within RefWorks. You can search and import references from

Haykin, Simon

182

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

SURFACE-MODIFIED COALS FOR ENHANCED CATALYST DISPERSION AND LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the Department of Energy Sponsored project DE-FGF22-95PC95229 entitled, surface modified coals for enhanced catalyst dispersion and liquefaction. The aims of the study were to enhance catalyst loading and dispersion in coal for improved liquefaction by preadsorption of surfactants and catalysts on the coal and to train and educate minority scientists in catalysts and separation science. Illinois No. 6 Coal (DEC-24) was selected for the study. The surfactants investigated included dodecyl dimethyl ethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), a cationic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate, an anionic surfactant, and Triton x-100, a neutral surfactant. Ammonium molybdate tetrahydrate was used as the molybdenum catalyst precursor. Zeta potential, BET, FTIR, AFM, UV-Vis and luminescence intensity measurements were undertaken to assess the surface properties and the liquefaction activities of the coal. The parent coal had a net negative surface charge over the pH range 2-12. However, in the presence of DDAB the negativity of the surface charge decreased. At higher concentrations of DDAB, a positive surface charge resulted. In contrast to the effect of DDAB, the zeta potential of the coal became more negative than the parent coal in the presence of SDS. Adsorption of Triton reduced the net negative charge density of the coal samples. The measured surface area of the coal surface was about 30 m{sup 2}/g compared to 77m{sup 2}/g after being washed with deionized water. Addition of the surfactants decreased the surface area of the samples. Adsorption of the molybdenum catalyst increased the surface area of the coal sample. The adsorption of molybdenum on the coal was significantly promoted by preadsorption of DDAB and SDS. Molybdenum adsorption showed that, over a wide range of concentrations and pH values, the DDAB treated coal adsorbed a higher amount of molybdenum than the samples treated with SDS. The infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the atomic force microscopy (AFM) also provided evidence that confirmed the adsorption of the surfactants onto the coal surface. The luminescence measurements showed that the coal and solid surfactants luminescence weakly. No statistically significant influence was observed that resulted from the action of the surfactants or surfactant-molybdenum catalyst. Interestingly, the liquefaction results produced data that indicated the use of surfactants did not significantly improve the liquefaction activity of the coal as had initially been hypothesized. The UV-adsorption tests provided evidence that suggest that this may have been due to oversaturation. Detailed discussions of the results and recommendations for future work are provided.

Dr. Yaw D. Yeboah

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The shakedown phase of the pilot-scale filtration platform was completed at the end of the last reporting period. A study of various molecular weight waxes was initiated to determine the effect of wax physical properties on the permeation rate without catalyst present. As expected, the permeation flux was inversely proportional to the nominal average molecular weight of the polyethylene wax. Even without catalyst particles present in the filtrate, the filtration membranes experience fouling during an induction period on the order of days on-line. Another long-term filtration test was initiated using a batch of iron catalyst that was previously activated with CO to form iron carbide in a separate continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system. The permeation flux stabilized more rapidly than that experienced with unactivated catalyst tests.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Steam reforming utilizing high activity catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High activity, sulfur tolerant steam reforming catalysts are described comprising rhodium or nickel supported on lanthanum stabilized alumina or magnesium promoted lanthanum stabilized alumina. The catalysts have improved activity over conventionally used catalysts in the presence of sulfur containing hydrocarbon fuel (such as No. 2 fuel oil) in a steam reforming environment. The material has particular utility in autothermal, tubular, cyclic and adiabatic steam reforming processes.

Setzer, H. J.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

Catalysts for Dehydrogenation of ammonia boranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several effective homogeneous catalysts for the dehydrogenation of amine boranes have been developed. The best catalyst uses an iridium complex, and is capable of dehydrogenating H3NBH3 (AB) and CH3NH2BH3 (MeAB) at comparable rates. Thermodynamic measurements using this catalyst demonstrate that the dehydrogenation of AB and MeAB is substantially exothermic, which has important implications for regeneration.

Heinekey, Dennis M.

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

Printing Your Monthly PTA Maintenance Screen Shannon Monahan Page 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Printing Your Monthly PTA Maintenance Screen Shannon Monahan Page 1 Office of Postdoctoral Maintenance Screen. All starting points begin before the popup menu comes up. In Internet Explorer the Orientation to Landscape, and click OK. Print as needed to either your printer or to Adobe PDF (only works

Kay, Mark A.

188

3D PRINTING FOR INTELLIGENT METALLIC STRUCTURES M. Strantza1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D PRINTING FOR INTELLIGENT METALLIC STRUCTURES M. Strantza1 , D. De Baere2 , M. Rombouts3 , SSHM system is produced by 3D printing or additive manufacturing. Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a "process to enable its implementation. This work demonstrates the feasibility study of eSHM systems produced by 3D

Boyer, Edmond

189

Study by IR-spectroscopy and adsorption of platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Additions of Re are widely employed for modifying platinum-alumina catalysts (PAC). The effect of Mn on the catalysis of and the physicochemical properties of PAC has been less studied. It is only known that adding <0.2 wt. % Mn has no effect on the dispersity of the Pt crystallites. In this work the authors have studied the state of Pt in unmodified PAC by IR spectroscopy of adsorbed CO and by the adsorption of H/sub 2/ at elevated temperatures. The state of the metallic platinum in platinum-alumina catalysts modified by Mn is more heterogeneous than in the unmodified sample. When manganese is added, platinum crystallites with stronger electron-donor properties form on the surface of the catalyst. In platinum-alumina catalysts modified by manganese, there is an increase in the number of sites for the high-temperature dissociative adsorption of hydrogen located on the surface of the Mn-modified carrier.

Zaitsev, A.V.; Barkova, A.P.; Borovkov, B.Yu.; Sterligov, O.D.; Isagulyants, G.V.; Kazanskii, V.B.

1987-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

Anodic Deposition of a Robust Iridium-Based Water-Oxidation Catalyst from Organometallic Precursors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Artificial photosynthesis, modeled on natural light-driven oxidation of water in Photosystem II, holds promise as a sustainable source of reducing equivalents for producing fuels. Few robust water-oxidation catalysts capable of mediating this difficult four-electron, four-proton reaction have yet been described. We report a new method for generating an amorphous electrodeposited material, principally consisting of iridium and oxygen, which is a robust and long-lived catalyst for water oxidation, when driven electrochemically. The catalyst material is generated by a simple anodic deposition from Cp*Ir aqua or hydroxo complexes in aqueous solution. This work suggests that organometallic precursors may be useful in electrodeposition of inorganic heterogeneous catalysts.

Blakemore, James D; Schley, Nathan D; Olack, G.; Incarvito, Christopher D; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Steam gasification of carbon: Catalyst properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal gasification by steam is of critical importance in converting coal to gaseous products (CO, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4]) that can then be further converted to synthetic natural gas and higher hydrocarbon fuels. Alkali and alkaline earth metals (present as oxides) catalyze coal gasification reactions and cause them to occur at significantly lower temperatures. A more fundamental understanding of the mechanism of the steam gasification reaction and catalyst utilization may well lead to better production techniques, increased gasification rates, greater yields, and less waste. We are studying the gasification of carbon by steam in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth oxides, using carbonates as the starting materials. Carbon dioxide gasification (CO[sub 2] + C --> 2CO) has been studied in some detail recently, but much less has been done on the actual steam gasification reaction, which is the main thrust of our work. In particular, the form of the active catalyst compound during reaction is still questioned and the dependence of the concentration of active sites on reaction parameters is not known. Until recently, no measurements of active site concentrations during reaction had been made. We have recently used transient isotope tracing to determine active site concentration during CO[sub 2] gasification. We are investigating the mechanism and the concentration of active sites for steam gasification with transient isotopic tracing. For this technique, the reactant feed is switched from H[sub 2]0 to isotopically-labeled water at the same concentration and tow rate. We can then directly measure, at reaction the concentration of active catalytic sites, their kinetic rate constants, and the presence of more than one rate constant. This procedure allows us to obtain transient kinetic data without perturbing the steady-state surface reactions.

Falconer, J.L.

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Polyfunctional catalyst for processiing benzene fractions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A by-product of the coke industry is a raw benzene fraction benzene- 1 which may serve as for catalytic processes. The paper reports a study on the influence of the composition and temperatures on the activity and selectivity of NiO-V{sub 2}O{sub 6}-MoO{sub 3}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts and the corresponding binary and tertiary subsystems are studied by a pulse method in model reactions; the hydrodealkylating of toluene and the hydrodesulfurizing of thioprhene. The optimal catalyst composition is established. The new catalyst is compared with industrial catalysts.

G. Byakov; B.D. Zubitskii; B.G. Tryasunov; I.Ya. Petrov [Kuznetsk Basin State Technical University, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

Lauterbach, Jochen (Newark, DE); Snively, Christopher M. (Clarks Summit, PA); Vijay, Rohit (Annandale, NJ); Hendershot, Reed (Breinigsville, PA); Feist, Ben (Newark, DE)

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

194

New Catalyst Converts CO2 to Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

New Catalyst Converts CO to Fuel Calculations Run at NERSC Help Confirm University of Illinois Breakthrough September 5, 2014 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Carver,...

195

High Impact Technology Catalyst | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

energy-efficient commercial building technologies. Through the High Impact Technology Catalyst program, initiated in 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) identifies...

196

CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres. 1: Coordination of CLEERS Project; Pres. 2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation CLEERS...

197

4/2/2014 www.scienceworldreport.com/home/news/services/print.php?article_id=12131 http://www.scienceworldreport.com/home/news/services/print.php?article_id=12131 1/2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/2/2014 www.scienceworldreport.com/home/news/services/print.php?article_id=12131 http://www.scienceworldreport.com/home/news/services/print.php fabrication foundry that took an initial interest #12;4/2/2014 www.scienceworldreport.com/home/news/services/print.php?article_id=12131 http://www.scienceworldreport.com/home/news/services/print.php?article_id=12131 2/2 in Rao's work

Chiao, Jung-Chih

198

Activation studies with promoted precipitated iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Ruhrchemie catalyst, the catalyst activity and stability changed markedly with reduction procedure. Hs reduction at 220'C was repeated since it gave very loiv activity. The reproducibility of this test ivas good. Hs reduction at 250 gave higher catalyst...

Manne, Rama Krishna

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrogenation of anthraquinone on metal-containing catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present work studied the reaction of hydrogen activated on metal-containing catalysts (platinum black, Pt/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (AP-15), and the hydride ZrNiH/sub 2.8/ with anthraquinone. The hydrogenation of anthraquinone bound into a strong donor-acceptor complex on the surface of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and AP-15 and physically absorbed on silica gel was investigated. Results indicated that under conditions of mechanical mixing of silica gel with catalysts containing platinum or hydrides of intermetallic compounds in an atmosphere of hydrogen, anthraquinone physically adsorbed on silica gel is able to undergo hydrogenation at temperature above 100/sup 0/ C with formation of anthracene.

Lunin, V.V.; Markaryan, G.L.; Chetina, O.V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

aged catalyst extrudates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

aged catalysts extrudates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lower the cost of plastic scintillation detectors, commercially available polystyrene pellets have been used in the production of scintillating materials that can be extruded into...

202

Attrition resistant fluidizable reforming catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing a steam reforming catalyst characterized by improved resistance to attrition loss when used for cracking, reforming, water gas shift and gasification reactions on feedstock in a fluidized bed reactor, comprising: fabricating the ceramic support particle, coating a ceramic support by adding an aqueous solution of a precursor salt of a metal selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Cr, Co, Mn, Mg, K, La and Fe and mixtures thereof to the ceramic support and calcining the coated ceramic in air to convert the metal salts to metal oxides.

Parent, Yves O. (Golden, CO); Magrini, Kim (Golden, CO); Landin, Steven M. (Conifer, CO); Ritland, Marcus A. (Palm Beach Shores, FL)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries. Dendrimer-Encapsulated Ruthenium Nanoparticles as Catalysts for Lithium-O2 Batteries....

204

Understanding Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science Approach: Model NOx Storage Materials. Understanding Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science Approach: Model NOx...

205

Controlling Axial p-n Heterojunction Abruptness Through Catalyst...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Axial p-n Heterojunction Abruptness Through Catalyst Alloying in Vapor-Liquid-Solid Grown Semiconductor Nanowires. Controlling Axial p-n Heterojunction Abruptness Through Catalyst...

206

Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on Functionalized Graphene Sheets for Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction . Enhanced Activity and Stability of Pt catalysts on...

207

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas Liquids: Prototype Development and Full-Scale Testing, April 2013 Catalyst-Assisted Production of Olefins from Natural Gas...

208

The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free Covalent...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free Covalent Attachment of Electrochemically Active Species to an Azide The Electrode as Organolithium Reagent: Catalyst-Free...

209

Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor...

210

Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues....

211

Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Thompson, David N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Raymond P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

Improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to improved catalysts for carbon and coal gasification and improved processes for catalytic coal gasification for the production of methane. The catalyst is composed of at least two alkali metal salts and a particulate carbonaceous substrate or carrier is used. 10 figures, 2 tables.

McKee, D.W.; Spiro, C.L.; Kosky, P.G.

1984-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

213

Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Vanadium catalysts break down biomass for fuels March 26, 2012 Vanadium catalysts break down biomass into useful components Due to diminishing petroleum reserves, non-food biomass (lignocellulose biomass into high-value commodity chemicals. The journal Angewandte Chemie International Edition published

214

Novel supports for coal liquefaction catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research is divided into three parts: (1) Evaluation of Alkaline-Earth-Promoted CoMo/Alumina Catalysts in a Bench Scale Hydrotreater, (2) Development of a Novel Catalytic Coal Liquefaction Microreactor (CCLM) Unit, and (3) Evaluation of Novel Catalyst Preparations for Direct Coal Liquefaction. (VC)

Haynes, H.W. Jr.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Ligand iron catalysts for selective hydrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are iron ligand catalysts for selective hydrogenation of aldehydes, ketones and imines. A catalyst such as dicarbonyl iron hydride hydroxycyclopentadiene) complex uses the OH on the five member ring and hydrogen linked to the iron to facilitate hydrogenation reactions, particularly in the presence of hydrogen gas.

Casey, Charles P. (Madison, WI); Guan, Hairong (Cincinnati, OH)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

216

Improved catalyst can clear the air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalyst technology can make clean coal plants look as clean as they are. This article examines the need and available methods for SO{sub 2} control with a specific focus on a catalyst technology developed by Cormetech. It also presents the results of commercial operating experience. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Pritchard, S. [Cormetech Inc. (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

Doctor, Richard D. (Lisle, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

Doctor, R.D.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

220

Preparation of ferric-sulfide-based catalysts using an aerosol technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron sulfides are used as catalysts for direct coal liquefaction. They are reasonably active, cheap, and environmentally benign. This permits their use as once-through, non-regenerated catalysts. Our work in this area is based on the products of disproportionation of ferric sulfide, produced in sufficiently small particle sizes. The small particle sizes have been produced by in-situ impregnation or by using an aerosol reactor. This talk will concentrate on the aerosol process. The resulting particles have been characterized and used as catalysts for coal liquefaction. The effects of precursor solution concentration and the pressure and temperature in the aerosol reactor on the performance of the catalysts have been noted. We have recently investigated the effect of adding small amounts of a second metal to the catalyst. Multi-metal catalysts prepared to date with the aerosol technique include Fe-Cu-S and Fe-Zn-S, each with 10% additive, and Fe-Cu-Zn-S, with 10% Cu and 5% Zn.

Stiller, A.H.; Dadyburjor, D.B.; Stinespring, C.D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent catalyst for particulate, SO sub 2 and NO sub x control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed on a new concept for integrated pollutant control: a cross-flow filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particle filter, an SO {sub 2} sorbent, and a NO {sub x} reduction catalyst. One critical element of the R D program is the development of mixed metal oxide materials that serve as combined SO {sub 2} sorbents and NO {sub x} reduction catalysts. In this seventh quarterly progress report, we summarize the performance characteristics of three promising sorbent/catalyst materials tested in powder form.

Benedek, K. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Pillared clays as superior catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide. Second semiannual report, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the first six months of the program, the work has progressed as planned. We have constructed a reactor system and assembled all laboratory essentials for conducting the three-year project. First, the catalytic activities of the Cu(2+) ion exchanged alumina-pillared clay for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ethylene were measured. The temperature range was 250-500{degrees}C. The activities of this catalyst were substantially higher than the catalyst that has been extensively studied in the literature, Cu-ZSM-5. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) was used to study the acidity of the catalyst. The second part of the work was an in-depth FTIR study of the NO decomposition mechanism on the catalyst. This was planned as the first and the key step to obtain an understanding of the reaction mechanism. Key surface intermediates were identified from the FTIR spectra, and a redox type Eley-Rideal mechanism was proposed for the NO decomposition on this catalyst. This report will be divided into two parts. In Part One, we report results on the catalytic activities of the Cu-alumina-pillared clay and a direct comparison with other known catalysts. In Part two, we focus on the FTIR study and from the results, we propose a NO decomposition mechanism on this new catalyst. Plans for the next six months include tests of different pillared clays as well as the catalytic mechanism. The micro reactor will continue to be the key equipment for measuring the catalytic activities. FTIR will continue to be the major technique for identifying surface species and hence understanding the reaction mechanism.

Yang, R.T.; Li, W.B.; Sirilumpen, M.; Tharapiwattananon, N.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Catalyst for producing lower alcohols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and system for the production of the lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol and propanol involves the reaction of carbon monoxide and water in the presence of a lead salt and an alkali metal formate catalyst combination. The lead salt is present as solid particles such as lead titanate, lead molybdate, lead vanadate, lead zirconate, lead tantalate and lead silicates coated or in slurry within molten alkali metal formate. The reactants, carbon monoxide and steam are provided in gas form at relatively low pressures below 100 atmospheres and at temperatures of 200-400.degree. C. The resulted lower alcohols can be separated into boiling point fractions and recovered from the excess reactants by distillation.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Bolingbrook, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Woodridge, IL); Heiberger, John J. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

First-time comprehensive list compiles world's petrochemical catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents compilation of catalysts used in petrochemical and related processes. This is the result of an extensive survey of the world's catalyst manufacturers and suppliers and covers catalysts for the production of olefins and aromatics derivatives, aromatics themselves, and synthesis gas components. More than 300 catalysts from 18 different suppliers are included in the report.

Corbett, R.A.

1988-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Formic acid fuel cells and catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exemplary fuel cell of the invention includes a formic acid fuel solution in communication with an anode (12, 134), an oxidizer in communication with a cathode (16, 135) electrically linked to the anode, and an anode catalyst that includes Pd. An exemplary formic acid fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (130) includes a proton-conducting membrane (131) having opposing first (132) and second surfaces (133), a cathode catalyst on the second membrane surface, and an anode catalyst including Pd on the first surface.

Masel, Richard I.; Larsen, Robert; Ha, Su Yun

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Adsorption of hydrogen on copper catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper catalysts display a high activity and selectivity in the hydrogenation of various carbonyl compounds, and copper is a component of the complex catalysts for the synthesis of methanol from CO and H/sub 2/. The adsorption of H/sub 2/ on copper catalysts has been studied by means of thermal desorption. The molecular form of adsorption of H/sub 2/ has been established, the thermal desorption parameters calculated, and the heat of adsorption of H/sub 2/ on a copper surface estimated.

Pavlenko, N.V.; Tripol'skii, A.I.; Golodets, G.I.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Steam reforming utilizing iron oxide catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High activity steam reforming iron oxide catalysts are described. Such catalysts can be unsupported utilizing at least 90% by weight iron oxide and various modifiers (Ai/sub 2/O/sub 3/, K/sub 2/O, CaO, SiO/sub 2/) or unmodified and supported on such things as alumina, CaO impregnated alumina, and lanthanum stabilized alumina. When used in steam reformers such as autothermal and tubular steam reformers, these catalysts demonstrate much improved resistance to carbon plugging.

Setzer, H. T.; Bett, J. A. S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hydrodesulfurization catalyst by Chevrel phase compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M/sub x/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS/sub 2/ catalysts. The most active catalysts were the ''large'' cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the ''small'' cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

McCarty, K.F.; Schrader, G.L.

1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed downstream to a multi-plans Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor. In order to simulate Diesel engine

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

231

Effect of Fuel Cell System Contaminants on the Pt Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of the balance of plant (BOP) fuel cell system has increased in importance with recent decreases in fuel cell stack cost. In order to lower the cost of the BOP system, low cost but relatively clean components must be used. Selection of these materials requires an understanding of potential materials and the contaminants that evolve from them, which have been shown to affect the performance and durability of fuel cells. The present work evaluates the influence of leachable constituents from prospective materials and model compounds on the electrochemical performance of a platinum catalyst.

Wang, H.; Christ, J.; Macomber, C. S.; O'Neill, K.; Neyerlin, K. C.; O'Leary, K. A.; Reid, R.; Lakshmanan, B.; Das, M.; Ohashi, M.; Van Zee, J. W.; Dinh, H. N.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

1985-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fluoride removal from water with spent catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption of fluoride from water with spent catalyst was studied. Adsorption density of fluoride decreased with increasing pH. Linear adsorption isotherm was utilized to describe the adsorption reaction. The adsorption was a first-order reaction, and the rate constant increased with decreasing surface loading. Adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst was endothermic, and the reaction rate increased slightly with increasing temperature. Fluoro-alumino complex and free fluoride ion were involved in the adsorption reaction. It is proposed that both the silica and alumina fractions of spent catalyst contribute to the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution. Coulombic interaction is proposed as the major driving force of the adsorption reaction of fluoride onto spent catalyst.

