Sample records for workers rse row

  1. 2003 CBECS RSE Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of the Excel tables (access from main detailed tables page) or in PDF format here: Building Characteristics for All Buildings (Tables A1-A8) RSE Tables: PDF, 16 pages, 312KB...

  2. RSE Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product:Anatolia JumpRSE Wind Jump to:

  3. 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2003 Detailed Tables > What is an RSE? What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of...

  4. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and program product check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  5. Row fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt Walter (Rochester, MN); Ratterman, Joseph D. (Rochester, MN); Smith, Brian Edward (Rochester, MN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product and method check for nodal faults in a row of nodes by causing each node in the row to concurrently communicate with its adjacent neighbor nodes in the row. The communications are analyzed to determine a presence of a faulty node or connection.

  6. 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption - What is an RSE

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS8) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility 2002 ManufacturingTechnical

  7. Katherine Rowe September 29, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    pavements, namely porous asphalt, porous concrete, and numerous modular paver systems. Both a construction particles allows water to drain through quickly. Porous concrete also consists of an open-graded coarseKatherine Rowe ECOL 8710 September 29, 2006 Short Memo: Aspects & Impacts of Porous Pavements

  8. Stability of tube rows in crossflow. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, S.S.; Jendrzejczyk, J.A.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model for the instability of tube rows subjected to crossflow is examined. The theoretical model, based on the fluid-force data for a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.33, provides additional insight into the instability phenomenon. Tests are also conducted for three sets of tube rows. The effects of mass ratio, tube pitch, damping, detuning and finned tubes are investigated. Theoretical results and experimental data are in good agreement.

  9. Workers' Rights

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUEWaterWhereChinn WomenWorkerHanford SiteIllness |

  10. Effects of various inefficiencies in rowing on shell speed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Stephen F., Jr

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First order predictions were made in determining the effects of various sources of inefficiency in rowing on shell speed. These predictions were then tested using a MATLAB model of the rowing stroke. The model simulates ...

  11. Propulsive Efficiency of Rowing Oars David S. Cabrera1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Propulsive Efficiency of Rowing Oars David S. Cabrera1 Andy L. Ruina2 Department of Theoretical Is the common folklore, that oars are less efficient at propulsion than propellers, correct? Here we examine the propulsive efficiency of the oars used in competitive rowing. We take the propulsive efficiency of rowing

  12. Track 2: Worker Engagement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 2: Worker Engagement

  13. CSLC ROW Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to:ROW Forms Jump to:

  14. Homogenisation of a Row of Dislocation Dipoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Jonathan Chapman; Yang Xiang; Yichao Zhu

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional discrete-to-continuum approaches have seen their limitation in describing the collective behaviour of the multi-polar configurations of dislocations, which are widely observed in crystalline materials. The reason is that dislocation dipoles, which play an important role in determining the mechanical properties of crystals, often get smeared out when traditional homogenisation methods are applied. To address such difficulties, the collective behaviour of a row of dislocation dipoles is studied by using matched asymptotic techniques. The discrete-to-continuum transition is facilitated by introducing two field variables respectively describing the dislocation pair density potential and the dislocation pair width. It is found that the dislocation pair width evolves much faster than the pair density. Such hierarchy in evolution time scales enables us to describe the dislocation dynamics at the coarse-grained level by an evolution equation for the slowly varying variable (the pair density) coupled with an equilibrium equation for the fast varying variable (the pair width). The time-scale separation method adopted here paves a way for properly incorporating dipole-like (zero net Burgers vector but non-vanishing) dislocation structures, known as the statistically stored dislocations (SSDs) into macroscopic models of crystal plasticity in three dimensions. Moreover, the natural transition between different equilibrium patterns found here may also shed light on understanding the emergence of the persistent slip bands (PSBs) in fatigue metals induced by cyclic loads.

  15. Optimization of row spacing and nitrogen fertilization for cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clawson, Ernest Leslie

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    rows. One recommendation is to achieve between 247,100 to 395,360 plants per hectare for UNR cotton (BASF Corporation, 1999). In conventional cotton 74,176 to 123,550 plants per hectare has been recommended in California (Hake et al., 1996a... recommendation, not directed toward a particular state, is 247,097 to 395,355 plants ha-1 (BASF, 1999). The 76-cm row spacing plant population means in this study fell within the recommendations for conventional rows, and the 19-cm means were within...

  16. ECG-edit function in multidetector-row computed tomography coronary arteriography for patients with arrhythmias.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    multi- detector row computed tomography for the evaluationwith multislice computed tomography. J Am Coll Cardiol 2001;multi- detector-row computed tomography: Results in 102

  17. Optimization Online - Simultaneous Column-and-Row Generation ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim Muter

    2010-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 14, 2010 ... Abstract: In this paper, we develop a simultaneous column-and-row generation algorithm that could be applied to a general class of large-scale ...

  18. Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW) Pavement Condition and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cal, Mark P.

    Roswell International Air Center Airport (ROW) Pavement Condition and Analysis Submitted to: Jane M in December, 2009 18 .......................................4. Predicted Pavement Conditions Assuming No Maintenance 18 ...............Table 5. Predicted Pavement Conditions (PCI) Assuming no Maintenance After 2010

  19. Advanced worker protection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.

  20. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 96-0137-2607, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Rowe, Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sylvain, D.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to a request from the Health and Safety Supervisor at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station (SIC-4911), Rowe, Massachusetts, an investigation was begun into ozone (10028156) exposure during plasma arc cutting and welding. Welders had reported chest tightness, dry cough, and throat and bronchial irritation. The nuclear power station was in the process of being decommissioned, and workers were dismantling components using welding and cutting methods. Of the operations observed during the site visit, the highest ozone concentrations were generated during plasma arc cutting, followed by metal inert gas (MIG) welding and arc welding. During plasma arc cutting the average and peak concentrations exceeded the NIOSH ceiling recommended exposure limit of 0.1 part per million. The author concludes that ozone exposure during plasma arc cutting and MIG welding presented a health hazard to welders. The author recommends that improvements be made in the local exhaust ventilation, that nitrogen-dioxide levels be monitored during hot work, and that many exposed workers wear protective clothing, use ultraviolet blocking lotion, and continue the use appropriate shade of eye protection.

  1. 2003 CBECS RSE Tables

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to7.1999Principal Building

  2. Worker Training Program (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Worker Training Program is a business incentive program to support the retraining and upgrading of Nebraska’s current workforce. The amount of grant funding available quarterly is distributed...

  3. FINDING ROWS OF PEOPLE IN GROUP IMAGES Andrew C. Gallagher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    People are among the most popular subjects in photography, and in many social settings, images of groupsFINDING ROWS OF PEOPLE IN GROUP IMAGES Andrew C. Gallagher Carnegie Mellon University Department of people are captured. People often arrange themselves in a very struc- tured manner in these group images

  4. Row Buffer Locality Aware Caching Policies for Hybrid Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    strengths · A hybrid memory system (DRAM-PCM) aims for best of both · Problem: How to place data between static energy (no refresh) 6 DRAM PCM CPU MC MC #12;Hybrid Memory · Design direction: DRAM as a cache memory devices? 8 DRAM PCM CPU MC MC #12;Outline · Background: Hybrid Memory Systems · Motivation: Row

  5. Effects of row spacing on diseases, herbicide persistence, and qualitative characteristics of peanut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besler, Brent Alan

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    white mold (57%) and rust (58%). Azoxystrobin also controlled white mold (58%) and controlling rust (44%). Both fungicides reduced leaf spot severity in the conventional and twin rows when compared to untreated plots. Twin rows showed a 10% yield...

  6. RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient In-DRAM Bulk Data Copy and Initialization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient In-DRAM Bulk Data Copy and Initialization Processor MemoryChannel Limited bandwidth High energy Carnegie Mellon University Intel Pittsburgh #12;RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient University Intel Pittsburgh #12;RowClone: Fast and Energy-Efficient In-DRAM Bulk Data Copy and Initialization

  7. Spacing of Rows in Corn and Its Effect Upon Grain Yield.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cornpal-sble and applicable in the field under the systems of planting used. 'igure 2.-Spacing of rows three fiet apart with individual stalks36 inches apart in the row. This distribution rairies 4840 stalks to th? acre. Figure 3.-Spacing of rows s...

  8. homeoffice_household2001.pdf

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2a. Home Office Equipment by Year of Construction, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Year of Construction RSE Row Factors 1990 to 2001 1...

  9. S:\\VM3\\RX97\\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1997 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than 10,000...

  10. 1997 Housing Characteristics Tables Home Office Equipment Tables

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1997 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total 1997 Household Income Below Poverty Line Eli- gible for Fed- eral Assist- ance 1 RSE Row Factors Less than 10,000...

  11. The phase diagram of the staggered row model for magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Weimin

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to frustration, ' ' and make spin systems exhibit rich phase structure and critical phenomena. One example is Villain's model of fully frustrated XY spins on the square lattice. ' In this model each plaquette has three ferromagnetic and one antiferro... goes in an antiferromagnetic state with ferromagnetic rows whose direction alternates as one moves vertically. In analogy to the generalization by Berge et al. of Villain's fully-frustrated model of XY spins on a square lattice, G. Parker, W. Saslow...

  12. Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), and was demonstrated at their facility in Houston, TX as well as at Kansas State University, Manhattan. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment. The prototype unit development and testing under Phase 1 has demonstrated that AWPS has the ability to meet performance criteria. These criteria were developed with an understanding of both the AWPS capabilities and the DOE decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities protection needs.

  13. NAPA Collaboration Project: Worker Dialogue to Improve Worker...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    will host A Worker Dialogue: Improving Health, Safety and Security at DOE. This web-based "conversation" will engage the DOE workforce in an open, online dialogue to...

  14. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Associated Worker Registry...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Associated Worker Registry (BAWR) The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains the Beryllium Associated...

  15. File:UtilityROW.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdf JumpUsgs.9.2010.Fig01.pdf JumpUtilityROW.pdf Jump to:

  16. Radiological worker training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Handbook describes an implementation process for core training as recommended in Implementation Guide G441.12, Radiation Safety Training, and as outlined in the DOE Radiological Control Standard (RCS). The Handbook is meant to assist those individuals within the Department of Energy, Managing and Operating contractors, and Managing and Integrating contractors identified as having responsibility for implementing core training recommended by the RCS. This training is intended for radiological workers to assist in meeting their job-specific training requirements of 10 CFR 835. While this Handbook addresses many requirements of 10 CFR 835 Subpart J, it must be supplemented with facility-specific information to achieve full compliance.

  17. INEEL Production Workers Needs Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in a medical screening and education program. Former workers have good access to health care and engage in periodic health examinations. However, most do not believe that...

  18. Chinese Workers: Under Threat or a Threat to American Workers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper Ho, Virginia E.; Zhang, Lu

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . At the same time, some employers have found ways to avoid following the spirit, if not the letter of the laws. The consequences for American workers are unclear, since their challenges are less about a direct threat from Chinese workers and more about...

  19. ADVANCED WORKER PROTECTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judson Hedgehock

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1993 to 2000, OSS worked under a cost share contract from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is a protective ensemble that provides the user with both breathing air and cooling for a NIOSH-rated duration of two hours. The ensemble consists of a liquid air based backpack, a Liquid Cooling Garment (LCG), and an outer protective garment. The AWPS project was divided into two phases. During Phase 1, OSS developed and tested a full-scale prototype AWPS. The testing showed that workers using the AWPS could work twice as long as workers using a standard SCBA. The testing also provided performance data on the AWPS in different environments that was used during Phase 2 to optimize the design. During Phase 1, OSS also performed a life-cycle cost analysis on a representative clean up effort. The analysis indicated that the AWPS could save the DOE millions of dollars on D and D activities and improve the health and safety of their workers. During Phase 2, OSS worked to optimize the AWPS design to increase system reliability, to improve system performance and comfort, and to reduce the backpack weight and manufacturing costs. To support this design effort, OSS developed and tested several different generations of prototype units. Two separate successful evaluations of the ensemble were performed by the International Union of Operation Engineers (IUOE). The results of these evaluations were used to drive the design. During Phase 2, OSS also pursued certifying the AWPS with the applicable government agencies. The initial intent during Phase 2 was to finalize the design and then to certify the system. OSS and Scott Health and Safety Products teamed to optimize the AWPS design and then certify the system with the National Institute of Occupational Health and Safety (NIOSH). Unfortunately, technical and programmatic difficulties prevented us from obtaining NIOSH certification. Despite the inability of NIOSH to certify the design, OSS was able to develop and successfully test, in both the lab and in the field, a prototype AWPS. They clearly demonstrated that a system which provides cooling can significantly increase worker productivity by extending the time they can function in a protective garment. They were also able to develop mature outer garment and LCG designs that provide considerable benefits over current protective equipment, such as self donning and doffing, better visibility, and machine washable. A thorough discussion of the activities performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 is presented in the AWPS Final Report. The report also describes the current system design, outlines the steps needed to certify the AWPS, discusses the technical and programmatic issues that prevented the system from being certified, and presents conclusions and recommendations based upon the seven year effort.

  20. Argonne National Laboratory-West Former Workers, Construction Worker Screening Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne National Laboratory-West Former Construction Workers (now known as Idaho National Laboratory), Construction Worker Screening Projects

  1. Facility worker technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVANS, C.B.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical basis for facility worker safety to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and described the criteria and methodology for allocating controls to hazardous conditions with significant facility worker consequences and presents the results of the allocation.

  2. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Takaro

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997. After excluding current workers, construction workers, and deceased workers, the total estimated number of former workers eligible for screening was 72,611. By September, 2006, 53,010 workers had been contacted, 20,298 responded, 2,835 were eligible and authorized, and 2,773 workers were ultimately screened. The cohort was 80% male, 85% white, and had a mean age of 63 years (range 24-96 years) at the time of first exam. Participants completed an occupational health history survey prior to the medical exam. Former Hanford workers were considered eligible for an exam if they reported exposure to asbestos, beryllium, or noise, or if a review of their Hanford work history indicated possible or probable exposure to one of these three hazards. We also invited any former Hanford worker who requested an exam to participate, regardless of documentation of exposure. The screening exam included a problem-focused physical exam, along with screening tests for one or more of three specific medical conditions: asbestosis (chest X-ray and spirometry), berylliosis (chest X-ray, spirometry, and beryllium-induced lymphocyte proliferation test), and NIHL (audiometry). We assisted ill workers in filing appropriate workers’ compensation claims, and facilitated appropriate follow-up medical care. This program has made an important contribution to the health of former DOE contractor workers at the Hanford defense nuclear site.

  3. Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Policy establishes Departmental expectations for worker safety and health through the development of rules, directives and guidance.

  4. Information, Technology, and Information Worker Productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aral, Sinan

    We econometrically evaluate information worker productivity at a midsize executive recruiting firm and assess whether the knowledge that workers accessed through their electronic communication networks enabled them to ...

  5. Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April 2011...

  6. The Opie Compiler from Row-major Source to Morton-ordered Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, David Stephen

    The Opie Compiler from Row-major Source to Morton-ordered Matrices Steven T. Gabriel Computer The Opie Project aims to develop a compiler to transform C codes written for row-major matrix the formalism behind the Opie com- piler for C, its status: now compiling several standard Level- 2 and Level-3

  7. High Fidelity Modeling of Blade Row Interaction in a Transonic Compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    High Fidelity Modeling of Blade Row Interaction in a Transonic Compressor Michael G. List in a transonic compressor, a time-accurate simulation of a transonic compressor rig was developed. Initially on the compressor. Three dierent axial spacings between the rotor and the upstream blade row have been simulated

  8. S:\\VM3\\RX97\\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than 10 households were sampled. Notes: * To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the corresponding column and row factors. * Because of rounding, data may...

  9. Clamping of Solid Tungsten Components for the Bulk W Divertor Row in JET – Precautionary Design for a Brittle Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clamping of Solid Tungsten Components for the Bulk W Divertor Row in JET – Precautionary Design for a Brittle Material

  10. Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power Handling of the Bulk Tungsten Divertor Row at JET: First Measurements and Comparison to the GTM Thermal Model

  11. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4.. U.S.

  12. Effect of tillage systems, row configuration-spacing and plant population on soil physical properties, evapotranspiration and dryland sorghum yields 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salinas-Garcia, Jaime Roel

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the convencional plots (101. 6-cm rows). The increase in yield was due primarily to the larger number of heads at harvest as compared with the conventional row-spacing. Clegg et al. (1972) observed that variation of row width can be used in greater utilization...

  13. Fact #777: April 29, 2013 For the Second Year in a Row, Survey...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    777: April 29, 2013 For the Second Year in a Row, Survey Respondents Consider Fuel Economy Most Important When Purchasing a Vehicle Fact 777: April 29, 2013 For the Second...

  14. A Model of Compressor Blade Row Interaction with Shock Induced Vortex Shedding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    A Model of Compressor Blade Row Interaction with Shock Induced Vortex Shedding Mark G. Turner = circulation = trailing edge thickness = shock angle = density I. Introduction ransonic compressor stages AIAA. Research Scientist, Compressor Aerodynamic Research Laboratory, Associate Fellow AIAA

  15. Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muncrief, G.E.; Lacewell, R. D.; Cornforth, G. C.; Pena, J. G.

    TR- 123 1983 Economic Implications of New Crops, Row Damming and Land Clearing in the Texas Winter Garden G.E. Muncrief R.D. Lacewell G.C. Cornforth J.G. Pena Texas Water Resources Institute...

  16. Quarter Annulus Simulations of Blade Row Interaction at Several Gaps and Discussion of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    annulus simulations to investigate the physics involved in the rotor bow shock interaction with a highly loaded upstream blade row and its eect on the compressor. Three dierent axial spacings between the rotor

  17. A Column-Row-Parallel ASIC architecture for 3D wearable / portable medical ultrasonic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kailiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a scalable Column-Row-Parallel ASIC architecture for 3D wearable / portable medical ultrasound. It leverages programmable electronic addressing to achieve linear scaling for both hardware interconnection ...

  18. Analysis of conventional and plutonium recycle unit-assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) PWR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mertens, Paul Gustaaf

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis and comparison of Unit Conventional UO2 Fuel-Assemblies and proposed Plutonium Recycle Fuel Assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) Reactor has been made. The influence of spectral effects, at the watergaps -and ...

  19. Workers' Compensation Costs Rising Across the Nation | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Workers' Compensation Costs Rising Across the Nation Workers' Compensation Costs Rising Across the Nation For the first time since 1992, benefits paid to workers and employers'...

  20. Incomes of Migratory Agricultural Workers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sargent, Frederic O.; Metzler, William H.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This was despite the fact that half of them, mainly women and childre-n, were out of the labor market complete- ly at the home base. During 1956, the average earnings per worker were $781, but male heads of households averaged labor was a major source of their income. In the 446 households surveyed, there was a total...

  1. Training for hazardous waste workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Favel, K.

    1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This implementation plan describes the system and provides the information and schedules that are necessary to comply with the Department of Energy (DOE) Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Memorandum, Reference EPD dated September 11, 1990, Training for Hazardous Waste Workers. The memo establishes the need for identifying employees requiring environmental training, ensuring that the training is received, and meeting documentation and recordkeeping requirements for the training.

  2. FACILITY WORKER TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-13033, ''Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA). It describes the criteria and methodology for allocating controls to hazardous conditions with significant facility worker (FW) consequence and presents the results of the allocation. The criteria and methodology for identifying controls that address FW safety are in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''.

