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1

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

David S. Schechter

2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Woodford County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay,°Trap, Virginia:Woodbridge,Woodcreek,Woodford

3

REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

4

PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

Biomarker and Paleontological Investigations of the Late Devonian Extinctions, Woodford Shale, Southern Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the abundances of the algal cyst Tasmanites are elevated, while the fossils recovered from the upper Woodford Shale by this study and previous authors show an increase in diversity of brown-algae-type microfossils and low diversity benthic faunas dominated...

Nowaczewski, Vincent Stephen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing over a regional area have long been known to dominate all aspects of performance in the Spraberry Trend Area. Two stages of depletion have taken place over 46 years of production: Primary production under solution gas drive and secondary recovery...

Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

7

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO2 gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Spraberry CO{sub 2} pilot project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of continuous CO{sub 2} injection in the naturally fractured reservoirs of the Spraberry Trend. In order to describe, understand, and model CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry reservoirs, characterization of the fracture system is a must. Additional reservoir characterization was based on horizontal coring in the second year of the project. In addition to characterization of natural fractures, horizontal coring has confirmed a previously developed rock model for describing the Spraberry Trend shaly sands. A better method for identifying Spraberry pay zones has been verified. The authors have completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. The authors have completed extensive imbibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. The authors have also made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. They have completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix.

McDonald, P.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

9

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the third year of the five-year project for each of the four areas including a status report of field activities leading up to injection of CO2.

Schechter, D.S.

1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

Schechter, D.S.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Applications of artificial neural networks in the identification of flow units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-4 (porosity)??29 12. Type log showing Happy Spraberry well Lott #19-4 (resistivity)?.30 13. Core photos showing typical oolitic skeletal grainstone/ packstone facies?????????????????????.31 14. Grainstone porosity versus permeability....6??????????????..?54 xi FIGURE Page 33. A photomicrograph of a skeletal rudstone showing vuggy porosity in Lott #19-4 at a depth of 4980...

Gentry, Matthew David

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

12

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. First annual technical progress report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

Schechter, D.S.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Reservoir. Quarterly technical report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research and the pilot project planned is to test the feasibility of CO{sub 2} for recovering oil from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in the Midland Basin. This notoriously marginal reservoir has confounded operators for 40 years with rapid depletion, low recovery during primary, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate recovery. Yet, the tremendous areal coverage and large amount of remaining oil (up to 10 Bbbl) warrants further investigation to expend all possible process options before large numbers of Spraberry wellbores need to be plugged and abandoned. CO{sub 2} injection on a continuous, pattern-wide basis has not been attempted in the Spraberry Trend. This is due to the obvious existence of a network of naturally-occurring fractures. However, it has become clear in recent years that neglecting CO{sub 2} injection as an option in fractured reservoirs may overlook potential projects which may be viable. The 15-well pilot field demonstration and supporting research will provide the necessary information to quantify the conditions whereby CO{sub 2} flooding would be economic in the Spraberry Trend.

Schechter, D.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the second year of the five-year project for each of the four areas. In the first area, the author has completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. In the second area, the author has completed extensive inhibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. In the third area, the author has made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. In the fourth area, the author has completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix. The final three years of this project involves implementation of the CO{sub 2} pilot. Up to twelve new wells are planned in the pilot area; water injection wells to contain the CO{sub 2}, three production wells to monitor performance of CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} injection wells including one horizontal injection well and logging observation wells to monitor CO{sub 2} flood fronts. Results of drilling these wells will be forthcoming.

Schechter, D.S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. The four areas have been completed and reported in the previous annual reports. This report provides the results of the final year of the project including two SPE papers (SPE 71605 and SPE 71635) presented in the 2001 SPE Annual Meeting in New Orleans, two simulation works, analysis of logging observation wells (LOW) and progress of CO{sub 2} injection.

Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

16

Woodford County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative JumpWilliamson County,Bay,°Trap,

17

Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, structureless sand- stones, very thinly laminated and bioturbated siltstones, and thin black shales. Sandstones are either thick or thin bedded, and vary in thickness from 0. 05 ft (0. 02 m) to 14. 5 ft (4. 4 m). Sandstones average 2. 7 ft (0. 8 m... of a reservoir study at Parks; and Mr. F. E. Hill in Dallas, for providing me with rewarding summer jobs. Mrs. Nina Ronalder, who as the Mobil employee in-charge of the field has been my primary source of data on the Parks field. Finally, I cannot...

Yale, Mark William

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Improving dual-porosity simulation of waterflood performance in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and horizontal core analysis. The results of this study could be used in determining an optimum waterflood pattern suitable for that area to forecast oil production with different scenarios such as, infill drilling, CO2 injection, horizontal wells etc. Finally...

Chowdhury, Tanvir

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Characterization of the Germania Spraberry unit from analog studies and cased-hole neutron log data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Crossplot for lithology identification in 1U sand for well ET 37..?.?? 23 2.6b Crossplot for lithology identification in 5U sand for well ET 37...??? 23 3.1 Minimum gamma ray values for ET O?Daniel unit in the 1U sand interval...??????????????????????.?... 26 3.2 Maximum gamma ray values for ET O?Daniel unit in the 1U sand interval??????????????????????..?.. 27 3.3 Variations in response from the gamma ray curves in ET O?Daniel??.. 28 3.4 Histogram and CDF for wells 36, before and after normalizing...

Olumide, Babajide Adelekan

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and selective dissolution, (5) precipitation of four different stages of calcite cement, (6) mechanical compaction, (7) late formation of anhydrite and (8) saddle dolomite and (9) replacement by chalcedony. Oomoldic porosity is the dominant pore type in oolitic...

Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "woodford niobrara-codell spraberry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

1. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION 1.1 NATURAL FRACTURES IN THE SPRABERRY FORMATION, MIDLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and vertically within the formation. 1.1.2 INTRODUCTION 1.1.2.1 Background Large reserves of oil were discovered production of 740 million barrels of oil to date, but oil recovery percentages and the daily production rates of oil (and 25,000 cubic feet of gas), which is an average of only 7 BO/D from each of the 8

Schechter, David S.

22

Transcending Conventional Log Interpretation A More Effective Approach for the Spraberry Trend Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was prepared for presentation at the 2002 Naturally Fractured Reservoir Conference held in Oklahoma City, 3 are characterized by low recovery during rapid primary depletion, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate

Schechter, David S.

23

Analyses of azimuthal seismic anisotrophy in the vertically fractured Spraberry and Dean formations, Midland County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPRAPTOMO SUDARMO Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: even . Harder (Chair of Committee) W. Spe er.... The advice and suggestions of these esteemed faculty have aided in the development and successful completion of this thesis. In addition my thanks are extended to Mr. Victor Hazelwood (GRAY Help desk), Mr. Chung Chi-Shi (COGNISEIS) who patiently taught me...

Sudarmo, Bernadus Supraptomo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

3.4 SIMULATED HORIZONTAL WELL PERFORMANCE IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED SPRABERRY TREND AREA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Waterflood Pilot was performed using commercial VIP and ECLIPSE simulators. A pilot model was developed using of performance between horizontal and vertical wells with different average reservoir pressures. (2) (Guevara, 1988). The individual beds rarely exceed 15 ft in thickness. Reservoir characterization

Schechter, David S.

25

Development of the optimized waterflooding pattern for the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is highly ineffective in this field and there is a need to develop unique ways in which the reservoir can be waterflooded and produced. The reservoir model used for this study was developed in two distinct steps to speed up the development and ascertain...

