Sample records for woodford niobrara-codell spraberry

  1. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

  2. Woodford County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County, Illinois: Energy

  3. Woodford County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County, Illinois:

  4. Porosity Characterization Utilizing Petrographic Image Analysis: Implications for Identifying and Ranking Reservoir Flow Units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layman, John Morgan, II

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spraberry Formation is traditionally thought of as deep-water turbidites in the central Midland Basin. At Happy Spraberry field, Garza County, Texas, however, production is from a carbonate interval about 100 feet thick that has been correlated...

  5. Analyses of azimuthal seismic anisotrophy in the vertically fractured Spraberry and Dean formations, Midland County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarmo, Bernadus Supraptomo

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The zone of interest is the Spraberry trend, which consists of Spraberry and Dean formations. The Spraberry trend, which is a deep sub-marine fan complex deposited from turbidity currents (Wilkinson, 1953; Hanford, 1981; Tyler and Gholston, 1988), forms... and sandstone (McLennan and Bradley, 1951; Schmidt, 1954; Hanford, 1981; Tyler and Gholston, 1988). The Dean formation consists of sandstone, gray-white to brown sandstone with thin streaks of tan to brown limestone and black shale (Mc Lennan and Bradley...

  6. Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................................................................95 91 Bubble Maps of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) for Active Wells in Germania Spraberry Unit. .....................................................................................96 92 WOR Behavior and Cumulative Oil Production Due...

  7. REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

  8. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

  9. Potential for producing oil and gas from the Woodford Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the southern mid-continent, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comer, J.B. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Woodford Shale is a prolific oil source rock throughout the southern mid-continent of the United States. Extrapolation of thickness and organic geochemical data based on the analysis of 614 samples from the region indicate that on the order of 100 {times} 10{sup 9} bbl of oil (300 {times} 10{sup 12} ft{sup 3} of natural gas equivalent) reside in the Woodford in Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas. The Woodford in west Texas and southeastern New Mexico contains on the order of 80 {times} 10{sup 9} bbl of oil (240 {times} 10{sup 12} ft{sup 3} of natural gas equivalent). Tapping this resource is most feasible in areas where the Woodford subcrop contains competent lithofacies (e.g., chert, sandstone, siltstone, dolostone) and is highly fractured. Horizontal drilling may provide the optimum exploitation technique. Areas with the greatest potential and the most prospective lithologies include (1) the Nemaha uplift (chert, sandstone, dolostone), (2) Marietta-Ardmore basin (chert), (3) southern flank of the Anadarko basin along the Wichita Mountain uplift (chert), (4) frontal zone of the Ouachita tectonic belt in Oklahoma (chert), and (5) the Central Basin platform in west Texas and New Mexico (chert and siltstone). In virtually all of these areas, the Woodford is in the oil or gas window. Thus, fracture porosity would be continuously fed by hydrocarbons generated in the enclosing source rocks. Reservoir systems such as these typically have produced at low to moderate flow rates for many decades.

  10. Potential for producing oil and gas from Woodford Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the southern Mid-Continent, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Comer, J.B. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Woodford Shale is a prolific oil source rock throughout the southern Mid-Continent of the US. Extrapolation of thickness and organic geochemical data based on the analysis of 614 samples from the region indicate that on the order of 100 {times} 10{sup 9} bbl of oil (300 {times} 10{sup 12} ft {sup 3} of natural gas equivalent). Tapping this resource is most feasible in areas where the Woodford subcrop contains competent lithofacies (e.g., chert, sandstone, siltstone, dolostone) and is high fractured. Horizontal drilling may provide the optimum exploitation technique. Areas with the greatest potential and the most prospective lithologies include (1) the Nemaha uplift (chert, sandstone, dolostone), (2) Marietta-Ardmore basin (chert), (3) southern flank of the Anadarko basin along the Wichita Mountain uplift (chert), (4) frontal zone of the Ouachita tectonic belt in Oklahoma (chert), and (5) the Central Basin platform in west Texas and New Mexico (chert and siltstone). In virtually all of these areas the Woodford is in the oil or gas window. Thus, fracture porosity would be continuously fed by hydrocarbons generated in the enclosing source rocks. Reservoir systems such as these have typically produced at low to moderate flow rates for many decades.