  3. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers' and Worker Representatives' Input to Work Planning and Control

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Tom McQuiston, Dr. P.H., United Steelworkers - Tony Mazzocchi Center for Health, Safety and Environmental Education. Lessons Learned in Optimizing Workers’ and Worker Representatives’ Input in Work Planning and Control.

  4. Effects of row spacing, seed rate and maturity group on late planted soybean under irrigated and dryland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    to decrease. This purpose of this study is determine the best planting strategies in regards to row spacing. Edwardsville, KS). Plots with 7.5 and 15 in row spacing were planted with a Great Plains Drill model 3P600, and pest management practices were conducted according to Oklahoma State University recommended practices

  5. Row spacing effects on the canopy light extinction coefficient of upland cotton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steglich, Evelyn Marie

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coefficient (k) in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). Treatments consisted of four row spacings (0.19-m, 0.38-m, 0.76-m, and 1.00-m) and four plant densities [148, 222, 296, 445 (1998) and 371 (1999) thousand plants ha-1] with each treatment replicated three times...

  6. Japan may take nuclear option in fusion row By David Pilling in Tokyo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Japan may take nuclear option in fusion row By David Pilling in Tokyo Published: November 20 2004 the joint project, Japan's chief negotiator has warned. The European Union says it has the financial and scientific clout to build and run a reactor in France, without Japan's support. Tokyo says it will fund more

  7. Detecting and Defending against Web-Server Fingerprinting Dustin Lee, Jeff Rowe, Calvin Ko, Karl Levitt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Detecting and Defending against Web-Server Fingerprinting Dustin Lee, Jeff Rowe, Calvin Ko, Karl of web servers and suggests possible defenses to the probing activity. General concepts of finger- printing and their application to the identification of Web servers, even where server information has been

  8. Shelley J. Row, P.E., PTOE Director, ITS Joint Program Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    since January 2007. As JPO Director, Ms. Row manages a $110 million annual budget to advance research in FHWA's Headquarters managing ITS Early Deployment Planning and Outreach, Shelley returned to the field as Engineering Systems Manager in the Georgia Division office, where she was responsible for ITS project

  9. First-row hydrides: Dissociation and ground state energies using quantum Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    First-row hydrides: Dissociation and ground state energies using quantum Monte Carlo Arne Lu, Pennsylvania 16802 Received 20 May 1996; accepted 24 July 1996 Accurate ground state energies comparable FN-DQMC method. The residual energy, the nodal error due to the error in the nodal structure

  10. MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1099 MOVEMENT OF FEMALE WHITE-TAILED DEER: EFFECTS OF CLIMATE AND INTENSIVE ROW-CROP AGRICULTURE in intensively (>80%) cultivated areas. From January 2001 to August 2002, we monitored movements of 77 (61 adult of seasonal migration, whereas crop emergence and harvest had minimal effects. Four deer (8%) dispersed a mean

  11. An Economic Comparison of Conventional and Narrow-Row Cotton Production--Southern Plains of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, Kenneth B.; Adams, James R.

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JUN ~ 3 1977 Texas A&M University June 19' An Economic Comparison of Coventional and Narrow-Row -- Cotton Production-Southern High Plains of Texas The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, J. E. Miller, Director' The Texas A&M University.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 4 Yield Comparisons .......................................... 4 Differences in Inputs Used ............... :................... 6 Fertil izer and Irrigation Inputs . . .......................... 6 Seeding rate...

  12. AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.L. Thacker

    2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  13. OSHANIOSH INFOSHEET Protecting Workers from Heat Illness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    include: · Confusion · Loss of consciousness · Seizures · Very high body temperature · Hot, dry skin in hot environments for long periods. When the human body is unable to maintain a normal temperature the worker wash his or her head, face and neck with cold water. FactorsThat Increase Risk to Workers · High

  14. Department of Pesticide Worker Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Danh

    6/6/2012 1 Cal/EPA Department of Pesticide Regulation Worker Health and Safety Branch Industrial Hygiene Services Health and Safety Issues and Case Studies For Fumigants Harvard R. Fong, CIH Senior Industrial Hygienist California Department of Pesticide Regulation Worker Health and Safety Branch Industrial

  15. Optimal Unemployment Insurance for Older Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    as early retirement or pre-retirement schemes (Gruber and Wise (1998)). This paper analyzes the economic to search for a job. This is because of the short time-horizon of workers close to retirement. We propose workers near retirement who still do not exercise job search to smooth their consumption during

  16. Interphase Cytogenetics of Workers Exposed to Benzene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Interphase Cytogenetics of Workers Exposed to Benzene Luoping Zhang,1 Nathaniel Rothman,2 Yunxia has been used to demonstrate that the benzene metabolites hydroquinone and 1,2,4-benzenetriol induce FISH procedure to perform cytogenetic analyses on the blood cells of 43 workers exposed to benzene

  17. Office Of Worker Safety And Health Assistance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Worker Safety and Health Assistance supports program and line organizations in the identification and resolution of worker safety and health issues and management concerns utilizing a corporate issues management process for crosscutting issues providing technical support for organizational specific issues and concerns.

  18. PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN BIOLOGICAL Preventing Absenteeism and Promoting Resilience among Health Care Workers in Biological Emergencies A and Promoting Resilience among Health Care Workers in Biological Emergencies A. Lesperance J. Miller1 1

  19. A Longitudinal Study of Wrist Tendinosis in Blue Collar Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris Adamson, Carisa

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Study of Wrist Tendinosis in Blue Collar Workers. by CarisaStudy of Wrist Tendinosis in Blue Collar Workers by Carisawrist tendinosis among blue—collar workers, and includes a

  20. apis mellifera workers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The effect of Apis mellifera carnica Polm worker bee source for populating mating of Croatia (Received 9 December 1991; accepted 18 March 1992) Summary The influence of worker...

  1. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool May 16, 2013 Presenter: Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center Topics Covered: The Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool...

  2. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War...

  3. Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars...

  4. Pulmonary cytology in chrysotile asbestos workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobusch, A.B.; Simard, A.; Feldstein, M.; Vauclair, R.; Gibbs, G.W.; Bergeron, F.; Morissette, N.; Davis, R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of atypical cytology has been determined in relation to age, smoking and asbestos exposure for male workers employed in 3 mines in the Province of Quebec. Overall participation was 71%. Out of 867 participating workers, 626 (72%) presented a deep cough specimen within normal limits, 74 (8.5%) a specimen with mild atypical metaplasia and 10 (1.2%) a specimen with moderate atypical metaplasia. Four lung carcinoma were identified. Five percent of the workers initially interviewed did not return their specimen and 12.7% had unsatisfactory test results. Proportions of cellular atypical increased with age and asbestos exposure. Using logistic regression analysis, estimated probabilities of abnormal cytology for workers aged 25 years when started mining increased with both years of asbestos exposure and exposure index measured in fibres per cubic centimeter.

  5. Job Position Description Job Title: Custodial Worker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Paul A.

    Job Position Description Job Title: Custodial Worker A. Main purpose of the job: Clean academic buildings and/or residence halls. B. Primary responsibilities or key duties of the job (tasks

  6. LBNL Worker Safety and Health Program LBNL/PUB-3851, Rev. 2.2 (March 2012) Worker Safety and Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    LBNL Worker Safety and Health Program LBNL/PUB-3851, Rev. 2.2 (March 2012) Worker Safety and Health Program Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory #12;LBNL Worker Safety and Health Program LBNL/PUB-3851, Rev. 2.2 (March 2012) This page intentionally left blank. #12;LBNL Worker Safety and Health Program LBNL

  7. Data Sharing Report Characterization of Isotope Row Facilities Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge TN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support using funds provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested ORAU to plan and implement a survey approach, focused on characterizing the Isotope Row Facilities located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for future determination of an appropriate disposition pathway for building debris and systems, should the buildings be demolished. The characterization effort was designed to identify and quantify radiological and chemical contamination associated with building structures and process systems. The Isotope Row Facilities discussed in this report include Bldgs. 3030, 3031, 3032, 3033, 3033A, 3034, 3036, 3093, and 3118, and are located in the northeast quadrant of the main ORNL campus area, between Hillside and Central Avenues. Construction of the isotope production facilities was initiated in the late 1940s, with the exception of Bldgs. 3033A and 3118, which were enclosed in the early 1960s. The Isotope Row facilities were intended for the purpose of light industrial use for the processing, assemblage, and storage of radionuclides used for a variety of applications (ORNL 1952 and ORAU 2013). The Isotope Row Facilities provided laboratory and support services as part of the Isotopes Production and Distribution Program until 1989 when DOE mandated their shutdown (ORNL 1990). These facilities performed diverse research and developmental experiments in support of isotopes production. As a result of the many years of operations, various projects, and final cessation of operations, production was followed by inclusion into the surveillance and maintenance (S&M) project for eventual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The process for D&D and final dismantlement of facilities requires that the known contaminants of concern (COCs) be evaluated and quantified and to identify and quantify any additional contaminants in order to satisfy the waste acceptance criteria requirements for the desired disposal pathway. Known facility contaminants include, but are not limited to, asbestos-containing material (ACM), radiological contaminants, and chemical contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and metals.

  8. Effects of plant density and row spacing on the ratooning of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priwin A., Ricardo A

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Row Width Sorghum, as all other crops, requires optimum spacing for efficient utilization of nutrients, solar energy and soil moisture. The effect of optimum spacing can be measured by the components which make up yield per unit area and per plant.... If the stand was not adequate, plants were trans- planted to insure a correct stand. The parent and ratoon crops were cultivated to maintain the plots free of weedy species. 20 After harvesting the grain from the parent crop, the plants were cut 8 cm...

  9. File:03AKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual1WAALandUsePlanning.pdf Jump to: navigation, search FileAKBRightOfWaysROWs.pdf Jump to:

  10. Centrifuge workers study. Phase II, completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wooten, H.D.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II of the Centrifuge Workers Study was a follow-up to the Phase I efforts. The Phase I results had indicated a higher risk than expected among centrifuge workers for developing bladder cancer when compared with the risk in the general population for developing this same type of cancer. However, no specific agent could be identified as the causative agent for these bladder cancers. As the Phase II Report states, Phase I had been limited to workers who had the greatest potential for exposure to substances used in the centrifuge process. Phase II was designed to expand the survey to evaluate the health of all employees who had ever worked in Centrifuge Program Departments 1330-1339 but who had not been interviewed in Phase I. Employees in analytical laboratories and maintenance departments who provided support services for the Centrifuge Program were also included in Phase II. In December 1989, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), now known as Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), was contracted to conduct a follow-up study (Phase II). Phase H of the Centrifuge Workers Study expanded the survey to include all former centrifuge workers who were not included in Phase I. ORISE was chosen because they had performed the Phase I tasks and summarized the corresponding survey data therefrom.

  11. Bootstrapping dielectronic recombination from second-row elements and the Orion Nebula

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badnell, N R; Gorczyca, T W; Nikolic, D; Wagle, G A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination process for most heavy elements in photoionized clouds. Accurate DR rates for a species can be predicted when the positions of autoionizing states are known. Unfortunately such data are not available for most third and higher-row elements. This introduces an uncertainty that is especially acute for photoionized clouds, where the low temperatures mean that DR occurs energetically through very low-lying autoionizing states. This paper discusses S$^{2+} \\rightarrow$ S$^+$ DR, the process that is largely responsible for establishing the [S~III]/[S~II] ratio in nebulae. We derive an empirical rate coefficient using a novel method for second-row ions, which do have accurate data. Photoionization models are used to reproduce the [O~III] / [O~II] / [O~I] / [Ne~III] intensity ratios in central regions of the Orion Nebula. O and Ne have accurate atomic data and can be used to derive an empirical S$^{2+} \\rightarrow$ S$^+$ DR rate coefficient at $\\sim 10^{4}$...

  12. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Vehicle Types

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4. Fuel.6.

  13. Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    June 21, 2011 Recovery Act Workers Accomplish Cleanup of Second Cold War Coal Ash Basin AIKEN, S.C. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers re- cently cleaned up a second...

  14. Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE Federal and contractor workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1.

  15. Savannah River Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in Engineering Teach-Ins Savannah River Site Workers Share Knowledge with Students in Engineering Teach-Ins March 30, 2015 - 12:00pm...

  16. Fostering a New Generation of Geothermal Workers | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fostering a New Generation of Geothermal Workers Fostering a New Generation of Geothermal Workers October 5, 2010 - 4:31pm Addthis Andy Oare Andy Oare Former New Media Strategist,...

  17. assembly plant workers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with registration form Live record Re-Entrant New Casual Worker Has, date of birth, NI number or payroll number what the status of the worker is. ** The following fields...

  18. Secretary Chu Thanks Utility Staff and Line Workers For Their...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thanks Utility Staff and Line Workers For Their Efforts to Restore Power in the Wake of Hurricane Sandy Secretary Chu Thanks Utility Staff and Line Workers For Their Efforts to...

  19. Former Construction Worker Finds New Career in Solar | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Former Construction Worker Finds New Career in Solar Former Construction Worker Finds New Career in Solar August 25, 2010 - 4:00pm Addthis Eco Technologies, Inc., hired eleven...

  20. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PREGNANCY POLICY FOR RADIATION WORKERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PREGNANCY POLICY FOR RADIATION WORKERS POLICY: Under applicable regulations and Federal statutes (2), it is the policy of the Columbia University to limit the radiation dose (3). Further, it is the policy of the Columbia University to provide counseling and education

  1. Laser Worker Registration Form (LWRF) Surname: Forenames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    ABCDEFGHI Laser Worker Registration Form (LWRF) Surname: Forenames: School of: Ext No.: Email YY Class of Laser to be Used 1 1M 1E 2 2M 3R 3B 4 Work Location(s) Lab No. Laser Work Currently Undertaken Elsewhere Are you currently engaged in work elsewhere involving laser radiation? YES

  2. Does Customer Auditing Help Chinese Workers?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perloff, Jeffrey M.

    , labor activists, and non-government organizations have extensively documented labor rights violations the late 1990s, multinational corporations have developed a variety of Corporate Codes of Conduct (CCC the impacts of corporate codes of labor practice on workers based on evidence from the UK Ethical Trading

  3. Core design study of a supercritical light water reactor with double row fuel rods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, C.; Wu, H.; Cao, L.; Zheng, Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi'an Jiaotong Univ., No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi'an, ShannXi, 710049 (China); Yang, J.; Zhang, Y. [China Nuclear Power Technology Research Inst., Yitian Road, ShenZhen, GuangDong, 518026 (China)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An equilibrium core for supercritical light water reactor has been designed. A novel type of fuel assembly with dual rows of fuel rods between water rods is chosen and optimized to get more uniform assembly power distributions. Stainless steel is used for fuel rod cladding and structural material. Honeycomb structure filled with thermal isolation is introduced to reduce the usage of stainless steel and to keep moderator temperature below the pseudo critical temperature. Water flow scheme with ascending coolant flow in inner regions is carried out to achieve high outlet temperature. In order to enhance coolant outlet temperature, the radial power distributions needs to be as flat as possible through operation cycle. Fuel loading pattern and control rod pattern are optimized to flatten power distribution at inner regions. Axial fuel enrichment is divided into three parts to control axial power peak, which affects maximum cladding surface temperature. (authors)

  4. Wavelet analysis of MODIS time series to detect expansion and intensification of row-crop agriculture in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    -crop agriculture in Brazil Gillian L. Galford a,b,, John F. Mustard a , Jerry Melillo b , Aline Gendrin a Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil e Escola Superior de Agricultura Luiz de Queiroz from natural vegetation and pastures to row-crop agricultural with the potential to affect regional

  5. Jeffrey R. Row Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, N2L 3G1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Row, Jeffrey R.

    , N2L 3G1 Website: http://jeffrow.ca · Email: jeff.row@me.com · Phone: 1-416-399-3066 1 Education 2006 and population structure of foxsnakes across spatial and temporal scales. 2003-2005 M.Sc. Biology, University (Lampropeltis triangulum). 1997-2001 B.Sc. Environmental Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario. 2

  6. The obese office worker seating problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benden, Mark E.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rainer Fink Head of Department, N.K. Anand December 2006 Major Subject: Interdisciplinary Engineering iii ABSTRACT The Obese Office Worker Seating Problem. (December 2006) Mark E. Benden, B.S.; M.S., Texas A&M University Co... to have you as a friend, confidant, and mentor in the field of ergonomics. To Dr. Rainer Fink and Dr. Gordon Vos, your council, friendship and service were invaluable during this process. Thanks for taking the time out of your hectic schedules...

  7. HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ANDERSON, T.J.

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

  8. Longitudinal study of workers in an aluminum smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Enarson, D.A.; MacLean, L.; Irving, D.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conducted a 6-y follow-up study that included workers in an aluminum smelter in British Columbia. Of the original cohort, 951 workers left the industry and 985 workers participated in both studies. Comparison of those who left and those who remained showed that those who left were (1) older, (2) had a slightly higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms, and (3) had lower lung function; this was especially true for workers who were 50 + y of age at the time the initial study was conducted. Analyses were conducted only on 586 male workers who did not change their job location or smoking habits between the initial and the follow-up study. Potroom workers in the ''high-exposure'' group had a significant reduction in the prevalence of cough, but experienced an increase in the prevalence of wheeze. There was no significant difference in the annual decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec and forced vital capacity between the potroom workers and controls. In general, older workers and smokers had a greater decline in lung function compared to younger workers and nonsmokers. Leukocyte count done during the initial study was found to be an independent predictor of longitudinal decline in lung function. The lack of exposure effect on longitudinal decline in lung function could be due to ''healthy worker'' effect and improvement in the working condition of the smelter.

  9. Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Consent Order

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Quinn Women12.1AWorkWorker6,

  10. Career Map: Construction Worker | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change RequestFirst Report to theAssembler andCivilWorker Career

  11. IWTU Construction Workers Set Largest Process Vessel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT | National NuclearIWTU Construction Workers

  12. Constant time worker thread allocation via configuration caching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; O'Brien, John K. P.

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanisms are provided for allocating threads for execution of a parallel region of code. A request for allocation of worker threads to execute the parallel region of code is received from a master thread. Cached thread allocation information identifying prior thread allocations that have been performed for the master thread are accessed. Worker threads are allocated to the master thread based on the cached thread allocation information. The parallel region of code is executed using the allocated worker threads.

  13. The influence of mechanical summer pruning, row direction, and tree spacing on yield and quality of peach, Prunus persica (L.) Batsch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raseira, Ailton

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    peach orchard densities were tested in peaches of cv. Redglobe. The trees were all winter pruned and then pruned 20 days before harvest (ESP, early summer pruning), after harvest (LSP, late summer pruning), or not pruned at summer time (WP, winter... pruning only) . The different spacing between plants within the row were: 2. 3 m, 3. 1 m and 4. 6 m, while the same space was maintained between rows. This research was designed to study the combined effect of plant spacing, summer pruning, and row...

  14. Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, J.; Rote, D.M.

    1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilization and propulsion system are disclosed comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the superconducting magnets on the vehicle. 12 figs.

  15. Double row loop-coil configuration for high-speed electrodynamic maglev suspension, guidance, propulsion and guideway directional switching

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Jianliang (Naperville, IL); Rote, Donald M. (Lagrange, IL)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stabilization and propulsion system comprising a series of loop-coils arranged in parallel rows wherein two rows combine to form one of two magnetic rails. Levitation and lateral stability are provided when the induced field in the magnetic rails interacts with the superconducting magnets mounted on the magnetic levitation vehicle. The loop-coils forming the magnetic rails have specified dimensions and a specified number of turns and by constructing differently these specifications, for one rail with respect to the other, the angle of tilt of the vehicle can be controlled during directional switching. Propulsion is provided by the interaction of a traveling magnetic wave associated with the coils forming the rails and the super conducting magnets on the vehicle.