Lai, Y.D.; Liu, J.C. [National Taiwan Institute of Technology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DEGRADATION OF HYDRODESULFURIZING CATALYSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bakelite, Lucite, and epoxy resins are suitable as mountingof the catalyst and epoxy resins when these are used asdown crack. In the th the epoxy resin mounting llet shown in

Whittle, D.P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental Studies of Emission Treatment Catalyst C.K. Narula, M. Moses-DeBusk, X. Chen, M.G. Stocks, X. Yang, L.F. Allard Physical Chemistry of...

237

Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010. p-08narula.pdf More Documents & Publications Catalyst by Design...

238

Development of FCC catalyst magnetic separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic separation has been historically active in several different industries, yet has not been utilized in petroleum refining until recently. Development of economical permanent magnets with high magnetic strength has led to a new process known as MagnaCat{reg_sign}. The MagnaCat{reg_sign}. Process separates less active (high metals) particles catalyst from equilibrium Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst, producing a higher activity/lower metals catalyst for recycle. Pilot FCC studies showed lower hydrogen, dry gas, and coke make with higher wet gas and octane from catalyst separated by MagnaCat{reg_sign}. With the use of a MagnaCat{reg_sign} Process unit, a refiner would produce an economic advantage of $0.20 to $0.40/Barrel of FCC charge and enhance unit operability.

Goolsby, T.L.; Moore, H.F. [Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Combustion Catalysts in Industry- An Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications of combustion catalysts for coal are presented. Combustion efficiency and calculations are discussed, followed by an explanation of the theories of combustion catalysis and a review of three case histories....

Merrell, G. A.; Knight, R. S.

240

Catalyst by Design - Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Theoretical, Nanostructural, and Experimental Studies of Oxidation Catalyst for Diesel Engine Emission Treatment C.K. Narula, M. Moses-DeBusk, X. Chen, M.G. Stocks, L.F. Allard...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Moderated ruthenium fischer-tropsch synthesis catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprises moderated ruthenium on an inorganic oxide support. The preferred moderator is silicon. Preferably the moderator is effectively positioned in relationship to ruthenium particles through simultaneous placement on the support using reverse micelle impregnation.

Abrevaya, Hayim (Wilmette, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Synthesis and Understanding of Novel Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research took advantage of our capabilities to perform in-situ and operando Raman spectroscopy on complex systems along with our developing expertise in the synthesis of uniform, supported metal oxide materials to investigate relationships between the catalytically active oxide composition, atomic structure, and support and the corresponding chemical and catalytic properties. The project was organized into two efforts: 1) Synthesis of novel catalyst materials by atomic layer deposition (ALD). 2) Spectroscopic and chemical investigations of coke formation and catalyst deactivation. ALD synthesis was combined with conventional physical characterization, Raman spectroscopy, and probe molecule chemisorption to study the effect of supported metal oxide composition and atomic structure on acid-base and catalytic properties. Operando Raman spectroscopy studies of olefin polymerization leading to coke formation and catalyst deactivation clarified the mechanism of coke formation by acid catalysts.

Stair, Peter C. [Northwestern University] [Northwestern University

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

Extended Platinum Nanotubes as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy consumption has relied principally on fossil fuels as an energy source; fuel cells, however, can provide a clean and sustainable alternative, an answer to the depletion and climate change concerns of fossil fuels. Within proton exchange membrane fuel cells, high catalyst cost and poor durability limit the commercial viability of the device. Recently, platinum nanotubes (PtNTs) were studied as durable, active catalysts, providing a platform to meet US Department of Energy vehicular activity targets.[1] Porous PtNTs were developed to increase nanotube surface area, improving mass activity for oxygen reduction without sacrificing durability.[2] Subsurface platinum was then replaced with palladium, forming platinum-coated palladium nanotubes.[3] By forming a core shell structure, platinum utilization was increased, reducing catalyst cost. Alternative substrates have also been examined, modifying platinum surface facets and increasing oxygen reduction specific activity. Through modification of the PtNT platform, catalyst limitations can be reduced, ensuring a commercially viable device.

Alia, S.; Pivovar, B. S.; Yan, Y.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Adsorbent key to polypropylene catalyst activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propylene streams from the refinery fluid catalytic cracking unit and delayed coker contain contaminants that are poisons to polymerization catalysts. A new sorbent catalyst, called Prosorb, allows petrochemical producers to clean up these dirty'' propylene streams to a level adequate for use with the new high-yielded polymerization catalysts. The process, called Triple P'' (propylene polishing process), eliminates all common contaminants, including COS, H[sub 2]S, mercaptans, AsH[sub 3], and SbH[sub 3]. Commercial trials have taken place at two Fina refineries and at a joint venture petrochemical plant. The refineries used the process to upgrade propylene feed from gasoline value to nearly polymer-grade value. The petrochemical producer was able to increase the activity of its polymerization catalyst and the consistency of the process.

Detrait, J.C.; Grootjans, J.F. (Fina Research, Feluy (Belgium))

1994-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cationic Ruthenium Catalysts for Olefin Hydrovinylation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CATIONIC RUTHENIUM CATALYSTS FOR OLEFIN HYDROVINYLATION A Thesis by RICHARD P. SANCHEZ, JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 2009 Major Subject: Chemistry CATIONIC RUTHENIUM CATALYSTS FOR OLEFIN HYDROVINYLATION A Thesis by RICHARD P. SANCHEZ, JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Sanchez, Richard P., Jr

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Single-layer transition metal sulfide catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Transition Metal Sulfides (TMS), such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2), are the petroleum industry's "workhorse" catalysts for upgrading heavy petroleum feedstocks and removing sulfur, nitrogen and other pollutants from fuels. We have developed an improved synthesis technique to produce SLTMS catalysts, such as molybdenum disulfide, with potentially greater activity and specificity than those currently available. Applications for this technology include heavy feed upgrading, in-situ catalysis, bio-fuel conversion and coal liquefaction.

Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

247

Comparative Investigation of Benzene Steam Reforming over Spinel Supported Rh and Ir Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a combined experimental and first-principles density functional theory (DFT) study, benzene steam reforming (BSR) over MgAl2O4 supported Rh and Ir catalysts was investigated. Experimentally, it has been found that both highly dispersed Rh and Ir clusters (1-2 nm) on the MgAl2O4 spinel support are stable during the BSR in the temperature range of 700-850?C. Compared to the Ir/MgAl2O4 catalyst, the Rh/MgAl2O4 catalyst is more active with higher benzene turnover frequency and conversion. At typical steam conditions with the steam-to-carbon ratio > 12, the benzene conversion is only a weak function of the H2O concentration in the feed. This suggests that the initial benzene decomposition step rather than the benzene adsorption is most likely the rate-determined step in BSR over supported Rh and Ir catalysts. In order to understand the differences between the two catalysts, we followed with a comparative DFT study of initial benzene decomposition pathways over two representative model systems for each supported metal (Rh and Ir) catalysts. A periodic terrace (111) surface and an amorphous 50-atom metal cluster with a diameter of 1.0 nm were used to represent the two supported model catalysts under low and high dispersion conditions. Our DFT results show that the decreasing catalyst particle size enhances the benzene decomposition on supported Rh catalysts by lowering both C-C and C-H bond scission. The activation barriers of the C-C and the C-H bond scission decrease from 1.60 and 1.61 eV on the Rh(111) surface to 1.34 and 1.26 eV on the Rh50 cluster. For supported Ir catalysts, the decreasing particle size only affects the C-C scission. The activation barrier of the C-C scission of benzene decreases from 1.60 eV on the Ir(111) surface to 1.35 eV on the Ir50 cluster while the barriers of the C-H scission are practically the same. The experimentally measured higher BSR activity on the supported highly dispersed Rh catalyst can be rationalized by the thermodynamic limitation for the very first C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst. The C-C bond scission of benzene on the small Ir50 catalyst is highly endothermic although the barrier is competitive with the barriers of both the C-C and the C-H bond-breakings on the small Rh50 catalyst. The calculations also imply that, for the supported Rh catalysts the C-C and C-H bond scissions are competitive, independently of the Rh cluster sizes. After the initial dissociation step via either the C-C or the C-H bond scission, the C-H bond breaking seems to be more favorable rather than the C-C bond breaking on the larger Rh terrace surface. This work was financially supported by the United States Department of Energy’s Office of Biomass Program’s. Computing time was granted by a user project at the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Mei, Donghai; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Rousseau, Roger J.; Glezakou, Vassiliki Alexandra; Albrecht, Karl O.; Kovarik, Libor; Flake, Matthew D.; Dagle, Robert A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

340th Catalysis Research Center (CRC) Colloquium NOx Storage Mechanism on NSR Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brought about the lean-burn engine technology with high air/fuel ratio for motor vehicles. However of the leading strategies to tackle this issue. The catalyst works with alternatively lean and rich conditions 1996 to 2003. He was a visiting professor at Kyoto University, Japan, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon

Ishii, Hitoshi

249

CatalystSpring 2007 Volume 2 Issue 1 The cycle of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SP 07 V 2.1 CatalystSpring 2007 Volume 2 · Issue 1 The cycle of energy Sustainable energy, sustainable societies The application of science Jon Ellman opens doors for drug discovery A prepared mind underpinnings of biology. His work on the role of nitric oxide in biological processes, profiled in this issue

Neumark, Daniel M.

250

Operando Raman and Theoretical Vibration Spectroscopy of Non-PGM Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation about spectroscopy techniques for non-platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts, presented by Eugene Smotkin, Northeastern University, at the kick-off meeting of the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program's Catalysis Working Group, held May 14, 2012, in Arlington, Virginia.

251

Low Cost Autothermal Diesel Reforming Catalyst Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) represents an important step of converting fossil fuel to hydrogen rich reformate for use in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The state-of-the-art reforming catalyst, at present, is a Rh based material which is effective but costly. The objective of our current research is to reduce the catalyst cost by finding an efficient ATR catalyst containing no rhodium. A group of perovskite based catalysts have been synthesized and evaluated under the reforming condition of a diesel surrogate fuel. Hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and conversion selectivity to carbon oxides of the catalyst ATR reaction are calculated and compared with the benchmark Rh based material. Several catalyst synthesis improvements were carried out including: 1) selectively doping metals on the A-site and B-site of the perovskite structure, 2) changing the support from perovskite to alumina, 3) altering the method of metal addition, and 4) using transition metals instead of noble metals. It was found that the catalytic activity changed little with modification of the A-site metal, while it displayed considerable dependence on the B-site metal. Perovskite supports performed much better than alumina based supports.

Shihadeh, J.; Liu, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Polypropylene reinvented: Costs of using metallocene catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study develops scoping estimates of the required capital investment and manufacturing costs to make a zirconocene catalyst/cocatalyst system [(F{sub 6}-acen)Zr(CH{sub 2}CMe{sub 3})(NMe{sub 2}Ph)][B(C{sub 6}F{sub 5}){sub 4}] immobilized on a silica support. Costs for this fluorine-based system are compared with estimates for two other metallocene catalysts using methylaluminoxane (MAO)-based cocatalysts. Including wt of support and cocatalyst, each of the production facilities for making the 3 zirconocene catalyst systems is sized at 364--484 tonnes/year. Cost to make the F-based catalyst system is estimated to be $10780/kg, assuming 20% return on capital invested. Costs for the two MAO-based catalyst system fall in the range of $10950--12160/kg, assuming same return. Within the {plus_minus}50% accuracy of these estimates, these differences are not significant. Given a catalyst productivity of 250 kg resin/gram zirconocene, the cost contribution in the finished ethylene-propylene copolymer resin is 4.4 cents/kg, excluding selling, administrative, research costs.

Brockmeier, N.F.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, Richard S. (1 Miller Ave., Shoreham, NY 11786); Slegeir, William A. (7 Florence Rd., Hampton Bays, NY 11946); O'Hare, Thomas E. (11 Geiger Pl., Huntington Station, NY 11746); Mahajan, Devinder (14 Locust Ct., Selden, NY 11784)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

1985-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

255

Low temperature catalysts for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

1986-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for Developing Durable Catalysts. The Corrosion of PEM Fuel Cell Catalyst Supports and Its Implications for...

257

SEPARATION OF FISCHER-TROPSCH WAX PRODUCTS FROM ULTRAFINE IRON CATALYST PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a fundamental filtration study was continued to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. In this reporting period, a series of crossflow filtration experiments were initiated to study the effect of olefins and oxygenates on the filtration flux and membrane performance. Iron-based FTS reactor waxes contain a significant amount of oxygenates, depending on the catalyst formulation and operating conditions. Mono-olefins and aliphatic alcohols were doped into an activated iron catalyst slurry (with Polywax) to test their influence on filtration properties. The olefins were varied from 5 to 25 wt% and oxygenates from 6 to 17 wt% to simulate a range of reactor slurries reported in the literature. The addition of an alcohol (1-dodecanol) was found to decrease the permeation rate while the olefin added (1-hexadecene) had no effect on the permeation rate. A passive flux maintenance technique was tested that can temporarily increase the permeate rate for 24 hours.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Burtron H. Davis

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a study of ultra-fine iron catalyst filtration was initiated to study the behavior of ultra-fine particles during the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids filtration. The overall focus of the program is with slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems. Hydrocarbon products must be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. An efficient wax product/catalyst separation system is a key factor for optimizing operating costs for iron-based slurry-phase FTS. Previous work has focused on catalyst particle attrition and the formation of ultra-fine iron carbide and/or carbon particles. With the current study, we are investigating how the filtration properties are affected by these chemical and physical changes of the catalyst slurry during activation/synthesis. The change of particle size during the slurry-phase FTS has monitored by withdrawing catalyst sample at different TOS. The measurement of dimension of the HRTEM images of samples showed a tremendous growth of the particles. Carbon rims of thickness 3-6 nm around the particles were observed. This growth in particle size was not due to carbon deposition on the catalyst. A conceptual design and operating philosophy was developed for an integrated wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor to be used in Phase II of this research program. The system will utilize a primary inertial hydroclone followed by a Pall Accusep cross-flow membrane. Provisions for cleaned permeate back-pulsing will be included to as a flux maintenance measure.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Burtron H. Davis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Bio-Inspired Molecular Catalysts for Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in Ni-based bio-inspired catalysts obtained in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, demonstrated the possibility of cleaving H2 or generating H2 heterolytically with turnover frequencies comparable or superior to those of hydrogenase enzymes. In these catalysts the transformation between H2 and protons proceeds via an interplay between proton, hydride and electron transfer steps and involves the interaction of a dihydrogen molecule with both a Ni(II) center and with pendant amine bases incorporated in a six-membered ring, which act as proton relays. These catalytic platforms are well designed in that when protons are correctly positioned (endo) toward the Raugei-ACS-Books.docxPrinted 12/18/12 2 metal center, catalysis proceeds at very high rates. We will show that the proton removal (for H2 oxidation) and proton delivery (for H2 production) are often the rate determining steps. Furthermore, the presence of multiple protonation sites gives rise to reaction intermediates with protons not correctly positioned (exo relative to the metal center). These isomers are easily accessible kinetically and are detrimental to catalysis because of the slow isomerization processes necessary to convert them to the catalytically competent endo isomers. In this chapter we will review the major findings of our computational investigation on the role of proton relays for H2 chemistry and provide guidelines for the design of new catalysts. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a Raugei-Bio-Inspired Molecular-Catalysts-for-Hydrogen- Oxidation-and-Hydrogen-Production.doc Printed 12/18/2012 23 national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and the Jaguar supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (INCITE 2008-2011 award supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC0500OR22725).

Ho, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R. Morris; Raugei, Simone

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long- term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the second year of the project, the catalysts were investigated for their SCR activity with methane in a microreactor setup and also, by the temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) technique. The results from the SCR experiments indicated that manganese is a more effective promoter than rhodium on the supported copper oxide-ceria catalysts under study; the effectiveness of the promoter increases with the increase in Ce/Cu ratio. The TPD profiles of the unpromoted catalyst (Cu/Ce=3) is different than those promoted with 0.1% rhodium.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hydrocarbon conversion process and catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for hydrocracking hydrocarbon oils into products of lower average molecular weight and lower average boiling point. It comprises contacting hydrocarbon oil at a temperature between 250{sup 0}C and 500{sup 0}C and a pressure up to 300 bar in the presence of hydrogen with a catalyst consisting essentially of a Y zeolite modified to have a unit cell size below 24.40 A, a water adsorption capacity (at 25{sup 0}C and a rho/rho/sub o/ value of 0.2) of between 10% and 15% by weight of the zeolite and a pore volume of at least 0.25 ml/g wherein between 10% and 60% of the total pore volume is made up of pores having a diameter of at least 8 nm; am amorphous cracking component, a binder and at least one hydrogenation component selected from the group consisting of a Group VI metal, a Group VIII metal and mixtures thereof.

Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Maxwell, I.E.

1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

3D Printing Electronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Login Register Home Videos Jobs Games 3D Printing Electronics Design Software Designer Edge for 3D Printing · -- B6 Sigma Labs (ticker SGLB) is not the same company as Sigma Technologies

Stryk, Oskar von

263

Method for producing catalysts from coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Pyrochlore catalysts for hydrocarbon fuel reforming  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A2B2-y-zB'yB"zO7-.DELTA., where y>0 and z.gtoreq.0. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

Berry, David A.; Shekhawat, Dushyant; Haynes, Daniel; Smith, Mark; Spivey, James J.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

Mahajan, Devinder (Port Jefferson, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

Mahajan, Devinder (Port Jefferson, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); O'Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

1984-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

269

Reaction of adsorption substitution of oxygen on a cracking catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an investigation of catalysts for methanol synthesis and carbon monoxide conversion, the authors have observed, for the first time, the reaction of adsorption substitution of strongly bound oxygen on catalysts containing zeolites and compounds of lanthanum and cerium.

Vishnetskaya, M.V.; Takhtarova, G.N.; Topchieva, K.V.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Catalysts for oxidation of mercury in flue gas  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Two new classes of catalysts for the removal of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg) from effluent gases. Both of these classes of catalysts are excellent absorbers of HCl and Cl.sub.2 present in effluent gases. This adsorption of oxidizing agents aids in the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants. The catalysts remove mercury by oxidizing the Hg into mercury (II) moieties. For one class of catalysts, the active component is selected from the group consisting of iridium (Ir) and iridum-platinum (Ir/Pt) alloys. The Ir and Ir/Pt alloy catalysts are especially corrosion resistant. For the other class of catalyst, the active component is partially combusted coal or "Thief" carbon impregnated with Cl.sub.2. Untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-activating in the presence of effluent gas streams. The Thief carbon catalyst is disposable by means of capture from the effluent gas stream in a particulate collection device (PCD).

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Understanding the Distributed Intra-Catalyst Impact of Sulfation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lean NOx Trap Catalyst The Lean NOx Trap catalyst is an aftertreatment technology for abatement of nitrogen-oxide emissions from lean-burn vehicle engines. deer10partridge.pdf...

272

Enhancement of alkylation catalysts for improved supercritical fluid regeneration  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of modifying an alkylation catalyst to reduce the formation of condensed hydrocarbon species thereon. The method comprises providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a plurality of active sites. The plurality of active sites on the alkylation catalyst may include a plurality of weakly acidic active sites, intermediate acidity active sites, and strongly acidic active sites. A base is adsorbed to a portion of the plurality of active sites, such as the strongly acidic active sites, selectively poisoning the strongly acidic active sites. A method of modifying the alkylation catalyst by providing an alkylation catalyst comprising a pore size distribution that sterically constrains formation of the condensed hydrocarbon species on the alkylation catalyst or by synthesizing the alkylation catalyst to comprise a decreased number of strongly acidic active sites is also disclosed, as is a method of improving a regeneration efficiency of the alkylation catalyst.

Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Petkovic, Lucia M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

273

Catalytic studies of supported Pd-Au catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reaction conditions is the ultimate goal. This thesis is mainly focused on the application of Pd-Au supported catalysts for vinyl acetate synthesis and CO oxidation reactions using highsurface area catalysts. We have attempted to improve the conventional Pd...

