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1

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

2

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO(2) Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Progress has been made in the area of laboratory analysis of Spraberry oil/brine/rock interactions during this quarter. Water imbibition experiments were conducted under ambient conditions, using cleaned Spraberry cores, synthetic Spraberry reservoir brine, and Spraberry oil. It has been concluded that the Spraberry reservoir cores are weakly water-wet. The average Amott wettability index to water is about 0.55. The average oil recovery due to spontaneous water imbibition is about 50% of original oil in place.

Schechter, David

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame by application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. A secondary and synergistic objective is purification and injection of produced water into Spraberry reservoirs.

David S. Schechter

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend.

David S. Schechter

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect

The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

David S. Schechter

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry reservoir. Quarterly technical report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress has been made in the area of laboratory analysis of Spraberry oil/brine/rock interactions during this quarter. Water imbibition experiments were conducted under ambient conditions, using cleaned Spraberry cores, synthetic Spraberry reservoir brine, and Spraberry oil. It has been concluded that the Spraberry reservoir cores are weakly water-wet. The average Amott wettability index to water is about 0.55. The average oil recovery due to spontaneous water imbibition is about 50% of original oil in place.

Schechter, D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

9

Heterogeneous deep-sea fan reservoirs, Shackelford and Preston waterflood units, Spraberry Trend, West Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book discusses the geological characterization of reservoir and production attributes of the Shackelford and Preston waterflood units, southeastern Midland County, West Texas. These two units, which are operated by Mobil Producing Texas and New Mexico, are part of the Permian Spraberry Trend. Conventional reserves in the Spraberry are estimated to be almost 60 million barrels of oil, and more than 4 billion barrels of unproduced mobile oil remain, making the Spraberry a prime target for extended conventional recovery from untapped or poorly drained reservoir compartments. The authors determine the stratigraphy of the formation, map sand distribution trends, and determine from cores and logs the extent and composition of facies that compose the principal reservoir units.

Tyler, N.; Gholston, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

An investigation of anisotropy using AVAZ and rock physics modeling in the Woodford Shale, Anadarko Basin, OK.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Woodford Shale formation is currently an important unconventional gas resource that extends across parts of the mid-continent of the United States. A resource shale (more)

Lamb, Alexander Peter Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Germania Unit is located in Midland County, 12 miles east of Midland, Texas and is part of the Spraberry Formation in the Midland Basin which is one of the largest known oil reservoirs in the world bearing between 8.9 billion barrels and 10.5 billion barrels of oil originally in place. The field is considered geologically complex since it comprises typically low porosity, low permeability fine sandstones, and siltstones that are interbedded with shaly non-reservoir rocks. Natural fractures existing over a regional area have long been known to dominate all aspects of performance in the Spraberry Trend Area. Two stages of depletion have taken place over 46 years of production: Primary production under solution gas drive and secondary recovery via water injection through two different injection patterns. The cumulative production and injection in Germania as of July 2003 were 3.24 million barrels and 3.44 million barrels respectively and the production level is 470 BOPD through 64 active wells with an average rate per well of 7.3 BOPD and average water cut of 60 percent. This performance is considered very low and along with the low amount of water injected, waterflood recovery has never been thoroughly understood. In this research, production and injection data were analyzed and integrated to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study addresses reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflood project with the aim of proposing alternatives development, taking into account current and future conditions of the reservoir. Consequently, this project will be performed to provide a significant reservoir characterization in an uncharacterized area of Spraberry and evaluate the performance of the waterflooding to provide facts, information and knowledge to obtain the maximum economic recovery from this reservoir and finally understand waterflood management in Spraberry. Thus, this research describes the reservoir, and comprises the performance of the reservoir under waterflooding, and controlled surveillance to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and reservoir management and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. This incremental is based in both extrapolations and numerical simulation studies conducted in Spraberry.

Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Improving dual-porosity simulation of waterflood performance in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we have discussed the methods of analyzing the waterflood performance of the O'Daniel waterflood pilot in the Spraberry Trend Area with the help of reservoir simulation. Spraberry Trend Area is considered to be one of the richest oil fields in the world. However, out of 6-10 billion bbls of original oil only 700 million bbls have been produced. In an effort to increase recovery, several waterflood pilots were conducted in Spraberry beginning in the late 1950's. Because of profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, waterflooding has been only moderately successful, and billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain unrecovered. A recent waterflood pilot study started in 1995 with dramatically different results. The pilot was conducted in the O'Daniel unit of the Spraberry. The recovery in this lease has exceeded 25% of the original oil in place, compared to only 10% recovery in the entire Spraberry. Data from the current waterflood clearly shows that on-trend wells which are outside the pilot and along the major fracture trend responded favorably. In the previous waterflood pilots in Spraberry, the producer located off-trend from the water injectors received all the attention and the response in the on-trend wells was overlooked. In this study, we have developed a waterflood pattern for Spraberry where the target wells for waterflood response will be the on-trend producers. A successful waterflood depends on properly positioning the injectors and producers. In fractured reservoirs, fracture location, orientation and permeability dictates the placing of injection and production wells. So, to understand the fracture distribution, the main intention behind this thesis is to develop a method to determine location, orientation and permeability of fractures in Spraberry by using reservoir simulation. We performed three simulation studies: Humble pilot waterflood, O'Daniel tracer analysis and O'Daniel pilot waterflood. The first two simulation studies were performed with simple two-well models. The fracture orientation and permeability ratio obtained in these models were applied to the full field O'Daniel pilot that consists of 59 wells in about 8500-acre area. Our simulation model shows that a concept of fracture enhancement (grid-blocks with high fracture permeability) in the dual-porosity model is necessary to capture the effect of heterogeneity of fracture network. The major fracture orientation obtained from the simulation is very close to the one obtained from the interference test and horizontal core analysis. The results of this study could be used in determining an optimum waterflood pattern suitable for that area to forecast oil production with different scenarios such as, infill drilling, CO2 injection, horizontal wells etc. Finally, the results of this work will provide a method to assess the economic feasibility of large-scale water injection in the remainder of the field.

Chowdhury, Tanvir

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the third year of the five-year project for each of the four areas including a status report of field activities leading up to injection of CO2.

Schechter, D.S.

1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

Schechter, D.S.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Development of the optimized waterflooding pattern for the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Spraberry Trend area has produced oil since 1949 with a history of low productivity and unresponsive waterflooding within areas of interest in the field. It has been shown over the years that the conventional line drive waterflooding approach is highly ineffective in this field and there is a need to develop unique ways in which the reservoir can be waterflooded and produced. The reservoir model used for this study was developed in two distinct steps to speed up the development and ascertain the accuracy of the model. The preliminary model introduced only a single water injector while the final model included all the injectors around the area of interest. In developing the model, we found that the conventional simulation grid orientation which is normally employed in dynamic model building could not be applied to the Spraberry. Rather, fracture enhancements were introduced into the model to represent and model the complex fracture network. This proved valuable in validating the final reservoir model which was used for the various studies in this research. This thesis examined the influence of the distance and orientation of producers to injectors, water injection rate, fracture spacing and reservoir wettability in the effectiveness of waterflooding in the Spraberry with the hope that the distance and orientation of producers to injectors as well as the water injection rate can be optimized and implemented in the field. Furthermore it is hoped that this research will throw more light on how fracture spacing and matrix wettability affect the response of producers to water injectors. Reservoir simulation work contained in this thesis was performed on an 800 acre area of the O'Daniel pilot. Some of the results obtained validated earlier studies while other results provided new insights into the behavior of waterflooding in this reservoir. By systematically using the developed simulation model to confirm the production pattern observed in the field, the results obtained show that attention has to be paid to the orientation of the production wells relative to the water injectors and the dominant fractures. The effects of the fracture orientation and fracture spacing at various distances from the water injector were also investigated and it was concluded that if the producer is close to the water injector, the fracture orientation will dominate fluid movement while the farther the injector and producers are placed apart, the greater the influence of the fracture spacing on the fluid movement. Investigating the wettability, we found that with a high water matrix wettability, it was possible to optimize the injection rate. At low wettability however, we found that it is not possible to optimize the injection rate since the water injection rate has a somewhat inverse relationship with oil production. Finally, the result obtained by this research shows that fracture spacing of 10ft could be considered as the critical spacing, above which there is an insignificant effect of fracture spacing on the performance of the waterflooding in the Spraberry.