  16. First principles investigation of the initial stage of H-induced missing-row reconstruction of Pd(110) surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padama, Allan Abraham B. [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kasai, Hideaki, E-mail: kasai@dyn.ap.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The pathway of H diffusion that will induce the migration of Pd atom is investigated by employing first principles calculations based on density functional theory to explain the origin of missing-row reconstruction of Pd(110).The calculated activation barrier and the H-induced reconstruction energy reveal that the long bridge-to-tetrahedral configuration is the energetically favored process for the initial stage of reconstruction phenomenon. While the H diffusion triggers the migration of Pd atom, it is the latter process that significantly contributes to the activated missing-row reconstruction of Pd(110). Nonetheless, the strong interaction between the diffusing H and the Pd atoms dictates the occurrence of reconstructed surface.

  17. Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Worker Safety and Health Assessments conducts assessments to provide critical feedback and objective information on occupational safety and health programs and performance....

  18. Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant Workers Remove Glove Boxes from Ventilation at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant January 28, 2015 -...

  19. Advanced worker protection system. Topical report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, J.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system, maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles.

  20. Y-12 and ORNL Production Workers Needs Assessment

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in a medical screening and education program. Former workers have good access to health care and engage in periodic health examinations. However, most do not believe that...

  1. Recovery Act Workers Demolish Facility Tied to Project Pluto...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery and Rein- vestment Act accomplishment helping clean up traces of past nuclear testing at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Recovery Act workers safely hauled...

  2. New Year, New Certification Opportunities for Home Energy Workers...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    today to find out how to get certified as a BPI home energy professional. Addthis Related Articles New Year, New Certification Opportunities for Home Energy Workers Accredited...

  3. Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Recovery Act Workers Remediate and Restore Former Waste Sites, Help Reduce Cold War Footprint RICHLAND, Wash. - The Hanford Site is looking greener these days after American...

  4. Bush Administration to Expand Department of Energy Former Worker...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Under this expansion, the Former Worker Medical Screening Program will offer all former Energy Department employees, contractors and subcontractors free medical examinations to...

  5. animal health workers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    American Schladow, S. Geoffrey 2 PREVENTING ABSENTEEISM AND PROMOTING RESILIENCE AMONG HEALTH CARE WORKERS IN Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary:...

  6. Effect of plant populations and row spacings on plant and ear characters and grain yield of corn hybrids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silapapun, Anek

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    break- age and barren stalks increased with increase in population densities. Allessi and Power (2) also found that number of barren stalks increased and ear weight decreased with increased plant population. Bleasdale (7) proposed that if a crop...EFFECT OF PLANT POPULATIONS AND ROW SPACINGS ON PLANT AND EAR CHARACTERS AND GRAIN YIELD OF CORN HYBRIDS A Thesis by ANEK SILAPAPUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  7. Effect of tillage systems, row configuration-spacing and plant population on soil physical properties, evapotranspiration and dryland sorghum yields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salinas-Garcia, Jaime Roel

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF T ILLAGE SYSTEMS & R01I CONF IGURAT I ON SPACING AND PLANT POPULATION ON SOIL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, EVAPOTRANSPIRATION AND DRYLAND SORGHUM YIELDS A Thesis by JAIME ROEL SALINAS-GARCIA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM... AND DRYLAND SORGHUM YIELDS A Thesis by JAIME ROEL SALINAS-GARCIA Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committ. ee) ( o-Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Head of Department) December 1981 ABSTRACT Effect of Tillage Systems, Row...

  8. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.S. Tang

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering.

  9. Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent accidental losses, injuries, and illnesses by providing DOE Federal and contractor workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Chg 1, 10-26-95; Chg 2, 10-26-96.

  10. BIOMARKERS IN THE MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BENZENE-EXPOSED WORKERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    BIOMARKERS IN THE MOLECULAR EPIDEMIOLOGY OF BENZENE-EXPOSED WORKERS Martyn T. Smith Division from workers exposed to high levels of benzene. The goal of these studies is to develop and validate (1) biomarkers of exposure to benzene, such as albumin or hemoglobin adducts; (2) molecular markers

  11. A Model of Job and Worker Flows Nobuhiro Kiyotaki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Model of Job and Worker Flows Nobuhiro Kiyotaki Princeton University Ricardo Lagos New York University August 17, 2007 Abstract We develop an equilibrium search model that incorporates job-to-job transitions, exhibits instances of replacement hiring, and conceptually distinguishes between job and worker

  12. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function were found, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

  13. Pulmonary function and respiratory symptoms in potash workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, B.L.; Dosman, J.A.; Cotton, D.J.; Weisstock, S.R.; Lappi, V.G.; Froh, F.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 94% of the workers in each of four Saskatchewan potash mines participated in a respiratory health surveillance program that included a questionnaire and pulmonary function tests. Compared with a nonexposed control group, potash workers had higher prevalences of cough, dyspnea, and chronic bronchitis but better pulmonary function. Prevalences of symptoms and pulmonary function abnormalities were similar among workers at the four mines tested and at the various job locations. Potash dust, diesel fumes, and other air contaminants may have an irritant effect that leads to the increased prevalences of cough and chronic bronchitis. Although we found no adverse effects of the potash mine environment on pulmonary function, these findings reflect a healthy worker effect or some selection process that makes the potash workers appear healthier in a cross-sectional study.

  14. ver the past fifty years, thousands of workers in the United States have handled plutonium. Of those workers, only about

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    O ver the past fifty years, thousands of workers in the United States have handled plutonium. Of those workers, only about fifty, all from the nuclear-weapons complex, have been exposed to plutonium direct informa- tion about the risk of plutonium in man. This leads to the ironic situa- tion

  15. DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    0. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees DOE Order 440. 1 B: Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including NNSA) Federal Employees Stakeholders:...

  16. Former Worker Medical Screening Program Summary of Services Available to Former Workers, February 1, 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf Flash2010-45.pdfFlash2011-43andPropertyForPlans |Former Worker

  17. Rad Worker I and Rad Worker II Classes Planned for July 7 and 14 |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITYResponses:December562Jefferson Lab Rad Worker

  18. Recovery Act Workers Clear Reactor Shields from Brookhaven Lab

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers are in the final stage of decommissioning a nuclear reactor after they recently removed thick steel shields once used to absorb neutrons produced for...

  19. Union Helps Produce Women Workers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to find air leaks, much like the equipment used here by an NREL worker. | File photo Finding a Career in Energy Efficiency Training Changing Face of West Virginia's Workforce...

  20. DOE Cites Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC for Worker Safety and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a chemical fume hood where a worker was pouring finely-powdered red phosphorus from a plastic bag into a metal canister and the red phosphorus ignited. The chemist involved in...

  1. Exposure to Methylene Diphenyl Diisocyante (MDI) among polyurethane roof workers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narvaez-Cuevas, Carmen Lourdes

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cross-sectional study was done to evaluate the association between methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI) exposure and respiratory system deterioration among permanent male workers. The studied company, located in Puerto ...

  2. Proceedings: Decommissioning, Decontamination, ALARA, and Worker Safety Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This workshop on decontamination, ALARA, and worker safety was the sixth in a series initiated by EPRI to aid utility personnel in assessing the technologies for decommissioning nuclear power plants. The workshop focused on specific aspects of decommissioning related to the management of worker radiation exposure and safety. The information presented will help individual utilities assess benefits of programs in these areas for their projects, including their potential to reduce decommissioning costs.

  3. Activity-level Work Planning and Control in the Hanford Site Worker Evaluation Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Ted Giltz, Volpentest HAMMER Federal Training Center. Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool, Verifying Activity-Level Worker Medical Clearance and Training. The Hanford Site Worker Eligibility Tool (HSWET) provides line management an easy to use tool to determine if workers are medically cleared and trained to perform work safely.

  4. Workshop on job and worker flows 15-16 November 2012, Kyoto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Workshop on job and worker flows 15-16 November 2012, Kyoto WORKER FLOWS AND ESTABLISHMENT WAGE attributable to the authors. hal-00833872,version1-13Jun2013 Author manuscript, published in "Workshop on job and worker flows, Kyoto : Japan (2012)" #12;Workshop on job and worker flows, 15-16 November 2012, Kyoto

  5. Heat transfer from combustion gases to a single row of closely spaced tubes in a swirl crossflow Stirling engine heater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bankston, C.P.; Back, L.H.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an experimental program to determine the heat-transfer characteristics of a combustor and heat-exchange system in a hybrid solar receiver which utilizes a Stirling engine. The system consists of a swirl conbustor with a crossflow heat exchanger composed of a single row of 48 closely spaced curved tubes. In the present study, heat-transfer characteristics of the combustor/heat-exchanger system without a Stirling engine have been studied over a range of operating conditions and output levels using water as the working fluid. Non-dimensional heat-transfer coefficients based on total heat transfer have been obtained and are compared with available literature data. The results show significantly enhanced heat transfer for the present geometry and test conditions. Also, heat transfer along the length of the tubes is found to vary, the effect depending upon test condition.

  6. Row by row methods for semidefinite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaiwen Wen

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 28, 2009 ... ... is supported by the Mathematical Programming Society and by the Optimization Technology Center. Mathematical Programming Society.

  7. ROW BY ROW METHODS FOR SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 28, 2009 ... than 5.25 minutes and nuclear norm matrix completion SDPs involving matrices of size 1000 × 1000 in less than 1 minute on a 3.4 GHZ ...

  8. An Automatic Brain Tumor Segmentation Tool Idanis Diaz1,4, Pierre Boulanger1, Russell Greiner1,2, Bret Hoehn1,2, Lindsay Rowe3, and Albert Murtha3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberta, University of

    ,2, Bret Hoehn1,2, Lindsay Rowe3, and Albert Murtha3 Abstract-- This paper introduces an automatic brain and B. Hoehn are with the Department of Computing Science, University of Alberta. 2 R. Greiner and B. Hoehn are also with the Alberta Innovates Centre for Machine Learning. 3L. Rowe and A. Murtha

  9. Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Oxidation of Methanol on 2nd and 3rd Row Group VIII Transition Metals (Pt, Ir, Os, Pd, Rh, and Ru): Application to Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Jeremy Kua and William A. Goddard III* Contribution from functional theory (B3LYP)], we calculated the 13 most likely intermediate species for methanol oxidation

  10. Unitizing worker expertise and maximizing the brain reward centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Anthony Bert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    People are experts when it comes to the work they do; unfortunately their expertise is not utilized as frequently as it could be. More opportunities need to be provided that allow people to participate in the design of their work including: accident investigations, job planning, and process improvements. Many employers use some form of job hazard analysis process to identify and document hazards and controls, but the front line worker is rarely involved. This presentation will show the core principles supporting employee involvement, provide examples where workers had brilliant ideas but no one listened, and provide examples where workers were given the opportunity to use their expertise to improve occupational safety. According to Abraham Maslow's Hierarch of Needs model, one essential human need is to be innovative and solve problems. Advances in brain science have proven, through functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, the brain reward pathway is activated when people are recognized for their intellectual contributions. As people contribute their expertise to improve occupational safety more frequently they will feel a sense of gratification. In addition, safety professionals will have more time to spend on strategic planning of emerging occupational safety issues. One effect of the current global recession is that SH&E professionals are asked to do more with less. Therefore, to be successful it is essential that SH&E professionals incorporate worker expertise in job planning. This will be illustrated in the presentation through an example where a worker had the answer to a difficult decision on appropriate personal protective equipment for a job but no one asked the worker for his idea during the job planning phase. Fortunately the worker was eventually consulted and his recommendation for the appropriate personal protective equipment for the job was implemented before work began. The goal of this presentation is to expand the awareness and knowledge of SH&E professionals on the benefits and opportunities for leveraging brain science. This will include an overview of the components of the brain reward pathway and the biological mechanisms that make workers feel a sense of gratification when they contribute their ideas toward improving occupational safety. On-the-job examples where it is hypothesized that the brain reward pathway was activated in workers will be provided. Finally, the presentation will include a model illustrating the importance of empowering workers to participate in occupational safety programs. SH&E professionals can use this model to maintain a robust safety and health program with limited resources. The model will also help SH&E professionals prepare for challenges in the SH&E fields by showing them how to allocate more time for strategic planning of emerging issues. Many recent best selling business books such as Wikinomics, Crowdsourcing, and Sway, illustrate how the benefit of harnessing the collective knowledge of employees is a key to company success. Companies like Google and Pixar have mastered the ability to capture empFoyee knowledge in terms of technology. Why should occupational safety be any different? Workers know how to improve safety in their workplace. SH&E professionals can harness this collective safety knowledge just as top companies do with technology, and workers will feel grateful for contributing.

  11. Innovative technology summary report: advanced worker protection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS) is a liquid-air-based, self-contained breathing and cooling system with a duration of 2 hrs. AWPS employs a patented system developed by Oceaneering Space Systems (OSS), which was supported by the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center through a cost sharing research and development contract. The heart of the system is the life-support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack is combined with advanced protective garments, an advanced liquid cooling garment (LCG), a respirator, and communications and support equipment.

  12. Patterns of role-impairment among alcoholic workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Carolyn Lesley Klein

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PATTERNS OF ROLE-INPAIRNENT ANi01'1G ALCOHOLIC WORKERS A Thesis by Carolyn Les1ey Klein Goldstein Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&N University ini partial fulfillment of the requirements for the dei-ree of NASTER OP SCIENCE Nay... 1971 Najor Su'oject: Sociology 0 R R, 8 PATTERNS OF ROLE-IMPAIRMENT AMONG ALCOHOLIC WORKERS A Thesis Jh '0 a Ql by Carolyn Lesley Klein Goldstein Approved as to style end content by: Chairman of Committee May 19/1 ABSTRACT Patterns...

  13. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 2 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'

  14. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 3 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'3

  15. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 4 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'34

  16. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 5 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'345

  17. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 6 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2 Workers'3456

  18. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 8 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight28 Workers'

  19. Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    40.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES Order Module--DOE O 440.1B, WORKER PROTECTION PROGRAM FOR DOE (INCLUDING NNSA) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES The...

  20. V-002: EMC NetWorker Module for Microsoft Applications Lets Remote...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2: EMC NetWorker Module for Microsoft Applications Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Obtain Passwords V-002: EMC NetWorker Module for Microsoft Applications...

  1. Does Border Enforcement Protect U.S. Workers From Illegal Immigration?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Gordon; Robertson, Raymond; Spilimbergo, Antonio

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect U.S. Workers From Illegal Immigration? By Gordon H.Protect U.S. Workers from Illegal Immigration? Gordon H.Haynes, and David Spener, “Illegal Mexican Migration and the

  2. IVOA Recommendation: Universal Worker Service Pattern Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Universal Worker Service (UWS) pattern defines how to manage asynchronous execution of jobs on a service. Any application of the pattern defines a family of related services with a common service contract. Possible uses of the pattern are also described.

  3. Influencing knowledge workers: the power of top management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seldin, Jonathan P.

    Influencing knowledge workers: the power of top management Sharmila Jayasingam Faculty of Business/methodology/approach ­ Data measuring top leaders social power and knowledge management (KM) practices is gathered from 402 and Accountancy, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Mahfooz A. Ansari Faculty of Management, University

  4. Worker reproduction and policing in insect societies: an ESS analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenseleers, Tom

    Worker reproduction and policing in insect societies: an ESS analysis T. WENSELEERS,* H. HELANTERA strategy (ESS) model to investigate factors that could explain these observed low levels of reproductive exploitation. Two key factors are identified: relatedness and policing. Relatedness affects the ESS proportion

  5. Seattle city light wins EMF lawsuit brought by worker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warkentin, D. [ed.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ruling consistent with similar lawsuit outcomes. A Washington state workers` compensation appeals board, in upholding an earlier state agency decision, has ruled that electric and magnetic fields (EMF) did not cause a Seattle City Light worker`s leukemia. The outcome of the case, Pilisuk vs. Seattle City Light, appears to fall in line with decisions in other, similar EMF personal injury lawsuits against electric utilities. Robert Pilisuk, 44, an apprentice and electrician-constructor for Seattle City Light for seven years, died five years ago as a result of acute lymphocytic leukemia. {open_quotes}This was the first thorough examination of the large body of EMF studies by a workers` compensation system,{close_quotes} said Betty Ngan, Seattle assistant city attorney. {open_quotes}The board`s decision is based on the extensive record of testimony taken and an exhaustive review of the studies. The result of this appeal process reflects the state of the science, that there is no proven cause-and -effect relationship between EMF and health effects.{close_quotes}

  6. Worker Protection Standard: Decontamination Frederick M. Fishel2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    PI-116 Worker Protection Standard: Decontamination Supplies 1 Frederick M. Fishel2 1. This document Basic responsibilities Employers of pesticide handlers must make sure that decontamination supplies. Employers must make sure that decontamination supplies for washing off pesticide residues are provided

  7. accident recovery workers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident recovery workers First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY...

  8. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Departmental Accident Report Form for Worker's Compensation Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Departmental Accident Report Form for Worker's Compensation Benefits EMPLOYEE___________ ACCIDENT DATA (to be completed by employee) Date of Injury_____/_____/____ Time of Injury the employee How did the injury or illness occur? (Describe fully the events that caused the accident) Describe

  9. Health effects of low-level radiation in shipyard workers. Final report: [Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matanoski, G.M.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Shipyard Workers Study (NSWS) was designed to determine whether there is an excess risk of leukemia or other cancers associated with exposure to low levels of gamma radiation. The study compares the mortality experience of shipyard workers who qualified to work in radiation areas to the mortality of similar workers who hold the same types of jobs but who are not authorized to work in radiation areas. The population consists of workers from six government and two private shipyards.