Dabiri, Adegoke

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

WHO ARE WE? We're writing from Wadham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Woodford County, Wanstead High, Valentine's High, Barking Abbey, Longsands, Seven Kings and Stantonbury

Wallace, Mark

27

Porosity Characterization Utilizing Petrographic Image Analysis: Implications for Identifying and Ranking Reservoir Flow Units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on seismic sections with the Leonardian aged, Lower Clear Fork Formation. The "Happy field" carbonates were deposited on the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin and consist of oolitic skeletal grainstones and packstones, rudstones and floatstones, in situ...

Layman, John Morgan, II

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

28

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS) Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Dennis Woodford Electranix Corporation Winnipeg, Manitoba...

29

A study of the source materials, depositional environments, mechanisms of generation and migration of oils in the Anadarko and Cherokee Basins, Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1989--September 14, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geochemical characterization of petroleum and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma, has continued. Major emphasis has seen on geochemistry of the Woodford shale.

Philp, R.P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2002 Naturally Fractured Reservoir Conference held in Oklahoma City, 34 June 2003.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2002 Naturally Fractured Reservoir Conference held-acre CO2 pilot in the Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. Spraberry reservoirs originally contained 10 Bbbls OOIP of which less than 10% has been recovered. Waterflooding has been documented as a poor

Schechter, David S.

31

5 FIELD DEMONSTRATION PROJECT A major milestone of this project is to implement a field demonstration of the technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and logged. The Upper Spraberry intervals 1U and 5U have been cored in all five of these wells and reservoir and the core analyzed with the analysis aiding in characterizing the Spraberry Reservoir. 5.1.1 Flood Facilities The waterflood and CO2 injection facilities are new facilities to be built for the 10-acre

Schechter, David S.

32

2. INVESTIGATION OF CO2 GRAVITY DRAINAGE AFTER WATER INJECTION IN FRACTURED SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on whole diameter Berea cores and Spraberry cores under the conditions of reservoir temperature fractured cores, five experiments had been performed on Berea and Spraberry reservoir cores. The properties investigations was designed to model the actual field experience of waterflooding followed by CO2 injection

Schechter, David S.

33

3 RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 3.1 ANALYSIS OF IMBIBITION MECHANISM IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery mechanism in the West Texas Spraberry reservoir is evaluated. Waterflood recovery in the Spraberry waterflooding is performed in this type of reservoir, the intent is to fill the fractures with water to initiate89 3 RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 3.1 ANALYSIS OF IMBIBITION MECHANISM IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED

Schechter, David S.

34

Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After field redevelopment in the Sherrod Unit of the Spraberry Trend Area, an inter-well tracer test was conducted at the field scale in order to understand the fracture system, which forms preferential flow paths for better management...

Kilicaslan, Ufuk

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

35

STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION experiments, followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding

Schechter, David S.

36

1 RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION 1.1 INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin, are important targets for CO2 enhanced recovery of oil. The Spraberry reservoirs were discovered in 1949, and have been producing oil since then. Traditionally marginal producers, these clastic, determination of targets in horizontal drilling, isopach mapping, reserve estimations and input data

Schechter, David S.

37

2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the temperature increased. The aging of low permeability cores saturated with oil had little effect in the rate44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine

Schechter, David S.

38

Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Annual Technical Conference and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

injection rates during waterflooding in the naturally fractured reservoirs of the Spraberry Trend Area breakthrough, one of common problems of waterflooding in all naturally fractured reservoirs. Introduction. The experimental study was performed using artificially fractured cores at reservoir temperature (138o F) and 500

Schechter, David S.

39

2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability. A two Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding- 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS

Schechter, David S.

40

A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basin, and of late the Eagle Ford shale located in southwest Texas. Figure A1 illustrates the growth reservoir pressure, total organic content, thermal maturity, porosity, the presence of natural fractures Eagle Ford Marcellus Haynesville Woodford Fayetteville Barnett Figure A1. Growth in natural gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "woodford niobrara-codell spraberry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wrench faulting and cavity concentration ; Dollarhide Field, Andrews County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tectonics of the Central Basin Platform During the Early Paleozoic, North America's passive southern margin enabled carbonate and siliceous rocks to infill the Tobosa Basin, or what is now the permian Basin (Galley, 1958; Hills, 1972; Yang and Dorobek...-Guadalupian stratigraphy of the Dollarhide Field. limestones, dolomites and cherts except for the Ordovician Simpson Group. The Woodford Shale (Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian) is organically rich and the probable source rock for the Devonian and Lower Permian...