Dabiri, Adegoke

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. First annual technical progress report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

Schechter, D.S.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

18

Characterization of the Germania Spraberry unit from analog studies and cased-hole neutron log data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. Petrophysical characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons ?? limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. In the absence of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O??Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O??Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of gamma ray, cased hole neutron, limited resistivity and neutron/density/sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area.

Olumide, Babajide Adelekan

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry reservoir. [Quarterly report], September 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research and the pilot project planned is to test the feasibility of CO{sub 2} for recovering oil from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in the Midland Basin. This notoriously marginal reservoir has confounded operators for 40 years with rapid depletion, low recovery during primary, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate recovery. Yet, the tremendous areal coverage and large amount of remaining oil (up to 10 Bbbl) warrants further investigation to expend all possible process options before large numbers of Spraberry wellbores need to be plugged and abandoned. CO{sub 2} injection on a continuous, pattern wide basis has not been attempted in the Spraberry Trend. This is due to the obvious existence of a network of naturally occurring fractures. However, it has become clear in recent years that neglecting CO{sub 2} injection as an option in fractured reservoirs may overlook potential projects which may be viable. The 15 well pilot filed demonstration and supporting research will provide the necessary information to quantify the conditions where by CO{sub 2} flooding would be economic in the Spraberry Trend. Technical progress for this quarter is described for field and laboratory experiments.

Schechter, D. [New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center, Socorro, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

Pyrolysis and hydrocarbon source bed potential of the Upper Devonian Woodford Shale, Hovey Channel, southern Permian basin, west Texas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upper Devonian Woodford Shale in the Hovey Channel area, southern Permian basin, is 50 m thick and composed largely of brown to black, pyritic, spore-bearing, organic-rich, fissile shale an chert. Total organic carbon, distillable hydrocarbons, genetic potential, organic carbon index, hydrogen index, temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation, and kerogen transformation index of the Woodford Shale suggest a matured to overmatured, gas-generating source bed. The total organic carbon content of the formation ranged from a low of 0.77% in the cherty samples to a high of 4.59% in a shaley sample, averaging 2.18%. Distillable hydrocarbon content of the samples is fairly high (averaging 1.72 mg HC/gm{degree} rock), varying from 0.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock to 3.22 mg HC/gm{degree} rock. Genetic potential evaluated in terms of both residual and total generative potential showed above average potential, averaging 3.25 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the residual and 4.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the total, respectively. Live organic carbon index values ranged from 11-28%, characterizing the formation as a moderate to good source bed. Hydrogen index values ranged from 73 mg HC/gm{degree} C org to 155 mg HC/gm{degree} C org, suggesting overmaturity and gas-generation potential of the source bed. Temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation values and kerogen transformation ratio values (averaging 0.34) also indicate overmatured nature of the Woodford Shale.