Boopalachandran, Praveenkumar

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Inkjet Printing of UWB Antennas on Paper Based , S. Safavi-Naeini1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This work is one step further towards the development of low-cost environment- friendly conformal printed research topic due to the ever growing demand for low cost, flexible and power-efficient broadband wireless look at the most common techniques for the fabrication of printed UWB antennas reveals

Tentzeris, Manos

275

Deactivation and poisoning of fuel cell catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deactivation and poisoning phenomena reviewed are: the poisoning of anode (fuel electrode) catalyst by carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide; the deactivation of the cathode (air electrode) catalyst by sintering; and the deactivation of the cathode by corrosion of the support. The anode catalyst is Pt supported on a conductive, high area carbon black, usually at a loading of 10 w/o. This catalyst is tolerant to some level of carbon monoxide or hydrogen sulfide or both in combination, the level depending on temperature and pressure. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been studied extensively, including detailed adsorption studies at various temperatures and pressures. Predictive models have been developed that effectively predict anode tolerance to carbon monoxide. Much less is known about hydrogen sulfide poisoning. Typical tolerance levels are 2% CO, and 10 ppM H/sub 2/S. The cathode catalyst is typically Pt supported on a graphitic carbon black, usually a furnace black heat-treated to 2700/sup 0/C. The Pt loading is typically 10 w/o, and the dispersion (or percent exposed) as-prepared is typically 30%. The loss of dispersion in use depends on the operational parameters, most especially the cathode potential history, i.e. higher potentials cause more rapid decrease in dispersion. The mechanism of loss of dispersion is not well known. The graphitic carbon support corrodes at a finite rate that is also potential dependent. Support corrosion causes thickening of the eletrolyte film between the gas pores and the catalyst particles, which in turn causes increased diffusional resistance and performance loss. In addition, support corrosion may also cause loss of Pt into the separator. Support corrosion appears to be the life limiting factor for phosphoric acid fuel cells.

Ross, P.N. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Windows XP - LPR Printing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To print to the math department printers in Windows XP, “Print Services for Unix” must be ... Page 3 ... The wizard will proceed to install "Print Services for Unix". ... Email systems@math.purdue.edu if you need assistance. D. Brown. 7/26/04.

dbrown

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

277

Recycling of WEEE: Characterization of spent printed circuit boards from mobile phones and computers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: > This paper presents new and important data on characterization of wastes of electric and electronic equipments. > Copper concentration is increasing in mobile phones and remaining constant in personal computers. > Printed circuit boards from mobile phones and computers would not be mixed prior treatment. - Abstract: This paper presents a comparison between printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones. Since printed circuits boards are becoming more complex and smaller, the amount of materials is constantly changing. The main objective of this work was to characterize spent printed circuit boards from computers and mobile phones applying mineral processing technique to separate the metal, ceramic, and polymer fractions. The processing was performed by comminution in a hammer mill, followed by particle size analysis, and by magnetic and electrostatic separation. Aqua regia leaching, loss-on-ignition and chemical analysis (inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy - ICP-OES) were carried out to determine the composition of printed circuit boards and the metal rich fraction. The composition of the studied mobile phones printed circuit boards (PCB-MP) was 63 wt.% metals; 24 wt.% ceramics and 13 wt.% polymers; and of the printed circuit boards from studied personal computers (PCB-PC) was 45 wt.% metals; 27 wt.% polymers and ceramics 28 wt.% ceramics. The chemical analysis showed that copper concentration in printed circuit boards from personal computers was 20 wt.% and in printed circuit boards from mobile phones was 34.5 wt.%. According to the characteristics of each type of printed circuit board, the recovery of precious metals may be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from personal computers and the recovery of copper should be the main goal of the recycling process of printed circuit boards from mobile phones. Hence, these printed circuit boards would not be mixed prior treatment. The results of this paper show that copper concentration is increasing in mobile phones and remaining constant in personal computers.

Yamane, Luciana Harue, E-mail: lucianayamane@uol.com.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil); Tavares de Moraes, Viviane, E-mail: tavares.vivi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil); Crocce Romano Espinosa, Denise, E-mail: espinosa@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil); Soares Tenorio, Jorge Alberto, E-mail: jtenorio@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 Sao Paulo, SP 05508-030 (Brazil)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Unique Catalyst System for NOx Reduction in Diesel Exhaust  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Development Partnership: AEI & Noxtech * Presenter: Ralph Slone from Noxtech * Mobile Applications: diesel aftertreatment * Unique dual catalyst system - Cost effective:...

279

Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thief carbon catalyst for oxidation of mercury in effluent stream  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A catalyst for the oxidation of heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury (Hg), in an effluent stream is presented. The catalyst facilitates removal of mercury through the oxidation of elemental Hg into mercury (II) moieties. The active component of the catalyst is partially combusted coal, or "Thief" carbon, which can be pre-treated with a halogen. An untreated Thief carbon catalyst can be self-promoting in the presence of an effluent gas streams entrained with a halogen.

Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Catalyst structure and method of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, reactions using Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, methods of making Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, processes of hydrogenating carbon monoxide, and fuels made using these processes. The invention provides the ability to hydrogenate carbon monoxide with low contact times, good conversion rates and low methane selectivities. In a preferred method, the catalyst is made using a metal foam support.

Wang, Yong; Vanderwiel, David P.; Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Gao, Yufei; Baker, Eddie G.

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Catalyst structure and method of fischer-tropsch synthesis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, reactions using Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, methods of making Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, processes of hydrogenating carbon monoxide, and fuels made using these processes. The invention provides the ability to hydrogenate carbon monoxide with low contact times, good conversion rates and low methane selectivities. In a preferred method, the catalyst is made using a metal foam support.

Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Vanderwiel, David P [Richland, WA; Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Baker, Eddie G [Pasco, WA

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reversible chemisorption on highly dispersed Ru catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorptions have been studied by static gas volumetric measurement on a range of highly dispersed Y-zeolite-supported ruthenium catalysts prepared by ion exchange. At ambient temperature, the absorption isotherms indicated two distinct types of adsorption - reversible (composed of both physisorption and weak chemisorption) and irreversible (strongly chemisorbed). The catalysts were highly dispersed and had average particle diameters ranging from 0.9 to 1.6 nm. Reversible hydrogen chemisorption was found to be a function of average particle diameter and dispersion. On the other hand, reversible carbon monoxide chemisorption seemed to be mainly due to interaction with the support.

Yang, C.H.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Method for producing iron-based catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing an acid catalyst having a long shelf-life is provided comprising doping crystalline iron oxides with lattice-compatible metals and heating the now-doped oxide with halogen compounds at elevated temperatures. The invention also provides for a catalyst comprising an iron oxide particle having a predetermined lattice structure, one or more metal dopants for said iron oxide, said dopants having an ionic radius compatible with said lattice structure; and a halogen bound with the iron and the metal dopants on the surface of the particle.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Diehl, J. Rodney (Pittsburgh, PA); Kathrein, Hendrik (McMurray, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Catalysts For Lean Burn Engine Exhaust Abatement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

287

Catalysts for lean burn engine exhaust abatement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The effects of gas adsorption on particle shapes in supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work has shown that the shapes of the metal particles in a supported platinum catalyst are substantially altered when the catalyst is treated in an appropriate adages. However, at present it is unclear why the shape changes occur. In the work here, simple first-order calculations were done to examine the effects of hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon monoxide on the equilibrium crystal shape of the platinum particles in a supported platinum catalyst. The calculation assumed that the main effect of the gaseous environment was to change the surface free energy of the facets on the platinum particles. The results of the calculations showed that when a clean platinum particle is equilibrated in nitrogen, the shape should not change significantly. However, Pt(100) facets should grow in hydrogen while Pt(210) facets should grow in carbon monoxide. By comparison, previous experiments have shown the Pt(100) facets do grow in hydrogen. Little change in shape is observed in nitrogen. Thus, it seems that changes in the surface free energy of the facets in the metal particles on a supported metal catalyst due to the presence of an adgas play an important role in the shape changes which are observed.

Shi, A.C.; Masel, R.I. (Univ. of Illinois, Urbana (USA))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Surface spectroscopic studies of mono- and bimetallic model catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation is focused on understanding heterogeneous bimetallic catalysts using model catalyst systems, such as Pd-Au/Mo(110), Pd/Au(111) and Pd/Au(100). Monometallic and bimetallic model catalysts, composed of Pd and Au, were prepared...

Yi, Cheol-Woo

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

290

Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The promoter(s) Mn oxide or Mn oxide and Zr oxide are added to a cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst combined with the molecular sieve TC-103 or TC-123 such that the resultant catalyst demonstrates improved product selectivity, stability and catalyst life. The improved selectivity is evidenced by lower methane production, higher C5+ yield and increased olefin production.

Miller, James G. (Pearl River, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Supported metal catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite extensive studies on hydrogen production via steam reforming of alcohols and sugar alcohols, catalysts typically suffer a variety of issues from poor hydrogen selectivity to rapid deactivation. Here, we summarize recent advances in fundamental understanding of functionality and structure of catalysts for alcohol/sugar alcohol steam reforming, and provide perspectives on further development required to design highly efficient steam reforming catalysts.

Davidson, Stephen; Zhang, He; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

292

Nano Catalysts for Diesel Engine Emission Remediation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop durable zeolite nanocatalysts with broader operating temperature windows to treat diesel engine emissions to enable diesel engine based equipment and vehicles to meet future regulatory requirements. A second objective was to improve hydrothermal durability of zeolite catalysts to at least 675 C. The results presented in this report show that we have successfully achieved both objectives. Since it is accepted that the first step in NO{sub x} conversion under SCR (selective catalytic reduction) conditions involves NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}, we reasoned that catalyst modification that can enhance NO oxidation at low-temperatures should facilitate NO{sub x} reduction at low temperatures. Considering that Cu-ZSM-5 is a more efficient catalyst than Fe-ZSM-5 at low-temperature, we chose to modify Cu-ZSM-5. It is important to point out that the poor low-temperature efficiency of Fe-ZSM-5 has been shown to be due to selective absorption of NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures rather than poor NO oxidation activity. In view of this, we also reasoned that an increased electron density on copper in Cu-ZSM-5 would inhibit any bonding with NH{sub 3} at low-temperatures. In addition to modified Cu-ZSM-5, we synthesized a series of new heterobimetallic zeolites, by incorporating a secondary metal cation M (Sc{sup 3+}, Fe{sup 3+}, In{sup 3+}, and La{sup 3+}) in Cu exchanged ZSM-5, zeolite-beta, and SSZ-13 zeolites under carefully controlled experimental conditions. Characterization by diffuse-reflectance ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) does not permit conclusive structural determination but supports the proposal that M{sup 3+} has been incorporated in the vicinity of Cu(II). The protocols for degreening catalysts, testing under various operating conditions, and accelerated aging conditions were provided by our collaborators at John Deere Power Systems. Among various zeolites reported here, CuFe-SSZ-13 offers the best NO{sub x} conversion activity in 150-650 C range and is hydrothermally stable when tested under accelerated aging conditions. It is important to note that Cu-SSZ-13 is now a commercial catalyst for NO{sub x} treatment on diesel passenger vehicles. Thus, our catalyst performs better than the commercial catalyst under fast SCR conditions. We initially focused on fast SCR tests to enable us to screen catalysts rapidly. Only the catalysts that exhibit high NO{sub x} conversion at low temperatures are selected for screening under varying NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio. The detailed tests of CuFe-SSZ-13 show that CuFe-SSZ-13 is more effective than commercial Cu-SSZ-13 even at NO{sub 2}:NO{sub x} ratio of 0.1. The mechanistic studies, employing stop-flow diffuse reflectance FTIR spectroscopy (DRIFTS), suggest that high concentration of NO{sup +}, generated by heterobimetallic zeolites, is probably responsible for their superior low temperature NO{sub x} activity. The results described in this report clearly show that we have successfully completed the first step in a new emission treatment catalyst which is synthesis and laboratory testing employing simulated exhaust. The next step in the catalyst development is engine testing. Efforts are in progress to obtain follow-on funding to carry out scale-up and engine testing to facilitate commercialization of this technology.

Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Yang, Xiaofan [ORNL; Debusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL; Mullins, David R [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Exploration of 3D Printing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??3D printing technology is introduced and defined in this Thesis. Some methods of 3D printing are illustrated and their principles are explained with pictures. Most… (more)

Lin, Zeyu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

Petta, Jason

295

Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluidizable Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from Biomass Pyrolysis/Steam Reforming K. Magrini/Objective Develop and demonstrate technology to produce hydrogen from biomass at $2.90/kg plant gate price based Bio-oil aqueous fraction CO H2 CO2 H2O Trap grease Waste plastics textiles Co-processing Pyrolysis

296

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Alkanes are oxidized by contact with oxygen-containing gas in the presence as catalyst of a metalloporphyrin in which hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring have been replaced with one or more nitro groups. Hydrogen atoms in the porphyrin ring may also be substituted with halogen atoms.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Prealloyed catalyst for growing silicon carbide whiskers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A prealloyed metal catalyst is used to grow silicon carbide whiskers, especially in the .beta. form. Pretreating the metal particles to increase the weight percentages of carbon or silicon or both carbon and silicon allows whisker growth to begin immediately upon reaching growth temperature.

Shalek, Peter D. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Joel D. (Niagara Falls, NY); Hurley, George F. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Catalyst Activity Comparison of Alcohols over Zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alcohol transformation to transportation fuel range hydrocarbon on HZSM-5 (SiO2 / Al2O3 = 30) catalyst was studied at 360oC and 300psig. Product distributions and catalyst life were compared using methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol or 1-butanol as a feed. The catalyst life for 1-propanol and 1-butanol was more than double compared to that for methanol and ethanol. For all the alcohols studied, the product distributions (classified to paraffin, olefin, napthene, aromatic and naphthalene compounds) varied with time on stream (TOS). At 24 hours TOS, liquid product from 1-propanol and 1-butanol transformation primarily contains higher olefin compounds. The alcohol transformation process to higher hydrocarbon involves a complex set of reaction pathways such as dehydration, oligomerization, dehydrocyclization, and hydrogenation. Compared to ethylene generated from methanol and ethanol, oligomerization of propylene and butylene has a lower activation energy and can readily take place on weaker acidic sites. On the other hand, dehydrocyclization of propylene and butylene to form the cyclic compounds requires the sits with stronger acid strength. Combination of the above mentioned reasons are the primary reasons for olefin rich product generated in the later stage of the time on stream and for the extended catalyst life time for 1 propanol and 1 butanol compared to methanol and ethanol conversion over HZSM-5.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Mark K. Debe 3M Company May 10, 2011 restricted information 2011 Annual Merit Review DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells and Vehicle Technologies Programs.125 Performance @ Rated (W/cm2 ) @ 0.8V 1 0.25 1 0.25 Additional Interactions GM Fuel Cell Activities, Nuvera Fuel

300

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or [beta]-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Lyons, J.E.

1994-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nitrated metalloporphyrins as catalysts for alkane oxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions of matter comprising nitro-substituted metal complexes of porphyrins are catalysts for the oxidation of alkanes. The metal is iron, chromium, manganese, ruthenium, copper or cobalt. The porphyrin ring has nitro groups attached thereto in meso and/or .beta.-pyrrolic positions.

Ellis, Jr., Paul E. (Downingtown, PA); Lyons, James E. (Wallingford, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

Sobolevskiy, Anatoly (Orlando, FL); Rossin, Joseph A. (Columbus, OH); Knapke, Michael J. (Columbus, OH)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

303

Catalysts for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst composition capable of ensuring the production of only relatively minor amounts of heavy products boiling beyond the diesel oil range. The catalyst composition, having desirable stability during continuous production operation, employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component. The latter component is a steam-stabilized zeolite Y catalyst of hydrophobic character, desirably in acid-extracted form.

Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY); Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Methane oxidation over dual redox catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic oxidation of methane to partial oxidation products, primarily formaldehyde and C[sub 2] hydrocarbons, was found to be directed by the catalyst used. In this project, it was discovered that a moderate oxidative coupling catalyst for C[sub 2] hydrocarbons, zinc oxide, is modified by addition of small amounts of Cu and Fe dopants to yield fair yields of formaldehyde. A similar effect was observed with Cu/Sn/ZnO catalysts, and the presence of a redox Lewis acid, Fe[sup III] or Sn[sup IV], was found to be essential for the selectivity switch from C[sub 2] coupling products to formaldehyde. The principle of double doping with an oxygen activator (Cu) and the redox Lewis acid (Fe, Sn) was pursued further by synthesizing and testing the CuFe-ZSM-5 zeolite catalyst. The Cu[sup II](ion exchanged) Fe[sup III](framework)-ZSM-5 also displayed activity for formaldehyde synthesis, with space time yields exceeding 100 g/h-kg catalyst. However, the selectivity was low and earlier claims in the literature of selective oxidation of methane to methanol over CuFe-ZSM-5 were not reproduced. A new active and selective catalytic system (M=Sb,Bi,Sn)/SrO/La[sub 2]O[sub 3] has been discovered for potentially commercially attractive process for the conversion of methane to C[sub 2] hydrocarbons, (ii) a new principle has been demonstrated for selectivity switching from C[sub 2] hydrocarbon products to formaldehyde in methane oxidations over Cu,Fe-doped zinc oxide and ZSM-5, and (iii) a new approach has been initiated for using ultrafine metal dispersions for low temperature activation of methane for selective conversions. Item (iii) continues being supported by AMOCO while further developments related to items (i) and (ii) are the objective of our continued effort under the METC-AMOCO proposed joint program.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Sojka, Z.; DiCosimo, J.I.; DeTavernier, S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Discovery of New NOx Reduction Catalysts for CIDI Engines Using Combinatorial Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project for the discovery of new lean reduction NOx catalysts was initiated on August 16th, 2002 and is now into its fourth year. Several materials have already been identified as NOx reduction catalysts for possible future application. NOx reduction catalysts are a critical need in the North American vehicle market since these catalysts are needed to enable both diesels and lean gasoline engines to meet the 2007-2010 emission standards. Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a preferred technology since it requires no infrastructure changes (as may be expected for urea SCR) and most likely has the simplest engine control strategy of the three proposed NOx reduction approaches. The use of fast throughput techniques and informatics greatly enhances the possibility of discovering new NOx reduction catalysts. Using fast throughput techniques this project has already screened over 3000 new materials and evaluates hundreds of new materials a month. Evaluating such a high number of new materials puts this approach into a very different paradigm than previous discovery approaches for new NOx reduction catalysts. With so much data on materials it is necessary to use statistical techniques to identify the potential catalysts and these statistical techniques are needed to optimize compositions of the multi-component materials that are identified under the program as possible new lean NOx catalysts. Several new materials have conversions in excess of 80% at temperatures above 300 C. That is more than twice the activity of previous HC SCR materials. These materials are candidates for emission control on heavy-duty systems (i.e.; over 8500 pounds gross weight). Tests of one of the downselected materials on an engine dynamometer show NOx reductions greater than 80% under some conditions even though the net NOx reductions on the HWFET and the US06 cycles were relatively low. The program is scheduled to continue until the end of the 2006 calendar year. Work in the final year will focus on continued discovery and identity of candidate materials, and also on refining the engine operating strategies to increase NOx reduction over a full engine cycle.

Blint, Richard J

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Catalyst poisoning during tar-sands bitumen upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of hydrotreating catalysts are used in commercial heavy oil upgrading facilities. One of these, a CoO/MoO{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst has been evaluated in a pilot plant CSTR for Tar-Sands Bitumen upgrading. Following its use in a test of 200 hours duration, the catalyst was removed, de-oiled, regenerated by air-calcination to remove the coke, and then re-tested. Samples of the coked, fresh and regenerated catalyst were each examined using surface analytical techniques. ESCA and SIMS analysis of the coked and regenerated catalyst samples show, as expected, significant contamination of the catalyst with Ni and V. In addition, the SIMS analysis clearly reveals that the edges of the catalyst pellets are rich in Ca, Mg and Fe while the Ni, V and coke are evenly distributed. Regeneration of the catalyst by calcination removes the carbonaceous material but appears not to change the distribution of the metal contaminants. Retesting of the regenerated catalyst shows a performance similar to that of the fresh catalyst. These data serve to support the view that catalyst deactivation during early use is not due to the skin of Ca and Mg on the pellets but rather via the poisoning of active sites by carbonaceous species.

Carruthers, J.D.; Brinen, J.S.; Komar, D.A.; Greenhouse, S. [CYTEC Industries, Stamford, CT (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Plub Borough, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material and configuration of the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hydrocarbon reforming catalyst material comprising a catalyst support impregnated with catalyst is provided for reforming hydrocarbon fuel gases in an electrochemical generator. Elongated electrochemical cells convert the fuel to electrical power in the presence of an oxidant, after which the spent fuel is recirculated and combined with a fresh hydrocarbon feed fuel forming the reformable gas mixture which is fed to a reforming chamber containing a reforming catalyst material, where the reforming catalyst material includes discrete passageways integrally formed along the length of the catalyst support in the direction of reformable gas flow. The spent fuel and/or combusted exhaust gases discharged from the generator chamber transfer heat to the catalyst support, which in turn transfers heat to the reformable gas and to the catalyst, preferably via a number of discrete passageways disposed adjacent one another in the reforming catalyst support. The passageways can be slots extending inwardly from an outer surface of the support body, which slots are partly defined by an exterior confining wall. According to a preferred embodiment, the catalyst support is non-rigid, porous, fibrous alumina, wherein the fibers are substantially unsintered and compressible, and the reforming catalyst support is impregnated, at least in the discrete passageways with Ni and MgO, and has a number of internal slot passageways for reformable gas, the slot passageways being partly closed by a containing outer wall. 5 figs.