Dygert, Todd Charles

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Review Meeting Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

:10 ­ 9:40 AM Devonian mudrock pore systems: Bakken, Woodford, New Albany; Reed 9:40 ­ 10:10 AM and Future: Ruppel Paleozoic Mudrock Systems 8:40 ­ 9:10 AM Natural fractures in the Marcellus Shale; Gale 9 properties from 3D seismic data; Zeng 2:30 ­ 3:00 PM Preliminary characterization of the Tuscaloosa shale; Lu

Texas at Austin, University of

43

Factors controlling Simpson Group production in central Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution of oil production from within the Simpson Group has been considered enigmatic because all of the sandstone members are present throughout the study area, but some fields produce from all of the sandstone members and others produce from only on horizon. The Simpson shales are not capable of generating hydrocarbons and the oil produced from the Simpson Group probably originated from the Devonian/Mississippian Woodford Shale. The McClain County fault juxtaposed the Woodford shale with the Simpson Group, which enabled lateral oil migration from the Woodford into the Simpson Group sandstones. Also, tortuous migration pathways allowed Woodford oil to ultimately accumulate in Simpson reservoirs which involve downthrown younger rocks adjacent to upthrown older rocks. Slight structural movements occurred contemporaneously with the deposition of the Simpson Group creating semi-parallel northeast-southwest-oriented thick and thin trends. Local structural movements were active during part or all of Simpson deposition. This created stratigraphic variations in the individual Simpson Group formations which cause the apex of a field to migrate (or even vanish) with depth. Consequently, lower Simpson structures may not be reflected by upper Simpson structures and, conversely, upper Simpson structures may not continue with depth. Variations in Viola deposition enhanced the vertical discontinuity of structures within the study area so that mapped Viola structures may not reflect underlying Simpson structures. Furthermore, a dramatic change in the orientation of the structural grain began to appear in the late Ordovician (Viola). Subsequent movements enhanced this later structural orientation, producing two acute structural trends that control the entrapment of oil. This study demonstrates that the dual structural imprint is probably the single most important factor in controlling the distribution and accumulation of hydrocarbons within the study area.

Smith, P.W.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Role of kerogen in the origin and evolution of nickel and vanadyl geoporphyrins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of petroleum source rock kerogen in the origin and evolution of the geoporphyrins was investigated by measuring the Ni and V content of four oil shale kerogens and comparing the Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins in the bitumen of two oil shales with the Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins generated from the associated kerogens during simulated catagenesis. A method for determining the organically-bound Ni and V content of kerogen by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was used to measure the Ni and V content of four oil shale kerogens Green River (Colorado); New Albany (Clark County, IN); Sunbury (Powell County, KY); Woodford (Carter County, OK). Sequential pyrolysis at temperatures ranging from 100-450/sup 0/C generated organically-bound Ni and V complexes from the New Albany and Woodford kerogens (determined by INAA), including Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins (determined by uv-visible spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography). Nickel and vanadyl porphyrins are associated with the kerogen in a similar manner providing direct evidence that kerogen is involved in the geochemical evolution of both metalloporphyrins. The Ni(II) and VO(II) porphyrins in New Albany shale bitumen-I and kerogen pyrolysates were investigated using liquid chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, and electron impact-mass spectrometry. Alternate porphyrin series are generated form the kerogen, but the mineral matrix may also be involved in their formation and association in source rocks.