Hussain, M.; Bloom, M.A. (Sul Ross State Univ., Alpine, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "woodford niobrara-codell spraberry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the Permian Basin, strata of Leonardian age typically consist of interbedded carbonates and siliciclastics interpreted to be turbidite deposits. Happy Spraberry Field produces from a 100-foot thick carbonate section in the Lower Clear Fork Formation (Lower Leonardian) on the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. Reservoir facies include oolitic- to-skeletal grainstones and packstones, rudstones and in situ Tubiphytes bindstones. Depositional environments vary from open marine reefs to shallow marine oolitic shoal mounds. Best reservoir rocks are found in the oolitic-skeletal packstones. Diagenesis occurred in several phases and includes (1) micritization, (2) stabilization of skeletal fragments, (3) recrystallization of lime mud, (4) intense and selective dissolution, (5) precipitation of four different stages of calcite cement, (6) mechanical compaction, (7) late formation of anhydrite and (8) saddle dolomite and (9) replacement by chalcedony. Oomoldic porosity is the dominant pore type in oolitic grainstones and packstones. Incomplete dissolution of some ooids left ring-shaped structures that indicate ooids were originally bi-mineralic. Bacterial sulfate reduction is suggested by the presence of (1) dissolved anhydrite, (2) saddle dolomite, (3) late-stage coarse-calcite cement and (4) small clusters of pyrite. Diagenetic overprinting on depositional porosity is clearly evident in all reservoir facies and is especially important in the less-cemented parts of the oolitic grainstones where partially-dissolved ooids were subjected to mechanical compaction resulting in "eggshell" remnants. Pore filling by late anhydrite is most extensive in zones where dissolution and compaction were intense. Finally, a porosity-permeability model was constructed to present variations in oolitic packstone- rudstone-bindstone reservoir rocks. The poroperm model could not be applied to oolitic grainstone intervals because no consistent trends in the spatial distribution of porosity and permeability were identified. Routine core analysis did not produce any reliable value of water saturation (Sw). An attempt to take advantage of wireline log data indicates that the saturation exponent (n) may be variable in this reservoir.

Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. The four areas have been completed and reported in the previous annual reports. This report provides the results of the final year of the project including two SPE papers (SPE 71605 and SPE 71635) presented in the 2001 SPE Annual Meeting in New Orleans, two simulation works, analysis of logging observation wells (LOW) and progress of CO{sub 2} injection.

Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Reserve growth through geological characterization of heterogeneous reservoirs - an example from mud-rich submarine fan reservoirs of Permian Spraberry Trend, west Texas  

SciTech Connect

Tight, naturally fractured Permian submarine fan reservoirs in the Midland basin contained more than 10.5 billion bbl of oil at discovery. Ultimate recovery is estimated to average 7% of the original oil in place. At abandonment 4 billion bbl of nonresidual mobile oil will remain in untapped or poorly drained reservoir compartments. This unproduced mobile oil is the target for Spraberry reserve growth through strategic infill drilling. Mid-fan facies of three separate submarine fans are productive in the Shackelford and Preston waterflood units (SPWU) in the central Spraberry Trend. Braided to meandering paleodip-oriented channels are flanked by levees which grade into upward-coarsening, unconfined distal fan sediment. Facies boundaries compartmentalize the reservoir, providing for interwell, stratigraphic entrapment of oil. Field-wide heterogeneity is pronounced. Stacking of channels in the upper Spraberry in the eastern half of the SPWU results in a dip-oriented belt of better reservoir quality. Wells completed in this axis have produced two to six times the amount of oil produced from wells located off of the depo-axis. Although fractures are important in early production, the contribution of matrix porosity is critical throughout the life of the reservoir. Current economics dictate that reserve growth might best be attained by siting new strategic infill wells in depositional axes and by selective recompletions of existing wells in areas of poorer reservoir quality for bypassed oil in undrained reservoir compartments.

Tyler, N.; Gholston, J.C.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Woodford County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9.1705998° 9.1705998° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7128889,"lon":-89.1705998,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

Woodford County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -84.7315563° °, -84.7315563° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0721662,"lon":-84.7315563,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Revolution and Evolution in Twentieth-Century Macroeconomics Michael Woodford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, chain of causation with a complexity to rival a Rube Goldberg cartoon. They were intended to render

Tesfatsion, Leigh

27

Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report was to propose the location of new injection wells, to review wellbore status in Germania unit and to forecast the incremental oil recovery based on waterflooding performance in other waterflood pilot area in order to demonstrate the benefit of waterflooding in Germania unit area.