  11. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.S.

    1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the third year of the five-year project for each of the four areas including a status report of field activities leading up to injection of CO2.

  12. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

  13. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.S.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

  14. Applications of artificial neural networks in the identification of flow units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentry, Matthew David

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of neural networks in the field of development geology is in its infancy. In this study, a neural network will be used to identify flow units in Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas. A flow unit is the mappable portion of the total...

  15. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. First annual technical progress report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.S.

    1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

  16. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Reservoir. Quarterly technical report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research and the pilot project planned is to test the feasibility of CO{sub 2} for recovering oil from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in the Midland Basin. This notoriously marginal reservoir has confounded operators for 40 years with rapid depletion, low recovery during primary, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate recovery. Yet, the tremendous areal coverage and large amount of remaining oil (up to 10 Bbbl) warrants further investigation to expend all possible process options before large numbers of Spraberry wellbores need to be plugged and abandoned. CO{sub 2} injection on a continuous, pattern-wide basis has not been attempted in the Spraberry Trend. This is due to the obvious existence of a network of naturally-occurring fractures. However, it has become clear in recent years that neglecting CO{sub 2} injection as an option in fractured reservoirs may overlook potential projects which may be viable. The 15-well pilot field demonstration and supporting research will provide the necessary information to quantify the conditions whereby CO{sub 2} flooding would be economic in the Spraberry Trend.

  17. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.S.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the second year of the five-year project for each of the four areas. In the first area, the author has completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. In the second area, the author has completed extensive inhibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. In the third area, the author has made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. In the fourth area, the author has completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix. The final three years of this project involves implementation of the CO{sub 2} pilot. Up to twelve new wells are planned in the pilot area; water injection wells to contain the CO{sub 2}, three production wells to monitor performance of CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} injection wells including one horizontal injection well and logging observation wells to monitor CO{sub 2} flood fronts. Results of drilling these wells will be forthcoming.

  18. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. The four areas have been completed and reported in the previous annual reports. This report provides the results of the final year of the project including two SPE papers (SPE 71605 and SPE 71635) presented in the 2001 SPE Annual Meeting in New Orleans, two simulation works, analysis of logging observation wells (LOW) and progress of CO{sub 2} injection.

  19. Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizemore, C.M.; Schechter, David S.; Vance, Harold

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report was to propose the location of new injection wells, to review wellbore status in Germania unit and to forecast the incremental oil recovery based on waterflooding performance in other waterflood pilot area in order to demonstrate the benefit of waterflooding in Germania unit area.

  20. Biomarker and Paleontological Investigations of the Late Devonian Extinctions, Woodford Shale, Southern Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowaczewski, Vincent Stephen

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions. 14 Chain length can also be a function of thermal maturity (e.g., Shi et al., 1982). However, carbon preference values (CPI) do not necessarily indicate a rock as being mature or immature as organic matter input also affects chain length... (Peters et al., 2005, p.641). Complementary bulk geochemical data is required to help discern whether biomarker ratios are reflecting changes in source or thermal maturity. While there have been a few organic geochemical studies conducted across...

  1. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yale, Mark William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structureless sand- stones, very thinly laminated and bioturbated siltstones, and thin black shales. Sandstones are either thick or thin bedded, and vary in thickness from 0. 05 ft (0. 02 m) to 14. 5 ft (4. 4 m). Sandstones average 2. 7 ft (0. 8 m.... , 1952; Mardock and Myers, 1951; Bartley, 1952; Wilkinson, 1953; Hubbert and Willis, 1955). The upper member contains three well-defined sandstone beds and intervening beds of black shale and argillaceous limestones. This member is commonly 200 to 250...

  2. Transcending Conventional Log Interpretation A More Effective Approach for the Spraberry Trend Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    was prepared for presentation at the 2002 Naturally Fractured Reservoir Conference held in Oklahoma City, 3 are characterized by low recovery during rapid primary depletion, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate

  3. Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    and selective dissolution, (5) precipitation of four different stages of calcite cement, (6) mechanical compaction, (7) late formation of anhydrite and (8) saddle dolomite and (9) replacement by chalcedony. Oomoldic porosity is the dominant pore type in oolitic...