Van Berkel, G.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

NONE

1991-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

Kinetic study of bitumen release from heated shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With rising temperature shales evolve hydrocarbons discontinuously. At low temperatures, bitumens are thermally distilled (Peak 1) while at higher temperatures kerogen is pyrolyzed to lower molecular weight products (Peak 2). Hydrocarbon release occurring between these two peaks is less well understood. They have studied the kinetics of thermal bitumen release (Peak 1) from samples of the Excello and Woodford Shales and find that they are second order with activation energies of 19,000 cals/mole and 17,048 cals/ mole, respectively. The thermal release of nC/sub 26/ adsorbed on a siliceous support also followed second order kinetics. Activation energies, along with the determined Arrhenius A factor, permits the calculation of Peak 1 shape so that its contribution can be subtracted from the total hydrocarbon release. The residual curve shows two smaller peaks between the bitumen and kerogen peaks. These are tentatively assigned to adsorption on the mineral matrix and adsorption on kerogen. An important consequence of second order kinetics is that the temperature for the Peak 1 maximum varies with the amount of bitumen in the rock.

Butler, E.B.; Barker, C.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

SEISMIC AND ROCKPHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

Gary Mavko

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing shale textures from scanning acoustic microscope images. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

Gary Mavko

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oils and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin: Final report, March 1, 1985-March 15, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research project investigated various geochemical aspects of oils, suspected source rocks, and tar sands collected from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. The information has been used, in general, to investigate possible sources for the oils in the basin, to study mechanisms of oil generation and migration, and characterization of depositional environments. The major thrust of the recent work involved characterization of potential source formations in the Basin in addition to the Woodford shale. The formations evaluated included the Morrow, Springer, Viola, Arbuckle, Oil Creek, and Sylvan shales. A good distribution of these samples was obtained from throughout the basin and were evaluated in terms of source potential and thermal maturity based on geochemical characteristics. The data were incorporated into a basin modelling program aimed at predicting the quantities of oil that could, potentially, have been generated from each formation. The study of crude oils was extended from our earlier work to cover a much wider area of the basin to determine the distribution of genetically-related oils, and whether or not they were derived from single or multiple sources, as well as attempting to correlate them with their suspected source formations. Recent studies in our laboratory also demonstrated the presence of high molecular weight components(C{sub 4}-C{sub 80}) in oils and waxes from drill pipes of various wells in the region. Results from such a study will have possible ramifications for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir engineering studies.

Philp, R. P. [School of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Chaotic Dynamics in Optimal Monetary Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is by now a large consensus in modern monetary policy. This consensus has been built upon a dynamic general equilibrium model of optimal monetary policy as developed by, e.g., Goodfriend and King (1997), Clarida et al. (1999), Svensson (1999) and Woodford (2003). In this paper we extend the standard optimal monetary policy model by introducing nonlinearity into the Phillips curve. Under the specific form of nonlinearity proposed in our paper (which allows for convexity and concavity and secures closed form solutions), we show that the introduction of a nonlinear Phillips curve into the structure of the standard model in a discrete time and deterministic framework produces radical changes to the major conclusions regarding stability and the efficiency of monetary policy. We emphasize the following main results: (i) instead of a unique fixed point we end up with multiple equilibria; (ii) instead of saddle--path stability, for different sets of parameter values we may have saddle stability, totally unstable equilibria and chaotic attractors; (iii) for certain degrees of convexity and/or concavity of the Phillips curve, where endogenous fluctuations arise, one is able to encounter various results that seem intuitively correct. Firstly, when the Central Bank pays attention essentially to inflation targeting, the inflation rate has a lower mean and is less volatile; secondly, when the degree of price stickiness is high, the inflation rate displays a larger mean and higher volatility (but this is sensitive to the values given to the parameters of the model); and thirdly, the higher the target value of the output gap chosen by the Central Bank, the higher is the inflation rate and its volatility.

Orlando Gomes; Vivaldo M. Mendes; Diana A. Mendes; J. Sousa Ramos

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z