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Sample records for woodford niobrara-codell spraberry

  1. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2002-03-01

    The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame by application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. A secondary and synergistic objective is purification and injection of produced water into Spraberry reservoirs.

  2. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David S. Schechter

    2004-08-31

    The naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area is one of the largest reservoirs in the domestic U.S. and is the largest reservoir in area extent in the world. Production from Spraberry sands is found over a 2,500 sq. mile area and Spraberry reservoirs can be found in an eight county area in west Texas. Over 150 operators produce 65,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd) from the Spraberry Trend Area from more than 9,000 production wells. Recovery is poor, on the order of 7-10% due to the profoundly complicated nature of the reservoir, yet billions of barrels of hydrocarbons remain. We estimate over 15% of remaining reserves in domestic Class III reservoirs are in Spraberry Trend Area reservoirs. This tremendous domestic asset is a prime example of an endangered hydrocarbon resource in need of immediate technological advancements before thousands of wells are permanently abandoned. This report describes the final work of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area.'' The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. This objective has been accomplished through research in three areas: (1) detail historical review and extensive reservoir characterization, (2) production data management, and (3) field demonstration. This provides results of the final year of the three-year project for each of the three areas.

  3. Porosity Characterization Utilizing Petrographic Image Analysis: Implications for Identifying and Ranking Reservoir Flow Units, Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Layman, John Morgan, II

    2004-09-30

    The Spraberry Formation is traditionally thought of as deep-water turbidites in the central Midland Basin. At Happy Spraberry field, Garza County, Texas, however, production is from a carbonate interval about 100 feet thick that has been correlated...

  4. Improving dual-porosity simulation of waterflood performance in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Tanvir

    2002-01-01

    In this thesis we have discussed the methods of analyzing the waterflood performance of the O'Daniel waterflood pilot in the Spraberry Trend Area with the help of reservoir simulation. Spraberry Trend Area is considered to be one of the richest oil...

  5. REFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2004-02-13

    This report describes the work performed during the first semi-annual third year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on analyzing production and injection data to optimize the reservoir management strategies for Germania Spraberry Unit. This study address the reservoir characterization and monitoring of the waterflooding project and propose alternatives of development of the current and future conditions of the reservoir to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional development as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. The results indicate that under the current conditions, a total of 1.410 million barrels of oil can be produced in the next 20 years through the 64 active wells and suggest that the unit can be successfully flooded with the current injection rate of 1600 BWPD and the pattern consisting of 6 injection wells aligned about 36 degrees respect to the major fracture orientation. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period.

  6. PREFERRED WATERFLOOD MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR THE SPRABERRY TREND AREA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. M. Sizemore; David S. Schechter

    2003-08-13

    This report describes the work performed during the second year of the project, ''Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area''. The objective of this project is to significantly increase field-wide production in the Spraberry Trend in a short time frame through the application of preferred practices for managing and optimizing water injection. Our goal is to dispel negative attitudes and lack of confidence in water injection and to document the methodology and results for public dissemination to motivate waterflood expansion in the Spraberry Trend. To achieve this objective, in this period we concentrated our effort on characterization of Germania Unit using an analog field ET ODaniel unit and old cased hole neutron. Petrophysical Characterization of the Germania Spraberry units requires a unique approach for a number of reasons--limited core data, lack of modern log data and absence of directed studies within the unit. The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. In the absence or lack of the afore mentioned resources, an approach that will rely heavily on previous petrophysical work carried out in the neighboring ET O'Daniel unit (6.2 miles away), and normalization of the old log data prior to conventional interpretation techniques will be used. A log-based rock model has been able to guide successfully the prediction of pay and non-pay intervals within the ET O'Daniel unit, and will be useful if found applicable within the Germania unit. A novel multiple regression technique utilizing non-parametric transformations to achieve better correlations in predicting a dependent variable (permeability) from multiple independent variables (rock type, shale volume and porosity) will also be investigated in this study. A log data base includes digitized formats of Gamma Ray, Cased Hole Neutron, limited Resistivity and Neutron/Density/Sonic porosity logs over a considerable wide area. In addition, a progress report on GSU waterflood pilot is reported for this period. We have seen positive response of water injection on new wells. We believe by proper data acquisition and precise reservoir engineering techniques, any lack of confidence in waterflooding can be overcome. Therefore, we develop field management software to control a vast data from the pilot and to perform precise reservoir engineering techniques such as decline curve analysis, gas and oil material balances, bubble map plot and PVT analysis. The manual for this software is listed in the Appendix-A.