Singh, P.; Shockling, L.A.; George, R.A.; Basel, R.A.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

309

New catalysts improves heavy feedstock hydro-cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new zeolite-Y-based second-stage hydrocracking catalyst, designated S-703, has been developed by Shell. Laboratory testing and commercial use show it has significantly improved performance with respect to gas make and middle-distillate selectivity in processing heavy feedstocks when compared to a Shell catalyst, S-753, developed earlier. Further, the new catalyst exhibits enhanced stability. Extensive laboratory testing of the S-703 catalyst has been carried out under single-stage, stacked- bed, two-stage-flow, and series-flow conditions. Commercial experience with the new catalyst has now been obtained in several units. To date, the commercial results have confirmed the laboratory results in terms of the superior, heavy- feedstock processing performance of the new catalyst in all respects. Because the trend toward heavier feedstocks is expected to continue, it is likely that catalysts such as S- 703 will find increasing applications in hydrocrackers in the future.

Hoek, A.; Huizinga, T.; Esener, A.A.; Maxwell, I.E.; Stork, W. (Koninklijke/Shell Laboratorium, Amsterdam (NL)); van de Meerakker, F.J. (Shell Internationale Petroleum Maatschappij BV, The Hauge (NL)); Sy, O. (Shell Canada Ltd., Oakville, Ontario (CA))

1991-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

Graphdiyne as a Promising Substrate for Stabilizing Pt Nanoparticle Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At present, Pt nanoparticle catalysts in fuel cells suffer from aggregation and loss of chemical activity. In this work, graphdiyne, which has natural porous structure, was proposed as substrate with high adsorption ability to stabilize Pt nanoparticles. Using multiscale calculations by ab initio method and the ReaxFF potential, geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics simulations, Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations and minimum energy paths calculations were performed to investigate the adsorption energy and the rates of desorption and migration of Pt nanoparticles on graphdiyne and graphene. According to the comparison between graphdiyne and graphene, it was found that the high adsorption ability of graphdiyne can avoid Pt nanoparticle migration and aggregation on substrate. Then, simulations indicated the potential catalytic ability of graphdiyne-Pt-nanoparticle system to the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. In summary, graphdiyne should be an excellent material to replace graphite or amorphous ca...

Lin, Zheng-Zhe

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane over transition metal-fluorite oxide composite catalysts. I. Catalyst composition and activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the total oxidation of carbon monoxide and methane was prepared by combining fluorite oxides with active transition metals. The fluorite oxides, such as ceria and zirconia, are oxygen-ion-conducting materials having catalytic properties usually at high temperatures. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of these oxides. The contact of the two types of materials gave rise to a high active oxidation catalyst. At a space velocity of about 42,000 h{sup {minus}1}, complete carbon monoxide oxidation in air occurred at room temperature on the Au{sub 0.05}[Ce(La)]{sub 0.95}L{sub x} catalyst and at ca. 100{degrees}C on Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts. At the same space velocity, total oxidation of methane on the Cu-Ce-O catalyst doped with La{sub 2}O{sub 3} or SrO took place at ca. 550{degrees}C. The specific carbon monoxide oxidation activity of the Cu-Ce-O catalyst was several orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional copper-based catalysts and comparable or superior to platinum catalysts. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water vapor poisoning. The enhanced catalyst activity and stability resulted from strong interaction of the transition metal and fluorite oxide materials. 44 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Liu, W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, F. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)] [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

DEVELOPMENT OF IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR THE SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION OF NITROGEN OXIDES WITH HYDROCARBONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant work has been done by the investigators on the cerium oxide-copper oxide based sorbent/catalysts for the combined removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from the flue gases of stationary sources. A relatively wide temperature window was established for the use of alumina-supported cerium oxide-copper oxide mixtures as regenerable sorbents for SO{sub 2} removal. Preliminary evaluation of these sorbents as catalysts for the selective reduction of NO{sub x} gave promising results with ammonia, but indicated low selectivity when methane was used as the reductant. Since the replacement of ammonia by another reductant is commercially very attractive, in this project, four research components will be undertaken. The investigation of the reaction mechanism, the first component, will help in the selection of promoters to improve the catalytic activity and selectivity of the sorbents in the SCR with methane. This will result in new catalyst formulations (second component). If this research is successful, the combined SO{sub 2}-NO{sub x} removal process based on alumina-supported copper oxide-ceria sorbent/catalysts will become very attractive for commercial applications. The objective of the third component of the project is to develop an alternative SCR process using another inexpensive fuel, residual fuel oil, instead of natural gas. This innovative proposal is based on very scant evidence concerning the good performance of coked catalysts in the selective reduction of NO and if proven to work the process will certainly be commercially viable. The fourth component of the project involves our industrial partner TDA Research, and the objective is to evaluate long-term stability and durability of the prepared sorbent/catalysts. In the first year of the project, the catalysts were investigated by the temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) technique. The results from TPR indicated that the interaction with support appears to promote reduction at lower temperatures. Copper oxide in excess of monolayer coverage reduces at temperatures close to the reduction temperature of the unsupported copper oxide. Increased dispersion increases the support effect. Low activity of ceria in NO reduction may be due to its resistance to reduction at low temperatures.

Dr. Ates Akyurtlu; Dr. Jale F. Akyurtlu

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the previous reporting period, modifications were completed for integrating a continuous wax filtration system for a 4 liter slurry bubble column reactor. During the current reporting period, a shakedown of the system was completed. Several problems were encountered with the progressive cavity pump used to circulate the wax/catalyst slurry though the cross-flow filter element and reactor. During the activation of the catalyst with elevated temperature (> 270 C) the elastomer pump stator released sulfur thereby totally deactivating the iron-based catalyst. Difficulties in maintaining an acceptable leak rate from the pump seal and stator housing were also encountered. Consequently, the system leak rate exceeded the expected production rate of wax; therefore, no online filtration could be accomplished. Work continued regarding the characterization of ultra-fine catalyst structures. The effect of carbidation on the morphology of iron hydroxide oxide particles was the focus of the study during this reporting period. Oxidation of Fe (II) sulfate results in predominantly {gamma}-FeOOH particles which have a rod-shaped (nano-needles) crystalline structure. Carbidation of the prepared {gamma}-FeOOH with CO at atmospheric pressure produced iron carbides with spherical layered structure. HRTEM and EDS analysis revealed that carbidation of {gamma}-FeOOH particles changes the initial nano-needles morphology and generates ultrafine carbide particles with irregular spherical shape.

James K. Neathery; Gary Jacobs; Amitava Sarkar; Adam Crawford; Burtron H. Davis

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtle

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Active Oxygen on Au/TiO2 Catalysts DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102062 Active oxygen on a Au/TiO2 catalyst Formation, stability and CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Active Oxygen on Au/TiO2 Catalysts DOI: 10.1002/anie.201102062 Active oxygen on a Au/TiO2 are the activation of molecular oxygen, the active site for this reaction step, and the nature of the catalytically active oxygen species present under working conditions.[3;9-15] Stiehl et al. had shown that molecularly

Pfeifer, Holger

317

Working Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 2, 2010 ... Working Paper. Branch and Bound Algorithms for ...... interest when evaluating the performance. First, each derived subproblem means usage ...

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

In Situ Generation of Pd/PdO Nanoparticle Methane Combustion Catalyst: Correlation of Particle Surface Chemistry with Ignition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supported in fixed-bed reactors. The extensive work on the kinetics of Pd oxidation and its relation applications, the typical fixed-bed catalytic reactor approach is not possible because of the high flowIn Situ Generation of Pd/PdO Nanoparticle Methane Combustion Catalyst: Correlation of Particle

Anderson, Scott L.

319

Zeolite catalyst composition and synthesis method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalyst. It comprises an inner portion and an outer portion disposed as a porous shell around the inner portion, the inner portion comprising a shape-selective tetrahedrally coordinated crystalline acidic aluminosilicate, having a silica:alumina molar ratio of about 20 to 300, and the outer portion comprising a fluoride-containing crystalline silica shell substantially free of acid sites.

Chu, P.; Schwartz, A.B.

1989-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Catalyst material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation.

Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA); Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Linehan, John C. (Richland, WA); Bean, Roger M. (Richland, WA); Brewer, Thomas D. (Richland, WA); Werpy, Todd A. (Richland, WA); Darab, John G. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Autothermal hydrodesulfurizing reforming method and catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reforming a sulfur-containing carbonaceous fuel in which the sulfur-containing carbonaceous fuel is mixed with H.sub.2 O and an oxidant, forming a fuel/H.sub.2 O/oxidant mixture. The fuel H.sub.2 O/oxidant mixture is brought into contact with a catalyst composition comprising a dehydrogenation portion, an oxidation portion and a hydrodesulfurization portion, resulting in formation of a hydrogen-containing gas stream.

Krumpelt, Michael; Kopasz, John P.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Kao, Richard Li-chih; Randhava, Sarabjit Singh

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2000-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

INVESTIGATION OF MIXED METAL SORBENT/CATALYSTS FOR THE SIMULTANEOUS REMOVAL OF SULFUR AND NITROGEN OXIDES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded research of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4} air mixtures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Investigation of mixed metal sorbent/catalysts for the simultaneous removal of sulfur and nitrogen oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} using a regenerable solid sorbent will constitute an important improvement over the use of separate processes for the removal of these two pollutants from stack gases and possibly eliminate several shortcomings of the individual SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} removal operations. The work done at PETC and the DOE-funded investigation of the investigators on the sulfation and regeneration of alumina-supported cerium oxide sorbents have shown that they can perform well at relatively high temperatures (823-900 K) as regenerable desulfurization sorbents. Survey of the recent literature shows that addition of copper oxide to ceria lowers the sulfation temperature of ceria down to 773 K, sulfated ceria-based sorbents can function as selective SCR catalysts even at elevated temperatures, SO{sub 2} can be directly reduced to sulfur by CO on CuO-ceria catalysts, and ceria-based catalysts may have a potential for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by methane. These observations indicate a possibility of developing a ceria-based sorbent/catalyst which can remove both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} from flue gases within a relatively wide temperature window, produce significant amounts of elemental sulfur during regeneration, and use methane for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The objective of this research is to conduct kinetic and parametric studies of the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with NH{sub 3} and CH{sub 4} over alumina-supported cerium oxide and copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbent/catalysts; investigate SO{sub 2} removal at lower temperatures by supported copper oxide-cerium oxide sorbents; and investigate the possibility of elemental sulfur production during regeneration with CO or with CH{sub 4}-air mixtures.

Akyurtlu, A.; Akyurtlu, J.F.

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

Method for regeneration and activity improvement of syngas conversion catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for the treatment of single particle iron-containing syngas (synthes.s gas) conversion catalysts comprising iron, a crystalline acidic aluminosilicate zeolite having a silica to alumina ratio of at least 12, a pore size greater than about 5 Angstrom units and a constraint index of about 1-12 and a matrix. The catalyst does not contain promoters and the treatment is applicable to either the regeneration of said spent single particle iron-containing catalyst or for the initial activation of fresh catalyst. The treatment involves air oxidation, hydrogen reduction, followed by a second air oxidation and contact of the iron-containing single particle catalyst with syngas prior to its use for the catalytic conversion of said syngas. The single particle iron-containing catalysts are prepared from a water insoluble organic iron compound.

Lucki, Stanley J. (Runnemede, NJ); Brennan, James A. (Cherry Hill, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Transition metal-promoted oxygen ion conductors as oxidation catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel metal oxide composite catalyst for the complete oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons was prepared by combining oxygen ion conducting materials with active transition metals. The oxygen ion conductors used were typical fluorite-type oxides, such as ceria, zirconia, and others. Active base metal catalysts, such as copper, were used as additives to promote the catalytic properties of oxygen ion conductors. The intimate contact of the two kinds of materials gave rise to a highly active oxidation catalyst. On Cu-Ce-O composite catalysts, 95% of carbon monoxide was oxidized by air at {approximately} 100 C. Complete methane oxidation on the same catalyst took place at {approximately} 550 C. When the stoichiometric amount of sulfur dioxide was sued to oxidize carbon monoxide, 96% of sulfur dioxide was reduced to elemental sulfur at temperatures above 460 C with 99% of sulfur dioxide conversion. This type of composite catalyst also showed excellent resistance to water poisoning.

Liu, W.; Sarofim, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Protocol development for evaluation of commercial catalytic cracking catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete, new set of testing protocols has been developed for qualification of catalysts for Ashland's commercial catalytic cracking units. The objective of this test development is to identify new generations of improved cracking catalysts. Prior test protocols have classically utilized microactivity (MAT) testing of steamed virgin catalysts, while more advanced methods have utilized fixed fluid bed and/or circulating pilot units. Each of these techniques, however, have been limited by their correlation to commercial operations, weaknesses in metallation and preparation of pseudo-equilibrium catalysts, and mechanical constraints on the use of heavy, vacuum bottoms-containing feedstocks. These new protocols have been baselined, compared to commercial Ashland results on known catalytic cracking catalysts, and utilized to evaluate a range of potentially new catalyst samples.

Mitchell, M.M. Jr.; Moore, H.F. (Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Compact organic vapor jet printing print head  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Engraving Print Classification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A print is a mark, or drawing, made in or upon a plate, stone, woodblock or other material which is cover with ink and then is press usually into a paper reproducing the image on the paper. Engraving prints usually are image composed of a group of binary lines, specially those are made with relief and intaglio techniques. Varying the number and the orientation of lines, the drawing of the engraving print is conformed. For this reason we propose an application based on image processing methods to classify engraving prints.

Hoelck, Daniel [Instituto de Fisica, P. Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Av. Brasil 2905, Valparaiso (Chile); Barbe, Joaquim [Grupo Felix Klein, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O'Higgins 3363 (Chile)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h.sup.-1. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications.

Jin, Yun (Peking, CN); Yu, Qiquan (Peking, CN); Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Comparative studies of hydrodenitrogenation by mixed metal sulfide catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , Sanchez, K. M. , and Reibenspies, J. , "Synthesis and characterization of [Et4N][M(CO)5SR] and [Et4N]2[M2 (CO) 8 (SR) 2] complexes (M = Cr, Mo, W) . Ligand substitution... to mimic the commercial catalyst (ie. no sulfide bridges prior to activation) l a Ni/Mo sulfide catalyst which consisted of Ni and Mo atoms brought in intimate contact by sulfide bridges; Ni/Mo and Co/Mo organometallic catalysts whose central metal had...

Luchsinger, Mary Margaret

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Supercomputers Help a Catalyst Reach its Full Potential  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

during the refining process. And, molecular hydrogen is also used to store electrical energy generated by renewable sources like sun and wind. Although many catalysts used in...

334

NREL: Biomass Research - Chemical and Catalyst Science Projects  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

develop and validate gasification process models. NREL uses chemical analysis to study biomass-derived products online during the conversion process. Catalysts are used in the...

335

SunShot Catalyst Program | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

vast array of tools, capabilities, data assets and additional resources developed by Energy Department and the national laboratories. Catalyst's open, fast-paced innovation cycle...

336

DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Test and Polarization Curve Protocols (http:www.uscar.orgcommandsfilesdownload.php?filesid267), Catalyst Support Cycle and Metrics (Table 2). Activity loss is based on...

337

Cobalt discovery replaces precious metals as industrial catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- The new material has the highest oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in alkaline media of any non-precious metal catalyst developed to date. Los Alamos research better...

338

Volatility of Vanadia from Vanadia-Based SCR Catalysts under...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications The Utility of FeVO4 in Combination with Stabilized Titanias for Mobile SCR Application New Developments in Titania-Based Catalysts for Selective Catalytic...

339

Durable Catalysts for Fuel Cell Protection Transient Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vernstrom Greg Haugen Mark Debe Radoslav Atanasoski Project Overwiew Durable Catalysts for Transient with fuel starved region Electrochemical reactions leading to carbon corrosion and Pt dissolution Durable

340

Ultra-High Resolution Electron Microscopy for Catalyst Characterizatio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10012007 * Project end date: 09302012 * Percent complete: 80% * Development and optimization of catalyst- based aftertreatment systems are inhibited by the lack of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma- Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction February 20, 2003 CRADA Protected Document and Data 2 Introduction * Engine dynamometer evaluation of...

342

Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality gasoline components, aromatic compounds, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel molybdenum-zeolite catalyst in high pressure hydrogen for conversion, as well as a novel rhenium-zeolite catalyst in place of the molybdenum-zeolite catalyst, and provides for use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

White, Mark G; Liu, Shetian

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Effectiveness of a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) to control CO and hydrocarbon emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) combustion Effectiveness of a...

344

Method of making chalcogen catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making an electrode catalyst material using aqueous solutions. The electrode catalyst material includes a support comprising at least one transition metal and at least one chalcogen disposed on a surface of the transition metal. The method includes reducing a metal powder, mixing the metal powder with an aqueous solution containing at least one inorganic compound of the chalcogen to form a mixture, and providing a reducing agent to the mixture to form nanoparticles of the electrode catalyst. The electrode catalyst may be used in a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell.

Choi, Jong-Ho (Los Alamos, NM); Zelenay, Piotr (Los Alamos, NM); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL); Cao, Dianxue (Harabin, CN)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Catalyst for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum Fuels in Diesel Engines Catalyst for Improving the Combustion Efficiency of Petroleum Fuels in Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel...

346

Combined catalysts for the combustion of fuel in gas turbines  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic oxidation module for a catalytic combustor of a gas turbine engine is provided. The catalytic oxidation module comprises a plurality of spaced apart catalytic elements for receiving a fuel-air mixture over a surface of the catalytic elements. The plurality of catalytic elements includes at least one primary catalytic element comprising a monometallic catalyst and secondary catalytic elements adjacent the primary catalytic element comprising a multi-component catalyst. Ignition of the monometallic catalyst of the primary catalytic element is effective to rapidly increase a temperature within the catalytic oxidation module to a degree sufficient to ignite the multi-component catalyst.

Anoshkina, Elvira V.; Laster, Walter R.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

Meyer, Thomas J. (Chapel Hill, NC); Sykora, Milan (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

348

How ISO-Standards Affect Graphic-Arts Work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How ISO-Standards Affect Graphic-Arts Work Andreas Kraushaar Head, Prepress Division Fogra Munich, Germany 4pm, Wed., Jan. 10, 2007 Auditorium of the Center for Imaging Science ISO TC 130 (graphic. Important standards with respect to the printing industry such as the ISO 2846 and ISO 12647-X

Zanibbi, Richard

349

Novel Solid Base Catalysts for the Production of Biodiesel from Lipids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The primary commercial biodiesel production processes use homogeneous base catalysts which cause separation and wastewater discharge problems. Solid base catalysts can overcome these drawbacks. However, a solid base catalyst with high activity...

Zhao, Lina

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of Nitric Oxide Oxidation Catalysts for the Fast SCR Reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was undertaken in order to assess the potential for oxidizing NO to NO{sub 2} in flue gas environments, with the aim of promoting the so-called fast SCR reaction. In principle this can result in improved SCR kinetics and reduced SCR catalyst volumes. Prior to commencing experimental work, a literature study was undertaken to identify candidate catalysts for screening. Selection criteria comprised (1) proven (or likely) activity for NO oxidation, (2) low activity for SO2 oxidation (where data were available), and (3) inexpensive component materials. Catalysts identified included supported base metal oxides, supported and unsupported mixed metal oxides, and metal ion exchanged ZSM-5 (Fe, Co, Cu). For comparison purposes, several low loaded Pt catalysts (0.5 wt% Pt) were also included in the study. Screening experiments were conducted using a synthetic feed gas representative of flue gas from coal-fired utility boilers: [NO] = 250 ppm, [SO{sub 2}] = 0 or 2800 ppm, [H{sub 2}O] = 7%, [CO{sub 2}] = 12%, [O{sub 2}] = 3.5%, balance = N{sub 2}; T = 275-375 C. Studies conducted in the absence of SO{sub 2} revealed a number of supported and unsupported metal oxides to be extremely active for NO oxidation to NO{sub 2}. These included known catalysts (Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, FeMnO{sub 3}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}), as well as a new one identified in this work, CrFeO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2}. However, in the presence of SO{sub 2}, all the catalysts tested were found to be severely deactivated with respect to NO oxidation. Of these, Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/ZSM-5 and Pt/CeO{sub 2} showed the highest activity for NO oxidation in the presence of SO{sub 2} (based on peak NO conversions to NO{sub 2}), although in no cases did the NO conversion exceed 7%. Reactor studies indicate there are two components to SO{sub 2}-induced deactivation of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, corresponding to an irreversible deactivation due to sulfation of the surface of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase, together with a reversible inhibition due to competitive adsorption of SO{sub 2} with NO on the catalyst. In an effort to minimize the deactivating effect of SO{sub 2} on Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, two synthetic approaches were briefly examined. These consisted of (1) the incorporation of highly dispersed Co(II) ions in silica, as a non-sulfating matrix, via the sol-gel preparation of CoO-SiO{sub 2}; and (2) the sol-gel preparation of a mixed metal oxide, CoO-Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-SiO{sub 2}, with the aim of exploiting the acidity of the niobium oxide to minimize SO2 adsorption. While both catalysts showed almost no activity for NO oxidation in the absence of SO{sub 2}, when SO{sub 2} was present low activity was observed, indicating that SO{sub 2} acts as a promoter for NO oxidation over these materials. The kinetics of NO oxidation over Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} were also examined. Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} was found to exhibit a higher apparent activation energy for NO oxidation than the Pt catalysts, while the combined reaction order in NO and O{sub 2} for the three catalysts was very close to one. CO{sub 2} was found to have no effect on the kinetics of NO oxidation over these catalysts. The presence of H{sub 2}O caused a decrease in NO conversion for both Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} and Pt/CeO{sub 2} catalysts, while no effect was observed for Pt/SiO{sub 2}. The inhibiting effect of water was reversible and is attributed to competitive adsorption with the reactants. In sum, this study has shown that a variety of base metal catalysts are very active for NO oxidation. However, all of the catalysts studied are strongly deactivated in the presence of 2800 ppm SO{sub 2} at typical flue gas temperatures; consequently improving catalyst resistance to SO{sub x} will be a pre-requisite if the fast SCR concept is to be applied to coal-fired flue gas conditions.