  10. A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia Therese Jefferson Alison Preston University of Technology Perth Western Australia http://www.cbs.curtin.edu/wiser #12;A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western Australia ii A Study of Low Paid Work and Low Paid Workers in Western

  11. This is how many older American workers today feel--trapped in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    . In a series of Work Trends surveys by the Heldrich Center for Workforce Development of workers who were laid will be permanently higher joblessness and a far less secure retire- ment--leading many workers over 50 to rethink periods of unemployment insurance have provided a temporary safety net for some older workers

  12. SUIVI MEDICAL DE SALARIES EXPOSES AU BERYLLIUM : Medical follow-up of beryllium -exposed workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 SUIVI MEDICAL DE SALARIES EXPOSES AU BERYLLIUM : Medical follow-up of beryllium - exposed workers-up of beryllium-exposed workers. Method: a medical follow-up of workers from a factory machining beryllium (Be preventive measures. Key words: beryllium, sensitisation, occupational exposure, prevention, Lymphocyte

  13. James Pon Memorial Award Scholarship Opportunity 2014 Foundation to Commemorate Chinese Railroad Workers in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Workers in Canada The Foundation to Commemorate the Chinese Railroad Workers in Canada (FCCRWC and awareness of the contribution to Canada by the Chinese Railroad Workers who participated in the construction of the first transcontinental railway (the CPR) that united Canada geographically and politically

  14. ABOUT THE TALK: Has anyone ever put the whole picture of Cannery Row, Monterey, together for you? Don't feel alone if that's the case. ere are few resources easily accessed to get to it all. e PowerPoint archival photographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McPhee-Shaw, Erika

    PowerPoint archival photographic historical presentation by Cannery Row historian Michael Kenneth Hemp: Berkeley born and UC Educated, Michael Kenneth Hemp became Cannery Row's career historian in a scenario Friends at (831) 771-4464 PHOTO BY RALPH W. SCHARDT An evening with Cannery Row Historian Michael Hemp

  15. Molecular Markers of Lung Cancer in MAYAK Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven A. Belinsky, PhD

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The molecular mechanisms that result in the elevated risk for lung cancer associated with exposure to radiation have not been well characterized. Workers from the MAYAK nuclear enterprise are an ideal cohort in which to study the molecular epidemiology of cancer associated with radiation exposure and to identify the genes targeted for inactivation that in turn affect individual risk for radiation-induced lung cancer. Epidemiology studies of the MAYAK cohort indicate a significantly higher frequency for adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in workers than in a control population and a strong correlation between these tumor types and plutonium exposure. Two hypotheses will be evaluated through the proposed studies. First, radiation exposure targets specific genes for inactivation by promoter methylation. This hypothesis is supported by our recent studies with the MAYAK population that demonstrated the targeting of the p16 gene for inactivation by promoter methylation in adenocarcinomas from workers (1). Second, genes inactivated in tumors can serve as biomarkers for lung cancer risk in a cancer-free population of workers exposed to plutonium. Support for this hypothesis is based on exciting preliminary results of our nested, case-control study of persons from the Colorado cohort. In that study, a panel of methylation markers for predicting lung cancer risk is being evaluated in sputum samples from incident lung cancer cases and controls. The first hypothesis will be tested by determining the prevalence for promoter hypermethylation of a panel of genes shown to play a critical role in the development of either adenocarcinoma and/or SCC associated with tobacco. Our initial studies on adenocarcinoma in MAYAK workers will be extended to evaluate methylation of the PAX5 {alpha}, PAX5 {beta}, H-cadherin, GATA5, and bone morphogenesis 3B (BMP3B) genes in the original sample set described under Preliminary studies. In addition, studies will be initiated in SCC from workers and controls to identify genes targeted for inactivation by plutonium in this other common histologic form of lung cancer. We will examine methylation of the p16, O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyl-transferase (MGMT), and death associated protein kinase genes ([DAP-K], evaluated previously in adenocarcinomas) as well as the new genes being assessed in the adenocarcinomas. The second hypothesis will be tested in a cross-sectional study of cancer-free workers exposed to plutonium and an unexposed population. A cohort of 700 cancer-free workers and 700 unexposed persons is being assembled, exposures are being defined, and induced sputum collected at initial entry into the study and approximately 1-year later. Exposed and unexposed persons will be matched by 5-year age intervals and smoking status (current and former). The frequency for methylation of four genes that show the greatest difference in prevalence in tumors from workers and controls will be determined in exfoliated cells within sputum. These studies will extend those in primary tumors to determine whether difference in prevalence for individual or multiple genes are detected in sputum samples from high-risk subjects exposed to plutonium. Follow-up of this cohort offers the opportunity to validate these endpoints and future biomarkers as true markers for lung cancer risk.

  16. Integrating The Non-Electrical Worker Into The Electrical Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, T. David; McAlhaney, John H.

    2012-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this paper is to demonstrate an electrical safety program that incorporates all workers into the program, not just the electrical workers. It is largely in response to a paper presented at the 2012 ESW by Lanny Floyd entitled "Facilitating Application of Electrical Safety Best Practices to "Other" Workers" which requested all attendees to review their electrical safety program to assure that non-electrical workers were protected as well as electrical workers. The referenced paper indicated that roughly 50% of electrical incidents involve workers whose primary function is not electrical in nature. It also encouraged all to "address electrical safety for all workers and not just workers whose job responsibilities involve working on or near energized electrical circuits." In this paper, a program which includes specific briefings to non-electrical workers as well as to workers who may need to perform their normal activities in proximity to energized electrical conductors is presented. The program uses a targeted approach to specific areas such as welding, excavating, rigging, chart reading, switching, cord and plug equipment and several other general areas to point out hazards that may exist and how to avoid them. NFPA 70E-2004 was incorporated into the program several years ago and with it the need to include the "other" workers became apparent. The site experience over the years supports the assertion that about half of the electrical incidents involve non-electrical workers and this prompted us to develop specific briefings to enhance the knowledge of the non-electrical worker regarding safe electrical practices. The promotion of "May is Electrical Safety Month" and the development of informative presentations which are delivered to the general site population as well as electrical workers have greatly improved the hazards awareness status of the general worker on site.

  17. Optimizing compliance training for the waste management worker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste management workers are required to participate in special training mandated by a variety of Federal laws and DOE Orders; these include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act (SARA) as implemented by OSHA in CFR 1920.120, in addition to requirements for Hazard Communication, Radiation Workers, Respiratory Protection, Transportation, and Waste Generator training. The Technical Resources and Training program is examining the course contents and mandated requirements to determine how to best meld these requirements into a training program that will still fulfill all requirements but eliminate the potential for duplication of some elements in successive courses. This approach may not eliminate all duplication between courses, but it should result in significant savings in manhours demanded in a training environment which requires similar information to meet a host of regulatory requirements. The training matrix planned for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be presented and discussed. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  18. Handbook: County Program Building for Texas Agricultural Extension Workers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lkrc~ound bbmafbn Puklkiso b.Ammi)te88 and Tndlirfdods E~atluate and Project the County Program BASIC STEPS A TEXAS. AGRtCULTURAL EXTEPISION SERVICE [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] To A I1 &tension Workers: This handbook supplements... this handbook, we assume that each county has a program building committee of some kind. Because of the wide differences among vounties, no one organizational plan will fit all counties in detail. The handbook provides an organizational structure which can...

  19. Epidemiologic study of renal function in copper smelter workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilis, R.; Valciukas, J.A.; Weber, J.P.; Malkin, J.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A medical cross-sectional examination of a copper smelter work force was undertaken after environmental contamination with lead, cadmium and arsenic had been documented. A total of 920 subjects was examined, including active smelter employees, retired workers and copper mine employees who had never worked in the smelter. Slight to moderate absorption of lead and cadmium was definitely present in the active copper smelter employees, who had significantly higher levels of Pb-B, ZPP and Cd-B than retired employees and miners. Cd-U levels were higher in retired workers, who were also older and had, as a group, longer duration of exposure in the smelter. Cd-U did not exceed 10 ..mu..g/g creatinine, the level considered critical for nephrotoxicity, in any of the subjects. Median Cd-B level for active workers was 2.75 ..mu..g/L. Lead absorption was characterized by a relatively small proportion (16.7%) of active employees with Pb-B levels 40 ..mu..g/dL or higher. That kidney function could be impaired by long-term exposure in the smelter was only indirectly suggested. Effects on renal function at the low levels of cadmium and lead absorption that were observed in this smelter population are minimal. 21 references, 8 figures, 21 tables.

  20. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Model Years Model Year

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4. Fuel.

  1. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Households with Children Households Without Children

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (Million Cubic 1. Introduction4.

  2. Re: NBP RFI: CommunicationRse quirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOERue,Consumers and thePepco

  3. Worker productivity and ventilation rate in a call center: Analyses of time-series data for a group of workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Price, Phillip; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas; Dibartolomeo, Dennis; Federspiel, Cliff; Liu, Gang; Lahiff, Maureen

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous studies, increased ventilation rates and reduced indoor carbon dioxide concentrations have been associated with improvements in health at work and increased performance in work-related tasks. Very few studies have assessed whether ventilation rates influence performance of real work. This paper describes part one of a two-part analysis from a productivity study performed in a call center operated by a health maintenance organization. Outside air ventilation rates were manipulated, indoor air temperatures, humidities, and carbon dioxide concentrations were monitored, and worker performance data for advice nurses, with 30-minute resolution, were analyzed via multivariate linear regression to look for an association of performance with building ventilation rate, or with indoor carbon dioxide concentration (which is related to ventilation rate per worker). Results suggest that the effect of ventilation rate on worker performance in this call center was very small (probably less than 1%) or nil, over most of the range of ventilation rate experienced during the study (roughly 12 L s{sup -1} to 48 L s{sup -1} per person). However, there is some evidence suggesting performance improvements of 2% or more when the ventilation rate per person is very high, as indicated by indoor CO{sub 2} concentrations exceeding outdoor concentrations by less than 75 ppm.

  4. Performance/design criteria review advanced worker protection systems. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This document describes an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS is built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with a variety of articles of protective clothing and support equipment.

  5. Office of Worker Safety and Health Assessments | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofC TEnergyosdbu/961641Worker Safety

  6. Office of Worker Safety and Health Enforcement | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment ofC TEnergyosdbu/961641Worker

  7. OHA Worker Appeal Cases Archive File | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecember 23,Misc Cases ArchiveWorker Appeal

  8. Workers Demolish Reactor Support Facility as Part of River Corridor

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUEWaterWhereChinn WomenWorker SafetyDepartment

  9. Workers Successfully Excavate Mother Lode of Chromium Contamination at

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUEWaterWhereChinn WomenWorkerHanford Site |

  10. Worker Rights Pamphlet March 2015 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Quinn Women12.1AWorkWorker

  11. Worker Safety and Health Rules, Directives, and Technical Standards |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri QuinnEnergy WorkerDepartment

  12. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 1 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -

  13. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 10 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter -0

  14. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 11 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter

  15. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 12 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight Newsletter2

  16. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 13 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight

  17. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 7 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight2

  18. Workers' Spotlight Newsletter - Issue 9 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Workers' Spotlight28

  19. Worker Health Summary, 1995-2004 | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley NickellApril 16, 2008Ms.12.1A Chg 107 The Worker Health

  20. Farm Worker Toilet and Handwashing FacilitiesFarm Worker Toilet and Handwashing Facilities romoting good worker hygiene is one of the most important steps farmers can take to prevent contamination of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    romoting good worker hygiene is one of the most important steps farmers can take to prevent contamination in promoting good hygiene is ensuring that there are handwashing stations and toilet facilities available

  1. Idaho Workers Complete Last of Transuranic Waste Transfers Funded by Recovery Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers successfully transferred 130 containers of remote-handled transuranic waste – each weighing up to 15 tons – to a facility for...

  2. Effects of Layoffs and Plant Closings on Depression Among Older Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brand, Jennie E; Ley, Becca R; Gallo, William T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and early 60s opt for early retirement rather than take onWorkers forced into early retirement may be inadequately

  3. asbestos-exposed shipyard workers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    my employer (named in box 18), its workers' compensation care advice, testing, treatment, or supplies provided to me for the injury or illness described above 88 Flexible...

  4. Long-term mortality profile of heavily-exposed lead smelter workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, A.J. (South Australian Health Commission, Adelaide); Johnson, H.M.

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of 241 male smelter workers diagnosed as having lead poisoning during 1928 to 1959, 140 are known to have subsequently died. Their cause-of-death profile has been compared with that of 695 other male decedents (predominantly nonoffice production workers) from the same smelter and with that of the Australian male population. Age-standarized proportional mortality analysis shows a substantial excess in the numbers of deaths from chronic renal disease and cerebral hemorrhage, particularly prior to 1965. A moderate excess was also apparent for the other smelter workers. In recent years, these mortality excesses in lead-exposed workers have largely dissipated.

  5. Anticipated dose to workers for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP Project W-460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LILLY, J.T.

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Report provides estimates of expected whole body and extremity radiological dose to workers conducting planned Pu stabilization and packaging operations at PFP.

  6. Type B Investigation Board Report Worker Fall from Shoring/Scaffolding...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Scaffolding Structure at the Savannah River Site Tritium Extraction Facility - Construction Site April 2, 2002 SAVANNAH RIVER SITE OFFICE MAY 2002 Worker Fall from Shoring...

  7. Basal area growth response to competition among improved families of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) in a 20-year-old row plot progeny trial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Joel Talbot

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. Sprinz Or. Michael G. Messina In two plantations, over two tsme intervals, tne average basal area growth of individual loblolly pine trees in a row plot progeny trial was modeled as a function of the Area Potentially Available (APA...) competition index, a crown pos1tion 1ndex, and the tree's basal area at the start of the interval. Hypothesis tests for differences in individual tree basal area growth response to competit1on amon9 genetically-1mproved families were performed. When...

  8. The impacts of the manager-to-worker ratio and institutional investors on the employment of production workers: 1985-1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchser, Daniel

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2 percent, Germany had 3. 9 percent, and Sweden had only 2. 6 percent. In 1994, these three countries and others paid higher hourly compensation to manufacturing employees than did the United States. The United States' average hourly compensation... for production workers is $17. 10, while it is $21. 42 in Japan, $18. 81 in Sweden, and $27. 31 in Germany (Gordon 1996). Therefore, by comparing national economies Gordon illustrates that production workers in the United States have more managers and are paid...

  9. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  10. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE and NNSA Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Chg 1 dated 8-21-12. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1A. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-14-13.

  11. Implementation Guide for Use with 10 CFR Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Programs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Guide provides supplemental information and describes implementation practices to assist contractors in effectively developing, managing and implementing worker safety and health programs required by 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 851, Worker Safety and Health Program. Canceled by DOE G 440.1-1B.

  12. Most Workers Who Suffer Head Injuries- Were Not Wearing Head Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) of accidents and injuries noted that most workers who suffered impact injuries to the head were not wearing head protection. In addition, the same survey showed that the majority of workers were injured while performing their normal jobs at their regular worksites.

  13. SHORT COMMUNICATION Production of Minima Workers by Gynes of Atta colombica Guerin-Meneville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    SHORT COMMUNICATION Production of Minima Workers by Gynes of Atta colombica Gue´rin-Me´ne´ville (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Attini) that Lack a Fungal Pellet HERMO´ GENES FERNA´ NDEZ-MARI´N 1 AND WILLIAM T showed that gynes sometimes lose their fungal pellets, or the fungal garden fails before workers emerge

  14. Guidance for Controlling Potential Risks to Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance for Controlling Potential Risks to Workers Exposed to Class B Biosolids This guidance is intended only for controlling health risks to workers from Class B biosolids during handling and land;1 Introduction Biosolids are the organic residues resulting from the treatment of commercial, industrial

  15. An Epidemiologic Study of Early Biologic Effects of Benzene in Chinese Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    An Epidemiologic Study of Early Biologic Effects of Benzene in Chinese Workers Nathaniel Rothman,1 and Anti-Epidemic Center, Shanghai, China Benzene is a recognized hematotoxin and leukemogen, but its a cross-sectional study of 44 healthy workers currently exposed to benzene (median 8-hr time

  16. Final Pantex Report - 2006 [Phase 1 plan for assessment of Former Workers at the Pantex Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, Ronna

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project was to develop a Phase 1 plan for assessment of Former Workers at the Pantex Facility in Amarillo, TX and to determine the suitability to start a medical surveillance program among former workers for this site.

  17. Evaluation of respiratory variables in smelter and control workers before and during a shutdown period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holness, D.L.; Batten, B.; Broder, I.; Corey, P.; Mintz, S.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-six smelter workers examined in this pilot study were found to have a higher prevalence of cough and dyspnea and lower baseline lung function than did 31 controls. They also experienced decreases in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) over the workweek while the controls did not. Baseline airflow rates and change in FVC and FEV1 over the workweek varied with levels of sulfur dioxide and particulates. Twenty-three smelter workers and 21 controls were seen on a second occasion, six months into an extended shutdown. The smelter workers continued to have a higher prevalence of cough and dyspnea and lower baseline lung function than the controls. There was, however, a slight increase in lung function in both the exposed workers and the controls during the shutdown. The results suggest that smelter workers may develop both acute and chronic work-related pulmonary effects and that the chronic effects may be nonreversible.

  18. Low Prevalence of Chronic Beryllium Disease among Workers at a Nuclear Weapons Research and Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arjomandi, M; Seward, J P; Gotway, M B; Nishimura, S; Fulton, G P; Thundiyil, J; King, T E; Harber, P; Balmes, J R

    2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    To study the prevalence of beryllium sensitization (BeS) and chronic beryllium disease (CBD) in a cohort of workers from a nuclear weapons research and development facility. We evaluated 50 workers with BeS with medical and occupational histories, physical examination, chest imaging with HRCT (N=49), and pulmonary function testing. Forty of these workers also underwent bronchoscopy for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and transbronchial biopsies. The mean duration of employment at the facility was 18 yrs and the mean latency (from first possible exposure) to time of evaluation was 32 yrs. Five of the workers had CBD at the time of evaluation (based on histology or HRCT); three others had evidence of probable CBD. These workers with BeS, characterized by a long duration of potential Be exposure and a long latency, had a low prevalence of CBD.

  19. Mortality of workers employed at organochlorine pesticide manufacturing plants: An update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.P.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mortality study of workers at four organochlorine pesticide manufacturing factories was updated through 1987. The cohorts included all white male workers employed for at least 6 months before December 31, 1964 at the four factories. The workers had been exposed to the following organochlorine pesticides: chlordane, heptachlor, endrin, aldrin, dieldrin, and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT). Workers at one factory had been exposed to the organobromine pesticide dibromochloropropane. The total number of deaths for the period from 1976 through 1987 was 650. Mortality for all causes and all malignant neoplasms was lower than expected at each of the factories. Cerebrovascular disease mortality was elevated for three of the four factories. The most important result was the statistically significant increase in liver/biliary tract cancer among workers at the facility where aldrin and dieldrin were the primary organochlorine pesticides produced and the nonsignificant increase at the facility where DDT was manufactured.

  20. Field testing of the Advanced Worker Protection System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd, R.J.E.; Hamill, D.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    AWPS is a life support system that allows a suited worker in operate in a chemically hazardous or radiologically hot environment for up to 2 hours with minimal heat stress and minimal encumbrance from his life support equipment. It consists of 3 parts: a backpack using liquid air to supply breathing gas and cooling power; a liquid cooling garment (LCG) that circulates water chilled from vaporizing and warming the cryogen; and a Level B protective garment which accommodates the low profile of the backpack, permits greater mobility and doesn`t require tape closure. The AWPS backpack and LCG are compatible with commercially available Level A protective garments. A one-hour demonstration of a AWPS prototype was done.

  1. Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, F.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described.

  2. Worker Safety and Security Teams Team Member Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sievers, Cindy S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Worker Safety and Security Teams (WSSTs) are an effective way to promote safe workplaces. While WSSTs have a variety of structures and roles, they have one thing in common - employees and management collaborate to find ways to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses on the job. The benefits for all concerned are obvious in that employees have a safe place to work, employers save money on lost work time and workers compensation costs, and everyone returns home safe and healthy each day. A successful WSST will have the support and wholehearted participation of management and employees. LANL has a WSST at the institutional level (IWSST) and at all directorates and many divisions. The WSSTs are part of LANL's Voluntary Protection Program (VPP). The WSSTs meet at least monthly and follow an agenda covering topics such as safety shares, behavior based safety (BBS) observations, upcoming events or activities, issues, etc. A WSST can effectively influence safety programs and provide recommendations to managers, who have the resources and authority to implement changes in the workplace. WSSTs are effective because they combine the knowledge, expertise, perspective, enthusiasm, and effort of a variety of employees with diverse backgrounds. Those with experience in a specific job or work area know what the hazards or potential hazards are, and generally have ideas how to go about controlling them. Those who are less familiar with a job or area play a vital role too, by seeing what others may have overlooked or taken for granted. This booklet will cover the structure and operations of WSSTs, what needs to be done in order to be effective and successful, and how you can help, whether you're a WSST member or not.

