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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

HISTORICAL WOOD COLLECTION AT THE DENDROCHRONOLOGY LABORATORY, VYTAUTAS MAGNUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigations. Subfossil oaks from river gravels, pines from peat bogs and wood from archeological excavations.) samples were collected in two peat bogs with pine trunks embedded in oligotrophic peat layers. One more than 300 samples of pine stumps and stems preserved in oligotrophic peat layers were coll

2

Overview of peat gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of recent research show that peat is an excellent raw material for making synthetic fuels. Therefore, the objective of most of the recent efforts in various countries is to produce synthetic fuels from peat. This paper presents an overview of the worldwide activity relating to research and development for peat gasification. The review includes thermal as well as biological peat gasification processes. 21 refs.

Punwani, D.V.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss Forestry and deep peat Purpose This policy guidance on forestry and deep peat acts as the country level guidance for FCW. It applies to regulatory functions: conserving and enhancing biodiversity climate change mitigation maintaining the peat and soil resource

4

PEAT: an energy alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though peat is a low-heating value and low-bulk density fossil fuel which in its natural state contains over 80 percent moisture, it can be an economical alternative to coal, and fuel oil, as is the case in Iceland and Finland for direct combustion applications. This is because of the relative ease with which peat can be harvested, and the generally low sulfur and ash content of peat. Recent studies show that peat also has very favorable characteristics for conversion to synthetic fuels. Tests show that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is a better raw material than coal for production of synthetic fuels. Recent estimates also show that conversion of peat to high-Btu gas (>950 Btu/scf) is competitive with other alternatives of synthetic high-Btu gas. Therefore, peat can be an economical energy alternative depending upon location of peat deposits, region of energy need, scale of operation and cost of other energy alternatives.

Schora, F.C.; Punwani, D.V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Chlorinated hydrocarbons in peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concentrations (ng/g), accumulation rates (ug/m/sup 2/=yr) and burdens were determined for DDT (1,1,1-trichlorophenyl2-2'bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane), polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and a,b,g-hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in peat cores taken across the mid-latitudes of North America. Because peat bogs are ombrotrophic, thereby receiving all contaminant inputs from the atmosphere and because peat cores were dated, atmospheric input functions were constructed for all of the compounds listed above excepting the HCHs. Compound inventories (burdens) in peat cores of PCBs, HCB, HCHs, Toxaphene, DDT, Pb and Zn were compared, indicating a strong influence from areas proximate to industrial sources and the atmospheric transport from source regions. Untransformed parent DDT (p,p' and o,p'-DDT) in surface peat and in precipitation provides evidence for the long range transport of DDT from neighboring countries where use has increased over the past 10-15 years. Present accumulation rates of DDT in peat are about 10-20% of maximum levels associated with peak use in the US around 1960. The DDT input function that was developed can be used to date peat cores. Transformations of DDT and PCBs were also examined in peat cores. First order transformation rates of DDT (p,p' and o,p') to DDD in anaerobic peat core environments ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 yr/sup -1/ with differences related to temperature. Aerobic transformation of PCB congeners in peat cores and microcosms was rapid for 2,3 and several 4 chlorinated congeners (T/sub 1/2 less than or equal to 0.2 to 3 years) and declined with increasing chlorine number.

Rapaport, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Third technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conference dealt with the estimation of US peat reserves, methods for the gasification of peat, including biogasification, techniques for dewatering peat, and the harvesting of peat. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fourth technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The papers presented dealt with peat dewatering, international peat programs, environmental and socio-economic factors, peat gasification, peat harvesting, and the state peat surveys for 14 states. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Peat as an energy alternative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This symposium, Peat as an Energy Alternative, was organized to facilitate in-depth discussion of the various topics at the last conference. The scope of the symposium was international and included papers from Brazil, Canada, Finland, Israel, Jamaica, and Sweden. The presentations were designed to provide the latest information relating to the following areas of interest: peat resources; peat deposit location; countries using peat for energy; countries showing inerest in considering peat for energy; status of the technologies for harvesting, dewatering, beneficiation, combustion, and conversion to synthetic fuels; environmental and socioeconomic issues relating to large-scale peat utilization; peat reclamation options; Federal and State government plans for peat utilization; and organizations working on developments relating to peat as an energy alternative. The symposium, sponsored by the Institute of Gas Technology, was held at Arlington, VA, December 1-3, 1980. Forth-six papers have been entered individually into EDB and ten also into ERA; two paper had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

International symposium on peat utilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This symposium was designed to provide a forum for peat scientists and engineers to discuss recent developments in the utilization of peat. It is thus the second international peat symposium to be held in Bemidji, the first having occurred two years earlier. Delegates to the 1983 Symposium represented eight nations (Finland, Sweden, Ireland, The Netherlands, Poland, Hungary, Canada, and the US), and a broad spectrum of peat interests. The objective was to survey world-wide activities in peat utilization and to report interesting developments and research results. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 50 items; all will appear in the Energy Data Base, 2 in Energy Research Abstracts, and 16 in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis. One paper was processed earlier.

Fuchsman, C.H.; Spigarelli, S.A. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Second technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The program includes peat resource surveys of eleven states, peat gasification process and equipment studies, dewatering studies, and environmental and socioeconomic factors in the development of peat technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for selected papers. (CKK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Modeling Northern Peatland Decomposition and Peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Northern Peatland Decomposition and Peat Accumulation Steve Frolking,1 * Nigel T. Roulet,2´al, Quebec, H3C 3J7, Canada ABSTRACT To test the hypothesis that long-term peat accumula- tion is related to contemporary carbon flux dynamics, we present the Peat Decomposition Model (PDM), a new model of long-term peat

Moore, Tim

12

Sludge sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a sludge sampler comprising an elongated generally cylindrical housing containing a baffle containing an aperture. Connected to the aperture is a flexible tubing having a valve for maintaining and releasing pressure in the lower end of the housing and exiting the upper end of the housing. The lower end of the housing contains a ball check valve maintained in closed position by pressure. When the lower end of the device contacts the sludge bed, the pressure valve is opened, enabling sludge to enter the lower end of the housing. After the sample is collected the valve is closed. An upsetting pin opens the valve to empty a sludge sample after the sample is removed from the fluid.

Ward, R.C.

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sludge sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a sludge sampler comprising an elongated generally cylindrical housing containing a baffle containing an aperture. Connected to the aperture is a flexible tubing having a valve for maintaining and releasing pressure in the lower end of the housing and exiting the upper end of the housing. The lower end of the housing contains a ball check valve maintained in closed position by pressure. When the lower end of the device contacts the sludge bed, the pressure valve is opened, enabling sludge to enter the lower end of the housing. After the sample is collected the valve is closed. An upsetting pin opens the valve to empty a sludge sample after the sample is removed from the fluid.

Ward, Ralph C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sewage Sludge (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sewage sludge utilization permits are required prior to the use, processing, and disposal of sewage sludge in Maryland.

15

Measurements of dynamic impedance for a model levee on peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of Sherman Island peat,” 2013 Geo Congress, Sanlevee resting on very soft peat soil was used to measureof levees resting on peat. 1. INTRODUCTION The seismic

Reinert, Edward T; Brandenberg, Scott J; Stewart, Jonathan P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from peat providing wide variation of the composite proportion of liquid-gas output while maintaining high overall carbon conversion to useful fuel. The process and apparatus utilizes three process stages in a single vessel providing functions of drying wet peat, provisions for addition of both wet and dry peat to a hydropyrolysis zone and gasification of the peat char.

Bodle, W.W.; Punwani, D.; Weil, S.A.

1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

17

2, 14571486, 2005 Halogens in peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 2, 1457­1486, 2005 Halogens in peat porewater H. Biester et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Halogens in porewater of peat bogs ­ the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter H. Biester 1 , D. Selimovi´c 1 , S. Hemmerich 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

18

CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT SECOND EDITION ISSUES PAPER, No. 2001-1 PUBLISHED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: North American Wetlands Conservation Council Committee Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Tourbe de and funding of: · Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association · Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada

Laval, Université

19

Early diagenetic transformations of peat Original research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early diagenetic transformations of peat Original research Organic matter sources and decay;KEY WORDS: bioindicators - carbohydrates - labile organic matter - peat botanical composition to the fate of organic matter (OM) in the underlying peat. Our aims were to determine how moisture conditions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat horizon in each core. Substantially older radiocarbon ages from organic-rich gytjja (mineral peat- lands throughout the WSL, for a total of 29,350 measurements digitized. (ii) Our own field data

Gillespie, Rosemary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Producing SNG and other fuels from peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1981, PEATGAS process testing advanced into the pilot-plant stage. The modification now in progress is the installation of a pressurized lockhopper system. Along with a series of fluidized-bed gasification tests, studies of a wet-carbonization peat-beneficiation process are underway. Other work includes mapping US peat resources.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Innovative sludge stabilization method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge is generated in many water and wastewater treatment processes, both biological and physical/chemical. Examples include biological sludges from sanitary and industrial wastewater treatment operations and chemical sludges such as those produced when metals are removed from metal plating wastewater. Even some potable water plants produce sludge, such as when alum is used as a flocculating agent to clarify turbid water. Because sludge is produced from such a variety of operations, different techniques have been developed to remove water from sludges and reduce the sludge volume and mass, thus making the sludge more suitable for recovery or disposal. These techniques include mechanical (e.g., filter presses), solar (sludge drying beds), and thermal. The least expensive of these methods, neglecting land costs, involves sludge drying beds and lagoons. The solar method was widely used in sewage treatment plants for many years, but has fallen in disfavor in the US; mechanical and thermal methods have been preferred. Since environmental remediation often requires managing sludges, this article presents a discussion of a variation of sludge lagoons known as evaporative sludge stabilization. Application of this process to the closure of two 2.5 acre (10117 m{sup 2}) hazardous waste surface impoundments will be discussed. 1 ref., 2 figs.

Riggenbach, J.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

WoodChemistry Wood Degradation & Preservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 WoodChemistry Wood Degradation & Preservation Chemical Utilization of Wood Pulp & Paper and carbohydrates is of considerable interest in connection with a number of issues in wood chemistry, such as the reactions taking place during the formation of wood, the natural molecular weight distribution of lignin

Geldenhuys, Jaco

24

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Wood Resources International  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Resources International Wood Raw Material Consumption on the Rise Despite Weak Global Economy UNECE Timber Committee Meeting October 7-8, 2003 Geneva, Switzerland Håkan Ekström Wood Resources International #12;Wood Resources International Outline · Roundwood Removals · Roundwood Consumption · Raw

27

Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research The value of peat bogs as open habitats may suffice on lowland raised bogs. Damming furrows is ineffective if the peat is severely cracked sundew, Drosera anglica #12;Introduction In their natural state, peat bogs provide unique habitats

28

Biodiversity Toolkit Why we DON'T DIG PEAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Toolkit Peat free Why we DON'T DIG PEAT The collegiate University is working to help the environment and wildlife by phasing out its use of products containing peat, such as compost and soil improver.admin.ox.ac.uk/estates/environment/biodiversity Cut your carbon emissions Wildlife living in peat bogs includes foxes, Irish hares, pygmy shrews, red

Melham, Tom

29

Sludge organics bioavailability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concern over the bioavailability of toxic organics that can occur in municipal sludges threatens routine land application of sludge. Available data, however, show that concentrations of priority organics in normal sludges are low. Sludges applied at agronomic rates yield chemical concentrations in soil-sludge mixtures 50 to 100 fold lower. Plant uptake at these pollutant concentrations (and at much higher concentrations) is minimal. Chemicals are either (1) accumulated at extremely low levels (PCBs), (2) possibly accumulated, but then rapidly metabolized within plants to extremely low levels (DEHP), or (3) likely degraded so rapidly in soil that only minor contamination occurs (PCP and 2,4-DNP).

Eiceman, G.E.; Bellin, C.A.; Ryan, J.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Peat Characterization and Uptake of Nickel (II) and Cobalt (II) in a Saprist Peat E. S. Asapo1, 2*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Peat Characterization and Uptake of Nickel (II) and Cobalt (II) in a Saprist Peat Column By E. S should be addressed. Email: esasapo@mun.ca Abstract Fibrist and saprist sphagnum peat soils taken from a bog in Torbay, Newfoundland, Canada were characterized. The saprist and fibrist peat soils had wet

Coles, Cynthia

31

Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2003 Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest:of decomposition for upland boreal peat under black spruceand $50% in sphagnum moss peat), despite slow decomposition

Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indo- nesiasmoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires insmoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Nelson, D. L; Diner, D. J; Logan, J. A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Laboratory investigation of the pre- and post-cyclic volume change properties of Sherman Island peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

response of Mercer Slough peat. ’’ J. Geotech. & Geoenv.properties of fibrous peats. ” J. Geotech. & Geoenv. Eng. ,Secondary compression of peat with or without surcharge. “J.

Shafiee, Ali; Brandenberg, Scott J; Stewart, Jonathan P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Fifth technical contractors' conference on peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fifth Technical Contractors' Conference on Peat was held April 28 to 29, 1982, at Bethesda, Maryland. Thirty papers have been entered into EDB and ERA; two had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Peat as an alternaive energy source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peat remains a virtually unexploited energy source in the US in spite of large resources and a long history of use as a fuel in other countries. Areas that lack other fossil fuels are often the site of large peat lands. US resources are estimated at 1443 quadrillion Btus, with over half located in Alaska outside the permanent frostline. The Soviet Union, with over four times the US resource, is the largest commercial user. Harvesting techniques include dry and wet methods that utilize both thermal and mechanical dewatering. Peat is well suited for gasification by several processes, including the PEAT GAS process now being tested. Harvested peatlands can be made into productive farm and forest land if proper techniques are used to preserve water and air quality. (DCK)

Punwani, D.V.; Mensinger, M.C.

1981-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

36

Experiments and Observation of Peat Smouldering Fires   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a subsurface layer of peat is ignited, it smoulders (flameless combustion) slowly but steadily. These fires propagate for long periods of time (days, weeks, even years), are particularly difficult to extinguish and can spread over very extensive...

Ashton, Clare; Rein, Guillermo; Dios, JD; Torero, Jose L; Legg, C; Davies, M; Gray, A

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Wood biology We present investigations of wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood biology We present investigations of wood formation which started in 1999. Samples for investigations are taken from living trees. Processes of wood formation are affected by different factors like temperature and precipitation. #12;We use light microscopy to study cell wall formation in the wood. Double

Cufar, Katarina

38

Wood Curriculum vitae 1 ERIC MATTHEW WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood ­ Curriculum vitae 1 ERIC MATTHEW WOOD Spatial Analysis for Conservation and Department/17/2014 Postdoctoral Research Associate, University of Wisconsin-Madison PUBLICATIONS Wood, E. M., A. M. Pidgeon, V. C community structure in U.S protected areas. Ecological Applications in press Wood, E. M., and A. M. Pidgeon

Mladenoff, David

39

FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF WOOD AND WOOD COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRACTURE TOUGHNESS OF WOOD AND WOOD COMPOSITES DURING CRACK PROPAGATION Noah Matsumoto Structural, USA * Corresponding author: John.Nairn@oregonstate.edu SWST member #12;Fracture Toughness of Wood and Wood Composites During Crack Propagation ABSTRACT The mode I fracture toughness as a function of crack

Nairn, John A.