Mark Crocker

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Reactivity of surface carbon deposited on supported Rh catalysts by the disproportionation of CO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent investigations on hydrocarbon synthesis from CO and H/sub 2/ over Group VIII metals have proposed that the surface carbon formed by the dissociation of CO is an intermediate for hydrocarbon formation. It implies that metals which dissociate CO readily (e.g., Ni, Co, and Ru) are good catalysts for hydrocarbon synthesis unless the surface carbon is bound too strongly. There is a certain controversy in the literature on whether CO undergoes dissociation on Rh surfaces under UHV conditions. In the present work, the authors have investigated the reactivity of surface carbon deposited on TiO/sub 2/- or SiO/sub 2/-supported Rh catalysts in the presence of molecularly adsorbed CO by means of the isotopic tracer technique and have made a direct comparison of the reactivity of adsorbed CO with that of surface carbon. It has been revealed that three forms of carbon are produced by the disproportionation of CO.

Orita, H.; Naito, S.; Tamaru, K.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Going To Work: Work Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of a worker's top goals should be to develop good relationships with coworkers and supervisers. This publication discusses five general rules for building good relationships at work and offers advice on handling criticism....

Hoffman, Rosemarie

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

Vajda, Stefan (Lisle, IL), Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Elam, Jeffrey W. (Elmhurst, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Winans, Randall A. (Downers Grove, IL); Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz (Roggentin, GR)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

Subnanometer and nanometer catalysts, method for preparing size-selected catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Highly uniform cluster based nanocatalysts supported on technologically relevant supports were synthesized for reactions of top industrial relevance. The Pt-cluster based catalysts outperformed the very best reported ODHP catalyst in both activity (by up to two orders of magnitude higher turn-over frequencies) and in selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate that highly dispersed ultra-small Pt clusters precisely localized on high-surface area supports can lead to affordable new catalysts for highly efficient and economic propene production, including considerably simplified separation of the final product. The combined GISAXS-mass spectrometry provides an excellent tool to monitor the evolution of size and shape of nanocatalyst at action under realistic conditions. Also provided are sub-nanometer gold and sub-nanometer to few nm size-selected silver catalysts which possess size dependent tunable catalytic properties in the epoxidation of alkenes. Invented size-selected cluster deposition provides a unique tool to tune material properties by atom-by-atom fashion, which can be stabilized by protective overcoats.

Vajda, Stefan (Lisle, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL); Elam, Jeffrey W. (Elmhurst, IL); Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Winans, Randall A. (Downers Grove, IL); Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz (Roggentin, GR)

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

Work Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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356

Working Copy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellowsWood and4213WorkWork

357

Selective catalyst reduction light-off strategy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An emissions control system includes a temperature determination module and an emissions control module. The temperature determination module determines a first temperature of a heater element of a diesel particulate filter (DPF) assembly in an exhaust system and determines a second temperature of a catalyst of the DPF assembly. The emissions control module selectively activates the heater element, selectively initiates a predefined combustion process in an engine based upon the first temperature, and selectively starts a reductant injection process based upon the second temperature.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

358

Catalyst for elemental sulfur recovery process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic reduction process is described for the direct recovery of elemental sulfur from various SO[sub 2]-containing industrial gas streams. The catalytic process provides high activity and selectivity, as well as stability in the reaction atmosphere, for the reduction of SO[sub 2] to elemental sulfur product with carbon monoxide or other reducing gases. The reaction of sulfur dioxide and reducing gas takes place over a metal oxide composite catalyst having one of the following empirical formulas: [(FO[sub 2])[sub 1[minus]n](RO)[sub n

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Liu, W.

1995-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Electrically heated particulate filter using catalyst striping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material is applied to an exterior upstream surface of the PF and selectively heats exhaust passing through the grid to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A catalyst coating is applied to the PF that increases a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Paratore, Jr., Michael J; Ament, Frank

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

360

Catalysts via First Principles | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Catalysts via First Principles | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 20154:04-21-2014InnovativeCatalyst-Assisted2010 DOE Vehicle

362

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Abstract: Low-cost...

363

Extended Two Dimensional Nanotube and Nanowire Surfaces as Fuel Cell Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

x-ray spectroscopy EOR: Ethanol oxidation reaction EGOR:in catalysts for MOR, ethanol (EOR), and ethylene glycolreported as an alkaline EOR catalyst, often with activity

Alia, Shaun Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Effects of catalyst pretreatment for carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of pretreatment of iron catalyst for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. CNTs were grown on Fe/A1203 (1/10 nm) thin-film catalyst deposited on silicon substrates via exposure to C2H4 in a thermal chemical ...

Morgan, Caitlin D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst, the kinetics for this catalyst, reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed, and simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Use of Catalysts in Near-Critical Water Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of heterogeneous catalysts in near-critical water processing provides many challenges of material stability in addition to the normal questions of chemical activity. Conventional catalyst materials developed in traditional organic chemistry or petroleum chemistry applications provide a source of information of materials with the required activities but often without the required stability when used in hot liquid water. The importance of the use of catalysts in near-critical water processing plays a particularly crucial role for the development of renewable fuels and chemicals based on biomass feedstocks. Stability issues include both those related to the catalytic metal and also to the catalyst support material. In fact, the stability of the support is the most likely concern when using conventional catalyst formulations in near-critical water processing. Processing test results are used to show important design parameters for catalyst formulations for use in wet biomass gasification in high-pressure water and in catalytic hydrogenations in water for production of value-added chemical products from biomass in the biorefinery concept. Analytical methods including powder x-ray diffraction for crystallite size and composition determination, surface area and porosity measurements, and elemental analysis have all been used to quantify differences in catalyst materials before and after use. By these methods both the chemical and physical stability of heterogeneous catalysts can be verified.

Elliott, Douglas C.

2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development of Highly Selective Oxidation Catalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to use Atomic Layer Deposition to construct nanostructured catalysts to improve the effectiveness of oxidative dehydrogenation of alkanes. More effective catalysts could enable higher specific conversion rates and result in drastic energy savings - up to 25 trillion Btu per year by 2020.

368

Cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts having improved selectivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalyst having an improved steam treated, acid extracted LZ-210 support is taught. The new catalyst system demonstrates improved product selectivity at Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions evidenced by lower methane production, higher C.sub.5.sup.+ yield and increased olefin production.

Miller, James G. (Pearl River, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Supported organometallic catalysts for hydrogenation and Olefin Polymerization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel heterogeneous catalysts for the which hydrogenation of olefins and arenes with high conversion rates under ambient conditions and the polymerization of olefins have been developed. The catalysts are synthesized from Ziegler-type precatalysts by supporting them on sulfate-modified zirconia.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Ahn, Hongsang (Evanston, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Development of Silica/Vanadia/ Titania Catalysts for Removal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mercury (Hg0) from simulated coal-combustion flue gas. Experiments were carried out in fixed-bed reactorsDevelopment of Silica/Vanadia/ Titania Catalysts for Removal of Elemental Mercury from Coal-Combustion the composition and microstructures of SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalysts for Hg0 oxidation in coal-combustion

Li, Ying

371

Report of 1,000 Hour Catalyst Longevity Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a 1,000 hour, high-pressure, catalyst longevity test for the decomposition of concentrated sulfuric acid. The reaction is used for both the sulfur-iodine (S-I) cycle and hybrid sulfur cycle. By the time of the delivery date of April 17, 2009, for project milestone no. 2NIN07TC050114, the 1% Pt/TiO2 catalyst had been in the reaction environment for 658 hours. During the first 480 hours of testing, the catalyst activity provided stable, near-equilibrium yields of 46.8% SO2 and 22.8% O2. However, product yields declined at sample exposure times >480 hours. At 658 hours of operation, catalyst activity (based on oxygen yield) declined to 57% relative to the stable period of catalyst activity. Thus, as of April 17, this catalyst did not provide the desired stability level of <10% degradation per 1,000 hours. The experiment was terminated on April 27, after 792 hours, when a fitting failed and the catalyst was displaced from the reactor such that the sample could not be recovered. Oxygen conversion at the end of the experiment was 12.5% and declining, suggesting that at that point, catalyst activity had decreased to 54% of the initial level.

Daniel M. Ginosar

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NOVEL SLURRY PHASE DIESEL CATALYSTS FOR COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in novel slurry phase catalysts for converting coal-derived synthesis gas to diesel fuels. The primary objective of this research program is to develop attrition resistant catalysts that exhibit high activities for conversion of coal-derived syngas.

Dr. Dragomir B. Bukur; Dr. Ketil Hanssen; Alec Klinghoffer; Dr. Lech Nowicki; Patricia O'Dowd; Dr. Hien Pham; Jian Xu

2001-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Fermilab at Work | Work Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall Works:OklahomaatWayneFermilab NowLab LifeWork

374

Development of a Novel Catalyst for No Decomposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NO{sub x} emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N{sub 2} will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the research that is being undertaken is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and elevated temperatures. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions were done. It is also planned to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. Temperature programmed desorption and temperature controlled reaction runs were made with catalysts containing 15% Pt and 10% Pt on SnO{sub 2}. Catalysts containing 10% Pt resulted in significantly lower activities than 15% PT catalysts. Therefore, in the remainder of the tests 15% Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts were used. Isothermal reaction studies were made to elucidate the effects of temperature, oxygen, water vapor, pretreatment temperature, and space velocity on NO dissociation. It was found that the presence of oxygen and water vapor did not affect the activation energy of the NO dissociation reaction indicating the presence of the same rate controlling step for all feed compositions. Activation energy was higher for higher gas velocities suggesting the presence of mass transfer limitations at lower velocities. Presence of oxygen in the feed inhibited the NO decomposition. Having water vapor in the feed did not significantly affect the catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 373 K, but significantly reduced catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 900 K. Long-term deactivation studies indicated that the catalyst deactivated slowly both with and without the presence of added oxygen in the feed, Deactivation started later in the presence of oxygen. The activities of the catalysts investigated were too low below 1000 K for commercial applications. Their selectivity towards N{sub 2} was good at temperatures above 700 K. A different method for catalyst preparation is needed to improve the catalyst performance.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale Akyurtlu

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ceramic wash-coat for catalyst support  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wash-coat (16) for use as a support for an active catalyst species (18) and a catalytic combustor component (10) incorporating such wash-coat. The wash-coat is a solid solution of alumina or alumina-based material (Al2O3-0-3 wt % La2O3) and a further oxide exhibiting a coefficient of thermal expansion that is lower than that exhibited by alumina. The further oxide may be silicon dioxide (2-30 wt % SiO2), zirconia silicate (2-30 wt % ZrSiO4), neodymium oxide (0-4 wt %), titania (Al2O3-3-40% TiO2) or alumina-based magnesium aluminate spinel (Al2O3-25 wt % MgO) in various embodiments. The active catalyst species may be palladium and a second metal in a concentration of 10-50% of the concentration of the palladium.

Kulkarni, Anand A.; Subramanian, Ramesh; Sabol, Stephen M.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Cross-flow, filter-sorbent-catalyst for particulate, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} control. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed on a new concept for integrated pollutant control: An active filter comprised of layered, gas permeable membranes that act as a particle filter, an SO{sub 2} sorbent, and a NO{sub x}, reduction catalyst. The focus of the research program documented in this final report is the development of the sorbent/catalyst materials that are the basis of such an emission control system. The device investigated in this program will simultaneously remove particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, from combustion exhaust gases. Sulfur dioxide capture and nitrogen oxide reduction are achieved with a reg le, mixed-metal oxide sorbent-catalyst. The device is a filter with layered walls: A small-pore layer is a barrier to particles, and a macroporus active layer is a SO{sub 2} sorbent and a catalyst for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The small-pore layer could be an inert ceramic that provides structural strength to the unit and protects the active (sorbent-catalyst) material from abrasion or contamination from fly ash particles. We have found that 95--100% removal efficiency of SO{sub 2} and 60--90% removal of NO{sub x}, is achievable with the use of mixed-metal oxide sorbent-catalysts in the device. The ceramic filters are barriers to particles and typically have removal efficiencies of 99.9%.

Benedek, K. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Content-adaptive lenticular prints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lenticular prints are a popular medium for producing automultiscopic glasses-free 3D images. The light field emitted by such prints has a fixed spatial and angular resolution. We increase both perceived angular and spatial ...

Tompkin, James

378

Idea Generation 3D printing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 Idea Generation 3D printing at nanoscale Cruising on electrical roads Pushing back against Centre micro and nanoscale 15 Taking 3D printing to the nanoscale 18 Fighting cancer with a "lab

Papadopouli, Maria

379

COPLANAR DIGITAL MICROFLUIDICS USING STANDARD PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD PROCESSES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPLANAR DIGITAL MICROFLUIDICS USING STANDARD PRINTED CIRCUIT BOARD PROCESSES P.Y. Paik1 , V circuit board (PCB) and 3. Transport and mixing in an "open" microfluidic substrate. Similar to "soft-flow microfluidics, this work allows researchers to easily experiment with discrete-flow microfluidics (digital

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

380

Mixed Alcohol Synthesis Catalyst Screening 2007 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are researching the feasibility of producing mixed alcohols from biomass-derived synthesis gas (syngas). PNNL is obtaining commercially available mixed alcohol or preparing promising mixed-alcohol catalysts and screening them in a laboratory-scale reactor system. The most promising catalysts are provided to NREL for testing using a slipstream from a pilot-scale biomass gasifier. After a review of the literature in 2006 and conversations with companies that produce catalysts, it was determined that no commercial mixed-alcohol synthesis catalysts were available. One manufacturer supplied a modified methanol catalyst that was tested in the PNNL laboratory-scale system and provided to NREL for further testing. PNNL also prepared and tested the behavior of 10 other catalysts representing the distinct catalyst classes for mixed alcohol syntheses. Based on those results,testing in 2007 focused on the performance of the rhodium-based catalysts. The effects of adding promoters to the rhodium catalysts in addition to the manganese already being used were examined. The iron and rhenium promoters both stood out as achieving higher carbon selectivities , followed by Cu. Iridium and Li, on the other hand, had low carbon selectivity ratios of 0.27 and 0.22, respectively. Although testing of candidate promoters is not complete, it appears that Ir and Li promoters warrant further optimization and possibly combination to further improve STYs and carbon selectivities to C2+ oxygenates. However, using these promoters, it will be necessary to incorporate a separate hydrogenation catalyst to improve the yield of C2+ alcohols with respect to the other oxygenates. Fe, Re, and Cu stand out as possible candidates in this respect, but additional research is needed to examine whether they can be combined with the other promoters on the Rh-based catalyst or need to be optimized on a separate catalyst support that is either physically mixed or used in series with the promoted Rh-based catalyst.

Gerber, Mark A.; White, J. F.; Gray, Michel J.; Stevens, Don J.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Organic vapor jet printing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An organic vapor jet printing system includes a pump for increasing the pressure of an organic flux.

Forrest, Stephen R

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

382

Part removal of 3D printed parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

Peña Doll, Mateo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Developing Enzyme and Biomimetic Catalysts for Upgrading Heavy Crudes via Biological Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery and conversion of heavy oils is limited due to the high viscosity of these crudes and their high heteroatom content. Conventional technology relies on thermochemical hydrogenation and hydrodesulfurization to address these problems and is energy intensive due to the high operating temperature and pressure. This project was initiated to explore biological catalysts for adding hydrogen to the heavy oil molecules. Biological enzymes are efficient at hydrogen splitting at very mild conditions such as room temperature and pressure, however, they are very specific in terms of the substrates they hydrogenate. The goal of the project was to investigate how the specificity of these enzymes can be altered to develop catalysts for oil upgrading. Three approaches were used. First was to perform chemical modification of the enzyme surface to improve binding of other non-natural substrates. Second approach was to expose the deeply buried catalytic active site of the enzyme by removal of protein scaffolding to enable better interaction with other substrates. The third approach was based on molecular biology to develop genetically engineered systems for enabling targeted structural changes in the enzyme. The first approach was found to be limited in success due to the non-specificity of the chemical modification and inability to target the region near the active site or the site of substrate binding. The second approach produced a smaller catalyst capable of catalyzing hydrogen splitting, however, further experimentation is needed to address reproducibility and stability issues. The third approach which targeted cloning of hydrogenase in alternate hosts demonstrated progress, although further work is necessary to complete the cloning process. The complex nature of the hydrogenase enzyme structure-function relationship and role of various ligands in the protein require significant more research to better understand the enzyme and to enable success in strategies in developing catalysts with broader specificity as that required for crude upgrading.

Borole, A.P.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Demetallization of asphaltenes: Thermal and catalytic effects with small-pore catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual oil hydrotreating has become an important front end process in commercial oil upgrading schemes because of tighter environmental regulations and a continuing trend toward processing heavier crudes. At Phillips Petroleum, residual oil hydrotreating pretreates feed for heavy oil cracking (HOC) by removing sulfur, a pollutant in the HOC stack gas, and metals such as nickel and vanadium, which adversely affect the cracking catalyst and gasoline yield in the HOC. Metals in residual oil are found almost exclusively in the resin and asphaltene fractions. Research has showed that metals in the resin fraction react more rapidly than metals in the asphaltene fraction. The hydrodemetallization (HDM) reaction is known to be diffusion limited and the larger molecular size of the asphaltene molecules may explain the slower reaction rates. Richardson and Alley and Asaoka, et al. have shown a reduction in asphaltene molecular weights with thermal and catalytic processing. Reynolds and Biggs demonstrated shifts in vanadium size distributions from thermally and catalytically treated residual. Recently Savage and Javanmaridian showed theoretically that reduction in molecular sizes external to catalyst pellets increases the reaction rate by as much as the inverse of the effectiveness factor. This work attempts to extend information on how metals are removed from asphaltenes and the interaction with small-pore catalysts generally found at the back end of residual oil hydrotreaters, where they are protected from deactivation by metal deposition. The small-pore catalysts are generally high in hydrodesulfurization (HDS) activity and generally restrict the large asphaltene molecules from entering their pores and depositing metals.

Adarme, R. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)); Sughrue, E.L.; Johnson, M.M.; Kidd, D.R.; Phillips, M.D.; Shaw, J.E. (Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Catalyst Additives to Enhance Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalysis is the key fundamental ingredient to convert elemental mercury in coal-fired power stations into its oxidized forms that are more easily captured by sorbents, ESPs, baghouses, and wet scrubbers, whether the catalyst be unburned carbon (UBC) in the ash or vanadium pentoxide in SCR catalysts. This project has investigated several different types of catalysts that enhance mercury oxidation in several different ways. The stated objective of this project in the Statement of Objectives included testing duct-injection catalysts, catalyst-sorbent hybrids, and coated low-pressure-drop screens. Several different types of catalysts were considered for duct injection, including different forms of iron and carbon. Duct-injection catalysts would have to be inexpensive catalysts, as they would not be recycled. Iron and calcium had been shown to catalyze mercury oxidation in published bench-scale tests. However, as determined from results of an on-going EPRI/EPA project at Southern Research, while iron and calcium did catalyze mercury oxidation, the activity of these catalysts was orders of magnitude below that of carbon and had little impact in the short residence times available for duct-injected catalysts or catalyst-sorbent hybrids. In fact, the only catalyst found to be effective enough for duct injection was carbon, which is also used to capture mercury and remove it from the flue gas. It was discovered that carbon itself is an effective catalyst-sorbent hybrid. Bench-scale carbon-catalyst tests were conducted, to obtain kinetic rates of mercury adsorption (a key step in the catalytic oxidation of mercury by carbon) for different forms of carbon. All carbon types investigated behaved in a similar manner with respect to mercury sorption, including the effect of temperature and chlorine concentration. Activated carbon was more effective at adsorbing mercury than carbon black and unburned carbon (UBC), because their internal surface area of activated carbon was greater. Catalyst coating of low-pressure-drop screens was of particular interest as this project was being developed. However, it was discovered that URS was already heavily involved in the pursuit of this same technology, being funded by DOE, and reporting significant success. Hence, testing of SCR catalysts became a major focus of the project. Three different commercial SCR catalysts were examined for their ability to oxidize mercury in simulated flue-gas. Similar performance was observed from each of the three commercial catalysts, both in terms of mercury oxidation and SO{sub 3} generation. Ammonia injection hindered mercury oxidation at low HCl concentrations (i.e., {approx}2 ppmv), yet had little impact on mercury oxidation at higher HCl concentrations. On the other hand, SO{sub 2} oxidation was significantly reduced by the presence of ammonia at both low and high concentrations of HCl.