  3. Paternalism and Law: The micropolitics of farm workers’ evictions and rural activism in the Western Cape of South Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolan, Pauline J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis deals with the micro-politics of farm workers’ evictions. It documents farm workers’ narratives of the processes of eviction and displacement from farms in the Western Cape of South Africa. It analyses farm ...

  4. Argonne National Laboratory-West, Former Production Workers Screening Projects (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Argonne National Laboratory-West, Former Production Workers Screening Projects (now known as the Idaho National Laboratory)

  5. A longitudinal study of respiratory symptoms in aluminum potroom workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kongerud, J.; Samuelsen, S.O. (Department of Thoracic Medicine, Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo (Norway))

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of occupational work exposure and host factors on the incidence of dyspnea and wheezing as reported in questionnaires was examined in 1,301 new employees in aluminum electrolytic potrooms. The incidence appeared to decrease after 2 yr of exposure, and the estimated probability of development of symptoms was nearly 20% after 4 yr. A total of 105 subjects developed dyspnea and wheezing. Of 78 symptomatic subjects who were interviewed, 76% experienced improvement or absence of symptoms when off work. In 523 subjects who were assigned to specific levels of exposure at the end of follow-up, a dose-response gradient was found between the development of symptoms and fluoride exposure. Increased risk with increasing amounts of tobacco was also observed, but childhood allergy and a family history of asthma were not significantly related to the outcome variable. The authors conclude that both total fluoride exposure and smoking are related to asthmatic symptoms in potroom workers, and the suggestion of a dose-response gradient was found for both variables. However, a causal relationship between fluorides and symptoms should be investigated further by specific bronchial provocation testing and by research for specific antibodies and other immunologic markers.

  6. Fluoride, aluminum, and phosphate kinetics in cryolite workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grandjean, P.; Horder, M.; Thomassen, Y. (Odense Univ. (Denmark))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to cryolite (Na3AlF6) dust may result in skeletal fluorosis. Eight male workers at a cryolite concentrator participated in a 4-day study after 5 days of vacation. Dust exposures were 0.16 to 21.2 mg/m3. Urine was collected before work began and during two 4-hour periods. Preshift urine fluoride concentrations increased during the week. Fluoride concentrations in postshift urine and serum both correlated with the dust exposures. Serum fluoride concentrations decreased with a half-life of 3.3 to 6.9 hours after work. Fluoride clearance was 40.5 to 76.5 mL/min at urinary flow rates of 0.89 to 2.21 mL/min. Serum aluminum concentrations varied without relation to the exposure, but the urinary aluminum excretion correlated with the fluoride levels. Preshift serum-phosphate concentrations increased significantly during the week, possibly indicating changes in mineral metabolism. For monitoring of individual uptake of cryolite dust, serum fluoride measurements are most useful.

  7. Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act workers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing...

  8. Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness Workers at Paducah Site Exceed 1.5 Million Hours Without Lost-Time Injury, Illness October 30, 2014 -...

  9. Spatial empowerment : the appropriation of public spaces by Filipina domestic workers in Hong Kong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillu, Jasmine Susanna

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On a typical Sunday afternoon, hundreds of Filipina domestic workers (FDW) gather on the floor of public spaces in prime real estate areas of downtown Hong Kong. Over the last few decades, Hong Kong experienced rapid ...

  10. Unexpected victories : protecting workers' rights in Guatemala's apparel-for-export sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, Sarah E., 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines three surprise victories for workers' rights in the Guatemalan garment sector. In the past three years, three unions have formed at the Choishin, Cimatextiles, and Nobland factories and each has ...

  11. Key worker housing : a demand analysis of middle-income workforce housing in eastern Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacks, Sean D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Boston Metropolitan Area is one of the most expensive places to live in the United States. In recent years studies have speculated that middle-income workers have had to endure increased commute times as they have moved ...

  12. Essays on social networks and information worker productivity by Lynn Wu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lynn, 1981-

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I examine how information, information technology, and social networks affect information worker productivity. The work is divided into three essays based on tracking detailed communication patterns of ...

  13. Workers Prepare to Safely Enter One of Hanford Site’s Most Hazardous Rooms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – When workers enter the hazardous, historic McCluskey Room at the Hanford site this summer, they will be safer due to their preparation and involvement in planning and training for the job.

  14. Preventing Absenteeism and Promoting Resilience Among Health Care Workers In Biological Emergencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesperance, Ann M.; Miller, James S.

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to ensure adequate numbers of medical staff represents a crucial part of the medical response to any disaster. However, healthcare worker absenteeism during disasters, especially in the event of an attack of biological terrorism or an epidemic such as pandemic influenza, is a serious concern. Though a significant rate of absenteeism is often included as a baseline assumption in emergency planning, published reports on strategies to minimize absenteeism are comparatively few. This report documents interviews with managers and emergency response planners at hospitals and public health agencies and reviews existing survey data on healthcare worker absenteeism and studies of disasters to glean lessons about the needs of healthcare workers during those disasters. Based on this research, expected rates of absenteeism and individual determinants of absenteeism are presented along with recommendations of steps that hospitals, emergency medical services departments, public health organizations, and government agencies can take to meet the needs of healthcare workers and minimize absenteeism during a biological event.

  15. Patterns of pulmonary dysfunction in asbestos workers: a cross-sectional study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abejie, Belayneh A; Wang, Xiaorong; Kales, Stefanos N; Christiani, David C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dysfunction in asbes- tos workers: a cross-sectional studywith a history of asbes- tos exposure. There is a goodDLCO. However, asbes- tos exposure was not significantly

  16. Identification of environmentally derived cesium-137 burdens in a worker population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Lynch, T.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1990, whole body measurements of a number of workers with little probability of onsite occupational exposure showed positive evidence of [sup 137]Cs. Further investigation revealed that many of these workers supplemented their diet with a significant portion of wild game, mainly deer and elk. To validate the assumption of an environmental source, donated samples of venison and other game were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. Results ranged from less than 0.1 to almost 100 Bq kg[sup [minus]l] (0.003 to 2.7 nCi kg[sup [minus]1]) and showed a correlation with the habitat from which the game was taken. Venison samples obtained from the two workers with the highest body burdens showed the highest activity. A questionnaire is now used to identify workers with an elevated potential for environmental-intakes.

  17. Identification of environmentally derived cesium-137 burdens in a worker population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Lynch, T.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1990, whole body measurements of a number of workers with little probability of onsite occupational exposure showed positive evidence of {sup 137}Cs. Further investigation revealed that many of these workers supplemented their diet with a significant portion of wild game, mainly deer and elk. To validate the assumption of an environmental source, donated samples of venison and other game were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. Results ranged from less than 0.1 to almost 100 Bq kg{sup {minus}l} (0.003 to 2.7 nCi kg{sup {minus}1}) and showed a correlation with the habitat from which the game was taken. Venison samples obtained from the two workers with the highest body burdens showed the highest activity. A questionnaire is now used to identify workers with an elevated potential for environmental-intakes.

  18. Zombies, Haiti, and (Sex) Workers: On Relating to Modernity/Coloniality and Subalterity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koné, Mzilikazi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caribbean. Zombies, 1 Haiti and (Sex) Workers On Relating tohow a country as small as Haiti has made such a large impactabout the island go back to Haiti’s independence from This

  19. Evaluation of selected glove materials for worker hand protection against exposure to an aqueous aniline solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Marc Kendall

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Nay 1977 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene EVALUATION OF SELECTED GLOVE MATERIALS FOR WORKER HAND PROTECTION AGAINST EXPOSURE TO AN AQUEOUS ANILINE SOLUTION A Thesis by NARC KENDALL POWELL Approved... glove materials to enable a health or safety professional to justify his selection of protective gloves for aniline workers. The results of this research indicate that any of the four glove materials evaluated would be acceptable to use for hand...

  20. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE and NNSA Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Chg 1 dated 8-21-12, cancels DOE M 440.1-1A. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-14-13, cancels DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  1. Construction safety: Can management prevent all accidents or are workers responsible for their own actions?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotten, G.B.; Jenkins, S.L.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction industry has struggled for many years with the answer to the question posed in the title: Can Management Prevent All Accidents or Are Workers Responsible for Their Own Actions? In the litigious society that we live, it has become more important to find someone {open_quotes}at fault{close_quotes} for an accident than it is to find out how we can prevent it from ever happening again. Most successful companies subscribe to the theme that {open_quotes}all accidents can be prevented.{close_quotes} They institute training and qualification programs, safe performance incentives, and culture-change-driven directorates such as the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP); yet we still see construction accidents that result in lost time, and occasionally death, which is extremely costly in the shortsighted measure of money and, in real terms, impact to the worker`s family. Workers need to be properly trained in safety and health protection before they are assigned to a job that may expose them to safety and health hazards. A management committed to improving worker safety and health will bring about significant results in terms of financial savings, improved employee morale, enhanced communities, and increased production. But how can this happen, you say? Reduction in injury and lost workdays are the rewards. A decline in reduction of injuries and lost workdays results in lower workers` compensation premiums and insurance rates. In 1991, United States workplace injuries and illnesses cost public and private sector employers an estimated $62 billion in workers` compensation expenditures.

  2. Renal function in relation to low levels of cadmium exposure in a group of smelter workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kazantzis, G.; Armstrong, B.G.

    1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Blood and urine samples were obtained from 274 smelter workers and urine samples from 48 controls. Cadmium, ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin, and creatinine were estimated in blood and urine, and total protein in urine. Concentrations of cadmium in urine (mean 2.0 nmole/mmole creatinine) and blood (mean 21.8 nmole/L) observed in the smelter workers confirmed that this group had absorbed more cadmium than the general population, but less than most other occupationally exposed groups studied. Mean ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in urine was not significantly different in the smelter workers and the controls. The mean total protein in urine was 20% higher in the smelter workers, a difference which was significant. There was no consistent picture within the smelter workers of a relationship between history of cadmium exposure and the effect measures of ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in urine and blood, total protein in urine, creatinine clearance and relative ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin clearance. Small but significant positive correlation coefficients were observed between cadmium in urine and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin in urine, total protein in urine and ..beta../sub 2/-microglobulin clearance although these may be artifactual. 14 references, 12 tables.

  3. Solid waste workers and livelihood strategies in Greater Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Claudel, E-mail: claudelnoel@gmail.co [University of the West Indies, Institute for Sustainable Development, Environmental Management Unit, 13 Gibraltar Camp Way, Mona Campus, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid waste management industry in Haiti is comprised of a formal and an informal sector. Many basic activities in the solid waste management sector are being carried out within the context of profound poverty, which exposes the failure of the socioeconomic and political system to provide sufficient job opportunities for the urban population. This paper examines the involvement of workers in the solid waste management industry in Greater Port-au-Prince and the implications for livelihood strategies. The findings revealed that the Greater Port-au-Prince solid waste management system is very inclusive with respect to age, while highly segregated with regard to gender. In terms of earning capacity, the results showed that workers hired by the State agencies were the most economically vulnerable group as more than 50% of them fell below the official nominal minimum wage. This paper calls for better salary scales and work compensation for the solid waste workers.

  4. Paraoxonase-1 genetic polymorphisms and susceptibility to DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Thakur, Sachin [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Presently at, Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA), 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Banerjee, Basu Dev [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Pasha, Syed Tazeen [National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Ichhpujani, Rattan Lal [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); National Programme for Prevention and Control of Fluorosis, DGHS, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi 110011 (India); Rai, Arvind, E-mail: arvindrai.nicd@gmail.com [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control, 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Human paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is a lipoprotein-associated enzyme involved in the detoxification of organophosphate pesticides (OPs) by hydrolyzing the bioactive oxons. Polymorphisms of the PON1 gene are responsible for variation in the expression and catalytic activity of PON1 enzyme. In the present study, we have determined (a) the prevalence of two common PON1 polymorphisms, (b) the activity of PON1 and acetylcholinesterase enzymes, and (c) the influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes variation on DNA damage in workers exposed to OPs. We examined 230 subjects including 115 workers exposed to OPs and an equal number of normal healthy controls. The results revealed that PON1 activity toward paraoxon (179.19 {+-} 39.36 vs. 241.52 {+-} 42.32 nmol/min/ml in controls) and phenylacetate (112.74 {+-} 17.37 vs. 134.28 {+-} 25.49 {mu}mol/min/ml in controls) was significantly lower in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the distribution of genotypes and allelic frequencies of PON1{sub 192}QR (Gln/Arg) and PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met) in workers and control subjects (p > 0.05). The PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was found to be significantly higher in the R/R (Arg/Arg) genotypes than Q/R (Gln/Arg) and lowest in Q/Q (Gln/Gln) genotypes in both workers and control subjects (p < 0.001). For PON1{sub 55}LM (Leu/Met), PON1 activity toward paraoxonase was observed to be higher in individuals with L/L (Leu/Leu) genotypes and lowest in individuals with M/M (Met/Met) genotypes in both groups (p < 0.001). No influence of PON1 genotypes and phenotypes was seen on the activity of acetylcholinesterase and arylesterase. The DNA damage was observed to be significantly higher in workers than in control subjects (p < 0.05). Further, the individuals who showed least paraoxonase activity i.e., those with (Q/Q [Gln/Gln] and M/M [Met/Met]) genotypes showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to other isoforms in workers exposed to OPs (p < 0.05). The results indicate that the individuals with PON1 Q/Q and M/M genotypes are more susceptible toward genotoxicity. In conclusion, the study suggests wide variation in enzyme activities and DNA damage due to polymorphisms in PON1 gene, which might have an important role in the identification of individual risk factors in workers occupationally exposed to OPs.

  5. Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 70, No. 3, 2007, Pages 661666 Factors Related to Food Worker Hand Hygiene Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand Hygiene Practices LAURA R. GREEN,1* VINCENT RADKE,2 RYAN MASON,3 LISA BUSHNELL,4 DAVID W. REIMANN To identify factors related to food worker hand hygiene practices, we collected (i) observational data on food worker (n = 321) hand hygiene practices (hand washing and glove use) and (ii) observational and interview

  6. 4.8 Row Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRETEX (Halifax NS) #1 1054 1999 Mar 05 10:59:16

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 16, 2007 ... For Problems 26–31, find the change-of-basis matrix PB?C from the given basis C to the given basis B of the vector space V . 26. V , B, and C ...

  7. AMERICAN JOURNAL OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE 29:236-246 (1 996) Hematotoxocity Among Chinese Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Heavily Exposed to Benzene Nathaniel Rothman, MD, MPH, MHS, Gui-Lin Li, MD, Mustafa Dosemeci, PhD, William to variation in the method of measuring blood cells, exposure to additional compounds such as toluene [Andrews. As part of a large cohort study of cancer and hemato- toxicity among approximately 75,000 workers exposed

  8. Radiation Protection Policy for Pregnant Workers Procedure: 7.40 Created: 02/03/2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Radiation Protection Policy for Pregnant Workers Procedure: 7.40 Created: 02/03/2005 Version: 1 of the Columbia University to limit the radiation dose to the embryo/fetus of a declared pregnant occupationally to the risks of radiation exposure and to consult with her regarding recommendations for maintaining

  9. "Carve-Outs" from the Workers' Compensation System / 467 David I. Levine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    construction industry. In California, and in 11 other states, construction unions and management can bargain permitted construction unions and employers to "carve out" their own workers' com- pensation system, and pollution regulation in Indonesia.1 Decentralization holds the promise of increasing flexibility

  10. Lockout/Tagout According to OSHA (29 CFR 1910.147), approximately 3 million workers service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockout/Tagout According to OSHA (29 CFR 1910.147), approximately 3 million workers service equipment and if lockout/tagout (LOTO) is not properly implemented they face the risk of injury. LOTO refers. The lockout standard applies when: 1. Employee must remove or bypass a guard or other safety device during

  11. Proposed Regulations Could Limit Access to Affordable Health Coverage for Workers'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Proposed Regulations Could Limit Access to Affordable Health Coverage for Workers' Children for Health Policy Research University of California, Los Angeles Key Findings The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is designed to offer premium subsidies to help eligible individuals

  12. Smart Companies “Wake up” Night Shift Workers Make More Mistakes & More Prone to Accidents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A study from Circadian Technologies, http://www.circadian.com/media/Press.html, a consulting firm which specializes in advising the nation's largest companies on how to manage their extended-hours operations, estimates that maintaining the practice may be costing companies a steep $206 billion annually -- $8,600 per worker.

  13. Colony Fusion in Argentine Ants is Guided by Worker and Queen Cuticular Hydrocarbon Profile Similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckel, Jeffrey A.

    Colony Fusion in Argentine Ants is Guided by Worker and Queen Cuticular Hydrocarbon Profile of unrelated L. humile colonies that share similar CHC profiles. In this study, we paired six southeastern U profile similarity between colonies was associated with colony fusion and intercolony genetic similarity

  14. Layoffs and Worker Effort Theory and Evidence from the North American Automotive Supplier Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkin, Richard J.

    1995-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we examine the effect of layoffs and layoff policies on three measures of worker effort. More specifically, we use data on first-tier automotive suppliers in the U.S. and Canada to test the proposition that ...

  15. Health status and sulfur dioxide exposure of nickel smelter workers and civic laborers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broder, I.; Smith, J.W.; Corey, P.; Holness, L.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examined a group of 143 nickel smelter workers who processed a high sulfide ore, and compared their health status with that of 117 civic laborers. All subjects were studied over the first four days of a week of work, administering a health questionnaire on day 1, measuring their pulmonary function on the morning of day 1 and day 4, and monitoring their personal exposure to SO/sub 2/ and particulates over the same period. The smelter workers were exposed to an average of 0.374 mg/m/sup 3/ of respirable particulates, a threefold higher level than the controls, and to 0.67 ppm of sulfur dioxide, a 40-fold greater amount than the controls, but were found to show no excess of chronic respiratory symptoms and did not differ from the controls either in their baseline pulmonary function or in their change from the morning of day 1 to day 4. However, there were several indicators of a healthy worker effect in the smelter worker group.

  16. Benzene Increases Aneuploidy in the Lymphocytes of Exposed Workers: A Comparison of Data Obtained by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Benzene Increases Aneuploidy in the Lymphocytes of Exposed Workers: A Comparison of Data Obtained Benzene is an established human leukemogen that increases the level of chromosome aberrations in lym and 8 in healthy benzene-exposed human subjects. Metaphase and interphase cells from the peripheral

  17. Decreased levels of CXC-chemokines in serum of benzene-exposed workers identified by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Decreased levels of CXC-chemokines in serum of benzene-exposed workers identified by array (received for review October 3, 2004) Benzene is an important industrial chemical and environmental contaminant that causes leukemia. To obtain mechanistic insight into benzene's mechanism of action, we

  18. accident clean-up workers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident clean-up workers First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY...

  19. ASU SUPERVISOR'S ACCIDENT/ILLNESS INVESTIGATION FORM Return to: ASU HRS Workers' Comp Office, PO Box 32010, Founders Hall, Boone, NC 28608

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    ASU SUPERVISOR'S ACCIDENT/ILLNESS INVESTIGATION FORM Return to: ASU HRS Workers' Comp Office, PO Services Workers' Comp Office within 24 hours or as soon as possible after the accident/illness. IMMEDIATELY report all accidents involving serious bodily injury or death to the Workers' Comp Office (X 6488

  20. Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the RR at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17), and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but no significant increases in lung and kidney disease were seen. The extended follow-up reinforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger combined studies of early workers in the United States using similar methodologies are warranted to refine and clarify radiation risks after protracted exposures.