Sizemore, C.M.; Schechter, David S.; Vance, Harold

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

28

THE ROLE OF HEAVY MINERALS IN THE THERMAL MATURATION OF THE WOODFORD SHALE, ANADARKO BASIN, OKLAHOMA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Shales are generally regarded as organic rich source and seal rocks that are unworthy of the amount of research that has been given to their (more)

Coddington, Kacee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable tight oil resources as of January 1, 2010 6. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable tight oil resources as of January 1, 2010 Basin/Play Area (square miles) Average well spacing (wells per square mile) Percent of area untested Percent of area with potential Average EUR (million barrels per well) Number of potential wells TRR (million barrels) Western Gulf Austin Chalk 16,078 3 72 61 0.13 21,165 2,688 Eagle Ford 3,200 5 100 54 0.28 8,665 2,461 Anadarko Woodford 3,120 6 100 88 0.02 16,375 393 Permian Avalon/Bone Springs 1,313 4 100 78 0.39 4,085 1,593 Spraberry 1,085 6 99 72 0.11 4,636 510 Rocky Mountain basins Niobrara 20,385 8 97 80 0.05 127,451 6,500 Williston Bakkena 6,522 2 77 97 0.55 9,767 5,372

30

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barnett, Woodford, and related mudrock successions in Texas Cores and outcrops Barnett, Woodford, and related mudrock successions in Texas Cores and outcrops Authors: S. C. Ruppel,...

31

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

belridge south wasson yates kern river elk hills fg milne point alpine spraberry trend area slaughter hondo fp levelland endicott cymric pescado san ...

32

Measurement of the rapidity and transverse momentum distributions of Z bosons in pp collisions at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. Our analysis, based on spatial autocorrelation of the Bakken shale series samples, a Bazhenov shale and a Woodford shale are shown in Figure 3. The C shale. Figure 3: SAM images of Bakken shales (bk), Bazhenov shale (bz, lower left), and Woodford shale

Adolphs, Ralph

33

PETROPHYSICS 217June 2011 Assessment of Residual Hydrocarbon Saturation with the Combined  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of waterflooding in the Upper Spraberry sand. Fluid saturation, waterflooding efficiency, and recovery are also.1.2 Concept of Process In the Spraberry reservoir, oil is stored in a very tight matrix, with virtually allU sand and 11% IOIP for 5U sand. The effect of time on recovery profiles was investigated. Several

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

34

Rare earth elements (REE) as geochemical clues to reconstruct hydrocarbon generation history.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The REE distribution patterns and total concentrations of the organic matter of the Woodford shale reveal a potential avenue to investigate hydrocarbon maturation processes in (more)

Ramirez-Caro, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Table 2. Principal tight oil plays: oil production and proved...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Other tight oil plays (e.g. Monterey, Woodford)",,,24,253 "All U.S. tight oil plays",,,228,3628 "Note: Includes lease condensate." "Source: U.S. Energy...

36

Basin Play States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WY 2 8 Subtotal 204 3,375 Other tight oil plays (e.g. Monterey, Woodford) 24 253 All U.S. tight oil plays 228 3,628 Note: Includes lease condensate. Source: U.S. Energy Information...

37

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http:www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an...

38

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

39

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

40

Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oahu Wind Integration and Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-50411 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada NREL Technical Monitor: David Corbus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "woodford niobrara-codell spraberry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

DOE tallies Class III oil recovery field projects  

SciTech Connect

Here are details from midterm proposals submitted as part of the US Department of Energy's Class 3 oil recovery field demonstration candidate projects. All of the proposals emphasize dissemination of project details so that the results, if successful, can be applied widely in similar reservoirs. Project results will also be fed into a national petroleum technology transfer network. The proposals include: Gulf of Mexico, Gulf coast, offshore California, a California thermal, immiscible CO[sub 2], produced/potable water, microbial EOR, California diatomite, West Texas Spraberry field, and other Permian Basin fields.

Not Available

1994-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

42

File:EIA-shaleusa6.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:EIA-shaleusa6.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Woodford Shale Play, Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 2.06 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Woodford Shale Play, Arkoma Basin, Oklahoma Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-30 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Oklahoma File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time.