40

Forest land application of sewage sludge on the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, a sewage sludge application study was initiated on the Savannah River Plant to evaluate the effects of sludge additions on nutrient cycling processes in loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) forest ecosystems and to determine whether or not such additions beneficially enhance forest productivity. Sewage sludge, either as a liquid anaerobic sludge at 0, 402, or 804 kg N/ha (360 and 720 lb/ac) containing approximately 7% N (oven dry) or a solid aerobic material at 632 kg N/ha (560 lb/ac) with approximately 1.3% N (oven dry), was applied to 1-, 3-, 8-, and 28-year-old loblolly pine stands on sandy and clayey upper coastal plain soils. A total of 525,000 gallons of liquid sludge and 560 tons of solid sludge was applied on 11.6 hectares (28.7 acres) of loblolly pine forest plots. Sludge additions were monitored to determine availability and movement so that potential impacts could be evaluated on water quality, nutrient and heavy metal cycling, soil and forest floor, understory vegetation, tree foliage, stand growth, biomass production, and wood quality. This study concluded that using liquid sludge at rates of 400 kg N/ha or less as a silvicultural treatment to fertilize pulp and sawtimber loblolly pine stands resulted in increased forest productivity without environmental or wood quality degradation. Application recommendations for stand age and loading rates for management purposes are addressed.

Davis, C.E. (comp.)

1989-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

42

Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog OUTLINE Microtephra horizons, found be found in peat bogs and lake sediments across Scotland and the rest of Northern Europe (Figure 1; Larsen

43

Carbon Emissions from Smouldering Peat in Shallow and Strong Fronts   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A series of experiments of shallow and strong smouldering fronts in boreal peat have been conducted under laboratory conditions to study the CO and CO2 emissions. Peat samples of 100 mm by 100 mm in cross section and 50 ...

Rein, Guillermo; Cohen, Simon; Simeoni, Albert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Parana-Etendeka Province David W. Peate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Parana-Etendeka Province David W. Peate Department of Earth Sciences, TheOpen University the flood basalts [e.g., Morgan, 1981; White and McKenzie, 1989; Peate et a/., Large Igneous Provinces

Peate, David W.

45

Origin of Lead in Eight Central European Peat Bogs Determined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Origin of Lead in Eight Central European Peat Bogs Determined from Isotope Ratios was identified in 210Pb-dated profiles through eight peat bogs distributed over an area of 60 000 km2 with Germany, Austria, and Poland. Basal peat 14C-dated at 11 000 years BP had a relatively high 206Pb/207Pb

Wieder, R. Kelman

46

Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

Roulet, Nigel T.

47

Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludge communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

kinase from activated sludge performing enhanced biologicalbetween flocculation of activated sludge and composition oforganisms from activated sludge systems. Wat Res 31,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational...

49

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 November 2013 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

50

Wood Quality: The Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Quality: The Effects of Planting Density and Thinning Eini C. Lowell PNW Research Station wood quality? By volume, characteristic, product? #12;http://jilldenton.files.wordpress.com/2007, faster #12;What is it that defines wood quality?What is it that defines wood quality? Density: earlywood

51

Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook Ecosystem Science and Management College ........................................................................................................................... 2 Wood Products Undergraduate Program ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Careers for Wood Products Majors

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

52

Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesiaforest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997–2009) G. R. vanin 2004: Importance of peat burn- ing and pyroconvective

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

Turner, Monica G.

54

Mires and Peat, Volume 6 (2010), Article 02, 1 6, http://www.mires-and-peat.net/, ISSN 1819-754X 2010 International Mire Conservation Group and International Peat Society 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mires and Peat, Volume 6 (2010), Article 02, 1 6, http://www.mires-and-peat.net/, ISSN 1819-754X © 2010 International Mire Conservation Group and International Peat Society 1 The physical properties of peat: a key factor for modern growing media J-C. Michel AGROCAMPUS OUEST, Research Unit EPHOR, Angers

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Final sludge rules consolidate options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final federal regulations for use and disposal of waste water sludge were signed in 1992. Now states must adopt standards that are at least as stringent to maintain sludge disposal permitting authority. The regulations define specific limits for 12 sludge contaminants while the organic contaminants listed have been eliminated. The regulations recognize three basic methods of sludge use and disposal: land application, surface disposal, and incineration.

Walsh, T.K. [Metcalf & Eddy Inc., Wakefield, MA (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Introduction Mich ael Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Mich ael Wood Italo Calvino was discreet about his life and the lives of others or mechanical means without prior written permission of the publisher. #12;viii michael wood notion with great

Rowley, Clarence W.

57

WOOD STREET METERED LOT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOT E1 LOT O WOOD STREET METERED LOT LOT W5 LOT C4 LOT B4 LOT L LOT M MARSHFIELDAVENUE PAULINASTREET Clinical Sciences Building UI Hospital Wood Street Station Clinical Sciences North Grand Grounds Garden

Dai, Yang

58

Qualifying Wood Stove Deduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This incentive allows Arizona taxpayers to deduct the cost of converting an existing wood fireplace to a qualifying wood stove. The cost to purchase and install all necessary equipment is tax...

59

Land application of sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book is the proceedings of a workshop held in Las Vegas, NV in 1985 entitled Effects of Sewage Sludge Quality and Soil Properties on Plant Uptake of Sludge-Applied Trace Constituents. The workshop was in response to the need to utilize the most current available information in the development of regulations and criteria to safely apply and manage the land application of municipal sewage sludge. The participants were undoubtedly the most knowledgeable of this subject matter, and were divided into five separate but related task groups. The groups addressed the following sludge-related topics: (1) role of soil properties on accumulation of trace element by crops; (2) role of sludge properties on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (3) influence of long-term application on accumulation of trace elements by crops; (4) transfer of trace elements to the food chain, and (5) effects of trace organics in agroecosystems and their risk assessment to humans. The text, therefore, parallels those of the results of the task groups. The five main chapters followed a similar format, i.e., having an introduction section, a comprehensive literature review, discussion of recent and current data, and synthesis of the most relevant information.

Page, A.L.; Logan, T.J.; Ryan, J.A. (eds.)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION V #12;#12;443USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Section Overview Wood Products and Utilization1 John R. Shelly2 Forests are obviously a very important asset to California, and their economic and social value to the state is well documented. Wood

Standiford, Richard B.

62

CURRICULUM VITAE Robert Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURRICULUM VITAE Robert Wood Assistant Professor Atmospheric Sciences, Box 351640, University. Publications [1] Wood, R., I. M. Stromberg, P. R. Jonas and C. S. Mill, 1997: Analysis of an air motion system on a light aircraft for boundary layer research. J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., 14, 960-968. [2] Wood, R., D. W

Wood, Robert

63

Synthetic fuels from peat: state-of-the-art review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The world has significant resources of peat. Total energy contained in these resources is estimated to be equivalent to over 1800 billion barrels of oil. Peat has been used extensively in Europe and Russia for years as a source of energy. In the United States, where peat resources are estimated at equivalent to 240 billion barrels of oil, peat is not used commercially as a source of energy. In 1974, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) initiated peat gasification research under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco). The results of that work, continued at IGT under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Minnegasco, show that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is a better raw material for making synthetic fuels than coal. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the total system of taking peat from the ground and converting it to synthetic fuels. This system incorporates subsystems on harvesting, dewatering, and conversion processes. The world peat resources and environmental effects on large-scale peat utilization are also reviewed.

Punwani, D.V.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

agricultural peat soil: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Boyer, Edmond 4 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Environmental Sciences and...

65

agricultural peat soils: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Boyer, Edmond 4 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Environmental Sciences and...

66

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Dottorato di Ricerca of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Supervisors: Prof. Roberto Baratti Ing. Stefania Tronci Dottorato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 ASP Models and Simulations 7 2.1 The Activated Sludge Process

Skogestad, Sigurd

69

Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Trace Element Leaching from Metalliferous Peats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Trace Element Leaching from Metalliferous PeatsDue to geochemical processes, peat soils often have elevated con- sulfides (Cannon, 1955). The maximum Zn concentra as high as 10 g kg 1 . Theperatures to vary microbial activity in two metalliferous peats (M7 acidic peat

Walter, M.Todd

70

Algal flora of subalpine peat bog pools in the Krkonose Mts asy tn krkonosskch subalpnskch raselinis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Algal flora of subalpine peat bog pools in the Krkonose Mts asy tní krkonosských subalpínských, Czech Repub- lic, e-mail: sylnova@natur.cuni.cz Nováková S. (2002): Algal flora of subalpine peat bog raselinist peat bog and the Pancavské raselinist peat bog in the Krkonose Mts (Czech Republic) about 228 taxa

71

DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

Moore, Tim

72

Nutrient limitations on peat decomposition and nutrient loading in Atlantic White Cedar swamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nutrient limitations on peat decomposition and nutrient loading in Atlantic White Cedar swamps examined the effects of nutrient increases on peat decomposition. I analyzed peat and porewater nutrients of surface water nutrients. The initial C:N and C:P ratios of the peat were higher than the molar ratios

Vallino, Joseph J.

73

Friction of wood on steel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis deals with the experimental description of friction between steel and wood materials, specifically laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and pine wood with two… (more)

Koubek, Radek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Chopwell Wood Health Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chopwell Wood Health Project An innovative project of school visits and General Practitioner. The project took place at Chopwell Wood a 360 hectare mixed woodland managed by the Forestry Commission to carry on being involved in the project. Next stage of the project Although the project leader has now

75

Steam generator sludge pile model boiler testing: sludge characterization. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a program to understand the thermal and hydraulic transport process that can lead to chemical concentration in sludge piles on the tubesheet in a steam generator, the chemical composition and physical properties of eight sludges and several simulants were determined. Analyses performed by emission and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that most of the sludges were mainly composed of iron oxides, copper, and other elements at trace levels. X-ray diffraction measurements identified iron to exist in the form of magnetite and copper to exist in the form of a metal. The densities, porosity, particle size, surface area, pore size distribution, and hydrodynamic permeabilities were determined on all plant sludges and selected simulants. Wide variations were observed in the physical measurements of the different plant sludges.

Becker, L.F. Jr.; Esposito, J.N.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Marcelo A. Wood Marcelo A. Wood, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marcelo A. Wood 1 Marcelo A. Wood, Ph.D. Curriculum Vitae June, 2013 Current Appointment: Associate, University of California, Irvine #12;Marcelo A. Wood 2 Teaching Experience: since joining UCI 2006, American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) #12;Marcelo A. Wood 3 Journal/Editorial Review Service

Wood, Marcelo A.

77

WOOD ANATOMY INSTRUCTIONS FOR LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD ANATOMY INSTRUCTIONS FOR LABORATORY WORK KATARINA CUFAR, MARTIN ZUPANCIC University of Ljubljana Biotechnical Faculty Department of Wood Science and Technology #12;Publisher Department of Wood The publishing of "Wood Anatomy - Instructions for Laboratory Work", a textbook by Katarina Cufar and Martin

Cufar, Katarina

78

WOOD RESEARCH 53 (4): 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WOOD RESEARCH 53 (4): 2008 1-12 CAMBIAL ACTIVITY AND WOOD FORMATION IN BEECH FAGUS SYLVATICA, Department of Wood Science and Technology, Ljubljana, Slovenia Jozica Griar Slovenian Forestry Institute (Fagus sylvatica), cambium, wood formation, cell differentiation, xylem growth rings, Gompertz function

Cufar, Katarina

79

WOOD RESEARCH 52 (2): 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 WOOD RESEARCH 52 (2): 2007 1-10 WOOD FORMATION IN NORWAY SPRUCE PICEA ABIES STUDIED BY PINNING Zupani, Katarina Cufar, Primoz Oven University of Ljubljana, Biotechnical Faculty, Department of Wood methods for examining wood formation. Pinning induced desiccation of differentiated xylem, necrosis

Cufar, Katarina

80

Generating power with waste wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among the biomass renewables, waste wood has great potential with environmental and economic benefits highlighting its resume. The topics of this article include alternate waste wood fuel streams; combustion benefits; waste wood comparisons; waste wood ash; pilot scale tests; full-scale test data; permitting difficulties; and future needs.

Atkins, R.S.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW -...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge...

82

James F. Wood  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

James F. Wood is currently Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal in the Office of Fossil Energy (FE). In this position, he is responsible for the management and direction of the Office's...

83

Wood Heating Fuel Exemption  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute exempts from the state sales tax all wood or "refuse-derived" fuel used for heating purposes. The law does not make any distinctions about whether the qualified fuels are used for...

84

Wye Wood: the wider wood : A project description and evaluation page 1 January 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wye Wood: the wider wood : A project description and evaluation page 1 January 2007 Wye Wood: the wider wood A project description and evaluation Report written by: Dr Frances Howie Associate Director Parrott Health Development Worker, Wye Wood: the wider wood #12;Wye Wood: the wider wood : A project

85

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Water supply and sludge metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ultimate sludge disposal is one of the major tasks facing wastewater treatment facilities today. Where adequate farmland exists in proximity to the treatment facility and where sludge characteristics are suitable, land application is often the most economical method. In some cases, however, metal concentrations in the sludge either limit the site life or the application rate to the point where land application is not economical. When metals are above regulatory limits, land application may become impossible. The origin of the metals has largely been credited to industrial users and stormwater runoff and have, in fact, often represented significant sources of metals. Another potentially significant source of metals that has been frequently overlooked is the water supply system (including the distribution and home piping systems). Data from some treatment facilities suggest that the water supply system is the major source of metals and is the reason that sewage sludge metal levels are above allowable land application limits.

Brown, W.E. (Wright-Pierce Engineers, Topsham, ME (USA))

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Progress on project to produce SNG and other fuels from peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developments in peat gasification research projects at the Institute of Gas Technology are briefly described. This includes developments in the Peatgas pilot plant and in the wet carbonization process. US peat resources are tabulated.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Reusable Process Control System Framework for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and NPP Sounder PEATE missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEATE missions Chris A. Mattmann, Dana Freeborn, Dan Crichton, Brian Foster, Andrew Hart, David Woollard missions: the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and NPP Sounder PEATE projects. 1 Introduction Data volume

Mattmann, Chris

90

Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams J. B. Johnson (jerry.johnson@byu.edu), S. M. Peat and B. J. Adams, Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Dept

Pfrender, Michael

91

Precision wood particle feedstocks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Synthetic fuels from peat by the IGT PEATGAS Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peat gasification research at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) began in 1974 under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Gas company (Minnegasco). The preliminary evaluation conducted under that program showed encouraging results and led to an expanded program under the joint sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Minnegasco. The current program is also funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the Northern Natural Gas Company (NNGC). Since 1976 IGT has completed tests with peats from Minnesota, North Carolina, and Maine in laboratory-scale equipment and process development units (PDU's). Tests in the hydrogasification PDU (which represents a scale-up of 250 times the laboratory-scale equipment) confirm the laboratory results. Preparations are being made for pilot-plant scale gasification tests in a modified coal gasification pilot plant (HYGAS) in Chicago. Based on the experimental results obtained in the laboratory-scale tests, IGT conceived a two-stage gasifier (named PEATGAS) for converting peat to synthetic fuels. The PEATGAS Process can be used for making medium- or high-Btu gas as well as liquid fuels. A complete process design and cost estimates have been prepared for a plant producing 250 million cubic feet of SNG per day from Minnesota peat containing 50% moisture. These estimates show that the conversion of peat (containing 50% moisture) is competitive with other alternative methods of SNG production. This paper discusses the important and significant gasification characteristics of the peats evaluated. The paper also describes the use of the PEATGAS Process for production of medium-Btu gas, methanol, and gasoline.