Thomas K. Gale

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Catalysts for the selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfur  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention provides catalysts for the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. In particular, the invention provides catalysts for the partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur and water. The catalytically active component of the catalyst comprises a mixture of metal oxides containing titanium oxide and one or more metal oxides which can be selected from the group of metal oxides or mixtures of metal oxides of transition metals or lanthanide metals. Preferred metal oxides for combination with TiO.sub.2 in the catalysts of this invention include oxides of V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Hf, Ta, W, Au, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu. Catalysts which comprise a homogeneous mixture of titanium oxide and niobium (Nb) oxide are also provided. A preferred method for preparing the precursor homogenous mixture of metal hydroxides is by coprecipitation of titanium hydroxide with one or more other selected metal hydroxides. Catalysts of this invention have improved activity and/or selectivity for elemental sulfur production. Further improvements of activity and/or selectivity can be obtained by introducing relatively low amounts (up to about 5 mol %)of a promoter metal oxide (preferably of metals other than titanium and that of the selected second metal oxide) into the homogeneous metal/titanium oxide catalysts of this invention.

Srinivas, Girish (Thornton, CO); Bai, Chuansheng (Baton Rouge, LA)

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

387

ATTRITION RESISTANT IRON-BASED FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis to convert syngas (CO + H{sub 2}) derived from natural gas or coal to liquid fuels and wax is a well-established technology. For low H{sub 2} to CO ratio syngas produced from CO{sub 2} reforming of natural gas or from gasification of coal, the use of Fe catalysts is attractive because of their high water gas shift activity in addition to their high FT activity. Fe catalysts are also attractive due to their low cost and low methane selectivity. Because of the highly exothermic nature of the FT reaction, there has been a recent move away from fixed-bed reactors toward the development of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) that employ 30 to 90 {micro}m catalyst particles suspended in a waxy liquid for efficient heat removal. However, the use of FeFT catalysts in an SBCR has been problematic due to severe catalyst attrition resulting in fines that plug the filter employed to separate the catalyst from the waxy product. Fe catalysts can undergo attrition in SBCRs not only due to vigorous movement and collisions but also due to phase changes that occur during activation and reaction.

K. Jothimurugesan; James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Santosh K. Gangwal

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

JV 58-Effects of Biomass Combustion on SCR Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A portable slipstream selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactor was installed at a biomass cofired utility boiler to examine the rates and mechanisms of catalyst deactivation when exposed to biomass combustion products. The catalyst was found to deactivate at a much faster rate than typically found in a coal-fired boiler, although this may have been the result of high ash loading rather than a general property of biomass combustion. Deactivation was mainly the result of alkali and alkaline-earth sulfate formation and growth in catalyst pores, apparently caused by alkaline-earth ash deposition on or near the pore sites. The high proportion of biomass in the fuel contributed to elevated levels of alkali and alkaline-earth material in the ash when compared to coal ash, and these higher levels provided more opportunity for sulfate formation. Based on laboratory tests, neither catalyst material nor ammonia contributed measurably to ash mass gains via sulfation. A model constructed using both field and laboratory data was able to predict catalyst deactivation of catalysts under subbituminous coal firing but performed poorly at predicting catalyst deactivation under cofiring conditions. Because of the typically higher-than coal levels of alkali and alkaline-earth elements present in biomass fuels that are available for sulfation at typical SCR temperatures, the use of SCR technology and biomass cofiring needs to be carefully evaluated prior to implementation.

Bruce C. Folkedahl; Christopher J. Zygarlicke; Joshua R. Strege; Donald P. McCollor; Jason D. Laumb; Lingbu Kong

2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method of making metal-polymer composite catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst for use as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel cells. The catalyst includes a heteroatomic polymer; a transition metal linked to the heteroatomic polymer by one of nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus, and a recast ionomer dispersed throughout the heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite. The method includes forming a heteroatomic polymer-carbon composite and loading the transition metal onto the composite. The invention also provides a method of making a membrane electrode assembly for a fuel cell that includes the metal-polymer-carbon composite catalyst.

Zelena, Piotr (Los Alamos, NM); Bashyam, Rajesh (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

In Situ XAS of Ni-W Hydrocracking Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ni-W based catalysts are very attractive in hydrotreating of heavy oil due to their high hydrogenation activity. In the present research, two catalyst samples, prepared by different methods, that exhibit significant differences in activity were sulfided in situ, and the local structure of the Ni and W were studied using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The Ni XANES spectra were analyzed using a linear component fitting, and the EXAFS spectra of the WS2 platelets in the sulfided catalysts were modeled. The Ni and W are fully sulfided in the higher activity sample, and there are both unsulfided Ni ({approx}25%) and W (<10%) in the lower activity sample.

Yang, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Mickelson, G. E.; Greenlay, N.; Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL 60016 (United States); Kelly, S. D. [EXAFS Analysis, Bolingbrook, IL 60440 (United States)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Use of ionic liquids as coordination ligands for organometallic catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Aspects of the present invention relate to compositions and methods for the use of ionic liquids with dissolved metal compounds as catalysts for a variety of chemical reactions. Ionic liquids are salts that generally are liquids at room temperature, and are capable of dissolving a many types of compounds that are relatively insoluble in aqueous or organic solvent systems. Specifically, ionic liquids may dissolve metal compounds to produce homogeneous and heterogeneous organometallic catalysts. One industrially-important chemical reaction that may be catalyzed by metal-containing ionic liquid catalysts is the conversion of methane to methanol.

Li, Zaiwei (Moreno Valley, CA); Tang, Yongchun (Walnut, CA); Cheng; Jihong (Arcadia, CA)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Pennsylvania Company Develops Solar Cell Printing Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The technology uses Plextronics’ conductive inks that can be printed by manufacturers worldwide to make solar cells, potentially as easily as they might print a newspaper.

395

Processes and catalysts for conducting fischer-tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided.

Singleton, Alan H. (Marshall Township, Allegheny County, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Allison Park, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Processes and catalysts for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes and catalysts are disclosed for conducting Fischer-Tropsch synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR). One aspect of the invention involves the use of cobalt catalysts without noble metal promotion in an SBCR. Another aspect involves using palladium promoted cobalt catalysts in an SBCR. Methods for preparing noble metal promoted catalysts via totally aqueous impregnation and procedures for producing attrition resistant catalysts are also provided. 1 fig.

Singleton, A.H.; Oukaci, R.; Goodwin, J.G.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells These slides were presented at the 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on September 28, 2010. 7uscpopov.pdf More Documents &...

398

Down-flow moving-bed gasifier with catalyst recycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gasification of coal and other carbonaceous materials by an endothermic gasification reaction is achieved in the presence of a catalyst in a down-flow, moving-bed gasifier. Catalyst is removed along with ash from the gasifier and is then sufficiently heated in a riser/burner by the combustion of residual carbon in the ash to volatilize the catalyst. This volatilized catalyst is returned to the gasifier where it uniformly contacts and condenses on the carbonaceous material. Also, the hot gaseous combustion products resulting from the combustion of the carbon in the ash along with excess air are introduced into the gasifier for providing heat energy used in the endothermic reaction.

Halow, John S. (Waynesburg, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Development Of A Novel Catalyst For No Decomposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NO{sub x} emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N2 will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO2 catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the research that is being undertaken is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO2 catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO2 catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions were done. It is also planned to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the previous reporting periods, runs were made with catalysts containing 15% Pt and 10% Pt on SnO{sub 2} were done. Catalysts containing 10% Pt resulted in significantly lower activities than 15% PT catalysts. Therefore, in the following tests 15% Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts were used. In the current reporting period runs to elucidate the effects of temperature, oxygen, water vapor, pretreatment temperature, and space velocity on NO dissociation were completed. It was found that the presence of oxygen and water vapor did not affect the activation energy of the NO dissociation reaction indicating the presence of the same rate controlling step for all feed compositions. Activation energy was higher for higher gas velocities suggesting the presence of mass transfer limitations at lower velocities. Presence of oxygen in the feed inhibited the NO decomposition. Having water vapor in the feed did not significantly affect the catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 373 K, but significantly reduced catalyst activity for catalysts pretreated at 900 K.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Mapping Metals Incorporation of a Single Catalyst Particle Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

andor heavy molecules of oil feedstock into smaller and lighter hydrocarbons, such as gasoline. The workhorse of the FCC process is a tiny catalyst particle of 50-150 m...

402

Deactivation Mechanisms of Pt/Pd-based Diesel Oxidation Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oh, DB Brown, DH Kim, JH Lee, and CHF Peden.2012."Deactivation Mechanisms of PtPd-based Diesel Oxidation Catalysts."Catalysis Today 184(1):197-204. doi:10.1016...

403

Proposals for Non-PGM Catalyst Target and Test Protocols  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cell Tech Team Proposals for Non-PGM catalyst target and test protocols FCTT (USCAR) Shinichi Hirano (co-chair), Tarek Abdel-Baset, Balsu Lakshmanan, David Masten, Mark...

404

Nanocomposite catalysts for soot combustion and propane steam reforming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nanocomposite system, CuO-Ag/CeO 2, has been successfully developed to complete carbon black combustion by 400*C. This novel catalyst has excellent potential for application in the emission control of soot particulates ...

He, Hong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Carbon Nanotube Growth Using Ni Catalyst in Different Layouts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes have been grown using Ni as catalyst by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system (PECVD) in various pre-patterned substrates. Ni was thermally evaporated on silicon substrates ...

Nguyen, H. Q.

406

Catalyst Cartography: 3D Super-Resolution Mapping of Catalytic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Catalyst Cartography: 3D Super-Resolution Mapping of Catalytic Activity Thanks to a groundbreaking new method, scientists have created the first 3D super-resolution maps of...

407

Impact of Fuel Metal Impurities on Diesel Exhaust Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Approach * Aged catalysts from a Ford F250 with biodiesel fuel containing Na, K and Ca. * Emissions measurement conducted after 150,000 miles...

408

Down-flow moving-bed gasifier with catalyst recycle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gasification of coal and other carbonaceous materials by an endothermic gasification reaction is achieved in the presence of a catalyst in a down-flow, moving-bed gasifier. Catalyst is removed along with ash from the gasifier and is then sufficiently heated in a riser/burner by the combustion of residual carbon in the ash to volatilize the catalyst. This volatilized catalyst is returned to the gasifier where it uniformly contacts and condenses on the carbonaceous material. Also, the hot gaseous combustion products resulting from the combustion of the carbon in the ash along with excess air are introduced into the gasifier for providing heat energy used in the endothermic reaction. 1 fig.

Halow, J.S.

1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

409

Catalyst Paper No-Carb Strategy for GHG Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Catalyst Paper strategy to manage GHG exposure is a combination of energy reduction initiatives in manufacturing and the effective use of biomass and alternative fuels to produce mill steam and electricity from the powerhouse. The energy...

McClain, C.; Robinson, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Mark K. Debe 3M Company May 15, 2012 group) Project Management - 3M (A. Steinbach, M. Kurkowski, S. Hendricks, A. Hester, P. Kadera, G

411

Neutral bimetallic transition metal phenoxyiminato catalysts and related polymerization methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst composition comprising a neutral bimetallic diphenoxydiiminate complex of group 10 metals or Ni, Pd or Pt is disclosed. The compositions can be used for the preparation of homo- and co-polymers of olefinic monomer compounds.

Marks, Tobin J. (Evanston, IL); Rodriguez, Brandon A. (Evanston, IL); Delferro, Massimiliano (Chicago, IL)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

Polyoxometalate water oxidation catalysts and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Homogeneous water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) for the oxidation of water to produce hydrogen ions and oxygen, and methods of making and using thereof are described herein. In a preferred embodiment, the WOC is a polyoxometalate WOC which is hydrolytically stable, oxidatively stable, and thermally stable. The WOC oxidized waters in the presence of an oxidant. The oxidant can be generated photochemically, using light, such as sunlight, or electrochemically using a positively biased electrode. The hydrogen ions are subsequently reduced to form hydrogen gas, for example, using a hydrogen evolution catalyst (HEC). The hydrogen gas can be used as a fuel in combustion reactions and/or in hydrogen fuel cells. The catalysts described herein exhibit higher turn over numbers, faster turn over frequencies, and/or higher oxygen yields than prior art catalysts.

Hill, Craig L.; Gueletii, Yurii V.; Musaev, Djamaladdin G.; Yin, Qiushi; Botar, Bogdan

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

Catalysts and Magnets: Built Environment Eects on Bicycle Commuting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalysts and Magnets: Built Environment Eects on Bicycle Commuting A THESIS SUBMITTED technical assistance in constructing the bicycle accessibility measure used in this thesis; Humphrey School immeasurable companionship, patience, and support. i #12;Abstract What eects do bicycle infrastructure

Levinson, David M.

414

Pt-free, Perovskite-based Lean NOx Trap Catalysts  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SV50,000 h -1 , ramp rate 10 Cmin, catalyst degreened at 700 o C for 2.5 hrs Absorption Desorption 2010 DEER Conference -20 80 180 280 380 480 580 680 780 2000 2050 2100...

415

Accelerated deployment of nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts. Final CRADA Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanomanufacturing offers an opportunity to create domestic jobs and facilitate economic growth. In response to this need, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy issued a Research Call to develop nanomanufacturing capabilities at the National Laboratories. High performance catalysts represent a unique opportunity to deploy nanomanufacturing technologies. Re-refining of used lube oil offers an opportunity to create manufacturing jobs and decrease dependence on imported petroleum. Improved catalysts are required to produce a better quality product, decrease environmental impact, extend catalyst life, and improve overall economics of lube oil re-refining. Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) in cooperation with Universal Lubricants, Inc. (ULI) and Chemical Engineering Partners (CEP) have carried out a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to prepare nanostructured hydrotreating catalysts using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to exhibit superior performance for the re-refining of used lube oil. We investigated the upgrading of recycled lube oil by hydrogenation using commercial, synthetically-modified commercial catalysts, and synthesized catalysts. A down-flow (trickle bed) catalytic unit was used for the hydrogenation experiments. In addition to carrying out elemental analyses of the various feed and product fractions, characterization was undertaken using H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR. Initially commercial were evaluated. Second these commercial catalysts were promoted with precious metals using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Performance improvements were observed that declined with catalyst aging. An alternate approach was undertaken to deeply upgrade ULI product oils. Using a synthesized catalyst, much lower hydrogenation temperatures were required than commercial catalysts. Other performance improvements were also observed. The resulting lube oil fractions were of high purity even at low reaction severity. The products recovered from both the ALD and other processes were water-white (even those from the low temperature, low residence time (high space velocity), low conversion runs). These results indicate that highly upgraded recycle lube oils can be produced using ALD-deposited active metal catalysts. The use of H{sup 1} and C{sup 13} NMR for the characterization of the treated lube oils has been shown to be effective.

Libera, J.A.; Snyder, S.W.; Mane, A.; Elam, J.W.; Cronauer, D.C.; Muntean, J.A.; Wu, T.; Miller, J.T. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); ( ES)

2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

416

Carbo-metallic oil-conversion process and catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a continuous process for cracking of a residual hydrocarbon feedstock into lower molecular weight hydrocarbon transportation fuels. The cracking being carried out in the presence of a catalyst having catalyst parameters comprising porosity, metals content, rare earth content, and zeolite content. The residual hydrocarbon feedstock comprising metal contaminants, fractions boiling above 1025{degrees}F. comprising asphaltenes, polynuclear aromatics, naphthenes and prophyrins.

Hettinger, W.P.; Beck, W.

1989-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

CATALYSTS FOR HIGH CETANE ETHERS AS DIESEL FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tungstena-zirconia (WZ) catalyst has been investigated for coupling methanol and isobutanol to unsymmetrical ethers, i.e. methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and compared with earlier studied sulfated-zirconia (SZ) and Nafion-H catalysts. In all cases, the ether synthesis mechanism is a dual site S{sub N}2 process involving competitive adsorption of reactants on proximal acid sites. At low reaction temperatures, methylisobutylether (MIBE) is the predominant product. However, at temperatures >135 C the WZ catalyst is very good for dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The surface acid sites of the WZ catalyst and a Nafion-H catalyst were diagnosed by high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) of N 1s shifts after adsorption of amines. Using pyridine, ethylenediamine, and triethylamine, it is shown that WZ has heterogeneous strong Broensted acid sites. Theoretical study located the transition state of the alcohol coupling reaction on proximal Broensted acid sites and accounted well for XPS core-level shifts upon surface acid-base interactions. While computations have not been carried out with WZ, it is shown that the SZ catalyst is a slightly stronger acid than CF{sub 3}SO{sub 3}H (a model for Nafion-H) by 1.3-1.4 kcal/mol. A novel sulfated zirconia catalyst having proximal strong Broensted acid sites was synthesized and shown to have significantly enhanced activity and high selectivity in producing MIBE or isobutene from methanol/isobutanol mixtures. The catalyst was prepared by anchoring 1,2-ethanediol bis(hydrogen sulfate) salt precursor onto zirconium hydroxide, followed by calcination to remove the -(CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2})- bridging residues.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Heock-Hoi Kwon; James G. C. Shen; Qisheng Ma; Robert A. Hunsicker; Andrew P. Butler; Scott J. Bollinger

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene-Catalyst Interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene? Catalyst Interaction Robert S. Weatherup,*,† Hakim Amara,‡ Raoul Blume,§ Bruno Dlubak,?,? Bernhard C. Bayer,† Mamadou Diarra,?,# Mounib Bahri,‡ Andrea Cabrero-Vilatela,† Sabina Caneva... , France * S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The dynamics of the graphene?catalyst interaction during chemical vapor deposition are investigated using in situ, time- and depth- resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and complementary grand canonical...

Weatherup, Robert S.; Amara, Hakim; Blume, Raoul; Dlubak, Bruno; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Diarra, Mamadou; Bahri, Mounib; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Caneva, Sabina; Kidambi, Piran R.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Deranlot, Cyrile; Seneor, Pierre; Schloegl, Robert; Ducastelle, François; Bichara, Christophe; Hofmann, Stephan

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Method of forming supported doped palladium containing oxidation catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a supported oxidation catalyst includes providing a support comprising a metal oxide or a metal salt, and depositing first palladium compound particles and second precious metal group (PMG) metal particles on the support while in a liquid phase including at least one solvent to form mixed metal comprising particles on the support. The PMG metal is not palladium. The mixed metal particles on the support are separated from the liquid phase to provide the supported oxidation catalyst.

Mohajeri, Nahid

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

Catalyst for selective NO.sub.x reduction using hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two phase catalyst is disclosed with one or more transition metals such as Cu, Co, Fe, Ag and Mo supported on a molecular sieve having a pore size not greater than 8 .ANG. along with a stabilizing oxide of one or more of the oxides of Zr, Mo, V, Nb or the rare earths coating the molecular sieve. A method of preparing the two phase catalyst and using same to remediate NO.sub.x in combustion gases is also described.

Marshall, Christopher L. (Naperville, IL); Neylon, Michael K. (Naperville, IL)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde over bimetallic catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde has been investigated over a monometallic Pt/SiO{sub 2} catalyst and platinum bimetallic catalysts where the second metal was either silver, copper, or tin. The effects of addition of a second metal to the Pt/SiO{sub 2} system on the selectivity to crotyl alcohol were investigated. The Pt-Sn bimetallic catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption, {sup 1}H NMR and microcalorimetry. The Pt-Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Pt-Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were characterized by hydrogen chemisorption. Pt-Sn/SiO{sub 2} catalysts selectively hydrogenated crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol and the method of preparation of these catalysts affected the selectivity. The most selective Pt-Sn/SiO{sub 2} catalysts for the hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol were those in which the Sn precursor was dissolved in a HCl solution. Sn increased both the rate of formation of butyraldehyde and the rate of formation of crotyl alcohol. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt-Ag/SiO{sub 2} and Pt-Cu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts produced only butyraldehyde. Initial heats of adsorption ({approximately}90 kJ/mol) measured using microcalorimetry were not affected by the presence of Sn on Pt. We can conclude that there is no through metal electronic interaction between Pt and Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn at least with respect to hydrogen surface bonds since the Pt and Pt-Sn had similar initial heats of adsorption coupled with the invariance of the {sup 1}H NMR Knight shift.

Schoeb, A.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Design and synthesis of catalysts for coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferric-sulfide-based materials satisfy many of the requirements of catalysts for coal liquefaction - they are cheap enough and environmentally-benign enough to be considered {open_quotes}disposable,{close_quotes} and they can be made small enough and active enough to be considered economical. The talk will focus on the different ways in which these catalysts can be made, including hydrothermal disproportionation, in situ impregnation, and aerosol, as well as their characterization and performance.

Dadyburjor, D.B.; Stinespring, C.D.; Stiller, A.H.; Zondio, J.W. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

SLURRY PHASE IRON CATALYSTS FOR INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, they have studied the attrition behavior of iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for converting coal based syngas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

424

Slurry Phase Iron Catalysts for Indirect Coal Liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted to support the DOE program in indirect coal liquefaction. Specifically, we have studied the attrition behavior of Iron Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, their interaction with the silica binder and the evolution of iron phases in a synthesis gas conversion process. The results provide significant insight into factors that should be considered in the design of catalysts for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas into liquid fuels.