43

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

44

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada Subcontract Report NREL/SR-5500-50414 February 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba Canada

45

File:EIA-shaleusa7.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

shaleusa7.pdf shaleusa7.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Woodford Shale Play, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma and Texas Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 1.43 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Woodford Shale Play, Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma and Texas Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-30 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Oklahoma, Texas File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:42, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:42, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (1.43 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

46

File:EIA-shaleusa8.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

shaleusa8.pdf shaleusa8.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Woodford Shale Play, Ardmore Basin, Oklahoma and Texas Size of this preview: 776 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,650 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 1.57 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Woodford Shale Play, Ardmore Basin, Oklahoma and Texas Sources Energy Information Administration Related Technologies Natural Gas Creation Date 2010-03-30 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Oklahoma, Texas File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 18:43, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 18:43, 20 December 2010 1,650 × 1,275 (1.57 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

47

Fiscal Policy in an Unemployment Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fiscal Policy in an Unemployment Crisis Pontus Rendahl 28 February 2012 CWPE 1211 Fiscal Policy in an Unemployment Crisis By Pontus Rendahl February 28, 2012 Abstract. This paper argues... ), Cogan, Cwik, Taylor and Wieland (2010), and Taisuke (2012) for further studies on this topic. 7In this situation the real interest rate is constant and a unit multiplier follows straightforwardly from the analysis of Woodford (2011). A multiplier of 1...

Rendahl, Pontus

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

49

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

American Petroleum Institute American Petroleum Institute April 04, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , API, April 04, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

50

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy CERAWEEK 2013, North American Energy March 06, 2013 | Houston, TX by Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CERAWEEK, March 06, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: DrillingInfo history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

51

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets Joint Forum on US Shale Gas & Pacific Gas Markets May 14, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 Domestic production of shale gas has grown dramatically over the past few years Adam Sieminski , May 14, 2013 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) shale gas production (dry) billion cubic feet per day Sources: LCI Energy Insight gross withdrawal estimates as of March 2013 and converted to dry production estimates with EIA-calculated average gross-to-dry shrinkage factors by state and/or shale play. Shale gas leads growth in total gas production through 2040 to

52

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Association of Money Managers Washington Association of Money Managers April 18, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays has steep decline curves Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin - production grows with continued drilling Adam Sieminski , WAMM, April 18, 2013

53

Status and outlook for shale gas and tight oil development in the U.S.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Council on Foreign Relations Council on Foreign Relations April 11, 2013 | Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator U.S. Shale Gas 2 Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 An average well in shale gas and other continuous resource plays can also have steep decline curves, which require continued drilling to grow production 3 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 0 5 10 15 20 Haynesville Eagle Ford Woodford Marcellus Fayetteville million cubic feet per year Source: EIA, Annual Energy Outlook 2012 1 0% 50% 100% 0 5 10 15 20 Cumulative production = EUR Adam Sieminski , CFR, April 11, 2013 For example: Oil production by monthly vintage of wells in the Williston Basin 4 Source: Drilling Info history through August 2012, EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, February 2013 forecast

54

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable resources for selected shale gas plays as of January 1, 2010 5. Attributes of unproved technically recoverable resources for selected shale gas plays as of January 1, 2010 Basin/Play Area (square miles) Average well spacing (wells per square mile) Percent of area untested Percent of area with potential Average EUR (billion cubic feet per well) Number of potential wells TRR (billion cubic feet) Appalachian Marcellus 104,067 5 99 18 1.56 90,216 140,565 Utica 16,590 4 100 21 1.13 13,936 15,712 Arkoma Woodford 3,000 8 98 23 1.97 5,428 10,678 Fayetteville 5,853 8 93 23 1.30 10,181 13,240 Chattanooga 696 8 100 29 0.99 1,633 1,617 Caney 2,890 4 100 29 0.34 3,369 1,135 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Bossier 9,320 8 98 34 2.67 24,627 65,860

55

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Authors: Ruppel, Stephen C. and Robert G. Loucks, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of GeoSciences, University of Texas at Austin Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: The Devonian Woodford and Mississippian Barnett formations document a long (approximately 70-80 million year) period of clay-rich sedimentation along the southern margin of the Laurentian paleocraton during the middle Paleozoic. As might be expected, these rocks display many general similarities, for example in thickness, mineralogy, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, organic matter type, etc. Both also display conspicuous and systematic changes in composition from more proximal to more distal areas. However, our studies of more than 75 cores across the Permian and Ft. Worth Basins demonstrate that dissimilarities between the two systems are perhaps even more common than similarities. Many of the differences can be related to paleogeography, basin hydrography, and global sea level.