Punwani, D.V.; Rader, A.M.; Kopstein, M.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Czech Phycology, Olonwuc, J: 41-52, 200J 41 Aigae and cyanoprokaryotic species from peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Czech Phycology, Olonwuc, J: 41-52, 200J 41 Aigae and cyanoprokaryotic species from peat bogs peat bogs and backwatersin Bohemia. Localities in the vicinity of the reservoir and in the core zone microbiotopes (Table 1) in the following investigated areas: acidophilous peat bog Mrtvý Iuh, Smrèinský

94

CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat Catherine E. Lovelock1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat Catherine E. Lovelock1 *, Roger W. Ruess2 , Ilka C. Feller3 1 on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO2 efflux (27 umol m22 s21 ), but this had returned

Ruess, Roger W.

95

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

Kulp, Mark

96

Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 Peat groundwater as a medium for surficial geochemical exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 1 Peat groundwater as a medium-mail: stew.hamilton@ontario.ca) ABSTRACT: Kimberlite-specific chemical responses are visible in shallow peat and migrated through the Tyrell Sea sediment into shallow peat groundwater. The presence of elevated values

97

Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired boreal peat under black spruce forest with sphagnum and feather moss understory using incubation increments. At temperatures below 0°C, significant decomposition was observed in feather moss peat

Litvak, Marcy

98

CHARACTERIZATION OF A HORTICULTURAL PEAT FOR TREATING MINING ASAPO, Emmanuel S and COLES, Cynthia A  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZATION OF A HORTICULTURAL PEAT FOR TREATING MINING WASTEWATER ASAPO, Emmanuel S and COLES. Peat has been identified as a cheap, natural and available material capable of adsorbing several heavy the properties of peat in order to capture dissolved heavy metals. This paper investigates the surface

Coles, Cynthia

99

Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Université d'Orléans, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract Seven samples from a 1 m long peat core targets because of their dominant or even exclusive OM content, peat deposits have received relatively

Boyer, Edmond

100

The role of peat decomposition in patterned mires: a case study from the central Swiss Alps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of peat decomposition in patterned mires: a case study from the central Swiss Alps., Stefanova V., van Leeuwen J. F. N., van der Knaap W. O., Colombaroli D. & Tinner W. (2013): The role of peat and is unique in its pattern. In two of five pools there is in the contact zone between the basal peat

Bern, Universität

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman Oberlin College `13 Advisor and loss. Rapid nitrate addition to salt marshes may stimulate bacterial decomposition of existing peat, and the decomposition may contribute to creek bank destabilization and collapse. Alternately, peat deposited in high

Vallino, Joseph J.

102

Carbon isotope evidence for recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat accumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon isotope evidence for recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat change. In this study, peat cores up to 2 m in depth from four moss banks on Signy Island were used included radiocarbon dating (to determine peat accumulation rates) and stable carbon isotope composition

103

Small-scale spatial variation of benthic algal assemblages in a peat bog Katerina Cerna n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small-scale spatial variation of benthic algal assemblages in a peat bog Katerina Cerna´ n test Peat bog a b s t r a c t Spatial patterns on a very small scale (10 cm), and the effect microhabitat types were investigated. Samples were taken in a peat bog along linear transects on a scale of 10

104

Mercury(II) Sorption to Two Florida Everglades Peats: Evidence for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury(II) Sorption to Two Florida Everglades Peats: Evidence for Strong and Weak Binding and Competition by Dissolved Organic Matter Released from the Peat R . T O D D D R E X E L , M A R K U S H A I 80309 The binding of mercury(II) to two peats from Florida Everglades sites with different rates

Illinois at Chicago, University of

105

OCEANOGRAPHY Stratigraphic Distribution of Amino Acids in Peats from Cedar Creek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Peats from Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota, and Dismal Swamp, Virginia' F. M. SWAIN, A. BLUMENTALS, AND R the bog waters and waters squeezed from the peats. Attempts to detect proteins in these substances by means of paper electrophoresis were unsuccessful. Fibrous proteins may be present, however. In both peat

Minnesota, University of

106

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada and their application to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada.sader@mmg.com) ABSTRACT: Peat groundwater compositions at depths of 0.4 and 1.1 m below ground surface in the Attawapiskat on hydrogeological measurements and variations in peat groundwater geochemical parameters (pH and EC are high

107

Original article Mechanical behaviour of silty clay loam/peat mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Mechanical behaviour of silty clay loam/peat mixtures: cyclic compression or amended with 20 or 40 % by volume of spagh- num peat, were studied at different values of water contentPa is increased to about 55 and 115 % for 20 and 40 % peat contents, respectively. A comparison of the cyclic test

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Long-term records of atmospheric deposition of mercury in peat cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-term records of atmospheric deposition of mercury in peat cores from Arctic, and comparisonD dissertation February 2004 #12;Long-term records of atmospheric deposition of mercury in peat cores from Arctic in southern Ontario recorded by peat cores from three bogs: comparison with natural "background" values (past

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia), Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D08207, doi:10.1029/2010JD015148. 1. Introduction [2] Peat and deforestation fires

Zender, Charles

110

PEAT-FORMING PLANT SPECIFIC BIOMARKERS AS INDICATORS OF PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN SPHAGNUM-DOMINATED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEAT-FORMING PLANT SPECIFIC BIOMARKERS AS INDICATORS OF PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN SPHAGNUM and rapid burial make the peat archives particularly useful for reconstructing natural or anthropogenic environmental changes. Nevertheless, up to now biochemical composition of peat OM has rarely been used

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

111

Microbial Respiration and Its Consequences on Oxygen Availability in Peat Substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

91 Microbial Respiration and Its Consequences on Oxygen Availability in Peat Substrate R. Naasz, J to Horticulture 2, rue Le Nôtre, F-49045 Angers Cedex 01 France Keywords: peat, oxygen uptake, microorganisms (Sphagnum peat) on oxygen transport and availability to the root. This is why, a one-dimensional transfer

Boyer, Edmond

112

Association of postfire peat accumulation and microtopography in boreal bogs1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Association of postfire peat accumulation and microtopography in boreal bogs1 Brian W. Benscoter, Dale H. Vitt, and R. Kelman Wieder Abstract: Peatlands accumulate organic matter as peat because of disproportionate rates of production and decomposi- tion. However, peat accumulation heterogeneity has not been

Benscoter, Brian W.

113

Feedback control of the rate of peat formation Lisa R. Belyea1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feedback control of the rate of peat formation Lisa R. Belyea1* and R. S. Clymo2 1 Institute or net sinks at present. Second, long-term rates of peat accumulation (and hence carbon sequestration) are surpris- ingly steady, despite great variability in the short-term rates of peat formation. Here, we

114

Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study Julian Deissa; accepted 6 February 2004 Abstract A set of peat column experiments was used to determine the transport-bearing stream 250 m from the site. Three pairs of peat columns were extracted from the rifle range for analysis

Walter, M.Todd

115

Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale Jiri´ Neustupa- scale transects were delimited at 4 temperate lowland peat bog localities to investigate spatial represented by dynamics of the common species. Keywords Desmidiales Á Microscale Á Microphytobenthos Á Peat

116

Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada by peatlands. Peat samples were examined in the Attawapiskat area, a region of discontinuous permafrost, where more than 19 kimberlite pipes have been found beneath a cover of peat (2­4 m thick) and Quaternary

117

Characterization of Brazilian peat samples by applying a multi-method F. Girardelloa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Characterization of Brazilian peat samples by applying a multi-method approach F. Girardelloa , R Peat is a mixture of compounds formed by the decomposition of plant residues and mineral materials heterogeneity and natural variety, the physical and chemical properties of peat can vary widely within

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

A STUDY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEWATERING IN EXPERIMENTAL REED-PLANTED OR UNPLANTED SLUDGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

94/0169 A STUDY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEWATERING IN EXPERIMENTAL REED-PLANTED OR UNPLANTED SLUDGE of the reeds in bed 2 died in spite of the influent sludge dose of 70 g. of SS.m"2.d~l. During the second phase (917 days) the 3 beds were aerated from the bottom and fed with sludge, directly extracted from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment S. Troesch.troesch@cemagref.fr, dirk.esser@sint.fr Abstract Sludge drying reed beds have been used for dewatering and mineralization of sludge since the beginning of the 90's, but their insufficient performances in terms of Dry Matter [DM

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

Long-term investigation of microbial fuel cells treating primary sludge or digested sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Biogas production was produced from primary sludge and quantified. Total energy production in MFCs could: Microbial fuel cell Primary sludge Digested sludge Energy Biogas a b s t r a c t The long-term performance. Digested sludge can be further composted for agriculture uses, and biogas can be con- verted

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wastewater sludge management options for Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sludge management is a fundamental area of concern across wastewater treatment systems in Honduras. The lack of timely sludge removal has led to declining plant performance in many facilities throughout the country. In ...

Bhattacharya, Mahua, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Inaugural 2012 Kristie Ann Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inaugural 2012 Kristie Ann Wood Scholarship Award Call for Nominations We are delighted to announce the Inaugural 2012 Kristie Ann Wood Scholarship Award for an Outstanding Women's, Gender, and Sexualities (WGSS Wood, a feminist mother, wife, friend, daughter, and lawyer who is remembered by her loved ones

Alpay, S. Pamir

123

April, 2006 Allen W. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 April, 2006 Vita Allen W. Wood Academic Address: Philosophy Department, Bldg 90 Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305-2155 Telephone 650-723-2587 Fax 650-723-0985 E-mail: Allen.Wood University, 1999-2000. Professor of Philosophy, Stanford University, 1999-2001 Ward W. and Priscilla B. Woods

Zalta, Edward N.

124

Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood 6495_C000.fm Page iii Wednesday, February 1, 2006 5:48 PM #12 of treated-wood research and their efforts in organizing the con- ference entitled Environmental Impacts, "Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood", the conference proceedings which served as a starting point

Florida, University of

125

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rheological Model for Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood as the most important natural and renewable building material plays an important role in the construction sector. Nevertheless, its hygroscopic character basically affects all related mechanical properties leading to degradation of material stiffness and strength over the service life. Accordingly, to attain reliable design of the timber structures, the influence of moisture evolution and the role of time- and moisture-dependent behaviors have to be taken into account. For this purpose, in the current study a 3D orthotropic elasto-plastic, visco-elastic, mechano-sorptive constitutive model for wood, with all material constants being defined as a function of moisture content, is presented. The corresponding numerical integration approach, with additive decomposition of the total strain is developed and implemented within the framework of the finite element method (FEM). Moreover to preserve a quadratic rate of asymptotic convergence the consistent tangent operator for the whole model is derived. Functionality and capability of the presented material model are evaluated by performing several numerical verification simulations of wood components under different combinations of mechanical loading and moisture variation. Additionally, the flexibility and universality of the introduced model to predict the mechanical behavior of different species are demonstrated by the analysis of a hybrid wood element. Furthermore, the proposed numerical approach is validated by comparisons of computational evaluations with experimental results.

Mohammad Masoud Hassani; Falk K. Wittel; Stefan Hering; Hans J. Herrmann

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

MAKENAS, B.J.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Chemical records of environmental pollution in ombrotrophic peat bogs   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environmental health. In recent years ombrotrophic peat bogs have been used to study the changing rates and sources of atmospheric metal deposition, as they receive all their water and nutrients from the atmosphere by dry and wet deposition alone. Cores from...

Cloy, Joanna Marie

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fermentation and chemical treatment of pulp and paper mill sludge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of chemically treating partially de-ashed pulp and/or paper mill sludge to obtain products of value comprising taking a sample of primary sludge from a Kraft paper mill process, partially de-ashing the primary sludge by physical means, and further treating the primary sludge to obtain the products of value, including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge as a substrate to produce cellulase in an efficient manner using the resulting sludge as the only carbon source and mixtures of inorganic salts as the primary nitrogen source, and including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge to produce ethanol.

Lee, Yoon Y; Wang, Wei; Kang, Li

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Balsa Wood Bridge Competition Sponsored by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Balsa Wood Bridge Competition Sponsored by: The University of Tennessee, Department of Civil only of BALSA WOOD and ELMER'S WOOD GLUE. No other materials will be accepted. The balsa wood must be no larger than ¼" high and ¼" wide. Any dowels can not have a diameter greater than ¼". Balsa wood comes

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

131

SOME POV-RAY TEXTURES AND COLORS T_Wood1 to T_Wood35  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOME POV-RAY TEXTURES AND COLORS WOODS.INC T_Wood1 to T_Wood35 STONES.INC T_Stone1 to T_Stone44Pink DarkPurple NeonBlue CoolCopper MandarinOrange LightWood MediumWood DarkWood SpicyPink Semi

Lee, Carl

132

High Btu gas from peat. Existing social and economic conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High Btu Gas from Peat. The proposed study was designed to assess the overall viability of the design, construction and operation of a commercial facility for the production of high-Btu substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. In order to complete the study, Minnegasco assembled an experienced project team with the wide range of expertise required. In addition, the State of Minnesota agreed to participate in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Ertec (The Earth Technology Corporation) was selected to conduct the site evaluation and environmental assessment portions of the feasibility study. The site evaluation was completed in March of 1981 with the submittal of the first of several reports to Minnegasco. This report describes the existing social and economic conditions of the proposed project area in northern Minnesota. The baseline data presented will be used to assess the significance of potential project impacts in subsequent phases of the feasibility study. Wherever possible, the data base was established using 1980 Bureau of Census statistics. However, where the 1980 data were not yet available, the most recent information is presented. 11 figures, 46 tables.

Not Available

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DIVISION 6 -WOOD AND PLASTICS 06000 GENERAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIVISION 6 - WOOD AND PLASTICS ________________________________________________________________________ 06000 GENERAL 1. For both woods and plastics, special attention is called to matters of flame spread-dried. 3. For exterior wood or plastic framed structures, see Division 4 for dimensions of Sample Panel

134

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Natural Resources Research Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Loll ThermoWood Hybrid Poplars Peat A boost for the peat industry Value in Minnesota peat deposits Natural che

Netoff, Theoden

136

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DR. ROBERT J. WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DR. ROBERT J. WOOD DIRECTOR OF THE COOPERATIVE OXFORD LABORATORY NATIONAL Robert Wood, Director of the Cooperative Oxford Laboratory, a cooperative scientific research laboratory

137

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

138

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

139

Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

140

The Asian Wood Pellet Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Asian Wood Pellet Markets Joseph A. Roos and Allen M. Brackley United States Department Wood Pellet plant in North Pole, Alaska. Clockwise from upper left: pelleting machine; pellets bagged for home use; a Superior Pellet Fuels bag; inventory of product ready for shipment to retailers. Upper

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson Biomass and Resource Efficiency: the need for a supply led approach to forest productivity European Parliament, Brussels, 10 November 2011 #12;MEGATREND WOOD SUPPLY ­ 2020 the trees on the right Source: JP Management Consulting (Asia-Pacific) Ltd., 2006 #12;BAMBOO FOREST Source

142

Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 6. Peat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements and potential for development of US peat resources for energy use are reviewed. Factors analyzed include the occurrence and properties of major peat deposits; technologies for extraction, dewatering, preparation, combustion, and conversion of peat to solid, liquid, or gaseous fuels; environmental, regulatory, and market constraints; and research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) needs. Based on a review of existing research efforts, recommendations are made for a comprehensive national RD and D program to enhance the use of peat as an energy source.

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was within the limits for landfilling inert residues. On the other hand, sulfate and chloride releases were found to comply with the limits for non-hazardous residues.