  4. Characterization of the Germania Spraberry unit from analog studies and cased-hole neutron log data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olumide, Babajide Adelekan

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. Petrophysical ...

  5. Improving dual-porosity simulation of waterflood performance in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Tanvir

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and horizontal core analysis. The results of this study could be used in determining an optimum waterflood pattern suitable for that area to forecast oil production with different scenarios such as, infill drilling, CO2 injection, horizontal wells etc. Finally...

  6. Characterization of the Germania Spraberry unit from analog studies and cased-hole neutron log data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olumide, Babajide Adelekan

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crossplot for lithology identification in 1U sand for well ET 37..?.?? 23 2.6b Crossplot for lithology identification in 5U sand for well ET 37...??? 23 3.1 Minimum gamma ray values for ET O?Daniel unit in the 1U sand interval...??????????????????????.?... 26 3.2 Maximum gamma ray values for ET O?Daniel unit in the 1U sand interval??????????????????????..?.. 27 3.3 Variations in response from the gamma ray curves in ET O?Daniel??.. 28 3.4 Histogram and CDF for wells 36, before and after normalizing...

  7. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yale, Mark William

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , structureless sand- stones, very thinly laminated and bioturbated siltstones, and thin black shales. Sandstones are either thick or thin bedded, and vary in thickness from 0. 05 ft (0. 02 m) to 14. 5 ft (4. 4 m). Sandstones average 2. 7 ft (0. 8 m... of a reservoir study at Parks; and Mr. F. E. Hill in Dallas, for providing me with rewarding summer jobs. Mrs. Nina Ronalder, who as the Mobil employee in-charge of the field has been my primary source of data on the Parks field. Finally, I cannot...

  8. 2.2 SPONTANEOUS IMBIBITION MODELING OF SPRABERRY CORES USING A FINITE DIFFERENCE SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    that equation numerically by using a semi-implicit method. Baker and Wilson (1997) used a "black oil" DRS Ver. 3 of the spontaneous imbibition equation. The objectives of this study were to simulate and to understand is negligible. In other words, no countercurrent oil flow exists. Knowing this weakness, they used equations

  9. 3.4 SIMULATED HORIZONTAL WELL PERFORMANCE IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    Waterflood Pilot was performed using commercial VIP and ECLIPSE simulators. A pilot model was developed using of performance between horizontal and vertical wells with different average reservoir pressures. (2) (Guevara, 1988). The individual beds rarely exceed 15 ft in thickness. Reservoir characterization

  10. Development of the optimized waterflooding pattern for the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabiri, Adegoke

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is highly ineffective in this field and there is a need to develop unique ways in which the reservoir can be waterflooded and produced. The reservoir model used for this study was developed in two distinct steps to speed up the development and ascertain...

  11. Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    marine oolitic shoal mounds. Best reservoir rocks are found in the oolitic-skeletal packstones. Diagenesis occurred in several phases and includes (1) micritization, (2) stabilization of skeletal fragments, (3) recrystallization of lime mud, (4) intense...

  12. A study of the source materials, depositional environments, mechanisms of generation and migration of oils in the Anadarko and Cherokee Basins, Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1989--September 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philp, R.P.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geochemical characterization of petroleum and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma, has continued. Major emphasis has seen on geochemistry of the Woodford shale.

  13. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2002 Naturally Fractured Reservoir Conference held in Oklahoma City, 34 June 2003.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2002 Naturally Fractured Reservoir Conference held-acre CO2 pilot in the Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. Spraberry reservoirs originally contained 10 Bbbls OOIP of which less than 10% has been recovered. Waterflooding has been documented as a poor

  14. 5 FIELD DEMONSTRATION PROJECT A major milestone of this project is to implement a field demonstration of the technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    , and logged. The Upper Spraberry intervals 1U and 5U have been cored in all five of these wells and reservoir and the core analyzed with the analysis aiding in characterizing the Spraberry Reservoir. 5.1.1 Flood Facilities The waterflood and CO2 injection facilities are new facilities to be built for the 10-acre