Abhaya K. Datye

1998-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

425

Methods for making a supported iron-copper catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst is described for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from CO+H.sub.2 utilizing a porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support impregnated with iron and copper and optionally promoted with an alkali metal. The use of an Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 support results in the suppression of heavy waxes (C.sub.26 + hydrocarbons), particularly in slurry phase operation, when compared to unsupported or co-precipitated catalysts.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Br�������¸nsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with blending octane No. of 105, and can replace aromatics in liquid fuels.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

Novel Surface Architecture Synthesis for Gas Separation and Fuel-Cell Catalyst Applications James Guthrie, Georgia Institute of Technology, SURF 2010 Fellow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel Surface Architecture Synthesis for Gas Separation and Fuel-Cell Catalyst Applications James-shell nanoparticle, Pt was deposited onto a flat surface substrate. Three separate substrates were used, Au(111 not significantly change over different voltages [3]. STM work was done using electrochemically etched tungsten tips

Li, Mo

428

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by slurring them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation.

White, Curt M. (Pittsburgh, PA); Quiring, Michael S. (Katy, TX); Jensen, Karen L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hickey, Richard F. (Bethel Park, PA); Gillham, Larry D. (Bartlesville, OK)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

Separation of catalyst from Fischer-Tropsch slurry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a catalytic process for converting synthesis gas including hydrogen and carbon monoxide to hydrocarbons and oxygenates by a slurry Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, the wax product along with dispersed catalyst is removed from the slurry and purified by removing substantially all of the catalyst prior to upgrading the wax and returning a portion to the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. Separation of the catalyst particles from the wax product is accomplished by dense gas and/or liquid extraction in which the organic compounds in the wax are dissolved and carried away from the insoluble inorganic catalyst particles that are primarily inorganic in nature. The purified catalyst-free wax product can be subsequently upgraded by various methods such as hydrogenation, isomerization, hydrocracking, conversion to gasoline and other products over ZSM-5 aluminosilicate zeolite, etc. The catalyst particles are returned to the Fischer-Tropsch Reactor by mixing them with a wax fraction of appropriate molecular weight, boiling point and viscosity to avoid reactor gelation. 2 figs.

White, C.M.; Quiring, M.S.; Jensen, K.L.; Hickey, R.F.; Gillham, L.D.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

430

Nanostructured carbide catalysts for the hydrogen economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The above quote, taken from the executive summary of the Report from the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Workshop held August 6–8, 2007,[1] places in context the research carried out at the University of California, Santa Barbara, which is reported in this document. The enormous impact of heterogeneous catalysis is exemplified by the Haber process for the synthesis of ammonia, which consumes a few % of the world’s energy supply and natural gas, and feeds as many as a third of the world’s population. While there have been numerous advances in understanding the process,[2] culminating in the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Gerhard Ertl in 2007, it is interesting to note that the catalysts themselves have changed very little since they were discovered heuristically in the the early part of the 20th century. The thesis of this report is that modern materials chemistry, with all the empirical knowledge of solid state chemistry, combined with cutting edge structural tools, can help develop and better heterogeneous catalysis. The first part of this report describes research in the area of early transition metal carbides (notably of Mo and W), potentially useful catalysts for water gas shift (WGS) and related reactions of use to the hydrogen economy. Although these carbides have been known to be catalytically useful since the 1970s,[3] further use of these relatively inexpensive materials have been plagued by issues of low surface areas and ill-defined, and often unreactive surfaces, in conjunction with deactivation. We have employed for the first time, a combination of constant-wavelength and time-of-flight neutron scattering, including a total scattering analysis of the latter data, to better understand what happens in these materials, in a manner that for the first time, reveals surface graphitic carbon in these materials in a quantitative manner. Problems of preparation, surface stability, and irreversible reactivity have become manifest in this class of materials that discourage us from pursuing these materials further.

Ram Seshadri, Susannah Scott, Juergen Eckert

2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Rational design of gold catalysts with enhanced thermal stability: post modification of Au/TiO2 by amorphous SiO2 matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Au/TiO{sub 2} is highly active for CO oxidation, but it often suffers from sintering in high-temperature environments. In this work, we report on a novel design of gold catalysts, in which pre-formed Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were post decorated by amorphous SiO{sub 2} to suppress the agglomeration of gold particles. Even after being aged in O{sub 2}-He at 700 C, the SiO{sub 2}-decorated Au/TiO{sub 2} was still active for CO oxidation at ambient temperature.

Zhu, Haoguo [ORNL; Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Iron catalyst for preparation of polymethylene from synthesis gas and method for producing the catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for synthesizing hydrocarbons; more particularly, the invention relates to a process for synthesizing long-chain hydrocarbons known as polymethylene from carbon monoxide and hydrogen or from carbon monoxide and water or mixtures thereof in the presence of a catalyst comprising iron and platinum or palladium or mixtures thereof which may be supported on a solid material, preferably an inorganic refractory oxide. This process may be used to convert a carbon monoxide containing gas to a product which could substitute for high density polyethylene.

Sapienza, Richard S. (1 Miller Ave., Shoreham, NY 11786); Slegeir, William A. (7 Florence Rd., Hampton Bays, NY 11946)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Iron catalyst for preparation of polymethylene from synthesis gas and method for producing the catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to a process for synthesizing hydrocarbons; more particularly, the invention relates to a process for synthesizing long-chain hydrocarbons known as polymethylene from carbon monoxide and hydrogen or from carbon monoxide and water or mixtures thereof in the presence of a catalyst comprising iron and platinum or palladium or mixtures thereof which may be supported on a solid material, preferably an inorganic refractory oxide. This process may be used to convert a carbon monoxide containing gas to a product which could substitute for high density polyethylene.

Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.

1990-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

This document is produced by the University Print Management Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Print Management Team. A Guide To Best Practice Printing #12;This document is produced by the University Print Management Team (UPMT) to raise awareness of printing on campus, and to demonstrate how we managing the print process to reduce cost, waste and to improve the functionality and availability of print

Li, Yi

435

Kinetics of methanation on nickel catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive steady-state and transient measurements of the disproportionation of carbon monoxide, the hydrogenation of deposited carbon, and methanation of carbon monoxide were performed over 2 and 10% nickel on silica support. The results indicated that the methanation of carbon monoxide involves competitively adsorbed species; that the reaction is nearly zero order in carbon monoxide at 0.1-0.5 atm CO and 1 atm H/sub 2/, but negative at higher CO partial pressures and that it becomes less negative with increasing temperature or increasing hydrogen pressure; and that the reaction order with respect to hydrogen changes from 0.5 to 1.0 with increasing CO pressure and decreasing H/sub 2/ pressure. A reaction mechanism is proposed which consists of the molecular adsorption of CO, the dissociative adsorption of H/sub 2/, dissociation of the surface CO species, and reaction of two adsorbed hydrogen atoms with the oxygen; and a multistep hydrogenation and desorption process for the adsorbed carbon. The dissociation and reaction of adsorbed CO is probably the rate-limiting step. The kinetic behavior is best represented with the assumption of a heterogeneous catalyst surface, containing three types of sites of widely varying activity.

Ho, S.V.; Harriott, P.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Dynamic structural disorder in supported nanoscale catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the origin and physical effects of “dynamic structural disorder” (DSD) in supported nano-scale catalysts. DSD refers to the intrinsic fluctuating, inhomogeneous structure of such nano-scale systems. In contrast to bulk materials, nano-scale systems exhibit substantial fluctuations in structure, charge, temperature, and other quantities, as well as large surface effects. The DSD is driven largely by the stochastic librational motion of the center of mass and fluxional bonding at the nanoparticle surface due to thermal coupling with the substrate. Our approach for calculating and understanding DSD is based on a combination of real-time density functional theory/molecular dynamics simulations, transient coupled-oscillator models, and statistical mechanics. This approach treats thermal and dynamic effects over multiple time-scales, and includes bond-stretching and -bending vibrations, and transient tethering to the substrate at longer ps time-scales. Potential effects on the catalytic properties of these clusters are briefly explored. Model calculations of molecule-cluster interactions and molecular dissociation reaction paths are presented in which the reactant molecules are adsorbed on the surface of dynamically sampled clusters. This model suggests that DSD can affect both the prefactors and distribution of energy barriers in reaction rates, and thus can significantly affect catalytic activity at the nano-scale.

Rehr, J. J.; Vila, F. D. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

437

Transition metal-free olefin polymerization catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ethylene and/or propylene are polymerized to form high molecular weight, linear polymers by contacting ethylene and/or propylene monomer, in the presence of an inert reaction medium, with a catalyst system which consists essentially of (1) an aluminum alkyl component, such as trimethylaluminum, triethylaluminum, triisobutylaluminum, tri-n-octylaluminum and diethylaluminum hydride and (2) a Lewis acid or Lewis acid derivative component, such as B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3, [(CH.sub.3).sub.2 N (H) (C.sub.6 H.sub.5)].sup.+ [B (C.sub.6 F.sub.5)4].sup.-, [(C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.3 NH].sup.+ [B C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ],.sup.-, [C(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.3 ].sup.+ [B(C.sub.6 F.sub.5).sub.4 ].sup.-, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(OCH.sub.3), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butyl-4-methylphenoxide), (C.sub.2 H.sub.5)Al(2,6 -di-t-butylphenoxide).sub.2, (C.sub.2 H.sub.5).sub.2 Al(2,6-di-t-butylphonoxide) , 2,6 -di-t-butylphenol.multidot.methylaluminoxane or an alkylaluminoxane, and which may be completely free any transition metal component(s).

Sen, Ayusman (State College, PA); Wojcinski, II, Louis M. (State College, PA); Liu, Shengsheng (State College, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Use of aluminum phosphate as the dehydration catalyst in single step dimethyl ether process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention pertains to a process for the coproduction of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) directly from a synthesis gas in a single step (hereafter, the "single step DME process"). In this process, the synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon oxides is contacted with a dual catalyst system comprising a physical mixture of a methanol synthesis catalyst and a methanol dehydration catalyst. The present invention is an improvement to this process for providing an active and stable catalyst system. The improvement comprises the use of an aluminum phosphate based catalyst as the methanol dehydration catalyst. Due to its moderate acidity, such a catalyst avoids the coke formation and catalyst interaction problems associated with the conventional dual catalyst systems taught for the single step DME process.

Peng, Xiang-Dong (Allentown, PA); Parris, Gene E. (Coopersburg, PA); Toseland, Bernard A. (Allentown, PA); Battavio, Paula J. (Allentown, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL CATALYST FOR NO DECOMPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NO{sub x} emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N{sub 2} will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the proposed research is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Therefore, it is proposed to perform temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions. It is also proposed to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the current reporting period first the GC-MS system was calibrated. Then the TPD runs for the 15% Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst after treatment with NO and subsequent treatments with NO and O{sub 2} were done. For these runs the catalyst was pretreated with dry helium for 2 hours at 40 C.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL CATALYST FOR NO DECOMPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NOx emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N{sub 2} will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the proposed research is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Therefore, it is proposed to perform temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions. It is also proposed to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the previous reporting period some TPRx runs with the catalysts containing 15% and 10% Pt were repeated due to the uncertainty of the oxygen content of the feed. In this reporting period runs were made with feed gas mixtures containing water vapor. Two reaction regimes, one below and the other above 750 K were observed. Presence of water vapor slightly enhanced the catalyst activity, but decreased the selectivity towards N{sub 2} at low temperatures.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

3D Printing Prof. Hank Dietz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Printing Prof. Hank Dietz TCMS, March 14, 2014 University of Kentucky Electrical & Computer #12;3D With Glue Layers of paper: printed with glue & cut Layers of powder: printed with glue Can also be printed in full color #12;3D Extrusion (RepRaps) FDM: Fused Deposition Modeling FFF: Fused

Dietz, Henry G. "Hank"

442

In situ Characterization of Pt Catalysts Supported on Ceria Modified TiO(2) for the WGS reaction: Influence of Ceria Loading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work analyzes the influence of cerium content (6-15 wt%) on a TiO{sub 2} support over the structure and water gas shift (WGS) activity of Pt catalysts. The structural properties of these Pt/Ce-TiO{sub 2} catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM and XANES. Physicochemical characterization of the catalysts showed differences in the structure and dispersion of Ce entities on the support with Ce loading. For the samples with low ceria content (6 wt%), cerium is deposited on the support in the form of CeO{sub x} clusters in a highly dispersed state in close interaction with the Ti atoms. The formation of CeO{sub x} clusters at low Ce-loading on the support facilitates the dispersion of small particles of Pt and improves the reducibility of ceria component at low temperatures. The changes in platinum dispersion and support reducibility with Ce-loading on the TiO{sub 2} support lead to significant differences in the WGS activity. Pt supported on the sample with lower Ce content (6 wt%) shows better activity than those corresponding to catalysts with higher Ce content (15 wt%). Activity measurements coupled with catalysts characterization suggest that the improvement in the reducibility of the support with lower Ce content was associated with the presence of CeO{sub x} clusters of high reducibility that improve the chemical activity of the oxide-metal interfaces at which the WGS reaction takes place.

Rodriguez J. A.; Barrio, L.; Zhou, G.; Gonzalez, I.D.; Estrella, M.; Hanson, J.; Navarro, R.M.; Fierro, J.L.G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Oxidation of propylene over copper oxide catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work on other phases of this project concerning cata- lytic oxidation of hydrocarbons has been described by Sanderson (59), Looney (34), Burns (11), Dunlop (17), Woodham (71), and Perkins (49). The early work of Sanderson indicated that chromia-alumina... and pro- moted chromia?alumina agents possessed the ability to catalyze the oxidation of propane by air. Subsequent work of Looney suggested that propylene was a primary product of this oxidation; hence most investigations since then have been confined...

Billingsley, David Stuart

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

445

DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL CATALYST FOR NO DECOMPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NO{sub x} emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N{sub 2} will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the proposed research is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Therefore, it is proposed to perform temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions. It is also proposed to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the previous reporting period runs were made with feed gas mixtures containing water vapor. Two reaction regimes, one below and the other above 750 K were observed. Presence of water vapor slightly enhanced the catalyst activity, but decreased the selectivity towards N{sub 2} at low temperatures. For the current reporting period it was decided to Finish the runs with water vapor in the feed, check the effect of higher gas flow rate, and run experiments with catalyst treated at 900 K and 1000 K to drive off the OH groups. Unfortunately, shortly into the current period we had to change the gas feed preparation section. Then two flow controllers failed and we had to switch to rotameters and manual flow control as a stop gap measure. This affected the quality of the results and required repeated runs. Currently the results are satisfactory and the experiments are continuing. To take advantage of the down time the surface areas of the 15% Pt and 10% Pt catalysts were measured. The results indicate that when the catalysts are treated at 900 K for to hours to remove most of the OH groups on the surface, the activity of the 15% Pt catalyst increased.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F Akyurtlu

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Method of making maximally dispersed heterogeneous catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a catalyst with monolayer or sub-monolayer metal by controlling the wetting characteristics on the support surface and increasing the adhesion between the catalytic metal and an oxide layer. There are two methods that have been demonstrated by experiment and supported by theory. In the first method, which is useful for noble metals as well as others, a negatively-charged species is introduced to the surface of a support in sub-ML coverage. The layer-by-layer growth of metal deposited onto the oxide surface is promoted because the adhesion strength of the metal-oxide interface is increased. This method can also be used to achieve nanoislands of metal upon sub-ML deposition. The negatively-charged species can either be deposited onto the oxide surface or a compound can be deposited that dissociates on, or reacts with, the surface to form the negatively-charged species. The deposited metal adatoms can thereby bond laterally to the negatively-charged species as well as vertically to the oxide surface. Thus the negatively-charged species serve as anchors for the metal. In the second method, a chemical reaction that occurs when most metals are deposited on a fully hydroxylated oxide surface is used to create cationic metal species that bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. These are incorporated into the top layer of the substrate and bind strongly both to the substrate and to metallic metal atoms. In this case, these oxidized metal atoms serve as the anchors. Here, as in the previous method, nanoislands of catalytic metal can be achieved to increase catalytic activity, or monolayers or bilayers of reactive metal can also be made.

Jennison, Dwight R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Integrated process and dual-function catalyst for olefin epoxidation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention discloses a dual-functional catalyst composition and an integrated process for production of olefin epoxides including propylene oxide by catalytic reaction of hydrogen peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen with olefin feeds such as propylene. The epoxides and hydrogen peroxide are preferably produced simultaneously in situ. The dual-functional catalyst comprises noble metal crystallites with dimensions on the nanometer scale (on the order of <1 nm to 10 nm), specially dispersed on titanium silicalite substrate particles. The dual functional catalyst catalyzes both the direct reaction of hydrogen and oxygen to generate hydrogen peroxide intermediate on the noble metal catalyst surface and the reaction of the hydrogen peroxide intermediate with the propylene feed to generate propylene oxide product. Combining both these functions in a single catalyst provides a very efficient integrated process operable below the flammability limits of hydrogen and highly selective for the production of hydrogen peroxide to produce olefin oxides such as propylene oxide without formation of undesired co-products.

Zhou, Bing (Cranbury, NJ); Rueter, Michael (Plymouth Meeting, PA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Bifunctional Nanostructured Base Catalysts: Opportunities for BioFuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT This research studied and develop novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We will focus on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts formed by two techniques: from (mixed) metal-oxide bases and by nitrogen substitution for oxygen in zeolites. These catalysts will be compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, catalytic fast pyrolysis, and transesterification reactions. These reactions are important in processes that are currently being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and will be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we have studied the aldol-condensation of acetone with furfural over oxides and zeolites, the conversion of sugars by rapid pyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our previous research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen-substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

Connor, William

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

The development of precipitated iron catalysts with improved stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to identify the chemical principles governing the deactivation of precipitated iron catalysts during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and to use these chemical principles in the design of catalysts suitable for slurry reactors. This report covers testing an iron catalyst. During the last quarter, a new precipitated iron catalyst was prepared and tested in the slurry autoclave reactor at various conditions. This catalyst did not noticeably deactivate during 1250 hours of testing. This quarter, the test was extended to include performance evaluations at different conversion levels ranging from 35 to 88% at 265 and 275{degree}C. The conversion levels were varied by changing the feed rate. The catalytic performance at different conversion intervals was then integrated to approximately predict performance in a bubble column reactor. The run was shut down at the end of 1996 hours because of a 24-hour-power outage. When the power was back on, the run was restarted from room temperature. Catalytic performance during the first 300 hours after the restart-up was monitored. Overall product distributions are being tabulated as analytical laboratory data are obtained. 34 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Works from the MIT Media Lab for the Campus Exhibition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for twice as long as using a computer or paper-based diet log. #12;3D Printed Clock Peter Schmitt & Robert Swartz The 3D Printed Clock results on the idea of ready assembled 3D printed computational mechanisms were added to allow for the access support material being removed after the print. The 3D Printed Clock

Ishii, Hiroshi

451

Reducing fischer-tropsch catalyst attrition losses in high agitation reaction systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reducing catalyst attrition losses in hydrocarbon synthesis processes conducted in high agitation reaction systems; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst; a catalyst produced by such method; a method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support; and a catalyst support produced by such method. The inventive method of reducing catalyst attrition losses comprises the step of reacting a synthesis gas in a high agitation reaction system in the presence of a catalyst. In one aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support including an amount of titanium effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support which has been treated, after calcination, with an acidic, aqueous solution. The acidic aqueous solution preferably has a pH of not more than about 5. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support wherein the cobalt has been applied to the .gamma.-alumina support by totally aqueous, incipient wetness-type impregnation. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises cobalt on a .gamma.-alumina support with an amount of a lanthana promoter effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the catalyst preferably comprises a .gamma.-alumina support produced from boehmite having a crystallite size, in the 021 plane, in the range of from about 30 to about 55 .ANG.ngstrons. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst comprises the step of treating a .gamma.-alumina support, after calcination of and before adding catalytic material to the support, with an acidic solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the catalyst. In another aspect, the inventive method of producing an attrition-resistant catalyst support comprises the step of treating calcined .gamma.-alumina with an acidic, aqueous solution effective for increasing the attrition resistance of the .gamma.-alumina.