56

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) 7. Estimated ultimate recovery for selected shale gas plays in three AEOs (billion cubic feet per well) AEO2010 AEO2011 AEO2012 Basin/Play Range Average Range Average Range Average Appalachian Marcellus 0.25-0.74 0.49 0.86-4.66 1.62 0.02-7.80 1.56 Utica -- -- -- -- 0.10-2.75 1.13 Arkoma Woodford 1.43-4.28 2.85 3.00-5.32 4.06 0.40-4.22 1.97 Fayetteville 0.91-2.73 1.82 0.86-2.99 2.03 0.19-3.22 1.30 Chattanooga -- -- -- -- 0.14-1.94 0.99 Caney -- -- -- -- 0.05-0.66 0.34 TX-LA-MS Salt Haynesville/Boosier 2.30-6.89 4.59 1.13-8.65 3.58 0.08-5.76 2.67 Western Gulf Eagle Ford 1.10-3.29 2.19 1.73-7.32 2.63 0.41-4.93 2.36 Pearsall -- -- -- -- 0.12-2.91 1.22

57

New York Solar Energy Industries Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Energy Industries Association Solar Energy Industries Association Name New York Solar Energy Industries Association Address 533 Woodford Avenue Place Endicott, New York Zip 13760 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Website http://www.nyseia.org/ Notes Non-profit membership and trade association dedicated solely to advancing solar energy use in New York State Coordinates 42.105025°, -76.065685° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.105025,"lon":-76.065685,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

58

Banks as Secret Keepers ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Banks are optimally opaque institutions. They produce debt for use as a transaction medium (bank money), which requires that information about the backing assets not be revealed, so that bank money does not fluctuate in value, reducing its efficiency in trade. This need for opacity conflicts with the production of information about investment projects, necessary for allocative efficiency. How can information be produced and not revealed? Financial intermediaries exist to hide such information; they are created and structured to keep secrets. For the economy as a whole, this can be accomplished by a separation in how firms finance themselves; they divide into bank finance and capital market/stock market finance based on how well they can be used to maintain information away from liquidity markets. Firms with large projects, risky projects or projects easy to evaluate are less likely to be financed by banks. We thank Michael Woodford and seminar participants at Columbia, MIT, Rutgers, Universite de Montreal, Wharton and the SED Meetings at Cyprus for useful comments. The usual waiver of liability applies.