  15. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CO2 GRAVITY DRAINAGE AFTER WATER INJECTION IN FRACTURED SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    on whole diameter Berea cores and Spraberry cores under the conditions of reservoir temperature fractured cores, five experiments had been performed on Berea and Spraberry reservoir cores. The properties investigations was designed to model the actual field experience of waterflooding followed by CO2 injection

  16. 3 RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 3.1 ANALYSIS OF IMBIBITION MECHANISM IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    recovery mechanism in the West Texas Spraberry reservoir is evaluated. Waterflood recovery in the Spraberry waterflooding is performed in this type of reservoir, the intent is to fill the fractures with water to initiate89 3 RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS 3.1 ANALYSIS OF IMBIBITION MECHANISM IN THE NATURALLY FRACTURED

  17. Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilicaslan, Ufuk

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    After field redevelopment in the Sherrod Unit of the Spraberry Trend Area, an inter-well tracer test was conducted at the field scale in order to understand the fracture system, which forms preferential flow paths for better management...

  18. STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION EXPERIMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM STATIC AND DYNAMIC IMBIBITION experiments, followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding

  19. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of C02 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Sprayberry Trend Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding of the naturally fractured Straberry Trend Area in west Texas. Research is being conducted in the extensive characterization of the reservoirs, the experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, the analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and the experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores.

  20. Rock Classification in Organic Shale Based on Petrophysical and Elastic Rock Properties Calculated from Well Logs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranibar Fernandez, Alvaro A

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    classification method was then applied to the field examples from the Haynesville shale and Woodford shales for rock classification. The estimates of porosity, TOC, bulk modulus, shear modulus, and volumetric concentrations of minerals were obtained...

  1. Bar Mar field Point field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Counties) West Texas Spraberry Scott Hamlin Regional Study (Pioneer Natural Resources) West Texas (Various Shelf Tannehill Frank Brown Regional Study (Gunn Oil) North Central Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Bone Spring Seay Nance Regional Study (Cimarex Energy) West Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Yates

  2. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE of imbibition or oil production rate, particularly after seven days or more aging time with oil. However in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine

  3. Report Date: April 10, 2004 Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current

  4. The performance of a simulated fractured matrix reservoir subject to a bottom-water drive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yazdi, Mojtaba

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ' Large-Scale Flooding in the Fractured. Spraberr'y Trend, Area Reservoir", Journal of Petroleum Technolo , (1959), 216, 15. Razap S, H, : "Hater and, Gas Cycling Pulsing retnod for Iaprov*d 0). 1 0 oovery", yontnal of Petrole n Teobnolo, (1967), 1067...

  5. Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Annual Technical Conference and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    injection rates during waterflooding in the naturally fractured reservoirs of the Spraberry Trend Area breakthrough, one of common problems of waterflooding in all naturally fractured reservoirs. Introduction. The experimental study was performed using artificially fractured cores at reservoir temperature (138o F) and 500

  6. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    , followed by waterflooding, were performed at reservoir conditions to investigate rock wettability. A two Berea and Spraberry cores at reservoir conditions to illustrate the actual process of waterflooding- 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS

  7. 1.4 PETROPHYSICS: Combined Rock and Fluid Character Integration of geological and petrophysical data allows development of a rock-fluid model for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    data allows development of a rock-fluid model for upper Spraberry rocks. This study identifies the different rock types that comprise the subject reservoirs, marginal reservoirs and non-reservoir rocks shales, clay rich siltstones and very fine sandstones units uses gamma-ray logs (Fig.1.2-1) and is widely

  8. Julia F. W. Gale Publications Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    ., and Gale, J. F. W., 2008, Barnett, Woodford, and related mudrock successions in Texas cores and outcrops in karst-brecciated dolostones of the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger Group, West Texas: recognitionJulia F. W. Gale Publications Summary May 13, 2013 Business address: The University of Texas

  9. A1. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES..............................1 A2. VARIABILITY IN SHALE WELL PRODUCTION PERFORMANCE ............................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    basin, and of late the Eagle Ford shale located in southwest Texas. Figure A1 illustrates the growth reservoir pressure, total organic content, thermal maturity, porosity, the presence of natural fractures Eagle Ford Marcellus Haynesville Woodford Fayetteville Barnett Figure A1. Growth in natural gas