  1. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in oil mist-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jarvholm, B. (Dept.of Occupational Medicine, Gothenburg, Sweden); Bake, B.; Lavenius, B.; Thiringer, G.; Vokmann, R.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was registered and ventilatory function was determined in 164 men exposed to oil mist. The average exposure time was 16.2 years. One hundred fifty-nine office workers served as controls. The exposed men reported more respiratory symptoms: 14% of the exposed nonsmokers v. 2% of the nonsmoking controls having cough at least three months a year. There were non significant differences between spirometric measurements and chest roentgenograms of the men exposed to oil mist and those of the office workers. The lung function of 25 nonsmoking exposed men was further examined with other lung function tests. The mean values for closing volume, slope of the alveolar plateau, total lung capacity, residual volume, elastic recoil at various lung volumes, and diffusion capacity did not differ significantly.

  2. Arsenic exposure, smoking, and lung cancer in smelter workers--a case-control study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G. (Department of Environmental Hygiene, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden))

    1991-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cohort of 3,916 Swedish copper smelter workers employed for at least 3 months between 1928 and 1967 was followed up through 1981. Arsenic exposure was estimated for different time periods at each workplace within the smelter. Detailed job records were linked to the exposure matrix, thus forming individual cumulative arsenic exposure measures for each smelter worker. Smoking history was collected for 107 lung cancer cases and 214 controls from the cohort. Lung cancer risks were positively related to cumulative arsenic exposure with smoking standardized relative risks ranging from 0.7 to 8.7 in different exposure groups. A negative confounding by smoking was suggested in the higher exposure categories. The interaction between arsenic and smoking for the risk of developing lung cancer was intermediate between additive and multiplicative and appeared less pronounced among heavy smokers.

  3. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP Project W-460

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEISS, E.V.

    2000-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  4. Integrating Walking for Transportation and Physical Activity for Sedentary Office Workers in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieters, Kathleen M.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and Cultural Correlates Social support for walking or companionship can influence walking levels. An Australian study of homemakers and workers (N=1803) found that the odds of achieving recommended levels of walking per day were increased as the number...., church-based social support was explored in rural communities of Missouri, Arkansas, and Tennessee (N=1625) (85). Two types of social support related to church activities were studied including direct information about improving physical activity...

  5. Anticipated Radiological Dose to Worker for Plutonium Stabilization and Handling at PFP - Project W-460

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, E V

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides estimates of the expected whole body and extremity radiological dose, expressed as dose equivalent (DE), to workers conducting planned plutonium (Pu) stabilization processes at the Hanford Site Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The report is based on a time and motion dose study commissioned for Project W-460, Plutonium Stabilization and Handling, to provide personnel exposure estimates for construction work in the PFP storage vault area plus operation of stabilization and packaging equipment at PFP.

  6. No ties that bind : low skill workers, social networks and job search in the Silicon Valley's new economy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajose, Lande U

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is concerned with the relationship between economic growth and social and economic equity. Equity is defined as the economic growth that enables lesser skilled workers to access employment opportunities ...

  7. Access to jobs : transportation barriers faced by low-skilled autoless workers in U.S. metropolitan areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawabata, Mizuki, 1972-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major concerns in today's urban labor market is spatial mismatch, the geographic separation between jobs and workers. Although numerous studies examine spatial mismatch, most of them focus on inner-city minorities, ...

  8. PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION ON POLISTES DOMINULUS WORKERS' SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION ON THE NEST IN RELATION TO IMMATURE BROOD POSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittka, Lars

    video-recorded the position of some workers of two Polistes dominulus colony during a day. We mapped in some Hymenoptera like hornets (YAMANE, 1976), honeybees (HUANG AND OTIS, 1991), bumblebees (PEREBOOM

  9. Evaluation of health effects in Sequoyah Fuels Corporation workers from accidental exposure to uranium hexafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, D.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Swint, M.J.; Kathren, R.L. (Hanford Environmental Health Foundation, Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urine bioassay measurements for uranium and medical laboratory results were studied to determine whether there were any health effects from uranium intake among a group of 31 workers exposed to uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) and hydrolysis products following the accidental rupture of a 14-ton shipping cylinder in early 1986 at the Sequoyah Fuels Corporation uranium conversion facility in Gore, Oklahoma. Physiological indicators studied to detect kidney tissue damage included tests for urinary protein, casts and cells, blood, specific gravity, and urine pH, blood urea nitrogen, and blood creatinine. We concluded after reviewing two years of follow-up medical data that none of the 31 workers sustained any observable health effects from exposure to uranium. The early excretion of uranium in urine showed more rapid systemic uptake of uranium from the lung than is assumed using the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 and Publication 54 models. The urinary excretion data from these workers were used to develop an improved systemic recycling model for inhaled soluble uranium. We estimated initial intakes, clearance rates, kidney burdens, and resulting radiation doses to lungs, kidneys, and bone surfaces. 38 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Grade Classification Step Annual Monthly Hourly SUP 1 Utility Worker 1 $30,948 $2,579 $17.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Grade Classification Step Annual Monthly Hourly SUP 1 Utility Worker 1 $30,948 $2,579 $17.01 Food,859 $18.85 Study Tour Assistant 5 $35,508 $2,959 $19.51 SUP 2 Clerk 2 $32,016 $2,668 $17.59 Library Clerk 3 Clerk 3 $33,144 $2,762 $18.21 Facilities Services Worker 4 $34,308 $2,859 $18.85 Library Clerk

  11. Grade Classification Step Annual Monthly Hourly SUP 1 Utility Worker 1 $31,572 $2,631 $17.35

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    Grade Classification Step Annual Monthly Hourly SUP 1 Utility Worker 1 $31,572 $2,631 $17.35 Food,916 $19.23 Study Tour Assistant 5 $36,216 $3,018 $19.90 SUP 2 Clerk 2 $32,652 $2,721 $17.94 Library Clerk 3 Clerk 3 $33,804 $2,817 $18.57 Facilities Services Worker 4 $34,992 $2,916 $19.23 Library Clerk

  12. The relationship between corporate philosophy and worker efficiency: a case study of the Woodward Governor Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goode, Alicia Paulette

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the United States. In terms of cultural symbols, every worker is given a two year pin to symbolize his or her membership in the company In Forbes magazine Robert McGough writes, Imagery and ceremony play large roles. To work at Woodward you don't merely... of f 985 I was working in the mills department. I did not do very well in this department because on occasion I would break a drill bit and they cost anywhere from $30. 00 to $800. 00. It always seems that the ones I broke were the 18 expensive ones...

  13. Looking for Work, Searching for Workers: U.S. Labor Markets after the Civil War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenbloom, Joshua L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .5 Public road construction 149 0.4 Other workers Coal mining 3,460 8.5 Copper & iron mining 848 2.1 Lumber & saw milling 835 2.0 Quarrying 631 1.5 Coking 443 1.1 Miscellaneous1 3,706 9.1 Total 40,737 100.0 Source: Sheridan 1907: 421. includes... operators faced the prob lem of assembling a workforce in relatively unpopulated areas. When mining operations were begun, operators had little choice but to bring the neces sary labor force to the location of production. As Table 1 shows, coal, copper...

  14. Updated mortality analysis of radiation workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boice, John [Vanderbilt University; Cohen, Sarah [IEI; Mumma, Michael [IEI; Ellis, Elizabeth D [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Boecker, Bruce [LRRI; Brill, Bertrand [Vanderbilt University; Henderson, Brian [University of Southern California, Los Angeles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 5,801 radiation workers, including 2,232 monitored for radionuclide intakes, and 41,169 non-radiation workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). The mean dose from external radiation was 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv), and the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined was 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional nine years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models. All cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the relative risk (RR) at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17) and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but significant increases in lung and kidney disease were not seen. The extended follow-up re-enforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger combined studies of early workers in the United States following similar methodologies are warranted to refine and clarify radiation risks following protracted exposures.

  15. Guidance for Deployment of Mobile Technologies for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heather D. Medema; Ronald K. Farris

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a guidance document prepared for the benefit of commercial nuclear power plants’ (NPPs) supporting organizations and personnel who are considering or undertaking deployment of mobile technology for the purpose of improving human performance and plant status control (PSC) for field workers in an NPP setting. This document especially is directed at NPP business managers, Electric Power Research Institute, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, and other non-Information Technology personnel. This information is not intended to replace basic project management practices or reiterate these processes, but is to support decision-making, planning, and preparation of a business case.

  16. Preliminary synchrotron analysis of lead in hair from a lead smelter worker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.R.; Kempson, I.M.; Naftel, S.J.; Skinner, W.M. (Case Western); (U. South Australia)

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence has been used to study the distribution of lead in a hair sample collected from a lead smelter worker. A mathematical model was used to imitate the transverse scan signal based on the analysis volume and concentration profiles. The results suggest that the Pb originates both from ingestion and environmental exposure, however direct deposition from the environment is the more important source of hair lead. The model could apply equally to any other analysis involving a thin cylindrical sample.

  17. A Basic Overview of the Former Worker Medical Screening Program, December 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartmentDepartment of Energy This documentFormer Worker Medical

  18. Department of Energy Cites Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC for Worker

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrack graphics4 Volume 1DeborahDenverWorker Safety

  19. Workers Pour 1 Million Gallons of Grout into Massive Tanks | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUEWaterWhereChinn WomenWorker

  20. Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium TransferonUS-IndiaVALUEWaterWhereChinn WomenWorkerHanford Site

  1. Workers Safely Tear Down Towers at Manhattan Project Site | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|ofEvents »SSLEnergy Workers Safely Tear Down Towers

  2. Workers at Hanford Site Achieve Recovery Act Legacy Cleanup Goals Ahead of Schedule

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads|ofEvents »SSLEnergy Workers Safely Tear Down

  3. Worker Safety and Health Program (10 CFR 851/DOE 0440.1B) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri QuinnEnergy Worker Safety

  4. Worker Safety and Health Program (10 CFR 851/DOE O 440.1B) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri QuinnEnergy Worker

  5. WIPP Workers Reach Two Million Man-Hours Without a Lost-Time Accident

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards Contract for19, 20142,pril 2Workers

  6. Constructing Predictive Estimates for Worker Exposure to Radioactivity During Decommissioning: Analysis of Completed Decommissioning Projects - Master Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dettmers, Dana Lee; Eide, Steven Arvid

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of completed decommissioning projects is used to construct predictive estimates for worker exposure to radioactivity during decommissioning activities. The preferred organizational method for the completed decommissioning project data is to divide the data by type of facility, whether decommissioning was performed on part of the facility or the complete facility, and the level of radiation within the facility prior to decommissioning (low, medium, or high). Additional data analysis shows that there is not a downward trend in worker exposure data over time. Also, the use of a standard estimate for worker exposure to radioactivity may be a best estimate for low complete storage, high partial storage, and medium reactor facilities; a conservative estimate for some low level of facility radiation facilities (reactor complete, research complete, pits/ponds, other), medium partial process facilities, and high complete research facilities; and an underestimate for the remaining facilities. Limited data are available to compare different decommissioning alternatives, so the available data are reported and no conclusions can been drawn. It is recommended that all DOE sites and the NRC use a similar method to document worker hours, worker exposure to radiation (person-rem), and standard industrial accidents, injuries, and deaths for all completed decommissioning activities.

  7. Urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers relative to job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bo Chen; Yunping Hu; Lixing Zheng; Qiangyi Wang; Yuanfen Zhou; Taiyi Jin [Fudan University, Shanghai (China). School of Public Health

    2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    1-Hydroxypyrene (1-OHP) is a biomarker of recent exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We investigated whether urinary 1-OHP concentrations in Chinese coke oven workers (COWs) are modulated by job category, respirator usage, and cigarette smoking. The present cross-sectional study measured urinary 1-OHP concentrations in 197 COWs from Coking plant I and 250 COWs from Coking plant II, as well as 220 unexposed referents from Control plant I and 56 referents from Control plant II. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations (geometric mean, {mu}mol/mol creatinine) were 5.18 and 4.21 in workers from Coking plants I and II, respectively. The highest 1-OHP levels in urine were found among topside workers including lidmen, tar chasers, and whistlers. Benchmen had higher 1-OHP levels than other workers at the sideoven. Above 75% of the COWs exceeded the recommended occupational exposure limit of 2.3 {mu}mol/mol creatinine. Respirator usage and increased body mass index (BMI) slightly reduced 1-OHP levels in COWs. Cigarette smoking significantly increased urinary 1-OHP levels in unexposed referents but had no effect in COWs. Chinese COWs, especially topside workers and benchmen, are exposed to high levels of PAHs. Urinary 1-OHP concentrations appear to be modulated by respirator usage and BMI in COWs, as well as by smoking in unexposed referents.

  8. Sun Protection Intervention for Highway Workers: Long-Term Efficacy of UV Photography and Skin Cancer Information on Men’s Protective Cognitions and Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-9151-2 ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sun Protection Intervention foramong outdoor workers in key sun- safety behaviors. Am JCA, Maddock JE, Cottrill SD. Sun protection behaviors and

  9. U.S. Department of Energy worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with environmental restoration and waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.; Travis, C.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Risk Management; Simek, M.A.; Sutherland, J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Scofield, P.A. [Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a worker health risk evaluation methodology for assessing risks associated with Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM). The methodology is appropriate for estimating worker risks across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex at both programmatic and site-specific levels. This document supports the worker health risk methodology used to perform the human health risk assessment portion of the DOE Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) although it has applications beyond the PEIS, such as installation-wide worker risk assessments, screening-level assessments, and site-specific assessments.

  10. Worker Protection Program for DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees Guide for Use with DOE O 440.1B

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide provides suggestions and alternative approaches that DOE elements may consider in implementing their worker protection program. Cancels DOE G 440.1-1.

  11. Elevated serum IgE, eosinophilia, and lung function in rubber workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bascom, R.; Baser, M.E.; Thomas, R.J.; Fisher, J.F.; Yang, W.N.; Baker, J.H. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously reported an outbreak of acute respiratory illness associated with eosinophilia in a group of rubber workers who performed a thermoinjection process in which synthetic rubber was heated and then injected onto metal molds. This study was conducted to determine if persistent respiratory health effects were associated with this work area and to explore the possible allergic etiology of this syndrome. A survey was performed 1 mo after a major improvement in area ventilation and consisted of baseline, cross-shift, and cross-week spirometry; diffusing capacity; serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), total eosinophil count; and skin patch testing. Baseline lung function, cross-shift, and cross-week spirometry were not significantly worse in the exposed group as compared to the control group. However, either eosinophilia (greater than 450/mm3) or elevated serum IgE (greater than 470 ng/ml) were present in 44% of exposed workers vs. 11% of the control group (p = .003). Nine months later, neither eosinophilia nor elevated IgE were associated with employment in this work area. We conclude that employment in the thermoinjection process was associated with eosinophilia and elevated IgE, which suggests sensitization to one of the components of the rubber, although no effect on pulmonary function could be demonstrated.

  12. Cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer in smelter workers: a dose-response study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaerup, L.P.; Pershagen, G.; Wall, S.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cause-specific mortality was followed through 1981 in a cohort of 3,916 male Swedish smelter workers employed for at least 3 months from 1928 through 1967. Arsenic levels in the air of all workplaces within the smelter were estimated for three different time periods. Using this exposure matrix and detailed information of the work history, cumulative arsenic exposure could be computed for each worker. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated for several dose categories using age-specific mortality rates from the county where the smelter was situated. A positive dose-response relationship was found between cumulative arsenic exposure and lung cancer mortality with an overall SMR of 372 (304-450, 95% confidence interval). The lung cancer mortality was related to the estimated average intensity of exposure to arsenic but not to the duration. No positive dose-response relationship was found between arsenic and ischemic heart disease or cerebrovascular disease. There was also no evident dose-response relationship between estimated exposure to sulfur dioxide and lung cancer.

  13. The Worker Component At The World Trade Center Cleanup: Addressing Cultural And Language Differences In Emergency Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, B.; Carpenter, C.; Blair. D.

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On September 11, 2001, the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC) caused astronomical loss of life and property. Systems in place to manage disaster response were strained to the limit because key first responders were among the casualties when the twin towers collapsed. In addition, the evolution of events required immediate response in a rapidly changing and extremely hazardous situation. Rescue, recovery, and clean up became an overpowering and sustained effort that would utilize the resources of federal, state and local governments and agencies. One issue during the response to the WTC disaster site that did not receive much attention was that of the limited and non-English speaking worker. The Operating Engineers National HAZMAT Program (OENHP), with its history of a Hispanic Outreach Program, was acutely aware of this issue with the Hispanic worker. The Hispanic population comprises approximately 27% of the population of New York City (1). The extremely unfortunate and tragic events of that day provided an opportunity to not only provide assistance for the Hispanic workers, but also to apply lessons learned and conduct studies on worker training with language barriers in a real life environment. However, due to the circumstances surrounding this tragedy, the study of these issues was conducted primarily by observation. Through partnerships with other organizations such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the New York Health Department, the New York Department of Design and Construction (DDC), the New York Committee for Occupational Safety and Health (NYCOSH), and private companies such as 3M and MSA, OENHP was able to provide translated information on hazards, protective measures, fit testing of respirators, and site specific safety and health training. The OENHP translated materials on hazards and how to protect workers into Spanish to assist in getting the information to the limited and non- English speaking workers.

  14. RSE Table 1.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" " Unit:

  15. RSE Table 1.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" " Unit:2

  16. RSE Table 10.10 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.10

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" " Unit:20

  17. RSE Table 10.11 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.11

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" " Unit:201

  18. RSE Table 10.12 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.12

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" " Unit:2012

  19. RSE Table 10.13 Relative Standard Errors for Table 10.13

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" " Unit:20123

  20. RSE Table 2.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 2.1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "

  1. RSE Table 3.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1 Relative

  2. RSE Table 3.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1 Relative2

  3. RSE Table 3.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1 Relative25

  4. RSE Table 4.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1

  5. RSE Table 4.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "12 Relative

  6. RSE Table 5.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "12 Relative1

  7. RSE Table 5.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "12

  8. RSE Table 5.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "124 Relative

  9. RSE Table 5.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "124

  10. RSE Table 5.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1246

  11. RSE Table 5.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "12467

  12. RSE Table 5.8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "124678

  13. RSE Table 7.10 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.10

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1246780

  14. RSE Table 7.3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "12467803

  15. RSE Table 7.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "124678034

  16. RSE Table 7.5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "1246780345

  17. RSE Table 7.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "12467803456

  18. RSE Table 7.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.7

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;" "124678034567

  19. RSE Table 7.9 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.9

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"

  20. RSE Table 8.2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 8.2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site.1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 1.1;"2 Relative Standard

  1. RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC) |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |D I S P URFIof Clean

  2. Hematotoxicity in Workers Exposed to Low Levels of Benzene Qing Lan1,*, Luoping Zhang2,*, Guilan Li3, Roel Vermeulen1, Rona S. Weinberg4, Mustafa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Hematotoxicity in Workers Exposed to Low Levels of Benzene Qing Lan1,*, Luoping Zhang2,*, Guilan Li for Cancer Research, NCI, NIH, DHHS, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. Abstract Benzene is known to have toxic effects million (ppm) remains uncertain. In a study of 250 workers exposed to benzene, white blood cell

  3. Worker productivity and ventilation rate in a call center: Analyses of time-series data for a group of registered nurses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Price, Phillip; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas; Dibartolomeo, Dennis

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the relationship of ventilation rates with the performance of advice nurses working in a call center. Ventilation rates were manipulated; temperatures, humidities, and CO{sub 2} concentrations were monitored; and worker performance data, with 30-minute resolution, were collected. Multivariate linear regression was used to investigate the association of worker performance with indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentration (which increases with decreasing ventilation rate per worker) and with building ventilation rate. Results suggest that the effect of ventilation rate on worker performance in this call center was very small (probably less than 1%) or nil, over most of the range of ventilation rate (roughly 12 L s{sup -1} to 48 L s{sup -1} per person). However, there is some evidence of worker performance improvements of 2% or more when the indoor CO{sub 2} concentration exceeded the outdoor concentration by less than 75 ppm.