  7. August 2010, Volume 32, Number 3 New Mexico GeoloGy 79 The Woodford Shale in southeastern New Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    August 2010, Volume 32, Number 3 New Mexico GeoloGy 79 The Woodford Shale in southeastern New 87801, ron@gis.nmt.edu Abstract The Woodford Shale (Upper Devonian) is 0­300 ft thick in southeastern at depths of less than 7,000 ft as it rises out of the Permian Basin. The Woodford Shale is absent from

  8. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2002-07-26

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

  9. Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Reservoir. Quarterly technical report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schechter, D.

    1996-07-01

    The objective of this research and the pilot project planned is to test the feasibility of CO{sub 2} for recovering oil from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in the Midland Basin. This notoriously marginal reservoir has confounded operators for 40 years with rapid depletion, low recovery during primary, disappointing waterflood results and low ultimate recovery. Yet, the tremendous areal coverage and large amount of remaining oil (up to 10 Bbbl) warrants further investigation to expend all possible process options before large numbers of Spraberry wellbores need to be plugged and abandoned. CO{sub 2} injection on a continuous, pattern-wide basis has not been attempted in the Spraberry Trend. This is due to the obvious existence of a network of naturally-occurring fractures. However, it has become clear in recent years that neglecting CO{sub 2} injection as an option in fractured reservoirs may overlook potential projects which may be viable. The 15-well pilot field demonstration and supporting research will provide the necessary information to quantify the conditions whereby CO{sub 2} flooding would be economic in the Spraberry Trend.

  10. Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

    2001-11-19

    The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. The four areas have been completed and reported in the previous annual reports. This report provides the results of the final year of the project including two SPE papers (SPE 71605 and SPE 71635) presented in the 2001 SPE Annual Meeting in New Orleans, two simulation works, analysis of logging observation wells (LOW) and progress of CO{sub 2} injection.

  11. Preferred Waterflood Management Practices for the Spraberry Trend Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizemore, C.M.; Schechter, David S.; Vance, Harold

    2003-03-10

    The objectives of this report was to propose the location of new injection wells, to review wellbore status in Germania unit and to forecast the incremental oil recovery based on waterflooding performance in other waterflood pilot area in order to demonstrate the benefit of waterflooding in Germania unit area.

  12. Woodford County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power Pty Ltd JumpWoodcliff Lake,

  13. Woodford County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia:Illinois:Wizard Power Pty Ltd JumpWoodcliff Lake,Kentucky: Energy

  14. Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

    2005-08-29

    of the reservoir under waterflooding, and controlled surveillance to improve field performance. This research should serve as a guide for future work in reservoir simulation and reservoir management and can be used to evaluate various scenarios for additional...

  15. Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

    2004-09-30

    analysis did not produce any reliable value of water saturation (Sw). An attempt to take advantage of wireline log data indicates that the saturation exponent (n) may be variable in this reservoir....

  16. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Spraberry sandstones, Parks field, Midland County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yale, Mark William

    1986-01-01

    , structureless sand- stones, very thinly laminated and bioturbated siltstones, and thin black shales. Sandstones are either thick or thin bedded, and vary in thickness from 0. 05 ft (0. 02 m) to 14. 5 ft (4. 4 m). Sandstones average 2. 7 ft (0. 8 m.... , 1952; Mardock and Myers, 1951; Bartley, 1952; Wilkinson, 1953; Hubbert and Willis, 1955). The upper member contains three well-defined sandstone beds and intervening beds of black shale and argillaceous limestones. This member is commonly 200 to 250...