  10. Application of computed tomography to enhanced oil recovery studies in naturally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fineout, James Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    producing zones in the Austin Chalk. . . 3. 3 Spraberry production potential due to fracture distribution and orientation . 27 3. 4 Florence field, Colorado with oil contained in fractures only. . . 3. S Niobrara stratagraphic diagram. . 29 Figure Page.... . Florence Field. . . 26 26 Niobrara Trend . . IV FRACTURED RESERVOIR IMBIBITION EXPERIMENTS . . . . . . . . 30 Experimental Method 30 CT Porosity Calculation. 31 CT Oil Saturations 31 CT Image Resolution. Experimental Sequence. . 34 Determining...

  11. Factors controlling Simpson Group production in central Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, P.W.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of oil production from within the Simpson Group has been considered enigmatic because all of the sandstone members are present throughout the study area, but some fields produce from all of the sandstone members and others produce from only on horizon. The Simpson shales are not capable of generating hydrocarbons and the oil produced from the Simpson Group probably originated from the Devonian/Mississippian Woodford Shale. The McClain County fault juxtaposed the Woodford shale with the Simpson Group, which enabled lateral oil migration from the Woodford into the Simpson Group sandstones. Also, tortuous migration pathways allowed Woodford oil to ultimately accumulate in Simpson reservoirs which involve downthrown younger rocks adjacent to upthrown older rocks. Slight structural movements occurred contemporaneously with the deposition of the Simpson Group creating semi-parallel northeast-southwest-oriented thick and thin trends. Local structural movements were active during part or all of Simpson deposition. This created stratigraphic variations in the individual Simpson Group formations which cause the apex of a field to migrate (or even vanish) with depth. Consequently, lower Simpson structures may not be reflected by upper Simpson structures and, conversely, upper Simpson structures may not continue with depth. Variations in Viola deposition enhanced the vertical discontinuity of structures within the study area so that mapped Viola structures may not reflect underlying Simpson structures. Furthermore, a dramatic change in the orientation of the structural grain began to appear in the late Ordovician (Viola). Subsequent movements enhanced this later structural orientation, producing two acute structural trends that control the entrapment of oil. This study demonstrates that the dual structural imprint is probably the single most important factor in controlling the distribution and accumulation of hydrocarbons within the study area.

  12. The geology of the basal sandstone-mudstone unit of the Blackhawk Landslide, Lucerne Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzior, Jerry Linn

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE GEOLOGY OF THE BASAL SANDSTONE-MUDSTONE UNIT OF THE BLACKHAWK LANDSLIDE, LUCERNE VALLEY, CALIFORNIA A Thesis by JERRY LINN KUZIOR Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements..., which could be in either a wet or dry state, proposed by Woodford and Harriss (1928), Hsu (1975), and Johnson (1978). The sandstone- mudstone unit has a different mechanical significance in each of the proposed models. Therefore, knowing the basic...

  13. Review Meeting Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    @mail.utexas.edu). March 6 Tuesday NOTE: Tuesday and Wednesday meeting presentations will be held in the The L'il Texas:10 ­ 9:40 AM Devonian mudrock pore systems: Bakken, Woodford, New Albany; Reed 9:40 ­ 10:10 AM for Del Rio FIELD TRIP: DEL RIO, TEXAS March 8 Thursday 8:00 AM ­ 6:00 PM: Examine Upper Cretaceous Del

  14. Agricultural science students' perceptions and knowledge of hearing loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slaydon, Sunny Leigh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    very large part of the personal lives of most farmers? (Lankford 2002) In 1996 Woodford, Lawrence, Fazalare, and Martin designed a study ?to determine the extent of hearing loss experienced by high school agriculture teachers in West Virginia... AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS AND KNOWLEDGE OF HEARING LOSS A Thesis by SUNNY LEIGH SLAYDON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  15. Woodhull, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County, Illinois:Woodhull,