Singleton, Alan H. (Baden, PA); Oukaci, Rachid (Gibsonia, PA); Goodwin, James G. (Cranberry Township, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Proton management as a design principle for hydrogenase-inspired catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The properties of the hydrogenase-inspired [Ni(PNP)2]2+ (PNP ¼ Et2PCH2NMeCH2PEt2) catalyst for homogeneous hydrogen oxidation in acetonitrile solution are explored from a theoretical perspective for hydrogen production. The defining characteristic of this catalyst is the presence of pendent bases in the second coordination sphere that function as proton relays between the solution and the metal center. DFT calculations of the possible intermediates along proposed catalytic pathways are carried out and used to construct coupled Pourbaix diagrams of the redox processes and free-energy profiles along the reaction pathways. Analysis of the coupled Pourbaix diagrams reveals insights into the intermediate species and the mechanisms favored at different pH values of the solution. Consideration of the acid-base behavior of the metal hydride and H2 adduct species imposes additional constraints on the reaction mechanism, which can involve intramolecular as well as intermolecular proton-coupled electron-transfer steps. The efficacy of the catalyst is shown to depend critically on the pKa values of these potential intermediates, as they control both the species in solution at a given pH and the freeenergy profile of reaction pathways. Optimal relationships among these pKa values can be identified, and it is demonstrated that ‘‘proton management’’, i.e., the manipulation of these pKa values (e.g., through choice of metal or substituents on ligands), can serve as a design principle for improved catalytic behavior. This material is based upon work supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Small, Yolanda A.; DuBois, Daniel L.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, J. T.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nanoengineering Catalyst Supports via Layer-by Layer Surface Functionalization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in the layer-by-layer surface modification of oxides for the preparation of highly active and stable gold nanocatalysts is briefly reviewed. Through a layer-by-layer surface modification approach, the surfaces of various catalyst supports including both porous and nonporous silica materials and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were modified with monolayers or multilayers of distinct metal oxide ultra-thin films. The surface-modified materials were used as supports for Au nanoparticles, resulting in highly active nanocatalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation. Good stability against sintering under high-temperature treatment was achieved for a number of the Au catalysts through surface modification of the support material. The surface modification of supports can be a viable route to control both the composition and structure of support and nanoparticle interfaces, thereby tailoring the stability and activity of the supported catalyst systems.

Yan, Wenfu [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

DEVELOPMENT OF A NOVEL CATALYST FOR NO DECOMPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air pollution arising from the emission of nitrogen oxides as a result of combustion taking place in boilers, furnaces and engines, has increasingly been recognized as a problem. New methods to remove NO{sub x} emissions significantly and economically must be developed. The current technology for post-combustion removal of NO is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO by ammonia or possibly by a hydrocarbon such as methane. The catalytic decomposition of NO to give N{sub 2} will be preferable to the SCR process because it will eliminate the costs and operating problems associated with the use of an external reducing species. The most promising decomposition catalysts are transition metal (especially copper)-exchanged zeolites, perovskites, and noble metals supported on metal oxides such as alumina, silica, and ceria. The main shortcoming of the noble metal reducible oxide (NMRO) catalysts is that they are prone to deactivation by oxygen. It has been reported that catalysts containing tin oxide show oxygen adsorption behavior that may involve hydroxyl groups attached to the tin oxide. This is different than that observed with other noble metal-metal oxide combinations, which have the oxygen adsorbing on the noble metal and subsequently spilling over to the metal oxide. This observation leads one to believe that the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts may have a potential as NO decomposition catalysts in the presence of oxygen. This prediction is also supported by some preliminary data obtained for NO decomposition on a Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst in the PI's laboratory. The main objective of the proposed research is the evaluation of the Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts for the decomposition of NO in simulated power plant stack gases with particular attention to the resistance to deactivation by O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and elevated temperatures. Therefore, it is proposed to perform temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature programmed reaction (TPRx) studies on Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalysts having different noble metal concentrations and pretreated under different conditions. It is also proposed to perform NO decomposition tests in a laboratory-size packed-bed reactor to obtain long-term deactivation data. In the previous reporting period the GC-MS system was calibrated and the TPD runs for the 15% Pt/SnO{sub 2} catalyst after treatment with NO and subsequent treatments with NO and O{sub 2} were done. For these runs the catalyst was pretreated with dry helium for 2 hours at 40 C. The Temperature Programmed Reaction (TPRx) of NO and NO+O{sub 2} mixtures on the catalysts containing 15% Pt and 10% Pt were also performed. In this reporting period some TPRx runs with the catalysts containing 15% and 10% Pt were repeated due to the uncertainty of the oxygen content of the feed.

Ates Akyurtlu; Jale F. Akyurtlu

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

455

Focussing the view on Nature's water-splitting catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 3 billion years ago Nature invented a catalyst that splits water with highefficiency into molecular oxygen and hydrogen equivalents (protons and electrons). This reaction is energetically driven by sun light and the active centre contains relatively cheap and abundant metals: manganese and calcium. This biological system therefore forms the paradigm for all man made attempts for direct solar fuel production and several studies are underway to determine the electronic and geometric structures of this catalyst. In this report we briefly summarize the problems and the current status of these efforts, and propose a DFT-based strategy for obtaining a reliable high resolution structure of this unique catalyst that includes both the inorganic core and the first ligand sphere.

Messinger, Johannes; Yano, Junko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Catalysts and process for hydrogenolysis of sugar alcohols to polyols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for preparation of low molecular weight polyols from high molecular weight polyols in a hydrogenolysis reaction under elevated temperature and hydrogen pressure. The process comprises providing in a reaction mixture the polyols, a base, and a metal catalyst prepared by depositing a transition metal salt on an inert support, reducing the metal salt to the metal with hydrogen, and passivating the metal with oxygen, and wherein the catalyst is reduced with hydrogen prior to the reaction. In particular, the process provides for the preparation of glycerol, propylene glycol, and ethylene glycol from sugar alcohols such as sorbitol or xylitol. In a preferred process, the metal catalyst comprises ruthenium which is deposited on an alumina, titania, or carbon support, and the dispersion of the ruthenium on the support increases during the hydrogenolysis reaction.

Chopade, Shubham P. (East Lansing, MI) [East Lansing, MI; Miller, Dennis J. (Okemos, MI) [Okemos, MI; Jackson, James E. (Haslett, MI) [Haslett, MI; Werpy, Todd A. (West Richland, WA) [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

2001-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

458

Percolation in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water management in the catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is confronted by two issues, flooding and dry out, both of which result in improper functioning of the fuel cell and lead to poor performance and degradation. At the present time, the data that has been reported about water percolation and wettability within a fuel cell catalyst layer is limited. A method and apparatus for measuring the percolation pressure in the catalyst layer has been developed based upon an experimental apparatus used to test water percolation in porous transport layers (PTL). The experimental setup uses a pseudo Hele-Shaw type testing where samples are compressed and a fluid is injected into the sample. Testing the samples gives percolation pressure plots which show trends in increasing percolation pressure with an increase in flow rate. A decrease in pressure was seen as percolation occurred in one sample, however the pressure only had a rising effect in the other sample.

Stacy, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Pyrochlore-type catalysts for the reforming of hydrocarbon fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of catalytically reforming a reactant gas mixture using a pyrochlore catalyst material comprised of one or more pyrochlores having the composition A.sub.2-w-xA'.sub.wA''.sub.xB.sub.2-y-zB'.sub.yB''.sub.zO.sub.7-.DELTA.. Distribution of catalytically active metals throughout the structure at the B site creates an active and well dispersed metal locked into place in the crystal structure. This greatly reduces the metal sintering that typically occurs on supported catalysts used in reforming reactions, and reduces deactivation by sulfur and carbon. Further, oxygen mobility may also be enhanced by elemental exchange of promoters at sites in the pyrochlore. The pyrochlore catalyst material may be utilized in catalytic reforming reactions for the conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into synthesis gas (H.sub.2+CO) for fuel cells, among other uses.

Berry, David A. (Morgantown, WV); Shekhawat, Dushyant (Morgantown, WV); Haynes, Daniel (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Mark (Morgantown, WV); Spivey, James J. (Baton Rouge, LA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control Effects of Catalysts on Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Retrofits for PM and NOX Control The more...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

CO2 Reduction on Supported Ru/Al2O3 Catalysts: Cluster Size Dependence...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 Reduction on Supported RuAl2O3 Catalysts: Cluster Size Dependence of Product Selectivity. CO2 Reduction on Supported RuAl2O3 Catalysts: Cluster Size Dependence of Product...

462

A design strategy applied to sulfur resistant lean NOx̳ automotive catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalyst poisoning due to sulfur compounds derived from fuel sulfur presents a major challenge, intractable thus far, to development of many advanced technologies for automotive catalysts such as the lean NOx, trap. Under ...

Tang, Hairong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

On the Acid-Base Mechanism for Ruthenium Water Oxidation Catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed theoretical study of the pathway for water oxidation in synthetic ruthenium-based catalysts. As a first step, we consider a recently discovered single center catalyst, where experimental observations ...

Wang, Lee-Ping

464

Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction. Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction. Abstract: Multiple catalytic functions...

465

Spray drying and attrition behavior of iron catalysts for slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes results of a study aimed at developing and evaluating attrition resistant iron catalysts prepared by spray drying technique. These catalysts are intended for Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis in a slurry bubble column reactor...

Carreto Vazquez, Victor Hugo

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. The Role of Ir in Ternary Rh-Based Catalysts for Syngas Conversion to C2+ Oxygenates. Abstract: Transition...

467

Syntheses and applications of soluble polyisobutylene (PIB)-supported transition metal catalysts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................. 34 Catalyst Recovery in Self-Separating Systems .............................. 39 Fluorous/Organic Biphasic Catalysis............................................. 41 Polymer-Supported Catalysts in Ionic Liquids... ................................................................................. 45 Results and Discussion................................................................. 51 Conclusions.................................................................................. 60 III POLYISOBUTYLENE-SUPPORTED RHODIUM...

Tian, Jianhua

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-based/SiO2 catalysts: A...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and theoretical modeling study. Ethanol synthesis from syngas over Rh-basedSiO2 catalysts: A combined experimental and...

469

Nickel-Borate Oxygen-Evolving Catalyst that Functions under Benign Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin catalyst films with electrocatalytic water oxidation properties similar to those of a recently reported Co-based catalyst can be electrodeposited from dilute Ni2+ solutions in borate electrolyte at pH 9.2 (Bi). The ...

Nocera, Daniel G.

470

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of the DOC Deactivation of Accelerated Engine-Aged and Field-Aged SCR Catalysts and the Role of...

471

Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach Accelerated Thermal Aging of Fe-Zeolite SCR Catalysts Using an Engine-Based Systems Approach This...

472

Development and Applications of Pd Catalysts for C-N Cross-Coupling Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 A procedure for forming a highly active Pd(0) catalyst from Pd(OAc) 2, water, and biarylphosphine ligands has been developed. This protocol generates a catalyst system, which exhibits excellent reactivity and ...

Fors, Brett P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Intra-catalyst Reductant Chemistry in Lean NOx Traps: A Study on Sulfur Effects Presentation given...

474

A Bimetmallic Fuel-Borne Catalyst for Reduce Precious Metal Use...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Bimetmallic Fuel-Borne Catalyst for Reduce Precious Metal Use in Medium-Duty Diesel Engines A Bimetmallic Fuel-Borne Catalyst for Reduce Precious Metal Use in Medium-Duty Diesel...

475

Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for CIDI Engines Development of a Durable Low-Temperature Urea-SCR Catalyst for CIDI Engines 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

476

SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO with methane. SO2-induced stability of Ag-alumina catalysts in the SCR of NO with methane. Abstract: We report on a...

477

Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells. Design of graphene sheets-supported Pt catalyst layer in PEM fuel cells. Abstract: A series of cathodes using Pt...

478

NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps NH3 generation over commercial Three-Way Catalysts and Lean-NOx Traps Research to identify most promising...

479

NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

Not Available

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam Reforming, and Reverse-Water-Gas-Shift. PdZnAl Catalysts for the Reactions of Water-Gas-Shift, Methanol Steam...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "working catalyst print" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

CO/FTIR Spectroscopic Characterization of Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COFTIR Spectroscopic Characterization of PdZnOAl2O3 Catalysts for Methanol Steam Reforming. COFTIR Spectroscopic Characterization of PdZnOAl2O3 Catalysts for Methanol Steam...

482

Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phasehydrodeoxy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol. Carbon-Supported bimetallic Pd-Fe catalysts for vapor-phase hydrodeoxygenation of...

483

Catalysts for the hydrodenitrogenation of organic materials and process for the preparation of the catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention discloses a process for forming a catalyst for the hydrodenitrogenation of an organic feedstock, which includes (a) obtaining a precatalyst comprising cobalt and molybdenum or nickel and molybdenum; (b) adding in a non-oxidizing an atmosphere selected from hydrogen, helium, nitrogen, neon, argon, carbon monoxide or mixtures thereof to the precatalyst of step (a), a transition met ORIGIN OF THE INVENTION This invention was made in the course of research partially sponsored by the Department of Energy through grants DE-FG22-83P C60781 and DE-FG-85-PC80906, and partially supported by grant CHE82-19541 of the National Science Foundation. The invention is subject to Public Law 96-517 (and amendments), and the United States Government has rights in the present invention.

Laine, Richard M. (Palo Alto, CA); Hirschon, Albert S. (Menlo Park, CA); Wilson, Jr., Robert B. (Mountain View, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

POISON RESISTANT CATALYST DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels Field Test Unit (AFFTU) is a portable laboratory designed specifically to provide on-site evaluation of potential feedstocks for processes that produce alternative fuels from indigenous raw materials such as coal, natural gas or environmentally disadvantaged carbonaceous feedstocks. Since conversion of these raw materials into feed gas streams can produce a variety of bulk gas compositions, which furthermore can contain a myriad of trace components, it is necessary to evaluate each new feedstock on an individual basis. While it is possible to prepare blended gas mixtures to simulate the bulk composition of a known feedstock, it is neither possible nor cost-effective to simulate adequately the variety of trace chemicals present in that feedstock--some of which may not even be detected by routine analysis. Additionally, the transient composition of the gas during upsets or routine process changes may have an impact on the proposed process that is not foreseen in standard design. To address these concerns, the AFFTU was constructed with the following experimental capabilities: (1) A state-of-the-art gas chromatograph system to perform semi-continuous monitoring of both bulk composition and the concentration of key trace poisons down to one part per billion (ppb). (2) A 30-mL reactor system that can accept up to two feed streams from the customer, allowing a true life test with the actual gas projected for use in the proposed facility. (3) A manifold of four adsorbent beds, located upstream of the reactor, which permits the testing of adsorbents for the removal of contaminants from the feed stream. The effectiveness of these adsorbents may be evaluated either by analysis of the gas upstream and downstream of the bed (or at an intermediate point within the bed) or by observing the impact of the presence or absence of that bed on the actual stability of the catalyst activity. To achieve portability, the AFFTU was constructed in a commercial 48-foot trailer. Roughly half of the trailer is dedicated as ''office'' space, and it contains three personal computers that serve as an interface to the process control and handles data acquisition and analysis. The other half houses the laboratory, which is highly automated and designed for unattended operation. When not in use at a customer's site, the AFFTU is located at Air Products' Iron Run research facility, where it becomes an effective extension of the Alternative Fuels research laboratories.

Andrew W. Wang

2001-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

485

Catalyst and process for converting synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The addition of an inert metal component, such as gold, silver or copper, to a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising cobalt enables said catalyst to convert synthesis gas to liquid motor fuels at about 240.degree.-370.degree. C. with advantageously reduced selectivity of said cobalt for methane in said conversion. The catalyst composition can advantageously include a support component, such as a molecular sieve, co-catalyst/support component or a combination of such support components.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

487

Quinone tailored selective oxidation of methane over palladium catalyst with molecular oxygen as an oxidantw  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quinones such as 2-alkyl anthraquinone, together with Pd catalyst, are used for industrial production of H2

Bao, Xinhe

488

Cobalt-ruthenium catalysts for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrocarbon synthesis process is described which comprises reacting hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a catalyst comprised of cobalt and ruthenium on titania, at reaction conditions suitable for the formation of higher hydrocarbons. The catalyst is prepared by impregnating titania with solutions of cobalt and ruthenium salts, drying the impregnated support, reducing the cobalt and ruthenium, treating the reduced metals with an oxygen containing stream at conditions sufficient to form oxides of cobalt and oxides of ruthenium and reducing the cobalt and ruthenium oxides.

Iglesia, E.; Soled, S.L.; Fiato, R.A.

1989-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

489

Thermally Stable Ultra-Low Temperature Oxidation Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual reports describes recent results of a CRADA between General Motors Company (GM) and Battelle/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In the CRADA, we are investigating a number of candidate low temperature oxidation catalysts as fresh materials, and after realistic laboratory- and engine-aging. These studies will lead to a better understanding of fundamental characteristics and various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of catalysts, while also providing an assessment of the appropriateness of the laboratory conditions in realistically reproducing the effects of actual engine aging conditions.

Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Kim, Chang H.; Oh, Se H.; Schmieg, Steven J.

2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

490

Los Alamos catalyst could jumpstart e-cars, green energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las Conchas recovery challenge fundCatalyst couldCatalyst

491

The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a component of conventional high temperature water gas shift iron oxide based catalysts. The catalysts contained Fe-Al-Cr-Cu-O and were synthesized by co-precipitation. A series of catalysts were prepared with 5 to 50 wt% Al2O3, with 8 wt% Cr2O3, 4 wt% CuO, and the balance Fe2O3. All of the catalysts were compared to a reference WGS catalyst (88 wt% FeOx, 8 wt% Cr2O3, and 4 wt% CuO) with no alumina. Alumina addition to conventional high temperature water gas shift catalysts at concentrations of approximately 15 wt% increased CO conversion rates and increase thermal stability. A series of high temperature water gas shift catalysts containing iron, chromia, and copper oxides were prepared with small amounts of added ceria in the system Fe-Cr-Cu-Ce-O. The catalysts were also tested kinetically under WGS conditions. 2-4 wt% ceria addition (at the expense of the iron oxide content) resulted in increased reaction rates (from 22-32% higher) compared to the reference catalyst. The project goal of a 10,000 liter per day WGS-membrane reactor was achieved by a device operating on coal derived syngas containing significant amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide. The membrane flux was equivalent to 52 scfh/ft2 based on a 600 psi syngas inlet pressure and corresponded to membranes costing $191 per square foot. Over 40 hours of iv exposure time to syngas has been achieved for a double membrane reactor. Two modules of the Chart reactor were tested under coal syngas for over 75 hours with a single module tested for 50 hours. The permeance values for the Chart membranes were similar to the REB reactor though total flux was reduced due to significantly thicker membranes. Overall testing of membrane reactors on coal derived syngas was over 115 hours for all reactors tested. Testing of the REB double membrane device exceeded 40 hours. Performance of the double membrane reactor has been similar to the results for the single reactor with good maintenance of flux even after these long exposures to hydrogen sulfide. Of special interest is that the flux is highest at the start of each e

Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

492

Knight's Tour: Digital Materialism in the Work of Michael Shroads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boolean_Buddha.obj. ABS 3-D print. 2014. xiv. Michaelcont. xx. Michael Shroads. Bend. ABS 3-D print. 2014. xxi.Michael Shroads. Bend. ABS 3-D print. 2014. xxii. Michael

Shroads, Michael James

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Study of hydrogen and carbon monoxide adsorption on modified Zn/Cr catalysts by adsorption calorimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential heat of adsorption (q) of hydrogen (a) and carbon monoxide (b) as a function of the adsorbed amount (a) on Zn/Cr catalysts at 463/sup 0/K; 1) unpromoted catalyst, 2) catalyst promoted with 2.5% of K/sub 2/O.

Yoshin, S.V.; Klyacho, A.L.; Kondrat'ev, L.T.; Leonov, V.E.; Skripchenko, G.B.; Sushchaya, L.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Fundamental studies of hydrogen interaction with supported meta and bimetallic catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thesis is divided into 3 parts: interaction of H with silica supported Ru catalysts (high pressure in situ NMR), in situ NMR study of H interaction with supported Ru-group IB bimetallic catalysts, and in-situ NMR study of H effects on silica-supported Pt, Rh and Ru catalysts.

Bhatia, S.

1993-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

495

Attrition resistant bulk iron catalysts and processes for preparing and using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An attrition resistant precipitated bulk iron catalyst is prepared from iron oxide precursor and a binder by spray drying. The catalysts are preferably used in carbon monoxide hydrogenation processes such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. These catalysts are suitable for use in fluidized-bed reactors, transport reactors and, especially, slurry bubble column reactors.

Jothimurugesan, Kandaswamy (Ponca City, OK); Goodwin, Jr., James G. (Clemson, SC); Gangwal, Santosh K. (Cary, NC)

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

496

Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes) was tested as a catalyst binder in a microbial fuel cell. 2012 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Anti-flooding Catalyst binder a b s t r a c

497

Method for improving catalyst function in auto-thermal and partial oxidation reformer-based processors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a method for reforming fuel, the method comprising contacting the fuel to an oxidation catalyst so as to partially oxidize the fuel and generate heat; warming incoming fuel with the heat while simultaneously warming a reforming catalyst with the heat; and reacting the partially oxidized fuel with steam using the reforming catalyst.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Papadias, Dionissios D.; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

498

Utilizing interfaces: One-step forward for rational design of heterogeneous catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As far as heterogeneous catalysts are a composite material, physicochemical properties of the interfaces between individual components should be extensively studied for rational design of catalysts with desired properties. Here, I will present recent computational achievements in following three heterogeneous catalysts where the interface between composing materials plays a critical role

Kim H. Y.

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

499

Method for hydrogen production and metal winning, and a catalyst/cocatalyst composition useful therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition of matter is useful in electrolytically producing hydrogen or electrowinning metals. Use of the catalyst/cocatalyst/organics composition causes the anode potential and the energy required for the reaction to decrease. An electrolyte, including the catalyst/cocatalyst composition, and a reaction medium composition further including organic material are also described.

Dhooge, Patrick M. (Corrales, NM)

1987-10-13T23:59:59.000Z