  17. Characterization of the Germania Spraberry unit from analog studies and cased-hole neutron log data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olumide, Babajide Adelekan

    2005-11-01

    The need for characterization of the Germania unit has emerged as a first step in the review, understanding and enhancement of the production practices applicable within the unit and the trend area in general. Petrophysical ...

  18. Biomarker and Paleontological Investigations of the Late Devonian Extinctions, Woodford Shale, Southern Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowaczewski, Vincent Stephen

    2011-12-31

    that applied FTIR microspectroscopy and py- GC/MS to scolecodonts from the Devonian of Germany, the Ordovician of Ohio, U.S.A., and the Silurian of Sweden (Dutta et al., 2010). Dutta et al. (2010) found that his scolecodont samples did not contain signatures... that applied FTIR microspectroscopy and py- GC/MS to scolecodonts from the Devonian of Germany, the Ordovician of Ohio, U.S.A., and the Silurian of Sweden (Dutta et al., 2010). Dutta et al. (2010) found that his scolecodont samples did not contain signatures...

  19. Contraction Moves for Geometric Model Fitting Oliver J. Woodford, Minh-Tri Pham, Atsuto Maki,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenger, Björn

    . This paper presents a new class of moves, called -expansion- contraction, which generalizes -expansion graph for optimizing the assignments in model fitting frameworks whose energies include Label Cost (LC), as well extensively in the early computer vision literature [1,2,3,4], has received renewed interest [5

  20. 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    44 2 INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CRUDE in this section and expand the understanding of the interactions of the Spraberry reservoir rock, oil and brine used Spraberry oil, synthetic reservoir brine and Spraberry core at reservoir temperature (138o F

  1. New College MS 328 and `Jane the Quene' New College MS 328, presented to College in 1710 by Rev. John Woodford, Fellow,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flynn, E. Victor

    and fabrics for the Royal household. Hidden away in the middle, are two signed by an altogether more enigmatic, effectively making Jane his successor. The will was made official through letters patent on 21 June, signed

  2. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    the Haynesville Shale, Gulf of Mexico Basin. Figure producedthe Haynesville Shale, Gulf of Mexico Basin. Figure producedThe Woodford Shale in southeastern New Mexico: distribution

  3. Dynamic Reservoir Characterization Of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs From An Inter-Well Tracer Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilicaslan, Ufuk

    2013-12-03

    After field redevelopment in the Sherrod Unit of the Spraberry Trend Area, an inter-well tracer test was conducted at the field scale in order to understand the fracture system, which forms preferential flow paths for ...

  4. 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS IN NATURALLY FRACTURED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    - 31 - 2. INVESTIGATION OF CRUDE OIL/BRINE/ROCK INTERACTION 2.1 STUDY OF WATERFLOODING PROCESS plays an important role in oil recovery from the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Therefore are important. We examined these issues by performing static and dynamic imbibition experiments. Oil recoveries

  5. Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Annual Technical Conference and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    psia confining pressure. Based on the experimental results, an equation to determine the critical water properties, such as wettability, porosity, matrix area and water viscosity. Two field cases using this scale in the Spraberry Trend Area. The findings of this study could be useful to solve the problem of early water

  6. New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources A DIVISION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    , The Barnett Shale in southeastern New Mexico: Distribution, thickness, and source rock characterization: New interpretation and mapping techniques. Broadhead, R.F., 2010, The Woodford Shale in southeastern New MexicoNew Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources A DIVISION OF NEW MEXICO INSTITUTE OF MINING