Seggiani, Maurizia, E-mail: m.seggiani@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Puccini, Monica, E-mail: m.puccini@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Raggio, Giovanni, E-mail: g.raggio@tiscali.it [Italprogetti Engineering SPA, Lungarno Pacinotti, 59/A, 56020 San Romano (Pisa) (Italy); Vitolo, Sandra, E-mail: s.vitolo@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors), so in peat pots; they are slow to germinate, so be patient. Seedlings may be transplanted in June. Crowns

Liskiewicz, Maciej

145

Holocene blanket peat development in south west Scotland : the roles of human activity, climate change and vegetation change   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the role of autogenic and allogenic forces in determining the timing and development of blanket peat initiation and how the occurrence and growth of blanket peat subsequently constrains human activities. A number of factors...

Flitcroft, Catherine Esther

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

146

Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy Patterson b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy). Palaeohydrological reconstructions from ombrotrophic peat- lands agree well with other proxy climate data (Baker et

Patterson, Timothy

147

RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge Attila Bai & László Stündl & Péter Bársony & Milán- ied an economical method of algae production on pig sludge that can be operated on animal farms in Hungary with modest levels of investment. We analyzed four algae spe- cies, Chlorella vulgaris

Boyer, Edmond

148

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates generally to the dewatering of sludge, and more particularly to the dewatering of a sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50 to 80% in the form of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water.

Carlson, L.W.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparative analysis of peat gasification reactor configuration. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the comparative analysis of two generic gasifiers (fluidized bed and entrained bed) and two specific hydrogasifiers (IGT's Peat-gas and Rockwell International's hydrogasifier). The objective is to establish a basis for recommending a peat gasification reactor configuration for testing in a DOE peat gasification pilot plant project. The approach involved the following four steps: data base evaluation, regression analysis, a chemical engineering evaluation of upstream and downstream equipment requirement, and computer simulation. Mathematical models and computer programs were developed to simulate the entrained-bed and fluidized-bed reactors. Parametric analyses were made, using these computer programs, to test the sensitivity and effects of significant operating variables (temperature, pressure and feed gas composition, for instance) on the product gas composition in the IGT gasifier and Rockwell International gasifier. This review and analysis concentrates primarily upon the Peatgas process of the Institute of Gas Technology and the Rockwell International Hydrogasification Process. The two-stage Peatgas process appears to have advantages in higher thermal efficiency, smaller capital investment, and its application of existing commercial operations and proven design practices from other types of fluidized solids processing units. There are two problems concerning operability of the Peatgas process: (1) the design of a fluidized solids unit for quite low standpipe densities (approximately 11 to 15 pounds per cubic foot), which may become even lower upon operating upsets, and (2) the potential problem of ash sintering in the very hot combustion zone of the steam-oxygen gasifier. On a relative time scale of development, the Peatgas would seem to be much closer to possible early commercialization than is the Rockwell system.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood River Levee Reconstruction, Madison County, IL 25 October 2006 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood damage reduction and restores the original degree of protection of the Wood River Levee-federal sponsor is the Wood River Drainage and Levee District. The Wood River Levee System was authorized

US Army Corps of Engineers

151

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood: role of microfibrils and lignification T Okuyama the growth stress generation in the region of normal and tension woods. growth stress/ tension wood in normal and ten- sion wood. The compressive stress from the deposition of lignin controls the level

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

152

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in Estonia Biomass Utilisation of Local of primary energy in Estonia ! Wood fuels production ! Pellet firing projects in Estonia ­ SIDA Demo East Production of wood fuels in Estonia in 2002 Regional Energy Centres in Estonia Wood pellets production

153

Plant uptake of sludge-borne PCBs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plant uptake of sludge-borne polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) (similar to Aroclor 1248) was evaluated in a greenhouse study with two food-chain crops and a grass species. Polychlorinated biphenyl loading to two soils was varied in one experiment by adding different rates of a municipal sewage sludge heavily contaminated (52 mg/kg) with PCBs. In a second experiment, Aroclor 1248 was spiked into unamended soils or soils amended with another sludge containing <1mg/kg PCBs. Analysis of PCBs was by GC/MS with a reliable detection limit in plants of 20 microg/kg for individual chlorinated classes (tri, tetra-, and pentachlorobiphenyls) and total PCBs. Only carrots (Daucus carota) were contaminated with PCBs, and contamination was restricted to carrot peels. Current USEPA guidelines for land application of sludges based on sludge PCB content are shown to be extremely conservative.

O'Connor, G.A.; Kiehl, D.; Eiceman, G.A.; Ryan, J.A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Disposable sludge dewatering container and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device and method for preparing sludge for disposal comprising a box with a thin layer of gravel on the bottom and a thin layer of sand on the gravel layer, an array of perforated piping deployed throughout the gravel layer, and a sump in the gravel layer below the perforated piping array. Standpipes connect the array and sump to an external ion exchanger/fine particulate filter and a pump. Sludge is deposited on the sand layer and dewatered using a pump connected to the piping array, topping up with more sludge as the aqueous component of the sludge is extracted. When the box is full and the free standing water content of the sludge is acceptable, the standpipes are cut and sealed and the lid secured to the box.

Cole, Clifford M. (1905 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Friedman et al. on Eagly & Wood ...1059 Kenrick & Li on Eagly & Wood ......1060  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comment Contents Friedman et al. on Eagly & Wood ...1059 Kenrick & Li on Eagly & Wood ......1060 Kleyman on Eagly & Wood ............ 1061 Wood & Eagly reply ....................... 1062 Chan on Peng J. Scheyd University of Texas at Austin Eagly and Wood (June 1999) argued that social structural

Pillow, Jonathan

156

Companies commit to eliminate dodgy wood products Companies commit to eliminate dodgy wood products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Companies commit to eliminate dodgy wood products Companies commit to eliminate dodgy wood products wood products only from sustainable managed sources. Canadian paper, pulp and wood company Domtar has. "Companies that seriously commit to responsible wood sourcing can have significant positive impacts on forest

157

HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

Zevenhoven, Ron

158

The Severity of Smouldering Peat Fires and Damage to the Forest Soil   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the large loss of soil mass but poorly documented in the literature. A series of smouldering experiments with boreal peat have been conducted under laboratory conditions to quantify these effects using small-scale samples. Peat samples of 100 mm by 100 mm...

Rein, Guillermo; Cleaver, Natalie; Ashton, Clare; Pironi, Paolo; Torero, Jose L

159

FIELD PERFORMANCE OF GEOTEXTILE REINFORCED SLUDGE CAPS AHMET H. AYDILEK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

589 FIELD PERFORMANCE OF GEOTEXTILE REINFORCED SLUDGE CAPS AHMET H. AYDILEK UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN the filtration performance of sludge-geotextile systems and investigate their durability, ten sludge lagoon test be effectively used in filtering contaminated wastewater treatment sludges. Considering the constructability

Aydilek, Ahmet

160

IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS Jacek Makinia*, Scott A in a full-scale activated sludge reactor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was used to describe for dissolved oxygen. KEYWORDS Activated sludge; dispersion; dissolved oxygen dynamics; mass transfer

Wells, Scott A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Field Assessment Tool for Deep Peat This methodology is designed to be undertaken at a site which has already been  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field Assessment Tool for Deep Peat This methodology is designed to be undertaken at a site which. The surveyor should have undertaken training in the application of this tool and the interpretation of the score. Tools you will require: Peat depth probe Pruning saw Clinometer Peat core sampler Map of the area

162

A Comparison of the Abundance and Diversity of Fossil Pigments in Wetland Peats and Woodland Humus Layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Comparison of the Abundance and Diversity of Fossil Pigments in Wetland Peats and Woodland Humus PEATS AND WOODLAND HUMUS LAYERS' JON E. SANGER Departmentof Botany and Bacteriology, Ohio Wesleyan) in woodland humus layers and in circumneutral to moderately acid swamp peats are shown to increase with degree

Minnesota, University of

163

Metal binding to dissolved organic matter and adsorption to ferrihydrite in shallow peat groundwaters: Application to diamond exploration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal binding to dissolved organic matter and adsorption to ferrihydrite in shallow peat t The speciation and solubility of kimberlite pathfinder metals (Ni, Nd, Ba and K) in shallow peat ground- waters with kimberlite pathfinder metals and determine the spatial distribution of those metals in shallow peat

164

An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la Possession, Iles Crozet, sub-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la;Abstract A 6200 year old peat sequence, cored in a volcanic crater on the sub-Antarctic Ile de la the proxy data the following changes could be inferred. From the onset of the peat formation (6200 cal yr BP

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences Management of carbon budgets for severely eroded upland blanket peat bogs impacts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

upland blanket peat bogs ­ impacts of restoration Blanket bog is an important carbon sink and an Annex 1 Habitat priority under the EU Habitats Directive, but in the Peak District National Park much suffers peat by Natural England as an important site for studies of vegetation history and peat erosion in the Pennines

Evans, Paul

166

Assessment of peat quality by molecular and bulk geochemical analysis: Application to the Holocene record of the Chautagne  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of peat quality by molecular and bulk geochemical analysis: Application to the Holocene in general from a limited variety of local plants, peat is however sensitive to physicochemical changes the information on peat quality provided by various families of biochemical components (lipids, lignin, sugars

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

THE WRONG, THE GOOD, AND THE BETTER BOOK REVIEW OF BOHM AND PEAT: SCIENCE, ORDER, AND CREATIVITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE WRONG, THE GOOD, AND THE BETTER BOOK REVIEW OF BOHM AND PEAT: SCIENCE, ORDER, AND CREATIVITY to think that we do not. Reading the book by Bohm and Peat one is almost assured that we do not. I do part an encyclopedia of failures of science and society to be good. Bohm and Peat wish instead to lead

Dürr, Detlef

168

Modeling Oxygen and Water Flows in Peat Substrate with Root Uptakes R. Naasz, J.-C. Michel and S. Charpentier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

191 Modeling Oxygen and Water Flows in Peat Substrate with Root Uptakes R. Naasz, J.-C. Michel to Horticulture Angers France Keywords: peat, simulation, substrate-plant system, water and oxygen availability, we first precisely characterized all transfer properties of a peat substrate (water retention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

169

Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le. In order to moniter peat reaccumulation and hence long-term carbon sequestration in peatlands which have ([1]). Among these indicators, it has previously been shown that physico-chemical properties of peat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. 2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. High sensitivity of peat decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rights reserved. LETTERS High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climate change through water of the high water-holding capacity of peat and its low hydraulic conductivity, accumulation of soil organic­biogeochemical soil model with peat depths that are continuously updated from the dynamic balance of soil organic

Moorcroft, Paul R.

171

Structure-Infesting Wood-Boring Beetles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

everal kinds of beetles damage stored wood, structural timbers and other wood products. The tunneling activities E-394 03/06 Structure-Infesting Wood-Boring Beetles John A. Jackman* S *Professor and Extension Entomologist, The Texas A... at these locations. Other signs of an infestation include stained wood or a blistering appearance on the wood surface caused by larvae tunneling just below the surface. Less commonly, immature beetles produce audible rasping or ticking sounds while chewing...

Jackman, John A.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Integrated Industrial Wood Chip Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sources of supply of wood residues for energy generation are described and the rationale for exploring the potential available from forest harvesting is developed. Details of three industrial-scale projects are presented and the specific...

Owens, E. T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Treatment of Wood Preserving Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wastewater produced by the wood preserving industry presents a difficult problem to treat economically. A review of the literature indicates the size of the industry has limited the pursuit of an orderly and economic solution. Atmospheric...

Reynolds, T. D.; Shack, P. A.

174

Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXTILE DRYING VIA WOOD GASIFICATION Thomas F. ;McGowan, Anthony D. Jape Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, Georgia ABSTRACT This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement... for dryers. In addition to the experimental program described above, the DOE grant covered two other major areas. A survey of the textile industry was made to assess the market for gasification equip ment. The major findings were that a large amount...

McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Monthly status report, February 1-February 28, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Task 1 (Single-Stage Fluidized-Bed Gasification Tests), one test was conducted with Minnesota peat in the process development unit (PDU), using steam and oxygen. The test was performed at a pressure of 268 psia, a fluidization velocity of 1.0 ft/s, and an average bed temperature of 1680/sup 0/F. The objective was to determine the effects of high feed moisture content (22-weight-percent moisture) and low gasification pressure on the gasification characteristics of peat. Most of the previous tests had been conducted at a nominal pressure of 500 psia. The test was successful; about 1 hour of steady-state operation was achieved before sintering began and the test was ended. The results of a test conducted previously with Minnesota peat containing about 8-weight-percent moisture were analyzed and are presented this month. The test was conducted at an average bed temperature of 1700/sup 0/F, a pressure of 522 psia, and a steam-to-carbon feed ratio of 1.1 mol/mol; it achieved a carbon conversion of about 84%. In Task 2 (Wet-Carbonization PDU-Scale Tests), orders were placed for long-lead-time equipment for the PDU. The design and specifications for the slurry heater/cooler system and the shell-and-tube heat exchangers have been finalized. The installation of the instrumentation and the control panel for the PDU is continuing. In Task 3 (Kinetic Data on Alaska and Florida Peats), efforts were made to obtain representative samples of peats from Alaska and Florida. A sample of Florida reed-sedge peat has been obtained and is being analyzed. Samples of Alaskan peat have been taken by the company conducting the US Department of Energy (DOE) peat resource assessment work; however, they have not yet been received. In Task 4 (Effect of Dewatering Methodology on Peat Gasification), efforts to obtain peat dewatered by various methods were continued.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge deflocculation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion Thomas... activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) demands extensive sludge dewatering... structure and are...

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge flocs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion Thomas... activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) demands extensive sludge dewatering... structure and are...

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic activated sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion Thomas... activated sludge (WAS) from wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) demands extensive sludge dewatering... structure and are...

179

Concentrations of Heavy Metals in Soil and Cassava Plant on Sewage Sludge Dump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JM. (1989). Assessment of sludge regulation assumptions: AMunicipal Wasteland and Sludge on Land. Univ. of California,1998). Effects of sewage sludge pre-treatment on microbial

Igbozuruike, Chris Washington Ifeanyi Mr.; Opara-Nadi, Achilihu Oliver Prof; Okorie, Ikechukwu Kennedy DR

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Coextruded Polyethylene and Wood-Flour Composite: Effect of Shell Thickness, Wood Loading, and Core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coextruded Polyethylene and Wood-Flour Composite: Effect of Shell Thickness, Wood Loading, and Core recycled polyethylene and wood-flour composites with core­shell structure were manufactured using a pilot

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Trends in atmospheric haze induced by peat fires in Sumatra Island, Indonesia and El Nin~o phenomenon from 1973 to 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trends in atmospheric haze induced by peat fires in Sumatra Island, Indonesia and El Nin by peat fires on the peat land area of the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. Visibility and the anomalies). Citation: Wang, Y., R. D. Field, and O. Roswintiarti (2004), Trends in atmospheric haze induced by peat

Field, Robert

183

Peat-Gasification Pilot-Plant Program. Final report, April 9, 1980-March 31, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program was twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities included the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. After shakedown of the new feed preparation equipment (drying, screening, and crushing) was successfully completed, the first integrated pilot plant test was conducted in April 1981 to provide solids flow data and operating experience with the new PEATGAS gasifier configuration. Three gasification tests were subsequently conducted using the existing slurry feed system. The lockhopper feed system, capable of providing a continuous, measured flow of 1 to 4 tons of dry feed at pressures up to 500 psig, was then successfully integrated with the gasifier. Two gasification tests were conducted, expanding the data to more economical operating conditions. The operation of the PEATGAS pilot plant has confirmed that peat is an excellent raw material for SNG production. Peat conversions over 90% were consistently achieved at moderate gasification temperatures and at sinter-free conditions. A large data base was established for Minnesota peat at pressure 1.0. The technical feasibility of the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated. However, an economic assessment of the peat gasification process indicates that the cost of the peat feedstock delivered to a plant site has a significant effect on the cost of the product SNG. 28 figures, 36 tables.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, "Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge"). The purpose of this technical report is to (1) present and discuss current understandings of gas retention and release mechanisms for deep sludge in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex waste storage tanks; and (2) to identify viable methods/criteria for demonstrating safety relative to deep sludge gas release events (DSGRE) in the near term to support the Hanford C-Farm retrieval mission. A secondary purpose is to identify viable methods/criteria for demonstrating safety relative to DSGREs in the longer term to support the mission to retrieve waste from the Hanford Tank Farms and deliver it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The potential DSGRE issue resulted in the declaration of a positive Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). C-Farm retrievals are currently proceeding under a Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) that only allows tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106 sludge levels of 192 inches and 195 inches, respectively. C-Farm retrievals need deeper sludge levels (approximately 310 inches in 241-AN-101 and approximately 250 inches in 241-AN-106). This effort is to provide analytical data and justification to continue retrievals in a safe and efficient manner.