Tri Vi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

SEISMIC AND ROCKPHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

Gary Mavko

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Technical and Economic Study of Completion Techniques In Five Emerging U.S. Gas Shale Plays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methane and other higher order hydrocarbons, through C4, with interest in further developing reactions important to methane- and ethane-related chemistry. With the increased demand for energy and the declining conventional hydrocarbons worldwide, energy companies, both majors and independents, are turning to unconventional resources to produce the hydrocarbons required to meet market demand. From coalbed methane to low permeability (tight) gas reservoirs and gas shales, energy companies are making substantial progress in developing the technologies required to bring these unconventional reserves to the market. A common misconception is that there are not enough domestic oil and gas reserves to fuel our economy. The United States imports most of the oil used for transportation fuel and several TCF of natural gas annually. However, there is a very large resource of natural gas in unconventional reservoirs, with over 2,200 TCF of gas in place in just the gas shale formations that have been identified in the energy arena (Navigant Study 2008). There are still major gas shale plays and basins that have not been explored and are waiting to be evaluated and developed. The natural gas in shales and other unconventional reservoirs can be used to generate electricity, or it can be turned into liquids and used by the transportation industry. It is also misconstrued that gas shales are relatively new in our industry and something of the future. The first commercially viable gas shale well was drilled in the early 1920s in Pennsylvania, before the famous oil well drilled by Colonel Drake. The objectives of this study are to (1) complete literature review to establish which geologic parameters affect completion techniques in five emerging gas shales: the Antrium, the Barnett, the Haynesville, the Marcellus, and the Woodford; (2) identify the different completion methods; (3) create an economic model for the completion techniques discussed; (4) develop a sensitivity analysis on various economic parameters to determine optimal completion strategy; and (5) create completion flowcharts. Based on the literature review I have done for several gas shale basins, I have identified seven pertinent geologic parameters that influence completion practices. These are depositional environment, total organic content (TOC), average gas content, shale mineralogy, shale thickness, and reservoir pressure. Next, I identified different completion and simulation trends in the industry for the different shale plays. The results from this study show that although there are some stark differences between depths (i.e. the Antrim Shale and the Haynesville Shale), shale plays are very similar in all other geologic properties. Interestingly, even with a large range for the different geological parameters, the completion methods did not drastically differ indicating that even if the properties do not fall within the range presented in this paper does not automatically rule them out for further evaluation in other plays. In addition to the evaluation of geologic properties, this study looked at drilling cost and the production profile for each play. Due to the volatility of the energy industry, economic sensitivity was completed on the price, capital, and operating cost to see what affect it would have on the play. From the analysis done, it is concluded that horizontal drilling in almost any economic environment is economic except for one scenario for the Woodford Shale. Therefore, gas shales plays should still be invested in even in lower price environments and companies should try to take advantage of the lower cost environments that occur during these times. With continual development of new drilling and completion techniques, these plays will become more competitive and can light the path for exploration of new shale plays worldwide.

Agrawal, Archna

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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A New Method for History Matching and Forecasting Shale Gas/Oil Reservoir Production Performance with Dual and Triple Porosity Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different methods have been proposed for history matching production of shale gas/oil wells which are drilled horizontally and usually hydraulically fractured with multiple stages. These methods are simulation, analytical models, and empirical equations. It has been well known that among the methods listed above, analytical models are more favorable in application to field data for two reasons. First, analytical solutions are faster than simulation, and second, they are more rigorous than empirical equations. Production behavior of horizontally drilled shale gas/oil wells has never been completely matched with the models which are described in this thesis. For shale gas wells, correction due to adsorption is explained with derived equations. The algorithm which is used for history matching and forecasting is explained in detail with a computer program as an implementation of it that is written in Excel's VBA. As an objective of this research, robust method is presented with a computer program which is applied to field data. The method presented in this thesis is applied to analyze the production performance of gas wells from Barnett, Woodford, and Fayetteville shales. It is shown that the method works well to understand reservoir description and predict future performance of shale gas wells. Moreover, synthetic shale oil well also was used to validate application of the method to oil wells. Given the huge unconventional resource potential and increasing energy demand in the world, the method described in this thesis will be the "game changing" technology to understand the reservoir properties and make future predictions in short period of time.

Samandarli, Orkhan

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Table 4. Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-1011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 Principal shale gas plays: natural gas production and proved reserves, 2010-2011 trillion cubic feet Basin Shale Play State(s) Production Reserves Production Reserves Production Reserves Fort Worth Barnett TX 1.9 31.0 2.0 32.6 0.1 1.6 Appalachian Marcellus PA, WV, KY, TN, NY, OH 0.5 13.2 1.4 31.9 0.9 18.7 Texas-Louisiana Salt Haynesville/Bossier TX, LA 1.5 24.5 2.5 29.5 1.0 5.0 Arkoma Fayetteville AR 0.8 12.5 0.9 14.8 0.1 2.3 Anadarko Woodford TX, OK 0.4 9.7 0.5 10.8 0.1 1.1 Western Gulf Eagle Ford TX 0.1 2.5 0.4 8.4 0.3 5.9 Sub-total 5.2 93.4 7.7 128.0 2.5 34.6 Other shale gas plays 0.2 4.0 0.3 3.6 0.1 -0.4 All U.S. Shale Plays 5.4 97.4 8.0 131.6 2.6 34.2 Change 2011-2010 2010 2011 Notes: Some columns may not add up to its subtotal because of independent rounding. Natural gas is wet after lease separation. The above table is