  7. Selected Highlight 2013 Publications of CSU Geosciences CSU Faculty, students, and staff indicated in bold. Student authors are indicated with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 83, 803-824, 2013. Gas storage in the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford Shale, Arbuckle.R. Boehlke, and S.O. Egenhoff Critical Assessment of Shale Resource Plays; Chatellier, J. and Jarvie, D. (eds--sedimentary processes and facies gradients in the upper shale member of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken

  8. Field trip guide to selected outcrops, Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-11-17

    The Arbuckle Mountains, named for Brigadier General Matthew Arbuckle, are located in south-central Oklahoma. The formations that comprise the Arbuckle Mountains have been extensively studied for hydrocarbon source rock and reservoir rock characteristics that can be applied to the subsurface in the adjacent Anadarko and Ardmore basins. Numerous reports and guidebooks have been written concerning the Arbuckle Mountains. A few important general publications are provided in the list of selected references. The purpose of this handout is to provide general information on the geology of the Arbuckle Mountains and specific information on the four field trip stops, adapted from the literature. The four stops were at: (1) Sooner Rock and Sand Quarry; (2) Woodford Shale; (3) Hunton Anticline and Hunton Quarry; and (4) Tar Sands of Sulfur Area. As part of this report, two papers are included for more detail: Paleomagnetic dating of basinal fluid migration, base-metal mineralization, and hydrocarbon maturation in the Arbuckle Mountains, Oklahoma and Laminated black shale-bedded chert cyclicity in the Woodford Formation, southern Oklahoma.

  9. SEISMIC AND ROCKPHYSICS DIAGNOSTICS OF MULTISCALE RESERVOIR TEXTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-11-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing microstructural constraints on seismic signatures. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

  10. Seismic and Rockphysics Diagnostics of Multiscale Reservoir Textures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Mavko

    2004-05-01

    As part of our study on ''Relationships between seismic properties and rock microstructure'', we have continued our work on analyzing shale textures from scanning acoustic microscope images. Our analysis is now extended to over 280 images of shales, giving us better statistics. The shales cover a range of depths and maturity. We estimate different statistical measures for characterizing heterogeneity and textures from scanning acoustic microscope (SAM) images of shale microstructures. Characterizing and understanding the microgeometry, their textures, scales, and textural anisotropy is important for better understanding the role of microgeometry on effective elastic properties. We analyzed SAM images from Bakken shale, Bazhenov shale, and Woodford shale. We observed quantifiable and consistent patterns linking texture, shale maturity, and elastic P-wave impedance. The textural heterogeneity and P-wave impedance increase with increasing maturity (decreasing kerogen content), while there is a general decrease in textural anisotropy with maturity. We also found a reasonably good match between elastic impedance estimated from SAM images and impedance computed from ultrasonic measurements.

  11. Oils and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin: Final report, March 1, 1985-March 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philp, R. P. [School of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-11-01

    The research project investigated various geochemical aspects of oils, suspected source rocks, and tar sands collected from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. The information has been used, in general, to investigate possible sources for the oils in the basin, to study mechanisms of oil generation and migration, and characterization of depositional environments. The major thrust of the recent work involved characterization of potential source formations in the Basin in addition to the Woodford shale. The formations evaluated included the Morrow, Springer, Viola, Arbuckle, Oil Creek, and Sylvan shales. A good distribution of these samples was obtained from throughout the basin and were evaluated in terms of source potential and thermal maturity based on geochemical characteristics. The data were incorporated into a basin modelling program aimed at predicting the quantities of oil that could, potentially, have been generated from each formation. The study of crude oils was extended from our earlier work to cover a much wider area of the basin to determine the distribution of genetically-related oils, and whether or not they were derived from single or multiple sources, as well as attempting to correlate them with their suspected source formations. Recent studies in our laboratory also demonstrated the presence of high molecular weight components(C{sub 4}-C{sub 80}) in oils and waxes from drill pipes of various wells in the region. Results from such a study will have possible ramifications for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir engineering studies.