Sams, Terry L.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Robert Wood, University of Washington many contributors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robert Wood, University of Washington many contributors VOCALS Education and Outreach Snider (Wyoming) · Dave Spencer (NCSU) · Cindy Twohy (OSU) · Rob Wood/Chris Bretherton/Rhea George

Wood, Robert

187

Marin County- Wood Stove Replacement Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The County of Marin has created a rebate program to encourage homeowners to remove or replace non-EPA certified wood-burning heaters (wood stoves and fireplace inserts) with cleaner burning stoves...

188

Decreasing the leachibility of boron wood preservatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of boron in wood preservatives has been growing since the 1930s, primarily in various boric acid/borax mixtures. Boron preservatives have several advantages for application as wood preservatives including a broad spectrum of activity...

Gezer, Engin Derya

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-01-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology OAK. Ferris, Entomologists This metallic wood-boring beetle (Family Bupresti- dae) primarily attacks oaks. Oak wood- borers. Distribution: The native geographical range of this beetle includes parts of Asia, Africa

Ginzel, Matthew

190

STACY L. WOOD Department of Marketing wood@moore.sc.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STACY L. WOOD Department of Marketing wood@moore.sc.edu Moore School of Business ph. (803) 777) Alba, Joseph, John Lynch, Barton Weitz, Chris Janiszewski, Richard Lutz, Alan Sawyer, Stacy Wood (1997, September-October 1996, p. 12. Wood, Stacy L. (2001), "Remote Purchase Environments: The Influence of Return

Reif, John H.

191

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-07-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology JAPANESE. Pupation takes place in the wood and adults emerge by chewing a round exit hole. Adults feed on the tender) #12;2Wood Borer -- WB-07-W October 2012 It is the policy of the Purdue University Cooperative

Ginzel, Matthew

192

Wood density measurement protocol J Chave Page 1 Measuring wood density for tropical forest trees  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood density measurement protocol ­ J Chave Page 1 Measuring wood density for tropical forest trees Diversité Biologique Université Paul Sabatier 31000 Toulouse, France 1. Introduction Wood is a biological, that transport the sap along the stem and they are filled by water. The density of tree wood is an interesting

Chave, Jérôme

193

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-06-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology CAMPHOR August. Female beetles make a horizontal tunnel in the wood initiating gallery construction where/APHIS grant number 10-8100-1488-CA. #12;2Wood Borer -- WB-06-W October 2012 It is the policy of the Purdue

Ginzel, Matthew

194

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-08-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology OAK, these beetles feed on oak (Quercus spp). Direct damage results from galleries in the wood that are formed in the breeding season. The host trees for these beetles are important for the wood indus- try, orna

Ginzel, Matthew

195

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-09-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology EUROPEAN trees are very crucial for the wood industry, ornamental industry and many species of wildlife: The beetles construct the egg gal- leries perpendicular to the grain of the wood which can be found under

Ginzel, Matthew

196

Environmental aspects of alternative wet technologies for producing energy/fuel from peat. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peat in situ contains up to 90% moisture, with about 50% of this moisture trapped as a colloidal gel. This colloidal moisture cannot be removed by conventional dewatering methods (filter presses, etc.) and must be removed by thermal drying, solvent extraction, or solar drying before the peat can be utilized as a fuel feedstock for direct combustion or gasification. To circumvent the drying problem, alternative technologies such as wet oxidation, wet carbonization, and biogasification are possible for producing energy or enhanced fuel from peat. This report describes these three alternative technologies, calculates material balances for given raw peat feed rates of 1000 tph, and evaluates the environmental consequences of all process effluent discharges. Wastewater discharges represent the most significant effluent due to the relatively large quantities of water removed during processing. Treated process water returned to the harvested bog may force in situ, acidic bog water into recieving streams, disrupting local aquatic ecosystems.

Smith, R.T.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

Reddington, C L

198

Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 1, October 1, 1980-August 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 200 peat gasification tests were conducted in laboratory-scale and PDU-scale (process development unit) equipment since 1976. A kinetic model for peat gasification was developed from laboratory and PDU data. The encouraging results of these tests and the model projections show that on the basis of its chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for commercial synthetic natural gas (SNG) production. To further advance peat gasification technology, DOE and GRI initiated a pilot-plant-scale program using an existing coal gasification pilot plant. This facility was adapted to peat processing and can convert 50 tons of peat to about 0.5 million standard cubic feet of SNG daily. The pilot plant is described in Appendix A. Only three major pieces of equipment - a peat dryer, a grinder, and a screener - were required to prepare the pilot plant for peat processing. This modification phase was completed in the winter of 1980-1981. After a number of drying, grinding, and screening tests, peat was first fed to the gasifier in April 1981, initiating the pilot plant studies to develop the PEATGAS process. Since that time, the gasification of Minnesota peat by the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated in a series of gasification tests. This report covers the work done between October 1, 1980, and August 31, 1981, under DOE Contract No. AC01-80ET14688.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

School of Biological Sciences Juvenile wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Biological Sciences Juvenile wood What is it and why should we be concerned? #12;School of Biological Sciences What is juvenile wood? A brief recap. There is no universally accepted definition of juvenile wood. It is typically described as follows · zone near to the pith · displays marked

200

c Copyright 2014 Benjamin P. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c Copyright 2014 Benjamin P. Wood #12;#12;Software and Hardware Support for Data-Race Exceptions Benjamin P. Wood A dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree;#12;University of Washington Abstract Software and Hardware Support for Data-Race Exceptions Benjamin P. Wood Co

Anderson, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Generating Textures of New Zealand Native Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Generating Textures of New Zealand Native Wood Jack Wang Abstract - This report explores algorithms for computer generated textures simulating New Zealand native wood, we out line procedural and Ray tracing. The main goal of this research is to study New Zealand native wood in depth and to gather

Goodman, James R.

202

Updated 1-12 Bryan H. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated 1-12 Bryan H. Wood UNITED STATES MARINE CORPS DIRECTOR, PACIFIC DIVISION PLANS, POLICIES, OPERATIONS DEPARTMENT U.S. Marine Corps Mr. Bryan H. Wood is the Director, Pacific Division under the Deputy-Japan International Agreement. Mr. Wood was appointed to his current position in 2010 following 24 years

203

SOLID WOOD PRODUCTS EFFECTS OF ELEVATED AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLID WOOD PRODUCTS EFFECTS OF ELEVATED AND HIGH-TEMPERATURE SCHEDULES ON NARP IN SOUTHERN YELLOW-temperature (ET) from ET and HT schedules. and a high-temperature (HT) schedule. Wood properties including juvenile wood content, density, ring count, largest knot area, presence of pith, moisture content

204

Wood Laminated Composite Louisiana Forest Product Lab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Laminated Composite Poles Cheng Piao Louisiana Forest Product Lab School of Renewable Natural, in accordance with CSA O15, ANSI 05 and many other international standards #12;Wood Laminated Composite Poles y, v z, w R r x, u #12;Why Wood Composite Poles · Sufficient strength · More cost-effective · Light

205

K Basin sludge treatment process description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

206

Optical computing Damien Woods a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract We consider optical computers that encode data using images and compute by transforming such images. We give an overview of a number of such optical

Woods, Damien

207

Optical computing Damien Woods a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract In this survey we consider optical computers of such optical computing archi- tectures, including descriptions of the type of hardware commonly used in optical

Woods, Damien

208

Creating Value Wood Products Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

209

Cultural Values of Trees, Woods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research into the importance of the cultural values of trees, woods and forests for sustainable forest managers have to take account of cultural values as one of the central themes of Sustainable Forest and taking them into account as part of the processes of planning and decisionmaking. Cultural values

210

Development of risk assessment methodology for municipal sludge incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by the series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, surface disposal, incineration and ocean disposal. In particular, these reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with incineration of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The procedures are structured to allow calculation of technical criteria for sludge disposal/reuse options based on the potential for adverse health or environmental impacts. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE STUDY OF KLONG Fecal sludge (FS) is widely acknowledged as a major source of infectious pathogens. However, the proper

Richner, Heinz

212

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

213

Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

J.L. Krumhansl

2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

214

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Incineration of biological sludge in a fluidized bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incineration rate, ash properties, and percentage destruction of the combustible material were evaluated under different operating conditions. Experimental measurements were made for temperature, air flow rate, sludge size, ash size and sludge composition. A model based on the heat transfer consideration was derived to describe the drying and devolatilization process during sludge incineration. The model assumes that the drying and devolatilization of a sludge particle is manly caused by the heat flowing into the sludge particle from the bed. Parameters affecting the simulation results included sludge size, inert particle size, sludge heat capacity, sludge heat conductivity, operating flow rate and incinerator temperature. A model developed to simulate a batch type air-sand fluidized bed considered the incineration process as being composed of three consecutive operations, namely, drying, devolatilization, and char combustion. The simulation model predicted the dynamic characteristics of sludge incineration in the bed including its percentage completion and the incinerator temperature. The effects of sludge moisture level, sludge size and incinerator operating conditions on the incinerator behavior were also evaluated. The model developed to simulate the behavior of a fluidized bed incinerator under continuous operation was capable of predicting the time to reach steady state, the stack gas composition, the percentage combustion and the auxiliary heat required under various operating conditions, including sludge feed rate and size, air feed rate, and incinerator temperature.

Ku, W.C.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures: the cysticercosis threat Jacques appears to be one of the major pathological threats when sewage sludge is used to fertilise cattle highly prevalent) and Asia (Taenia saginata-like are prevalent). The processing of sludge and the delay

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

217

PROPERTIES OF TREATMENT SLUDGE DURING SEDIMENTATION AND CONSOLIDATION TESTS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPERTIES OF TREATMENT SLUDGE DURING SEDIMENTATION AND CONSOLIDATION TESTS1 Lincar Pedroni2 , Jean on sludge produced from an acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment plant. The testing program involved test, physical and geotechnical properties of the resulting sludge were measured. In this paper

Aubertin, Michel

218

Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study Jacek Makinia, Scott A. Wells, Piotr Zima ABSTRACT: A model of temperature dynamics was developed as part of a general model of activated-sludge biochemical-energy inputs and other activated-sludge, heat-balance terms. All the models were tested under

Wells, Scott A.

219

Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

Skogestad, Sigurd

220

ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil by stimulating indigenous microbes In situ bioremediation of oily sludge- contaminated soil by biostimulation of indigenous microbes through. Keywords Bioremediation Á Biostimulation Á In situ Á Microbial community Á Oily sludge Introduction

Ma, Lena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sludge utilization and disposal in Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art study was initiated to determine the problem issues, present knowledge about the issues, and additional research needs in the area of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge. Three questionnaires were developed to survey technically oriented professional, county extension agents, and Virginia NPDES permit holders to obtain these groups' views on problems and deficiencies needing further investigation. Another phase of the study was to conduct an extensive review of the literature on the subject of land application of sewage sludge. Listings of pertinent literature relating to land application with specific interest toward potentially toxic metals, pathogens, nitrogen, and phosphorus were obtained and reviewed. Additional research is needed in the following areas: a method that accurately estimates metal availability within the soil; a method to determine the potential for a disease outbreak from controlled application of treated municipal sewage sludge; a more precise method of N-balancing; the impact of P loading on water quality.

Martens, D.C.; McCart, G.D.; Reneau, R.B. Jr; Simpson, T.W.; Ban-Kiat, T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Risk to animal health from pathogens in municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Public and legislative concerns directed toward resource and materials recycling have stimulated widespread interest in the use of sewage sludge to improve the fertility and water-holding capacity of soil. The use of sludge on land to grow crops for human or animal consumption has raised concerns over the health hazards from the sludge pathogens. Relatively little attention has been focused on the risks to the health of animals that may graze on sudge-amended pastures or consume feedstuffs grown on these lands. Concern about the animal health risks is justified because economic losses from animal disease that may be associated with the use of sewage sludge could be quite large. In fact, these losses may exceed poential economic losses from human disease associated with sludge use. This review emphasizes the risk to animal health from zoonotic and human pathogens in sludge and from specific animal pathogens that may be found in sludge.

Yeager, J.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Acceptance Test Plan for the Sludge Pickup Adaptor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan documents the acceptance testing of the sludge pickup adapter for potential use during PSI Phases 3 and 4 fuel cleanliness inspection activities. The adaptex is attached to the strainer tip of the vacuum wand and used to suction up residual sludge captured in a sludge collection tray. The material is vacuumed into a chamber of known volume in the sludge pickup adapter. The device serves as an aid in helping to determine whether the observed quantity of sludge is within allowable limits (1.4 cm{sup 3} per fuel assembly). This functionality test involves underwater testing in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility to verify that sludge can be successfully vacuumed from a collection tray. Ancillary activities in this acceptance test include demonstration that the sludge pickup adapter CM be successfully attached to and detached from the vacuum wand underwater.

PITNER, A.L.

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

225

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

California Wood Energy Program1 Gary Brittner2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

California Wood Energy Program1 Gary Brittner2 The California Department of Forestry Wood Energy projects to increase utilization of wood for energy. The Wood Energy Program came about partly the management of the wood resource. The Department of Forestry recognized that an extensive resource

Standiford, Richard B.

228

Integrating BES in the wastewater and sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, denitrification, and anaerobic digester treatment systems, while chemical methods include phosphate removal, dye of WAS, including treatment of influent or the accumulated sludge with anaerobic digesters (Rulkens 2008; Seghezzo et al. 1998). This is a more sustainable treatment method because methane in biogas can partly

Angenent, Lars T.

229

SLUDGE BATCH 5 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing to Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in early fiscal year 2009. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB5 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2007-0007, Rev. 1 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB5 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB5 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the washing plan to prepare SB5 and the estimated SB4 heel mass. Nine DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using both a batch simulant (Tank 51 simulant after washing is complete) and a blend simulant (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). Each simulant had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (115%, 130%, 145% and 160%). One additional run was made using blend simulant at 130% acid that included additions of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) waste prior to acid addition and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) waste following SRAT dewatering. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB5 sludge: (1) This is the first batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution. (2) The sludge is high in mercury. (3) The sludge is high in noble metals. (4) The sludge is high in U and Pu--components that are not added in sludge simulants. Two SB5 processing issues were noted during testing. First, high hydrogen generation rates were measured during experiments with both the blend and batch simulant at high acid stoichiometry. Also, the reflux time was extended due to the high mercury concentration in both the batch and blend simulant. Adding ARP will extend processing times in DWPF. The ARP caustic boil took approximately six hours. The boiling time during the experiment with added MCU was 14 hours at the maximum DWPF steam flux rate. This is comparable to the DWPF processing time for dewatering plus reflux without MCU at a 5000 lbs/hr boil-up rate, but would require significantly more time at boiling at 2000-2500 lbs/hr boil-up rate. The addition of ARP and MCU did not cause any other processing issues, since foaming, rheology and hydrogen generation were less of an issue while processing with ARP/MCU.

Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; David Best, D; David Koopman, D

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

One on One- Douglas K Woods  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A September 2014 interview with Douglas K Woods, the President of the Association for Manufacturing Technology, on the state of US manufacturing.

231

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-05-W America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers Department of Entomology ASIAN) #12;1-888-EXT-INFO · www.extension.purdue.edu 2Wood Borer -- WB-05-W October 2012 It is the policy

Ginzel, Matthew

232

WoodPolymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood­Polymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood Yong-Feng Li in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). ABSTRACT: Wood­polymer composites (WPCs) were prepared words: composites; mechanical properties; modifi- cation; monomers; renewable resources INTRODUCTION

233

High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 9. 2. Financial risk analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic, and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for management structural support.) This final report presents the work conducted under Task 9.2 (Risk Assessment) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process selected for the study. At this time, there is little technical doubt that the PEATGAS gasifier can indeed operate. In order to assess the risks associated with the peat gasification facility, it was subdivided according to the following risk areas; (1) peat harvesting; (2) peat dewatering; (3) peat gasification; and (4) environmental. In summary, the risks associated with the peat gasification facility are manageable. Even under the extreme risk of no peat availability, the gasification facility can be operated with lignite at a slightly higher SNG price. 1 figure, 5 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Department of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014 Postgraduate Diploma Enquiries: Head of Department Contact details: Department of Forest and Wood Science Stellenbosch University;Department of Forest and Wood Science - 2012 2 Contents: Postgraduate Programmes Postgraduate Diploma

Geldenhuys, Jaco

235

Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar): diagenesis appraisal and consequences for palaeoenvironmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake and petrographical work [2], we applied such an approach to the analysis of a peat core section to get additional (saturated and unsaturated n-FAs, plus i-C16) at the surface of the peat sequence and low amounts

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 2332 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties of peat soils 23 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 23­32 (2003) © EGU An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils.Schwaerzel@TU-Berlin.de Abstract A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which

Boyer, Edmond

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evolution of organic matter indicators in response to major environmental changes: The case of a formerly cut-over peat bog (Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a formerly cut-over peat bog (Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France) Laure Comont, Fatima Laggoun-Défarge, Jean To assess whether the biochemical characteristics of peat can provide clues for past ecosystem changes monosaccharide determination of peat organic matter (OM) and the dominant living plants from a formerly cut

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

238

CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark,' Associate Member, ASCE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark of natural materials, including peats. organic silts, highly sensitive clays, shales, as well as granular this statement and credit Mesri and Castro (1987) for reporting a C)Cc range of 0.02-0.10 for peats. Ac tually

239

Daniel Wood | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOE Theory9-9260-2003October 02,(JulyWebinar: IRSofDanDaniel Wood

240

Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. Powell 1 ,to produce a clay-like sludge layer, a slurry phase, and anto be concentrated in the sludge phase, which is primarily

Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl. Sci.from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci. Tech. 38(2),Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In preparation,

Powell, Brian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Use of nutrients of sewage sludge in the initial development of Copaifera langsdorffii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

under the 20 t ha -1 of sludge rate. Figure 1: CopaibaSupl. K) and sewage sludge doses (2.5, 5, 10, 15 e 20 t ha -dm Fe Mn Zn Table 2: Sewage sludge chemical characteristics.

Sampaio, Thalita Fernanda; Guerrini, Iraê Amaral; Croce, Ciro; de Toledo, Maria Angélica; Morales, Marina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Field-Measured Oxidation Rates of Biologically Reduced Selenium in Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced Selenium in Sludge Sally M. Benson, John Daggett andCalifornia 94720 U.S.A. Sludge generated during surface-Finding safe and economical sludge disposal methods requires

Benson, Sally M.; Daggett, John; Zawislansi, Peter

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Functions and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge retrieval and packaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall functions and requirements for sludge retrieval and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin.

Feigenbutz, L.V.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speciation in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl.and Sr(II) from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci.Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In

Powell, Brian A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

automatic wood furnaces: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pressure differences that included standard rating points 11 Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Wood Products 201213 Student...

247

Autonomy for Aurora's Mars Missions Mark Woods,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Autonomy for Aurora's Mars Missions Mark Woods, SciSys Ltd., Clothier Road, Bristol, UK BS4 5SS Email: mark.woods@scisys.co.uk Tel: +44 117 9717251 ESA's Aurora programme incorporates a strategy for European involvement in future robotic and human exploration of our Solar System. The Aurora roadmap calls

Fisher, Michael

248

FAO Forestry Department Wood Energy WISDOM Slovenia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as their relevance in forestry, energy and rural development contexts, woody biomass is an important resource thatFAO ­ Forestry Department ­ Wood Energy WISDOM ­ Slovenia Spatial woodfuel production Rudi Drigo Forestry Specialist - Wood energy planning and forest resources monitoring Zivan Veseli

249

Management of sewage sludge and ash containing radioactive materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 50% of the seven to eight million metric tonnes of municipal sewage sludge produced annually in the US is reused. Beneficial uses of sewage sludge include agricultural land application, land reclamation, forestry, and various commercial applications. Excessive levels of contaminants, however, can limit the potential usefulness of land-applied sewage sludge. A recently completed study by a federal inter-agency committee has identified radioactive contaminants that could interfere with the safe reuse of sewage sludge. The study found that typical levels of radioactive materials in most municipal sewage sludge and incinerator ash do not present a health hazard to sewage treatment plant workers or to the general public. The inter-agency committee has developed recommendations for operators of sewage treatment plants for evaluating measured or estimated levels of radioactive material in sewage sludge and for determining whether actions to reduce potential exposures are appropriate.

Bachmaier, J. T.; Aiello, K.; Bastian, R. K.; Cheng, J.-J.; Chiu, W. A.; Goodman, J.; Hogan, R.; Jones, A. R.; Kamboj, S.; Lenhart, T.; Ott, W. R.; Rubin, A. B.; Salomon, S. N.; Schmidt, D. W.; Setlow, L. W.; Yu, C.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Environmental Science Division; Middlesex County Utilities Authority; U.S. EPA; N.J. Dept of Environmental Protection; NRC

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

Jonathan Bolling

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

Temperature effects on seawater batch activated sludge systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of salinity of shipboard waste on the activated sludge process and anaerobic digestion, found no detectable changes in the continuous per- formance of the activated sludge units with chloride concentra- tion of up to 8, 000 mg/1; although temporary... different values of a were required to describe the reaction rates within the range of 50'C to 40'C. Zanoni (20) reported that incubation temperatures had little significance on the ultimate demand of carbon and nitrogen for oxygen in an activated sludge...

Wigley, Henry Albert

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Using sludge on land raises more than crops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Applying sludge to croplands has been one solution to the dilemma of accumulating sewage. At the present time, approximately 25 percent of all sludge disposal programs are conducted as land application, specifically land reclamation and agricultural utilization. The application of sludge to croplands is developing from a small and scattered program into a large-scaled program because of the prohibition of ocean dumping of sludge, increased costs for incineration of sludge and its pollution control, and an increasing national production of over 280 million tons/yr of wet sludge. Agricultural utilization of sewage sludge has several notable benefits including the recycling of essential and trace nutrients, improvement of marginal soil with organic matter, increased crop yield, and direct costs comparable to commercial fertilizers. However, cropland utilization of sewage sludge may involve risks if proper management is not followed. Besides the risk of metal contamination of soil and plants which has received considerable notoriety, the overall environmental impact of sludge application programs must also consider the public health hazards of nitrate (Ntheta/sub 3/) pollution and the spread of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms, and any odor nuisance which may be associated with these programs.

Gerardi, M.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Level 6 for the sludge retrieval system. HSS observed interlock testing using the seismic switch signal simulator, which was satisfactorily performed. The seismic safety...

254

E-Print Network 3.0 - anaerobic sludge bed Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

was selected be cause of its (a) prior successful application in municipal sludge incineration, (b... LEWIS Mountain View, California ABSTRACT Municipal sewage sludge can be...

255

E-Print Network 3.0 - alkaline sludge treatment Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Cooperative Extension Land Application of Sewage Summary: . These wastewater treatment solids are commonly referred to as sewage sludge. "Sewage sludge" or...

256

Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Batch and Kinetic Studies of ni adsorption on Highly Humified newfoundland Peat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the environment depend on soil geology and industrial activities. Ni mining (with Co recovery) in Newfoundland and labrador (Nl) could become a source of pollution if lime precipitation only is used for effluent treatment was air dried and sieved and fractions 850 µm constituting about 90% of the peat were separated and used

Coles, Cynthia

258

Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 2, September 1-November 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant; and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities include the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. Drying, grinding, and screening equipment for peat was installed and operated during the previous reporting periods. Three gasification tests (PT-1 through PT-3) had also been conducted using the toluene slurry feed system. Installation of the lockhopper dry feed system was completed on schedule. Shakedown of the system has begun. Operation of the modified 400-ton storage and transport system was successfully demonstrated with peat containing 10% moisture. Preparations for Test PT-4 are currently underway. Data analyses for Test PT-2 were completed and are presented. The low-pressure Plexiglas unit was modified to investigate the use of a downflowing pneumatic feed system for the dryer bed. Initial testing was begun.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Site suitability and evaluation study for Minnegasco's proposed peat gasification facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High BTU Gas from Peat. The proposal covered a feasibility study to assess the overall viability of designing, constructing, and operating a commercial facility for the production of high-BTU substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. To complete the study, Minnegasco assembled a project team having a wide range of expertise. In addition, the State of Minnesota will participate in some parts of the study in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic matters. This report, the first of several to be submitted to Minnegasco by Ertec, has been prepared to outline the status of the site suitability and evaluation study. The purpose of this initial phase of the feasibility study was to identify and evaluate several potential sites in northeastern Minnesota. These sites will be studied in further detail to assess the economic and environmental feasibility of developing the proposed peat gasification facility described in Minnegasco's proposal. 33 figures, 12 tables.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

262

Organic Matter Transformation in the Peat Column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and Vertical Stratification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large-scale ecosystem manipulation (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change, SPRUCE) is being constructed in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA, to determine the effects of climatic forcing on ecosystem processes in northern peatlands. Prior to the initiation of the manipulation, we characterized the solid-phase peat to a depth of 2 meters using a variety of techniques, including peat C:N ratios, 13C and 15N isotopic composition, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT IR), and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR). FT IR determined peat humification-levels increased rapidly between and 75 cm, indicating a highly reactive zone. We observed a rapid drop in the abundance of O-alkyl-C, carboxyl-C, and other oxygenated functionalities within this zone and a concomitant increase in the abundance of alkyl- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Below 75-cm, minimal change was observed except that aromatic functionalities accumulated with depth. Incubation studies revealed the highest methane production rates and greatest CH4:CO2 ratios within this and 75 cm zone. Hydrology and surface vegetation played a role in belowground carbon cycling. Radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in deeper porewaters resembled the signatures of dissolved organic carbon rather than solid phase peat, indicating that more recently photosynthesized organic matter fueled the bulk of subsurface microbial respiration. Oxygen-containing functionalities, especially O-alkyl-C, appear to serve as an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rate, and in addition should be a sensitive indicator of the response of the solid phase peat to the climatic manipulation.

Tfaily, Malak [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Cooper, Bill [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Chanton, Patrick R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Chanton, Jeff P [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of Existing and Alternative Management Options (FINAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CCA-TREATED WOOD ASH II.1 Sample Preparation 10 II.2 Laboratory Methods 15 II.3 Laboratory Results 24 CHAPTER III, SORTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SEPARATING TREATED WOOD FROM UNTREATED WOOD III.1

Florida, University of

264

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities Richard Vlosky, Ph.D. Professor, R.E. Taylor & Associates Ltd. Forest Industry Strategic Services & Publisher: WOOD Markets Monthly newsletter WOOD Markets 2002 - The Solid Wood Products Outlook. #501 - 543 Granville Street Vancouver, B

265

ORIGINAL PAPER M. Grosell C.M. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER M. Grosell á C.M. Wood Branchial versus intestinal silver toxicity and uptake Hogstrand and Wood 1998; Wood et al. 1999 for reviews), much less is known about the exact toxic mechanisms primarily through the apical Na+ channel (Bury and Wood 1999) and targets the basolateral Na/K-AT- Pase

Grosell, Martin

266

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W Department of Entomology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-02-W Department of Entomology America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers CHINESE under the bark and in dry dead wood and complete their development in two or more years. Adults emerge campestris (Faldermann) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), an Asian wood-boring beetle recorded in North America

Ginzel, Matthew

267

ALASKAN WOOD FROGS STOCK UP ON SOLUTES TO SURVIVE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inside JEB i ALASKAN WOOD FROGS STOCK UP ON SOLUTES TO SURVIVE Outwardly, the tiny wood frog, Rana these wood frogs, which are native to Alaska, Canada and the northern USA, to unravel their secrets. Costanzo tolerance in a northern population of the wood frog. J. Exp. Biol. 216, 3461-3473. Nicola Stead THE GENETICS

Besansky, Nora J.

268

Original article A study on growth stresses, tension wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article A study on growth stresses, tension wood distribution and other related wood variations of wood structure (specific gravity and pulp yield), and the transverse mechanical resistance of wood. To investigate growth stresses, longitudinal displacements after stress release were estimated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

269

Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics, Computer Science & Statistics Purdue University Calumet Hammond, Indiana 46323--2094 USA wood@calumet.purdue.edu http://www.calumet.purdue.edu/public/math/wood Scholarly Research Awards. #12; JAY A. WOOD 1. Linear codes as modules Throughout this extended abstract

Wood, Jay

270

Wood of Giant Sequoia: Properties and Unique Characteristics1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood of Giant Sequoia: Properties and Unique Characteristics1 Douglas D. Piirto2 Abstract: Wood tree species. Wood properties such as specific gravity, various mechanical properties, extractive be considered for planting stock in managed production forests to increase future supplies of wood having

Standiford, Richard B.

271

1Wood Borer --WB-XX-W Department of Entomology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1Wood Borer -- WB-XX-W WB-04-W Department of Entomology America's Least Wanted Wood-Borers BLACK living trees. The wood- boring larvae cause structural damage that may make the trees susceptible). (Photo credit: Stanislaw Kinelski, Bugwood.org) #12;1-888-EXT-INFO · www.extension.purdue.edu 2Wood Borer

Ginzel, Matthew

272

Emerging Markets for Wood Energy Richard Vlosky, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· The Louisiana Forest Products Development Center · Wood-to-Energy · Wood Biomass · Energy Options · Current-based Biomass Energy #12;2/20/2014 5 Forest Landowner Opportunities and Challenges The U.S. South is the "wood2/20/2014 1 Emerging Markets for Wood Energy Richard Vlosky, Director Crosby Land & Resources

273

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

Growth of chrysanthemums in sewage sludge amended media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of seedlings of Lironden- d ~tl' 'f, L. d C fl d, L. g t tt screened compost (224 metric tons/ha) made from degested sewage sludge and woodchips. However, Kirkham and Emino (50) found with increasing rates of liquid sewage sludge (50 ml...