  16. Woodinville, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County,

  17. Woodlake Sanitary Services Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County,Woodlake Sanitary

  18. Woodland Beach, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County,Woodlake

  19. Woodland Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford County,WoodlakeBiomass

  20. Woodland Hills, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,Woodford

  1. Woodland Landfill Gas Recovery Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill Gas Recovery

  2. Woodland, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill Gas

  3. Woodland, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill GasUtah: Energy

  4. Woodlawn Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill GasUtah:

  5. Woodlawn, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill GasUtah:Woodlawn,

  6. Woodmere, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfill

  7. Woodmoor, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfillWoodmoor, Colorado:

  8. Woodridge, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfillWoodmoor,

  9. Woodruff County, Arkansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood,WoodfordLandfillWoodmoor,215846°,

  10. Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

  11. Adaptive Geographical Variation in Bill Shape of Scrub Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, A. Townsend

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas and Colorado west to the Pacific coast, with disjunct populations in peninsular Florida and on Santa Cruz Island off the coast of southern California (fig. 1) (Pitelka 1951). Scrub jays exhibit geographical varia- tion in a number of characters....26 ± .21 8.7 ± 1.5 .994 ± .023 F 1 19.91 8.44 9.26 9.0 .981 w o e California, Woodfords M 2 19.43 ± .00 8.68 8.59 ± .39 10.5 ± .5 1.093 ± .010 F 1 20.40 7.86 8.32 10.0 1.067 Mixed woodlands—mostly oak: BCS Baja California Sur, tip M 5 19.79 ± .42 8...

  12. Horizontal drilling: Overview of geologic aspects and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stark, P.H. (Petroleum Information Corp., Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal drilling and completions may become the most significant petroleum technology enhancement since reflection seismic. Through September 1990, 640 US horizontal completions were recorded, resulting in 532 oil and 69 gas producers. In addition, 345 horizontal wells were drilling or completing and 255 permits were outstanding. Mroe than 60% of historic US horizontal wells will be completed during 1990. Case studies demonstrate higher production rates and improved recoveries for horizontal completions. There are abundant global geologic opportunities for horizontal well technolgoy. Eight geologic criteria with potential for horizontal technology are reviewed. Models and examples showing results are presented for each. Source rocks - Bakken Shale case history, North Dakota; Fractured reservoirs - Austin Chalk case history, Texas; Paleokarst reservoirs - Liuhua field example, South China Sea; and karst reservoir potential, Mediterranean region; Chalk reservoirs - global distribution and Niobrara example, Colorado and Wyoming; Stratigraphic traps - Niagaran Reef example, Michigan basin; and tight, overpressured gas sands, northern Rocky Mountains; Reservoir/heterogeneity - Spraberry trend example, Midland basin; Coal-bed methane - US potential; Coning - Prudhoe Bay example, Alaska. Forecasts showing 5,000 worldwide horizontal completions by the year 2000 are tempered by limited equipment, crews, and recognized opportunity. If, however, economic benefits from case histories are creatively applied to potential geologic opportunities, then horizontal technology may comprise 30% or more of worldwide drilling at the turn of the century. Certainly, a technology that reduces dry-hole and environmental risks, increases productivity, and generates profits with $20/bbl oil could revitalize the domestic onshore industry.

  13. SEISMIC AND ROCKPHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

  14. Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing shale textures from scanning acoustic microscope images. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

  15. Wrenching and oil migration, Mervine field, Kay County, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.G.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1913, Mervine field (T27N, R3E) has produced oil from 11 Mississippian and Pennsylvanian zones, and gas from 2 Permian zones. The field exhibits an impressive asymmetric surface anticline, with the steeper flank dipping 30/sup 0/E maximum. A nearly vertical, basement-involved fault develops immediately beneath the steeper flank of the surface anticline. Three periods of left-lateral wrench faulting account for 93% of all structural growth: 24% in post-Mississippian-pre-Desmoinesian time, 21% in Virgilian time, and 48% in post-Wolfcampian time. In Mesozoic through early Cenozoic times, the Devonian Woodford Shale (and possibly the Desmoinesian Cherokee shales) locally generated oil, which should have been structurally trapped in the Ordovician Bromide sandstone. This oil may have joined oil already trapped in the Bromide, which had migrated to the Mervine area in the Early Pennsylvanian from a distant source. Intense post-Wolfcampian movement(s) fractured the competent pre-Pennsylvanian rocks, allowing Bromide brine and entrained oil to migrate vertically up the master fault, finally accumulating in younger reservoirs. Pressure, temperature, and salinity anomalies attest to vertical fluid migration continuing at the present time at Mervine field. Consequently, pressure, temperature, and salinity mapping should be considered as valuable supplements to structural and lithologic mapping when prospecting for structural hydrocarbon accumulations in epicratonic provinces.