  4. Effect of the {delta}-aminolevulinate dehydratase polymorphism on the accumulation of lead in bone and blood in lead smelter workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, D.E.B.; Chettle, D.R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy] [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Wetmur, J.G.; Desnick, R.J. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)] [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Robin, J.P. [Noranda Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Noranda Inc., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Boulay, D.; Richard, N.S. [Brunswick Mining and Smelting Corp. Ltd., Belledune, New Brunswick (Canada). Occupational Health Services] [Brunswick Mining and Smelting Corp. Ltd., Belledune, New Brunswick (Canada). Occupational Health Services; Gordon, C.L.; Webber, C.E. [Hamilton Health Sciences Corp., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine] [Hamilton Health Sciences Corp., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead inhibition of the zinc metalloenzyme {delta}-aminolevulinate dehydratase (ALAD) is one of the most sensitive indicators of blood lead levels. Whole blood lead, serum lead, and ALAD genotype were determined for 381 lead smelter workers, including 70 workers expressing the ALAD allele, whose blood lead elevations were observed for more than 20 years of employment. The same employees demonstrated higher serum lead levels. Using a cumulative blood lead index (CBLI) for each worker, based on individual blood lead histories, and in vivo X-ray fluorescence measurements of bone lead to estimate total lead body burden, the slopes of linear relations of bone lead to CBLI were greater for workers homoallelic for ALAD, indicating more efficient uptake of lead from blood into bone. This effect was most significant in calcaneus bone and for workers hired since 1977. Decreased transfer of blood lead into bone in individuals expressing the ALAD allele contrasted with increased blood lead.

  5. Grid porting of Bhabha scattering code through a master-worker scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Lorca; Jose Luis Vazquez-Poletti; Eduardo Huedo; Ignacio M. Llorente

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program calculating Bhabha scattering at high energy colliders is considered for porting to the EGEE Grid infrastructure. The program code, which is a result of the aITALC project, is ported by using a master-worker operating scheme. The job submission, execution and monitoring are implemented using the GridWay metascheduler. The unattended execution of jobs turned out to be complete and rather efficient, even when pre-knowledge of the grid is absent. While the batch of jobs remains organized at the user's side, the actual computation was carried out within the phenogrid virtual organization. The scientific results support the use of the small angle Bhabha scattering for the luminosity measurements of the International Linear Collider project.

  6. Metabolites of arsenic and increased DNA damage of p53 gene in arsenic plant workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen Weihua, E-mail: Dongsijiehua@sina.com [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Public Health College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No. 13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan City, Hubei, 430030 (China); Wen Jinghua [Guizhou College of Finance and Economics, No. 276, Chongguan Road, Guiyang, Guizhou, 550004 (China); Lu Lin [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Liu Hua [The First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical College, No. 295 Xichang Road, Kunming, Yunnan, 650032 (China); Yang Jun; Cheng Huirong [Department of Occupational Health, Yunnan Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 158, Dongsi Street, Kunming, Yunnan, 650022 (China); Che Wangjun [The First Division of Public Health, Kunming Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 4, Ziyun Road, Xishan District, Kunming, Yunnan 650228 (China); Li Liang [Honghe Zhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, No. 1, Guannan Road, Mengzi City, Yunnan, 661100 (China); Zhang Guanbei [Yunnan Institute for Drug Abuse, Kunming, 650028 (China)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that monomethylarsonous acid is more cytotoxic and genotoxic than arsenate and arsenite, which may attribute to the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we used hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry to determine three arsenic species in urine of workers who had been working in arsenic plants,and calculated primary and secondary methylation indexes. The damages of exon 5, 6, 8 of p53 gene were determined by the method developed by Sikorsky, et al. Results show that the concentrations of each urinary arsenic species,and damage indexes of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene in the exposed population were significantly higher, but SMI was significantly lower than in the control group. The closely positive correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and PMI,MMA, DMA were found, but there was closely negative correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and SMI. Those findings suggested that DNA damage of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene existed in the population occupationally exposed to arsenic. For exon 5, the important factors may include the model of arsenic metabolic transformation, the concentrations of MMA and DMA, and the MMA may be of great importance. - Research Highlights: > In our study, the mean SMI for workers came from arsenic plants is 4.06, so they may be in danger. > There are more MMA, there are more damage of exon 5 of p53 gene. > MMA and damage of exon 5 of p53 gene may be useful biomarkers to assess adverse health effects caused by arsenic.

  7. The role of the school social worker in family involvement as identified by family specialists and parents in selected title 1 schools in north east independent school district in san antonio, texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada, Gloria Lou

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the influence of social workers placed at the elementary school level, who work with low-socioeconomic families. The intent of the study was to examine the role of the social worker, at identified Title ...

  8. The role of the school social worker in family involvement as identified by family specialists and parents in selected title I schools in North East Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canada, Gloria Lou

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the influence of social workers placed at the elementary school level, who work with low-socioeconomic families. The intent of the study was to examine the role of the social worker, at identified ...

  9. CORNELL'S QUARTERLY MAGAZINE SPRING 2010 19 -LIBRARY STUDENT WORKERS 20 -CORNELL CARES DAY 26 -MENS BASKETBALL TRIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    University's approach to entrepreneurship is focused on experiential learning, teaching students how to thinkCORNELL'S QUARTERLY MAGAZINE SPRING 2010 19 - LIBRARY STUDENT WORKERS 20 - CORNELL CARES DAY 26 - MENS BASKETBALL TRIO NURTURING BIG IDEAS CORNELL GIVES HEAD START TO STUDENT INNOVATORS #12;EZRA Spring

  10. Abstract--Health information access by low-literate community health workers is a pressing need of community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, Roni

    in developing countries. These regions have the highest maternal mortality and neonatal mortality ratios-mail: tongia@cmu.edu). He is also a Senior Fellow at the Center for Study of Science, Technology, and Policy improvement in health care" [1]. Given the low-literate background of many community health workers (CHWs

  11. UCSD Medical Center Ergonomic Funding Assistance Form Purpose: The UCSD Medical Center Workers' Compensation Unit (WCU) currently has funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    UCSD Medical Center Ergonomic Funding Assistance Form Purpose: The UCSD Medical Center Workers' Compensation Unit (WCU) currently has funds available to assist departments implement ergonomic recommendations identified during an ergonomic assessment. This program will match up to 50% of the cost of identified

  12. Worker Safety and Health Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) Federal and contractor employees in effectively developing, managing, and implementing a worker safety and health program. Cancels DOE G 440.1-1A and DOE G 440.1-8. Adm Chg 1, dated 3-22-13.

  13. Worker Safety and Health Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) Federal and contractor employees in effectively developing, managing, and implementing a worker safety and health program. Cancels DOE G 440.1-1A and DOE G 440.1-8. Adm Chg 1, dated 3-22-13, cancels DOE G 440.1-1B.

  14. Fall Protection for Roof Workers Before working on roofs above 7 feet,1 Physical Plant staff should implement an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Fall Protection for Roof Workers Before working on roofs above 7 ½ feet,1 Physical Plant staff practical fall protection method. Most roofs at CSUF qualify as monolithic roofing systems. It may involve a single layer of sealed rubber. Multiple unit roofing systems utilize shingles or tiles. The two roofing

  15. City of Pittsburgh Neighborhoods -Census 2000 Social and Economic Profiles -October 2002 Total Workers 16 years and over 280

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    .4% Population for whom Poverty Status is determined 836 Income below poverty level Income below 200% of poverty level Poverty Status in 1999 396 47.4% Workers 16 and over 280 Work in City of Pittsburgh Work outside With Social Security Income Households with Social Security Income 55 19.1% Population for whom Poverty Status

  16. Allegheny County Municipalities -Census 2000 Social and Economic Profiles -December 2002 Total Workers 16 years and over 567

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    .0% Population for whom Poverty Status is determined 1,030 Income below poverty level Income below 200% of poverty level Poverty Status in 1999 52 5.0% Workers 16 and over 567 Work in municipality of residence,506 With Social Security Income Households with Social Security Income 360 23.9% Population for whom Poverty

  17. ASU SUPERVISOR'S ACCIDENT/ILLNESS INVESTIGATION FORM Return to: ASU Office of Human Resources, Workers' Comp Office,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    ASU SUPERVISOR'S ACCIDENT/ILLNESS INVESTIGATION FORM Return to: ASU Office of Human Resources or as soon as possible after the accident/illness. IMMEDIATELY report all accidents involving serious bodily injury or death to the HR Workers' Comp Office (X 6488) ACCIDENT DATA 1. Name of Employee: SS#: SEX: Male

  18. Evaluation of thyroid radioactivity measurement data from Hanford workers, 1944--1946

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikenberry, T.A.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the preliminary results of an evaluation conducted in support of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The primary objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at the Hanford Site since 1944. A secondary objective is to make information that HEDR staff members used in estimate radiation doses available to the public. The objectives of this report to make available thyroid measurement data from Hanford workers for the year 1944 through 1946, and to investigate the suitability of those data for use in the HEDR dose estimation process. An important part of this investigation was to provide a description of the uncertainty associated with the data. Lack of documentation on thyroid measurements from this period required that assumptions be made to perform data evaluations. These assumptions introduce uncertainty into the evaluations that could be significant. It is important to recognize the nature of these assumptions, the inherent uncertainty, and the propagation of this uncertainty, and the propagation of this uncertainty through data evaluations to any conclusions that can be made by using the data. 15 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  19. USING STRUCTURAL EQUATIONS MODELLING TO UNRAVEL THE INFLUENCE OF LAND USE PATTERNS ON TRAVEL BEHAVIOR OF URBAN ADULT WORKERS OF PUGET SOUND REGION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Abreu e Silva, João; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior observation in the Puget Sound region: sampleHighway Administration and the Puget Sound Regional Council,OF URBAN ADULT WORKERS OF PUGET SOUND REGION João de Abreu e

  20. Using Structural Equations Modelling to Unravel the Influence of Land Use Patterns on Travel Behavior of Urban Adult Workers of Puget Sound Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    e Silva, Joao de Abreu; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior observation in the Puget Sound region: sampleHighway Administration and the Puget Sound Regional Council,OF URBAN ADULT WORKERS OF PUGET SOUND REGION João de Abreu e

  1. University of Virginia Agency 207 Accident Report for Workers' Compensation Claim Please complete this form and turn it in to your department's Human Resource Coordinator or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    University of Virginia Agency 207 Accident Report for Workers' Compensation Claim Please complete Accident Reported: __________Reported Accident to:___________________________________ Was Supervisor(es)___________________________________________________________________ Information About the Nature and Cause of Accident Machine, tool, or object causing injury

  2. Massachusetts Beryllium Screening Program for Former Workers of Wyman-Gordon, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, L.D.

    2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to provide medical screening to former workers of Wyman-Gordon Company, Norton Abrasives, and MIT/Nuclear Metals (NMI) in order to prevent and minimize the health impact of diseases caused by site related workplace exposures to beryllium. The program was developed in response to a request by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that had been authorized by Congress in Section 3162 of the 1993 Defense Authorization Act, urging the DOE to â??carry out a program for the identification and ongoing evaluation of current and former DOE employees who are subjected to significant health risks during such employment." This program, funded by the DOE, was an amendment to the medical surveillance program for former DOE workers at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This programâ??s scope included workers who had worked for organizations that provided beryllium products or materials to the DOE as part of their nuclear weapons program. These organizations have been identified as Beryllium Vendors.

  3. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: chronic effects of diesel exhaust on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hundred and eighty-three (283) male diesel bus garage workers from four garages in two cities were examined to determine if there was excess chronic respiratory morbidity related to diesel exposure. The dependent variables were respiratory symptoms, radiographic interpretation for pneumoconiosis, and pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and flow rates). Independent variables included race, age, smoking, drinking, height, and tenure (as surrogate measure of exposure). Exposure-effect relationships within the study population showed no detectable associations of symptoms with tenure. There was an apparent association of pulmonary function and tenure. Seven workers (2.5%) had category 1 pneumoconiosis (three rounded opacities, two irregular opacities, and one with both rounded and irregular). The study population was also compared to a nonexposed blue-collar population. After indirect adjustment for age, race, and smoking, the study population had elevated prevalences of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, but there was no association with tenure. Dyspnea showed a dose-response trend but no apparent increase in prevalence. Mean percent predicted pulmonary function of the study population was greater than 100%, i.e., elevated above the comparison population. These data show there is an apparent effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function but not chest radiographs. Respiratory symptoms are high compared to blue-collar workers, but there is no relationship with tenure.

  4. All row, planar fault detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles Jens; Pinnow, Kurt Walter; Ratterman, Joseph D; Smith, Brian Edward

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus, program product and method for detecting nodal faults may simultaneously cause designated nodes of a cell to communicate with all nodes adjacent to each of the designated nodes. Furthermore, all nodes along the axes of the designated nodes are made to communicate with their adjacent nodes, and the communications are analyzed to determine if a node or connection is faulty.

  5. Sport Scholarship programme Rowing at Birmingham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinke, Dietmar

    included Silver at the World Cup in Linz 2007; 5th at the World Cup in Amsterdam 2007; 4th at Lucerne 2007, winning gold in Bled, silver in Munich and bronze in Lucerne. She has already been selected for the women

  6. Gas turbine row #1 steam cooled vane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunha, Frank J. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design for a vane segment having a closed-loop steam cooling system is provided. The vane segment comprises an outer shroud, an inner shroud and an airfoil, each component having a target surface on the inside surface of its walls. A plurality of rectangular waffle structures are provided on the target surface to enhance heat transfer between each component and cooling steam. Channel systems are provided in the shrouds to improve the flow of steam through the shrouds. Insert legs located in cavities in the airfoil are also provided. Each insert leg comprises outer channels located on a perimeter of the leg, each outer channel having an outer wall and impingement holes on the outer wall for producing impingement jets of cooling steam to contact the airfoil's target surface. Each insert leg further comprises a plurality of substantially rectangular-shaped ribs located on the outer wall and a plurality of openings located between outer channels of the leg to minimize cross flow degradation.

  7. CSLB ROW Forms | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation,

  8. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses of4

  9. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses of47

  10. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses of478

  11. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses of4787

  12. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses of47878

  13. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses

  14. " Row: End Uses;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182 End Uses8 End

  15. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of1

  16. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed Floorspace

  17. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed Floorspace3

  18. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed Floorspace31

  19. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed9.1 Enclosed

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed9.1

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1.S4.1.4 Number468143

  3. BLM ROW Grant Template | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass Conversions Inc JumpIM 2011-003 Jump to: Jump to:Management | OpenBLMROW

  4. Update rows? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlin BaxinUmwelt Management AG UMaAGUnitilMichigan JumpWaterloo UWrows?

  5. Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Letter issued to Los Alamos National Security, LLC, related to Worker Beryllium Exposure during Machining at the Los Alamos National Laboratorys Beryllium Technology Facility, May 29, 2013 (WEL-2013-01)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015Visiting Strong,Women @ Energy:Terri Quinn Women12.1AWorkWorker6,29,

  6. 'Green-in-Three' IT Solutions Protecting Workers and the Environment - 12526

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckman, Todd [MSA Hanford, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management (EM), DOE Richland Operations Office (RL), Mission Support Alliance (MSA), and Lockheed Martin Services, Inc. (LMSI), Information Technology partnered in an effort to reduce environmental impacts, energy use, and operating costs and improve worker safety through consolidation, centralization, and standardization of Information Technology (IT) assets on the Hanford Site. Green-in-Three is an IT Value strategy, which is moving Hanford from an inefficient, antiquated 20. Century IT architecture to a smart, green, flexible 21. Century IT architecture that delivers information anywhere at any time to Hanford Mission partners. The 'Green-in-three' efforts to date have had a significant impact on meeting and exceeding the overall IT Value Strategy to decrease IT maintenance and delivery costs and move Hanford into a smart, green, and flexible 21. Century IT architecture. Some of the results and impacts are as follows: - Thirteen data centers were reduced to two, freeing up approximately 279 m{sup 2} (3000 ft{sup 2})) of space; - Reduced data center energy use 50%, from 120,000 to 60,000 kW; - Excessed 9 metric tons (10 tons) of server equipment; - Removed and properly disposed of 2871 kg (6,300 lb) lead acid batteries; - Projects saved over $1 M in fiber and copper cable installation through 2011; - Developed or improved partnerships with local, state, and federal agencies, Tribes, and Site contractors; - Increased wireless coverage for improved access to remote areas. Moving forward to 2012, the impact of these accomplishments will be realized in the years to come. IT services will be delivered in days instead of months. Field personnel will have access to information at the point of performance, reducing travel time. Remote monitoring, telemetry, and/or video can be conducted using the wireless network; reducing travel time for field inspections. Emergency personnel have access to critical information at the incident site, saving valuable time. Full deployment of the VoIP technologies will reduce power use by 1,000,000 kWh/yr for telecommunications equipment, driving home the IT Value Strategy of Green-in-Three. (author)

  7. March 7, 2012, USW Health Safety and Environment Conference Presentations - DOE Worker Safety and Health Regulatory Enforcement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECSEnergy Plans andWorker Safety and

  8. Issue 01 September 2009 This issue: 1 STFC Innovations Ltd to lead ESA's UK technology transfer work 2 RSE/STFC Enterprise Fellowships 3 RSE/STFC Enterprise Fellowships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a wide number of areas including; to improve air purification in hospital intensive care wards, produce, and help manufacturers to develop or improve new and existing products. STFC Innovations Ltd has a long successfully established 15 spin-out companies which have raised more than £25m of external investment between

  9. Carcinogenesis and Inflammatory Effects of Plutonium-Nitrate Retention in an Exposed Nuclear Worker and Beagle Dogs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Christopher E.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Brooks, Antone L.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Patton, Kristin M.; McComish, Stacey; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; Morgan, William F.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The genetic and inflammatory response pathways elicited following plutonium exposure in archival lung tissue of an occupationally exposed human and experimentally exposed beagle dogs were investigated. These pathways include: tissue injury, apoptosis and gene expression modifications related to carcinogenesis and inflammation. In order to determine which pathways are involved, multiple lung samples from a plutonium exposed worker (Case 0269), a human control (Case 0385), and plutonium exposed beagle dogs were examined using histological staining and immunohistochemistry. Examinations were performed to identify target tissues at risk of radiation-induced fibrosis, inflammation, and carcinogenesis. Case 0269 showed interstitial fibrosis in peripheral and subpleural regions of the lung, but no pulmonary tumors. In contrast, the dogs with similar and higher doses showed pulmonary tumors primarily in brochiolo-alveolar, peripheral and subpleural alveolar regions. The TUNEL assay showed slight elevation of apoptosis in tracheal mucosa, tumor cells, and nuclear debris was present in the inflammatory regions of alveoli and lymph nodes of both the human and the dogs. The expression of apoptosis and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes was slightly but not significantly elevated in protein or gene levels compared to that of the control samples. In the beagles, mucous production was increased in the airway epithelial goblet cells and glands of trachea, and a number of chemokine/cytokine genes showed positive immunoreactivity. This analysis of archival tissue from an accidentally exposed worker and in a large animal model provides valuable information on the effects of long-term retention of plutonium in the respiratory tract and the histological evaluation study may impact mechanistic studies of radiation carcinogenesis.