Schlutt, Edward Frederick

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Model calculations and cost "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet.DK under the PSO-F&U projects having National Laboratory, Rambøll, the Estate of Overgaard and SamRas. The wastewater treatment plant Esbjerg

276

Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008 Revised Model calculations and cost benefit analysis for Esbjerg Vest wastewater treatment plant, Denmark PSO-F&U project nr. 2006 This project "Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge" is supported by EnergiNet .DK under the PSO

277

Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM?50).

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Wood and Fiber Science, 36(1), 2004, pp. 107118 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 36(1), 2004, pp. 107­118 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology FORMOSAN SUBTERRANEAN TERMITE RESISTANCE OF BORATE-MODIFIED STRANDBOARD MANUFACTURED FROM SOUTHERN WOOD, but not on termite mortality. Wood species showed no significant effect on the termite resistance. Correlations

279

Wood and Fiber Science, 37(1), 2005, pp. 95111 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 37(1), 2005, pp. 95­111 © 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology SURFACE AND INTERFACIAL CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PVC COMPOSITE: IMAGING MORPHOLOGY AND WETTING wetting behavior of wood-PVC composites in this study. Two-dimensional and time-dependent profiles

280

Wood and Fiber Science, 36(1), 2004, pp. 1725 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 36(1), 2004, pp. 17­25 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology FUNDAMENTALS OF VERTICAL DENSITY PROFILE FORMATION IN WOOD COMPOSITES. PART III. MDF DENSITY FORMATION DURING of Wood Science and Forest Products 210 Cheatham Hall, Virginia Tech Blacksburg, VA 24061-0323 and Timothy

Wang, Siqun

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wood and Fiber Science, 35(4), 2003, pp. 482498 2003 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 35(4), 2003, pp. 482­498 2003 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology. INTRODUCTION Strength properties of wood-based compos- ites are related to mean panel density and the density of the average panel density (Kruse et al. 2000). Modeling for the spatial structure of wood composites

282

Wood and Fiber Science, 37(2), 2005, pp. 207212 2005 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 37(2), 2005, pp. 207­212 © 2005 by the Society of Wood Science. Leichti Associate Professor and Barbara L. Gartner Professor Department of Wood Science and Engineering purposes that characterize smaller sections of wood. Moreover, theASTM standards spec- ify loading

Lachenbruch, Barbara

283

Wood and Fiber Science, 35(3), 2003, pp. 381396 2003 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 35(3), 2003, pp. 381­396 2003 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology a feasible application of both methods in wood composite research and in a real-time quality control system wood composites widely 1 This paper (NO: 02-40-0457) is published with the approval of the Director

284

Wood and Fiber Science, 36(1), 2004, pp. 7183 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood and Fiber Science, 36(1), 2004, pp. 71­83 2004 by the Society of Wood Science and Technology (Lenth and Kamke 1996). Interest in predicting the consolidation be- havior of wood strand mats has led that strand geometry affects the relative void volume in a mat. #12;72 WOOD AND FIBER SCIENCE, JANUARY 2004, V

285

North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

themes were: 1. softwood market developments, and 2. wood energy and wood mobilization. The main use of wood for energy throughout the UNECE region, driven by policy measures and high oil prices development, which will have to try to balance the needs of the established wood products sector and the bio-energy

286

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

287

Wood furnance cuts fuel bills and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of a wood burning furnace instead of propane to heat the Saddlecraft manufacturing plant in Cherokee, North Carolina, is described. A chart shows gallons of propane usage in winter for five years. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

From the Woods to the Refinery  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

289

Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

New York exempts retail sales of wood used for residential heating purposes from the state sales tax. The law also permits local governments (municipalities and counties) to grant an exemption from...

290

Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wood Fired Steam Plants in Georgia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suppliers. Based upon the designs submitted and subsequent negotiations, the Applied Engineering Company (APCO) in Orangeburg, South Carolina, was chosen to do the job. Applied Engineering has been working on wood gasification systems for several years...-20, 1983 company has a large manufacturing plant in Orange burg and is fully capable of fabricating large pressure vessels and heavy industrial equipment. The overall wood gasification system is shown in Figure 1. The fuel for the gasifier is green...

Bulpitt, W. S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A WOOD-FIRED GAS TURBINE PLANT Sam H. Powell, Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, Tennessee Joseph T. Hamrick, Aerospace Research Corporation, RBS Electric, Roanoke, VA Abstract This paper covers the research and development of a wood...-fired gas turbine unit that is used for generating electricity. The system uses one large cyclonic combustor and a cyclone cleaning system in series to provide hot gases to drive an Allison T-56 aircraft engine (the industrial version is the 50l-k). A...

Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

294

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

295

Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO[sub 3], NO[sub 2], PO[sub 4], SO[sub 4], and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model.

Silva, L J; Felmy, A R; Ding, E R

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic in activated sludge from a standard activated sludge WWTP equipped with enhanced biological phosphorus removal) and anaerobic conditions rather low removal rates were determined. In a laboratory-scale activated sludge

Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

297

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008. “Utilization of sewage sludge in EU application of old2007. “Cost evaluation of sludge treatment options andwastewater treatment plant sludge treating leather tanning

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 11. Technical support. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support). This report presents the work conducted under Task II (Technical Support) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process, which was selected for the study. Task achievements are presented for: gasifier design and performance; technical support; and task management. 12 figures, 22 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood.2 million cubic meters) of lumber treated with CCA are produced annually in the United States (Micklewright 1998). ·In 1997, for example, some 581.4 million cu. ft. was treated with waterborne preservatives

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

European Panel FederationEuropean Panel Federation viewpoint on wood energy policiesviewpoint on wood energy policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--called "green energy"called "green energy" ·· Simultaneously, the taxes on the use of fossil fuelsSimultaneously, the taxes on the use of fossil fuels increaseincrease ·· This leads to increasing costs for wood productsIncreasing use of wood for energy production ·· Governments in Europe are granting subsidies for

302

Safety evaluation of the ESP sludge washing baselines runs. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose is to provide the technical basis for evaluation of unreviewed safety question for the Extended Sludge Processing (ESP) Sludge Washing Baseline Runs, which are necessary to resolve technical questions associated with process control (sludge suspension, sludge settling, heat transfer, temperature control). The sludge is currently stored in below-ground tanks and will be prepared for processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility as part of the Integrated Waste Removal Program for Savannah River Site.

Gupta, M.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effectiveness of irradiation in killing pathogens. [Treatment of sewage sludge for land application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

United States Environmental Protection Agency regulations include gamma ray irradiation of sludge as an approved Process to Further Reduce Pathogens (PFRP) prior to land application. Research at Sandia National Laboratories on pathogen inactivation in sludge by gamma irradiation has demonstrated that the 1 Mrad PFRP dose is capable, by itself, of eliminating bacterial, fungal, and parasitic pathogens from sludge. Gamma irradiation of sludge in conjunction with the required Processes to Significantly Reduce Pathogens (PSRP) should also eliminate the viral hazard from wastewater sludges.

Yeager, J.G.; Ward, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Use and disposal of waste-water sludge in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) proposed Part 503 Rules on sludge were first published in February 1989. Part 503 proposed sludge regulations address five categories of sludge use or disposal: land application, distribution and marketing, monofills, surface disposal sites, and incineration. The report on sludge management in Illinois examines the probable effects that the proposed federal rules on use and disposal of sewage sludge will have on current practices by Illinois publicly owned treatment works outside the City of Chicago.

John, S.F.; Kane, D.N.; Hinesly, T.D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Landfarming of municipal sewage sludge at Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been applying municipal sanitary sludge to 9 sites comprising 90 ha on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983. Approximately 13,000,000 L are applied annually by spraying sludge (2 to 3% solids) under pressure from a tanker. Under an ongoing monitoring program, both the sludge and the soil in the application areas are analyzed for organic, inorganic, and radioactive parameters on a regular basis. Organic pollutants are analyzed in sludge on a semiannual basis and in the soil application areas on an annual basis. Inorganic parameters are analyzed daily (e.g., pH, total solids) or monthly (e.g., nitrogen, manganese) in sludge and annually in soil in application areas. Radionuclides (Co-60, Cs-137, I-131, Be-7, K-40, Ra-228, U-235, U-238) are scanned daily during application by the sewage treatment plant and analyzed weekly in composite sludge samples and annually in soil. Additionally, data on radioactive body burden for maximally exposed workers who apply the sludge show no detectable exposures. This monitoring program is comprehensive and is one of the few in the United States that analyzes radionuclides. Results from the monitoring program show heavy metals and radionuclides are not accumulating to levels in the soil application areas.

Tischler, M.L.; Pergler, C.; Wilson, M.; Mabry, D.; Stephenson, M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Bioavailability to plants of sludge-borne toxic organics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large numbers of man-made organic chemicals occur in sewage sludge and many are thought to represent an environmental hazard. This is particularly true of the compounds classified as priority pollutants (TOs) which typically occur in sludges in the mg/kg concentration range. Concerns about their environmental fate, specifically their bioavailability to food-chain crops, have disrupted land application of sludges. A review of the pertinent literature (especially field studies utilizing sludge-amended soils and confirmational analysis for parent compound) suggest the concern is largely groundless. The vast majority of TOs in sludge occur at low concentrations and when applied to soil are strongly sorbed in the soil-sludge matrix, degraded, or are otherwise lost from the soil during the cropping season. Plant bioconcentration factors for most TOs are less 0.01 DW. Even if taken up by plants the TOs may be metabolized within the plant or accumulate in plant parts that are usually not consumed. In contrast a second general group of man-made organics (aromatic surfactants) exist in sludge at much greater concentrations (g/kg).

O'Connor, G.A.; Chaney, R.L.; Ryan, J.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 {times}10{sup {minus}7} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 {times}10{sup {minus}4} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges.

Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 {times}10{sup {minus}7} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 {times}10{sup {minus}4} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges.

Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

SLUDGE RETRIEVAL FROM HANFORD K WEST BASIN SETTLER TANKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was deployed to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from ten submerged tanks in Hanford's K-West Basin. As part of K-West Basin cleanup, the accumulated sludge needed to be removed from the 0.5 meter diameter by 5 meter long settler tanks and transferred approximately 45 meters to an underwater container for sampling and waste treatment. The abrasive, dense, non-homogeneous sludge was the product of the washing process of corroded nuclear fuel. It consists of small (less than 600 micron) particles of uranium metal, uranium oxide, and various other constituents, potentially agglomerated or cohesive after 10 years of storage. The Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS) was developed to access, mobilize and pump out the sludge from each tank using a standardized process of retrieval head insertion, periodic high pressure water spray, retraction, and continuous pumping of the sludge. Blind operations were guided by monitoring flow rate, radiation levels in the sludge stream, and solids concentration. The technology developed and employed in the STRS can potentially be adapted to similar problematic waste tanks or pipes that must be remotely accessed to achieve mobilization and retrieval of the sludge within.

ERPENBECK EG; LESHIKAR GA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

310

Low temperature thermal treatment for petroleum refinery waste sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treatment requirements for waste sludges generated by petroleum refinery operations and designated as waste codes K048, K049, K050, K051 and K052 under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) became effective in November, 1990 under the Landban regulations. An experimental program evaluated low temperature thermal treatment of filter cakes produced from these sludges using laboratory and pilot-scale equipment. One set of experiments on waste samples from two different refineries demonstrated the effective removal of organics of concern from the sludges to meet the RCRA Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) treatment standards. Cyanides were also within the acceptable limit. Combined with stabilization of heavy metals in the treatment residues, low temperature thermal treatment therefore provides an effective and efficient means of treating refinery sludges, with most hydrocarbons recovered and recycled to the refinery. A milder thermal treatment was used to remove the bulk of the water from a previously filtered waste sludge, providing effective waste minimization through a 40% decrease in the mass of sludge to be disposed. The heating value of the sludge was increased simultaneously by one-third, thereby producing a residue of greater value in an alternative fuels program. A process based on this approach was successfully designed and commercialized.

Ayen, R.J.; Swanstrom, C.P. (Geneva Research Center, IL (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

15th International Conference Ramiran, May 3-6, 2013, Versailles Accounting GHG emissions from sludge treatment and disposal routes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% of sewage sludge is directly land spreading or composted before land spreading. Sludge application sludge treatment and disposal routes ­ methodological problems focused on sludge land spreading this tool can be used to quantify GHG emissions of sludge land spreading of a 380 000 per captia equivalent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

312

Spreading lagooned sewage sludge on farm land: A case history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the development of a project involving the application of approximately 265,000 cubic meters of lagooned sewage sludge from a metropolitan area on privately-owned farm land in an adjacent, rural county. The sludge application project was initiated to enable use of the land occupied by the lagoons for expansion of the sewage treatment plant. The procedures developed will be valuable to those proposing to practice land disposal of stabilized sludge as part of the Nation`s resource conservation program.

Robson, C.M.; Sommers, L.E.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal.

BANNING, D.L.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

314

241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal.

BANNING, D.L.

1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

315

The Composition of Fertilizing Value of Sewage Sludge.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be definitely shed (5, 8, 12) ; so the work on the availability of nitrogen in sewage here reported has been directed chiefly to that in digested sludge. r EXPERIMENTS TO ESTIMATE THE AVAILABILITY OF NITROGEN IN SEWAGE SLUDGES efficiency of the nitrogen... case it was better than that of cottonseed meal, whi other cases is was nearly as good. The average of all the experimenl digested sewage sludge, gives an availability of 19 for its nitrogen colny with 100 for nitrate of soda, and 47 for cottonseed...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

1932-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

Mukhtar, Saqib

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sludge application program at the Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1980 a research program has been conducted at the Savannah River Plant to evaluate the use of domestic sewage sludge to enhance forest productivity. The objectives of the program have been to determine the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of using sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and slow-release fertilizer. The potential impacts of sludge application on nutrient cycling, organic carbon budgets, forest wildlife, and biomass production have been studied. Soil, soil water, groundwater, and stand biomass samples have been analyzed to monitor the availability and movement of nutrients and metals. Remote sensing techniques have been applied to the plots to see if they have large scale application to biomass determinations. Results of the study have been used to develop guidelines for land application of domestic sewage sludge.

Corey, J C; Lower, M W; Davis, C E

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

319

Microsoft Word - 2010 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Visit...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

being considered, before the next attempts, in order to provide the maximum assurance of success. HSS toured the facility where the equipment and conditions for the K-Basin Sludge...

320

Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from larger commercial sources such as wood-burning biomass plants which produce heat or electricity in the soil. Wood ash is more soluble and reactive than ground limestone, and brings about a Benefits Recycles

New Hampshire, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A study of the molecular mechanics of wood cell walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood is the original structural material, developed by nature to support tall plants. Every advantageous feature of wood as used in artificial structures is rooted in the plant's evolved capability to withstand the conditions ...

Adler, David, S.M. (David C.). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process J. Z. Lu,1 Q. Wu,1 I. I parameters for the wood-fiber/high-density-polyethylene blends at 60 rpm were a temperature of 180°C

323

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood #3; Departament de Matem#18;atica Aplicada II Universitat Polit#18;ecnica de Catalunya Barcelona, Spain david.wood@upc.edu Submitted: Nov 16, 2004; Accepted

Wood, David R.