  16. Oils and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin: Final report, March 1, 1985-March 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philp, R. P. [School of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research project investigated various geochemical aspects of oils, suspected source rocks, and tar sands collected from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. The information has been used, in general, to investigate possible sources for the oils in the basin, to study mechanisms of oil generation and migration, and characterization of depositional environments. The major thrust of the recent work involved characterization of potential source formations in the Basin in addition to the Woodford shale. The formations evaluated included the Morrow, Springer, Viola, Arbuckle, Oil Creek, and Sylvan shales. A good distribution of these samples was obtained from throughout the basin and were evaluated in terms of source potential and thermal maturity based on geochemical characteristics. The data were incorporated into a basin modelling program aimed at predicting the quantities of oil that could, potentially, have been generated from each formation. The study of crude oils was extended from our earlier work to cover a much wider area of the basin to determine the distribution of genetically-related oils, and whether or not they were derived from single or multiple sources, as well as attempting to correlate them with their suspected source formations. Recent studies in our laboratory also demonstrated the presence of high molecular weight components(C{sub 4}-C{sub 80}) in oils and waxes from drill pipes of various wells in the region. Results from such a study will have possible ramifications for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir engineering studies.

  17. Kinetic study of bitumen release from heated shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, E.B.; Barker, C.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With rising temperature shales evolve hydrocarbons discontinuously. At low temperatures, bitumens are thermally distilled (Peak 1) while at higher temperatures kerogen is pyrolyzed to lower molecular weight products (Peak 2). Hydrocarbon release occurring between these two peaks is less well understood. They have studied the kinetics of thermal bitumen release (Peak 1) from samples of the Excello and Woodford Shales and find that they are second order with activation energies of 19,000 cals/mole and 17,048 cals/ mole, respectively. The thermal release of nC/sub 26/ adsorbed on a siliceous support also followed second order kinetics. Activation energies, along with the determined Arrhenius A factor, permits the calculation of Peak 1 shape so that its contribution can be subtracted from the total hydrocarbon release. The residual curve shows two smaller peaks between the bitumen and kerogen peaks. These are tentatively assigned to adsorption on the mineral matrix and adsorption on kerogen. An important consequence of second order kinetics is that the temperature for the Peak 1 maximum varies with the amount of bitumen in the rock.

  18. Chaotic Dynamics in Optimal Monetary Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando Gomes; Vivaldo M. Mendes; Diana A. Mendes; J. Sousa Ramos

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is by now a large consensus in modern monetary policy. This consensus has been built upon a dynamic general equilibrium model of optimal monetary policy as developed by, e.g., Goodfriend and King (1997), Clarida et al. (1999), Svensson (1999) and Woodford (2003). In this paper we extend the standard optimal monetary policy model by introducing nonlinearity into the Phillips curve. Under the specific form of nonlinearity proposed in our paper (which allows for convexity and concavity and secures closed form solutions), we show that the introduction of a nonlinear Phillips curve into the structure of the standard model in a discrete time and deterministic framework produces radical changes to the major conclusions regarding stability and the efficiency of monetary policy. We emphasize the following main results: (i) instead of a unique fixed point we end up with multiple equilibria; (ii) instead of saddle--path stability, for different sets of parameter values we may have saddle stability, totally unstable equilibria and chaotic attractors; (iii) for certain degrees of convexity and/or concavity of the Phillips curve, where endogenous fluctuations arise, one is able to encounter various results that seem intuitively correct. Firstly, when the Central Bank pays attention essentially to inflation targeting, the inflation rate has a lower mean and is less volatile; secondly, when the degree of price stickiness is high, the inflation rate displays a larger mean and higher volatility (but this is sensitive to the values given to the parameters of the model); and thirdly, the higher the target value of the output gap chosen by the Central Bank, the higher is the inflation rate and its volatility.