  10. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: acute effects of NO/sub 2/ and respirable particulate on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Personal samples of nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/) and respirable particulate (RP) were collected over the shift on 232 workers in four diesel bus garages. Response was assessed by an acute respiratory questionnaire and before and after shift spirometry. Measures of exposure to NO/sub 2/ and RP were associated with work-related symptoms of cough; itching, burning, or watering eyes; difficult or labored breathing; chest tightness; and wheeze. The prevalence of burning eyes, headaches, difficult or labored breathing, nausea, and wheeze experienced at work were higher in the diesel bus garage workers than in a comparison population of battery workers, while the prevalence of headaches was reduced. Mean reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak flow, and flows at 50 and 75% of FVC were not obviously different from zero. There was no detectable association of exposure to NO/sub 2/ or respirable particulate and acute reductions in pulmonary function. Workers who often had respiratory work-related symptoms generally had a slightly greater mean acute reduction in FEV1 and FEF50 than did those who did not have these symptoms, but these differences were not statistically significant.

  11. Non-Mandatory Appendix E to 1910. 900: Summary of the MSD/Ergonomics Program The purpose of this standard to reduce musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) developed by workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choobineh, Fred

    1 Non-Mandatory Appendix E to §1910. 900: Summary of the MSD/Ergonomics Program Standard Purpose involve tasks that lead to MSDs. The principle behind ergonomics is that by fitting the job to the worker employees. If an adequate quick fix is implemented, an MSD/Ergonomics program need not be implemented. Job

  12. Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Hazard Communication (Worker Right to Know) As a UW employee, you have the right to know about hazards to which you may be exposed as part of your work assignment. The University's Hazard Communication the hazard communication training you need? A combination of hazard communication training resources

  13. VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlers, Guenter

    VISITOR SAFETY TRAINING CHECKLIST: Free Electron Laser (FEL) Laboratory Under California law and campus policy, the University must provide documented safety training for workers. For FEL visitors, this generally means covering the basic guidelines/tasks below. The FEL management loosely defines a "visitor

  14. TsKgel ReVeRseD PhAse Tosoh biosCienCe GMbh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    for a broad range of applications in R&D, quality control or reaction monitoring. TSKgel ODS-80, ODS-100 and ODS-120 silica based RPC columns offer high resolution power for various applications. For high-speed separations we recommend the porous, silica-based TSKgel Super and ODS-140HTP series or the nonporous

  15. 22 RSE n 5 juillet-aot 2010 www.rsemag.com Les PME face aux risques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    marginal et, il faut bien le dire, circonscrit à la littérature anglo- saxonne. Hasle et Limborg en 2006

  16. "RSE Table C1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C1.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B Winter13434.1.

  17. "RSE Table C10.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B Winter13434.1.1.

  18. "RSE Table C10.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.2;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B

  19. "RSE Table C10.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C10.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3. Relative

  20. "RSE Table C11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table C11.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3. Relative1.3.

  1. "RSE Table C12.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C12.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3.

  2. "RSE Table C2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C2.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3.C2.1. Relative

  3. "RSE Table C3.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C3.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3.C2.1.

  4. "RSE Table C4.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C4.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3.C2.1.C4.1.

  5. "RSE Table C9.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table C9.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data from03.4B3.C2.1.C4.1.C9.1.

  6. "RSE Table E1.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E1.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data

  7. "RSE Table E13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative Standard Errors

  8. "RSE Table E13.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.2;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative Standard

  9. "RSE Table E13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table E13.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative Standard3.

  10. "RSE Table E2.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E2.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative Standard3.E2.1.

  11. "RSE Table E7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative

  12. "RSE Table E7.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table E7.2;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2. Relative

  13. "RSE Table N1.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N1.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2. Relative.3.

  14. "RSE Table N11.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2. Relative.3.1.

  15. "RSE Table N11.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.2;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.

  16. "RSE Table N11.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3. Relative

  17. "RSE Table N11.4. Relative Standard Errors for Table N11.4;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3. Relative4.

  18. "RSE Table N13.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3.

  19. "RSE Table N13.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N13.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3.3. Relative

  20. "RSE Table N5.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3.3.

  1. "RSE Table N5.2. Relative Standard Errors for Table N5.2;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3.3.2.

  2. "RSE Table N7.1. Relative Standard Errors for Table N7.1;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3.3.2.N7.1.

  3. "RSE Table N8.3. Relative Standard Errors for Table N8.3;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. AppliancesTotal" "(Data1. Relative2.3.3.2.N7.1.3.

  4. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings from the U.S. EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, Mark; Mirer, Anna

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some prior research in office buildings has associated higher indoor temperatures even within the recommended thermal comfort range with increased worker symptoms. We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We investigated relationships between building-related symptoms and thermal metrics constructed from real-time measurements. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95percent confidence intervals in adjusted logistic regression models with general estimating equations, overall and by season. Winter indoor temperatures spanned the recommended winter comfort range; summer temperatures were mostly colder than the recommended summer range. Increasing indoor temperatures, overall, were associated with increases in few symptoms. Higher winter indoor temperatures, however, were associated with increases in all symptoms analyzed. Higher summer temperatures, above 23oC, were associated with decreases in most symptoms. Humidity ratio, a metric of absolute humidity, showed few clear associations. Thus, increased symptoms with higher temperatures within the thermal comfort range were found only in winter. In summer, buildings were overcooled, and only the higher observed temperatures were within the comfort range; these were associated with decreased symptoms. Confirmation of these findings would suggest that thermal management guidelines consider health effects as well as comfort.

  5. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  6. Land and Water Use, CO2 Emissions, and Worker Radiological Exposure Factors for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brett W Carlsen; Brent W Dixon; Urairisa Pathanapirom; Eric Schneider; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. AUlt; Allen G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Fuel Cycle Technologies program is preparing to evaluate several proposed nuclear fuel cycle options to help guide and prioritize Fuel Cycle Technology research and development. Metrics are being developed to assess performance against nine evaluation criteria that will be used to assess relevant impacts resulting from all phases of the fuel cycle. This report focuses on four specific environmental metrics. • land use • water use • CO2 emissions • radiological Dose to workers Impacts associated with the processes in the front-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, mining through enrichment and deconversion of DUF6 are summarized from FCRD-FCO-2012-000124, Revision 1. Impact estimates are developed within this report for the remaining phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. These phases include fuel fabrication, reactor construction and operations, fuel reprocessing, and storage, transport, and disposal of associated used fuel and radioactive wastes. Impact estimates for each of the phases of the nuclear fuel cycle are given as impact factors normalized per unit process throughput or output. These impact factors can then be re-scaled against the appropriate mass flows to provide estimates for a wide range of potential fuel cycles. A companion report, FCRD-FCO-2013-000213, applies the impact factors to estimate and provide a comparative evaluation of 40 fuel cycles under consideration relative to these four environmental metrics.

  7. Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 and Historic Assessement of the Happy Valley Worker Camp Roane County, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New South Associates

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Parcel ED-3 was the location of a portion of 'Happy Valley', a temporary worker housing area occupied from 1943 to 1947 during the construction of the K-25 Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The project was carried out under subcontract for the Department of Energy. The survey report will be used in the preparation of an Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). New South Associates conducted a Phase I Archaeological Survey of Parcel ED-3 at the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation in Roane County, Tennessee. The survey was conducted in two parts. The first survey was carried out in 2008 and covered an area measuring approximately 110 acres. The second survey took place in 2009 and focused on 72 acres west of the first survey area. The objective of the surveys was to identify any archaeological remains associated with Happy Valley and any additional sites on the property and to assess these sites for National Register eligibility. New South Associates also conducted a historic assessment to gather information on Happy Valley. This historic assessment was used in conjunction with the archaeological survey to evaluate the significance of the Happy Valley site. Archaeological remains of Happy Valley were located throughout the parcel, but no additional sites were located. The official state site number for Happy Valley is 40RE577. During the two surveys a total of 13 artifact concentrations, 14 isolated finds, and 75 structural features were located. Due to the Happy Valley's stron gassociation with the Manhattan Project, the site is recommended eligible for the National Register of Historic Places under Criterion A.

  8. Worker Rights Pamphlet

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    personal protective equipment are often used by themselves or in addition to other hazard control measures. Contractors must provide protective equipment free of charge....

  9. Initial Score: # of workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yamamoto, Keith

    My lab has replaced incandescent lamps with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFLs) or Light Emitting Diodes

  10. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

  11. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for example, investments in clean energy technologies thatclean-energy sector; and • Open new opportunities for investment

  12. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

  13. Green Chemistry and Workers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy retrofitting and solar panel installation. Sincemarket by piloting a solar panel “photovoltaic” trainingin the installation of solar panels. The pilot program was

  14. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  15. ORISE: Worker Health Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of theDedicationOakVisiting Us If you are

  16. ORISE: Worker Health Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurseResourcesThe Value The U.S. DepartmentWork

  17. Radiological Worker Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898 October 1998

  18. Radiological Worker Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898 October

  19. Radiological Worker Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898

  20. Radiological Worker Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898 NOT

  1. Radiological Worker Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898 NOTTS NOT

  2. Radiological Worker Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to 1 |DDOE HDBK-1113-200898 NOTTS NOT8

  3. More Workers"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghurajiConventionalMississippi"site. IfProved Reserves (Billion+ShaleperYear Jan FebShale Proved5.

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Worker Health at a Glance, 2000-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Worker Health at a Glance, 2000 – 2009 provides an overview of selected illness and injury patterns among the current DOE contractor workforce that have emerged over the 10-years covered by this report. This report is a roll-up of data from 16 individual DOE sites, assigned to one of three program offices (Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and the National Nuclear Security Administration). In this report, an absences is defined as 40 or more consecutive work hours (5+ calendar days) off the job. Shorter absences were not included.

  5. Role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to organophosphate pesticides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Satyender [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Kumar, Vivek [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India)] [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Vashisht, Kapil; Singh, Priyanka [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Banerjee, Basu Dev, E-mail: banerjeebd@hotmail.com [Environmental Biochemistry and Molecular Biology laboratory, Department of Biochemistry, University College of Medical Sciences and GTB Hospital, University of Delhi, Dilshad Garden, Delhi-110095 (India); Rautela, Rajender Singh; Grover, Shyam Sunder; Rawat, Devendra Singh; Pasha, Syed Tazeen [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Jain, Sudhir Kumar [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Centre for Epidemiology and Parasitic Diseases, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India); Rai, Arvind [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)] [Division of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, National Centre for Disease Control 22, Sham Nath Marg, Delhi-110054 (India)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Organophosphate pesticides (OPs) are primarily metabolized by several xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes (XMEs). Very few studies have explored genetic polymorphisms of XMEs and their association with DNA damage in pesticide-exposed workers. The present study was designed to determine the role of genetic polymorphisms of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, and PON1 in the modulation of DNA damage in workers occupationally exposed to OPs. We examined 284 subjects including 150 workers occupationally exposed to OPs and 134 normal healthy controls. The DNA damage was evaluated using the alkaline comet assay and genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. The results revealed that the PONase activity toward paraoxonase and AChE activity was found significantly lowered in workers as compared to control subjects (p < 0.001). Workers showed significantly higher DNA damage compared to control subjects (14.37 {+-} 2.15 vs. 6.24 {+-} 1.37 tail% DNA, p < 0.001). Further, the workers with CYP2D6*3 PM and PON1 (QQ and MM) genotypes were found to have significantly higher DNA damage when compared to other genotypes (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increase in DNA damage was also observed in workers with concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes which need further extensive studies. In conclusion, the results indicate that the PON1 and CYP2D6 genotypes can modulate DNA damage elicited by some OPs possibly through gene-environment interactions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Role of CYP1A1, CYP3A5, CYP2C, CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes on DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Workers exposed to some OPs demonstrated increased DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYP2D6 *3 PM and PON1 (Q192R and L55M) genotypes are associated with DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concomitant presence of certain CYP2D6 and PON1 genotypes can increase DNA damage.

  6. THE USE OF VAPOR EXTRACTION SYSTEM AND ITS SUBSEQUENT REDUCTION OF WORKER EXPOSURE TO CARBON TETRACHLORIDE DURING RETRIEVAL OF HANFORDS LEGACY WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITTS DA

    2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site is a decommissioned nuclear productions complex located in south eastern Washington and is operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). From 1955 to 1973, carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}), used in mixtures with other organic compounds, was used to recover plutonium from aqueous streams at Z Plant located on the Hanford Site. The aqueous and organic liquid waste that remained at the end of this process was discharged to soil columns in waste cribs located near Z Plant. Included in this waste slurry along with CCl{sub 4} were tributyl phosphate, dibutyl butyl phosphate, and lard oil. (Truex et al., 2001). In the mid 1980's, CCl{sub 4} was found in the unconfined aquifer below the 200 West Area and subsequent ground water monitoring indicated that the plume was widespread and that the concentrations were increasing. It has been estimated that approximately 750,000 kg (826.7 tons) of CCl{sub 4} was discharged to the soil from 1955 to 1973. (Truex et al., 2001). With initial concentration readings of approximately 30,000 parts per million by volume (ppmv) in one well field alone, soil vapor extraction began in 1992 in an effort to remove the CCl{sub 4} from the soil. (Rohay, 1999). Since 1992, approximately 78,607.6 kg (86.65 tons) of CCl{sub 4} have been extracted from the soil through the process of soil vapor extraction and 9,409.8 kg (10.37 tons) have been removed from the groundwater. (EPA, 2006). The success of this environmental cleanup process benefited not only the environment but also workers who were later involved in the retrieval of solid waste from trenches that were in or near the CCl{sub 4} plume. Solid waste was buried in trenches near Z Plant from 1967 to 1990. The solid waste, some of which was chemically and/or radioactively contaminated, was buried in trenches in steel or fiber drums, fiberboard boxes, fiberglass-reinforced plywood boxes, and steel, concrete, or wooden boxes. Much of this waste was buried with the intention of retrieving it later for permanent disposal and storage. Removal of this solid waste would disturb the soil that was potentially contaminated with CC4 and thereby pose a risk to workers involved in the retrieval effort. However, with the success of the VES, worker exposure did not occur.

  7. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops (Spanish) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    cinta en el suelo con el lado de los emisores hacia arriba para evitar taponamien- tos condici?n que se presenta cuando el riego termina y las particulas se sedimentan. Los rollos traen indicadores que muestran la direc- ci?n de los emisores. 5. Poco...-45049-01149. La informaci?n presentada aqu? es solamente para prop?sitos educativos. Las referencias a productos o marcas comerciales se han hecho bajo el entendimiento que esto no implica que Texas AgriLife Extension Service tenga la intenci?n de discriminar o...

  8. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication describes the components of a subsurface drip irrigation system and the procedure for installing such a system. Each step is outlined and illustrated. Steps include tape injection, trenching, connecting drip lines, back...

  9. Tabu search for the single row facility layout problem using ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 13, 2012 ... show that the speed up techniques are effective, and our tabu search implementations are ...... We copy the first permutation as a template for the permutation. We then ..... Advances in Production Engineering & Management,.

  10. A Semidefinite Optimization Approach to the Parallel Row Ordering ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    problem in which one wishes to minimize the total material flow cost. .... ing system [33], balancing hydraulic turbine runners [39], numerical analysis [14], optimal ...

  11. A competitive genetic algorithm for single row facility layout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 22, 2012 ... quality solutions. ... ate selection of genetic operators can yield high quality solutions in spite of ..... uk/staff/letchfoa/articles/SRFLP-rev.pdf.

  12. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops (Spanish)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    cinta en el suelo con el lado de los emisores hacia arriba para evitar taponamien- tos condici?n que se presenta cuando el riego termina y las particulas se sedimentan. Los rollos traen indicadores que muestran la direc- ci?n de los emisores. 5. Poco...-45049-01149. La informaci?n presentada aqu? es solamente para prop?sitos educativos. Las referencias a productos o marcas comerciales se han hecho bajo el entendimiento que esto no implica que Texas AgriLife Extension Service tenga la intenci?n de discriminar o...

  13. Scatter search algorithms for the single row facility layout problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 22, 2012 ... [11] F. Glover, Heuristics for integer programming using surrogate constraints, ... [

  14. Energy Conservation Analysis of Three-Row-Hole Hollow Blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, G.; Li, H.; Liu, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, solid clay blocks have been forbidden in large and middle cities with the wall reformation policy issued in China. Many kinds of new wall materials have appeared in the market, but little research has been done on these new...

  15. Computing Globally Optimal Solutions for Single-Row Layout ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    includes linear programming problems as a special case, namely when the .... fact that for any assignment of ±1 to the entries of X, the entries Xp1,p2 , Xp1,p3 ...

  16. A Polyhedral Approach to the Single Row Facility Layout Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    problem of arranging facilities on a line, while minimizing a weighted sum of the ... Facility Layout Problem (SRFLP) asks for a layout of the facilities, i.e., a.

  17. Row-Reduced Column Generation for Degenerate Master Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 5, 2013 ... node of a search tree, and often produces strong dual bounds. ... In linear algebra terms, we work with a projection ... enter the current basis.

  18. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.5 First4

  19. Level: National Data; Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.5 First44

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability to.544.42.4

  1. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Wellhead0 Capability

  2. Improving Data Center Efficiency with Rack or Row Cooling Devices |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:DepartmentDepartment of Energy Implementing

  3. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Electricity Components;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy for613.1.3.13.1.

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy for613.1.3.13.1.1

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy1 Electricity:

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy1 Electricity:6

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy1 Electricity:66

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy1 Electricity:666

  10. " Row: Employment Sizes within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number of833A6.3.

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number4

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number44

  14. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number441. End

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number441. End2.

  16. " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number441.

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy18 Number441.4. End1

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  11. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number of1.

  12. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number

  13. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number1

  14. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number12

  15. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number124

  16. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number1241

  17. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1. Number12412

  18. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.

  19. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4 Number

  20. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4 Number1

  1. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4 Number12

  2. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4

  3. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.41

  4. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.412

  5. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4122.4

  6. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4122.41

  7. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of Energy182C3.1.2.4122.412

  8. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of

  9. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of1 Offsite-Produced Fuel

  10. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of1 Offsite-Produced Fuel2

  11. " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of1 Offsite-Produced Fuel24.4

  12. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed9.11.1.1.

  13. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed9.11.1.1.2.

  14. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1. Enclosed9.11.1.1.2.1.

  15. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1.

  16. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1.S4.1. Offsite-Produced

  17. " Row: Selected SIC Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocksa. Appliances byA49. Total Inputs of12.1.S4.1.

  18. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number of2.4

  19. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number

  20. Level: National Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade EnergyTennesseeYear Jan FebFoot)(Millionper22,445.5.4 Number4.4