324

Ring Involutions and Self-Dual Codes Jay A. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ring Involutions and Self-Dual Codes Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics Western Michigan University jay.wood@wmich.edu AMS meeting, Lexington, Kentucky March 27, 2010 #12;Acknowledgments Much

Wood, Jay

325

RELATIVE ONE-WEIGHT LINEAR CODES JAY A. WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELATIVE ONE-WEIGHT LINEAR CODES JAY A. WOOD In memory of Professor F. E. P. Hirzebruch, 17 October University. 1 #12;2 JAY A. WOOD G thus defines a linear functional (a "coordinate functional") on the k

Wood, Jay

326

Generalizing Halfspaces 1 Eugene Fink 2 Derick Wood 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalizing Halfspaces 1 Eugene Fink 2 Derick Wood 3 Abstract Restricted­orientation convexity, as a generalization of standard convexity [9]. Rawlins, Wood, and Schuierer studied planar O­convex sets

Fink, Eugene

327

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drawing a Graph in a Hypercube David R. Wood Departament de Matem`atica Aplicada II Universitat Polit`ecnica de Catalunya Barcelona, Spain david.wood@upc.edu Submitted: Nov 16, 2004; Accepted: Aug 11

Wood, David R.

328

Wood mobilization: la nuova frontiera delle politiche forestali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8-03-2013 1 Wood mobilization: la nuova frontiera delle politiche forestali europee CONAF settore forestale, un nuovo tema-guida: Wood Mobilization Task Force Foreste2. Green o grey? 3. Politica

Pettenella, Davide

329

XML Structure Compression Mark Levene and Peter Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

XML Structure Compression Mark Levene and Peter Wood Birkbeck College, University of London London WC1E 7HX, U.K. {m.levene,p.wood}@dcs.bbk.ac.uk Abstract XML is becoming the universal language

Levene, Mark

330

Characters and finite Frobenius rings Jay A. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characters and finite Frobenius rings Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics Western Michigan-modules; 3. R = R as right R-modules. Due independently to Hirano, 1997, and Wood, 1999. JW (WMU) Frobenius

Wood, Jay

331

Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program...

332

FAO Forestry Department Wood Energy WISDOM East Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

percent of total African wood consumption. In the countries of East Sahelian Africa, Central Africa energy consumption (FAO 1999). Numerous studies have analyzed the wFAO ­ Forestry Department ­ Wood Energy WISDOM ­ East Africa Woodfuel Integrated Supply

333

International Trade of Wood Pellets (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of wood pellets has increased dramatically in recent years due in large part to aggressive emissions policy in the European Union; the main markets that currently supply the European market are North America and Russia. However, current market circumstances and trade dynamics could change depending on the development of emerging markets, foreign exchange rates, and the evolution of carbon policies. This fact sheet outlines the existing and potential participants in the wood pellets market, along with historical data on production, trade, and prices.

Not Available

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science VOLATILE CONSTITUTENTS IN A WOOD PYROLYSIS OIL A Thesis SHIH-CHIEN LIN Appro d as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of epa tmen (Member Member Nay 1978 442936 ABSTRACT Volatile Constituents in a Wood Pyrolysis Oil.../120 Supelcoport. Other trace constituents of volatile acid were also 'dentifi="' by trap- ping the substances from the C. C. column into i: n;- 0-sh ped capillary tube and subjecting to mass spectrometry. The corrosivity of pyrolysis oil and it, volati'e acids...

Lin, Shih-Chien

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Wood Fuel LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWood Fuel LP Name: Wood

336

Land disposal of water treatment plant sludge -- A feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the following alternative disposal methods for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Sludge were evaluated: landfilling, discharge into sanitary sewers, long-term lagooning, use in manufacturing, co-composting, alum recovery and land application. Land application was chosen at the best disposal alternative. Preliminary design resulted in a 1% dry alum sludge loading rate (25 tonnes/ha), requiring 35 ha over a nine-year period and a phosphorus fertilizer supplement of about 50kg/ha.

Viraraghavan, T.; Multon, L.M.; Wasylenchuk, E.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Preparing sewage sludge for land application or surface disposal: A guide for preparers of sewage sludge on the monitoring, record keeping, and reporting requirements of the federal standards for the use of disposal of sewage sludge, 40 CFR part 503  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document focuses on the monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements that apply to persons who prepare sewage sludge or a material derived from sewage sludge. It defines persons who prepare sewage sludge and then summarizes their general responsibilities. USEPA promulgated at 40 CFR Part 503 Phase 1 of the risk-based regulations that govern the final use or disposal of sewage sludge. The intent of the Federal program is to ensure that the use or disposal of sewage sludge occurs in a way that protects both human health and the environment. The Part 503 regulation establishes general requirements, pollutant limits, operational standards, and management practices, as well as monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting requirements. These requirements apply to sewage sludge that is land applied, placed on a surface disposal site, or incinerated in a sewage sludge-only incinerator.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Storage and Seasoning of Pecan Bud Wood.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be returned to cold storage and will remain ready for use at a later date. It has been found that bud wood cut late in the dormant period seasons in a shorter time than that cut early. Bud wood of the Delmas variety seasons more readiIy than that of Stuart... _._-_._.--__..__------~-..._..--_...._.--_.....-. Relation of Time of Cutting Bud Wood to Seasoning ._.__....._._-___._------------ ., Relative Response of Stuart and Delmas in Seasoning _---..__._.__....._.---....-....--.- 10 Number of Days for Seasoning Bud Wood During Different Months .... 12 Storage...

Brison, Fred R. (Fred Robert)

1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Sludge Settling Rate Observations and Projections at the Savannah River Site - 13238  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 2004, sludge batches have included a high percentage of stored sludge generated from the H- modified (HM) process. The slow-settling nature of HM sludge means that the settling is often the major part of the washing tank quiescent period between required pump runs to maintain flammability control. Reasonable settling projections are needed to wash soluble salts from sludge in an efficient manner, to determine how much sludge can be washed in a batch within flammability limits, and to provide composition projections for batch qualification work done in parallel with field preparation. Challenges to providing reasonably accurate settling projections include (1) large variations in settling behavior from tank-to-tank, (2) accounting for changing initial concentrations, sludge masses, and combinations of different sludge types, (3) changing the settling behavior upon dissolving some sludge compounds, and (4) sludge preparation schedules that do not allow for much data collection for a particular sludge before washing begins. Scaling from laboratory settling tests has provided inconsistent results. Several techniques have been employed to improve settling projections and therefore the overall batch preparation efficiency. Before any observations can be made on a particular sludge mixture, projections can only be made based on historical experience with similar sludge types. However, scaling techniques can be applied to historical settling models to account for different sludge masses, concentrations, and even combinations of types of sludge. After sludge washing/settling cycles begin, the direct measurement of the sludge height, once generally limited to a single turbidity meter measurement per settle period, is now augmented by examining the temperature profile in the settling tank, to help determine the settled sludge height over time. Recently, a settling model examined at PNNL [1,2,3] has been applied to observed thermocouple and turbidity meter readings to quickly provide settling correlations to project settled heights for other conditions. These tools improve the accuracy and adaptability of short and mid-range planning for sludge batch preparation. (authors)

Gillam, Jeffrey M.; Shah, Hasmukh B.; Keefer, Mark T. [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation LLC, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS SUMMARY REPORT [VOLUME 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly radioactive sludge (containing up to 300,000 curies of actinides and fission products) resulting from the storage of degraded spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in temporary containers located in the 105-K West storage basin near the Columbia River. The background, history, and known characteristics of this sludge are discussed in Section 2 of this report. There are many compelling reasons to remove this sludge from the K-Basin. These reasons are discussed in detail in Section1, and they include the following: (1) Reduce the risk to the public (from a potential release of highly radioactive material as fine respirable particles by airborne or waterborn pathways); (2) Reduce the risk overall to the Hanford worker; and (3) Reduce the risk to the environment (the K-Basin is situated above a hazardous chemical contaminant plume and hinders remediation of the plume until the sludge is removed). The DOE-RL has stated that a key DOE objective is to remove the sludge from the K-West Basin and River Corridor as soon as possible, which will reduce risks to the environment, allow for remediation of contaminated areas underlying the basins, and support closure of the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The environmental and nuclear safety risks associated with this sludge have resulted in multiple legal and regulatory remedial action decisions, plans,and commitments that are summarized in Table ES-1 and discussed in more detail in Volume 2, Section 9.

FREDERICKSON JR; ROURK RJ; HONEYMAN JO; JOHNSON ME; RAYMOND RE

2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 3, December 1, 1981-February 28, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this program is twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant; and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities include the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. The lockhopper system was successfully integrated with the gasifier, and shakedown of the newly installed unit was completed. Test PT-4, the first test using this system, was completed during January. Results far exceeded the objectives set for this test. One hundred fifty tons of Minnesota peat containing up to 25-weight-percent moisture were fed to the gasifier at a pressure of 300 psig. Peat conversions averaged more than 90%. Over 57 hours of steady operating time were selected for data analysis. Post-run inspection following Test PT-4 was completed. Peat dried to 10 and 20-weight-percent moisture is currently being stored in preparation for Test PT-5, scheduled to begin in March.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris: Arsenic phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills

Florida, University of

343

Deplump for Streaming Data Nicholas Bartlett Frank Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deplump for Streaming Data Nicholas Bartlett Frank Wood Department of Statistics, Columbia of discrete sequences called the sequence memoizer [Wood et al., 2009]. Gasthaus et al. showed that although was reposed on a sequence memo- izer [Wood et al., 2009] whose space complexity was linear in the length

Wood, Frank

344

Wood Products Identification by Internal Characteristics Readings C. FUENTEALBA1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products Identification by Internal Characteristics Readings C. FUENTEALBA1 , C. SIMON2 , D.fuentealba@cran.uhp-nancy.fr 5 LERMAB - Wood Research Laboratory, Epinal, France, e-mail: daniel- proving control of production tools and reacting to their defi- ciencies. For wood industries

Boyer, Edmond

345

Wood in rivers: interactions with channel morphology and processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Editorial Wood in rivers: interactions with channel morphology and processes No doubt about it, wood complicates fluvial geo- morphology. It messes up nice tidy streams, compli- cates quantitative through the study of channels lacking a substantial load of wood debris (Leopold et al., 1964

Montgomery, David R.

346

Using Wood Quality Measures to Evaluate Second-Growth Redwood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

553 Using Wood Quality Measures to Evaluate Second-Growth Redwood Stephen L. Quarles1 and Yana stability, durability, microfibril angle, redwood, wood quality Introduction Redwood has long been a valued" or "resistant or very resistant" (Wood Handbook 1999). 1 University of California Cooperative Extension (Advisor

Standiford, Richard B.

347

Frederic Wood Compiled by Michael W. Pidgeon (1985)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frederic Wood fonds Compiled by Michael W. Pidgeon (1985) University of British Columbia Archives Description Frederic Wood fonds. ­ 1915-1973. 33 cm of textual records. 22 photographs. Biographical Sketch Born in Victoria, B.C., Frederic Gordon Campbell Wood (1887-1976) enrolled in the first class

Handy, Todd C.

348

Surface light fields for 3D photography Daniel N. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface light fields for 3D photography Daniel N. Wood A dissertation submitted in partial This is to certify that I have examined this copy of a doctoral dissertation by Daniel N. Wood and have found for 3D photography by Daniel N. Wood Chair of Supervisory Committee: Associate Professor Brian L

Washington at Seattle, University of

349

Wood Engineering Education Trends and Challenges Rakesh Gupta1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Engineering Education ­ Trends and Challenges Rakesh Gupta1 and Vijaya Gopu2 1 Member ASCE, Associate Professor, Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis of the factors impacting the wood engineering/design education in the U.S. has been presented. The actions

Cox, Dan

350

Wood Science and Nanotechnology: Overview and Our Efforts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Science and Nanotechnology: Overview and Our Efforts Siqun Wang, Ph.D. Department of Forestry. Bot. 17, 543-588 (1886). Wang UT CRC #12;Wood Structure MICROFIBRIL STRUCTURE CRYSTALLINE REGIONS wood fibers under axial tensile strain Nature 1971; 229:252-3 Page DH, EI-Hosseiny F., Winkler K. Wang

Gray, Matthew

351

Wood 1 19th Annual AIAA/USU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood 1 19th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites SSC05-IV-03 Adopting Internet standards for orbital use Lloyd Wood Cisco Systems Global Defense, Space and Security Bedfont Lakes, London, UK; +44. #12;Wood 2 19th Annual AIAA/USU Conference on Small Satellites In June 2004, after lying dormant while

Wood, Lloyd

352

Robert Wood Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robert Wood Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences Mechanical Engineering Robert Wood is the Charles River Professor of Engineering member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. Prof. Wood completed his M.S. and Ph

Lin, Xi

353

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood ants use resin to protect themselves against pathogens Michel Chapuisat1,*, Anne Oppliger2. Wood ants, Formica paralugubris, commonly bring back pieces of solidified coniferous resin of larvae exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. These results show that wood ants

Lehmann, Laurent

354

Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Codes of constant Lee or Euclidean weight Jay A. Wood Department of Mathematics, Computer Science & Statistics Purdue University Calumet Hammond, Indiana 46323 2094 USA wood@calumet.purdue.edu http: www.calumet.purdue.edu public math wood Abstract. Carlet 2 has determined the linear codes over Z=4 of constant Lee weight

Wood, Jay

355

Wood September 28, 2002 DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood September 28, 2002 1 DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING CARNEGIE MELLON: Microstructure-Sensitive Mechanical Properties #12;Wood September 28, 2002 2 Introduction Reading will also have an opportunity to perform similar experiments on various types of wood. These will illustrate

Rollett, Anthony D.

356

Wood Density and Growth Conifers Introduced to Hawaii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Density and Growth of Some Conifers Introduced to Hawaii Roger G. Skolmen U . S . F O R E - Berkeley, California Forest Service - U. S. Department of Agriculture #12;Skolmen, Roger G. 1963. Wood Expt. Sta. 20 pp., illus. (U.S. Forest Serv. Res Paper PSW-12) The specific gravity of the wood of 14

Standiford, Richard B.

357

Center for Wood Utilization Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Asia, and Latin America. A business plan was developed to capture 1% of the $2.5 billion h manufacturing; and (c) lead to more efficient use of renewable wood-based materials for the benefit of Americans. Renewable wood is essential to human existence. Wood utilization research is critical to national needs

Tullos, Desiree

358

Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS -WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS - WOOD Gasification / Cogeneration ARMAGH United Kingdom Gasification is transferring the combustible matters in organic waste or biomass into gas and pure char by burning the fuel via it allows biomass in small-scaled engines and co-generation units ­ which with conventional technologies

359

Integrated Datasets (IDs) Wood/Bretherton proposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Datasets (IDs) Wood/Bretherton proposal ID Rationale Space/Time scale; Location; Platforms Parameters Combined Drizzle Dataset (CD ID) Collocated precipitation, aerosol and cloud micro, precip. rate, cloud Cross- Section Dataset (XS-ID) Data on E-W cross- section along 20°S from coast

Wood, Robert

360

CORRUPTION AND ILLEGAL LOGGING IN THE WOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CORRUPTION AND ILLEGAL LOGGING IN THE WOOD PRODUCTS MARKET: the Italian experience in controlling Science 7 May 2004 Paper organization 1. State of the problem 2. Are Italian companies involved in deforestation and trade of illegal logging? 3. Which are the most affected countries? 4. Why do we need

Pettenella, Davide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

PASSION FOR WOOD THE DLH GROUP 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

countries on 5 continents · 19 timber merchant companies in Denmark, 10 of which have do-it-yourself stores Division consists of 19 timber merchant companies in Denmark, just over half of which have an adjacent doPASSION FOR WOOD THE DLH GROUP 2006 #12;54% 21% 25% ONE OF THE WORLD'S MAJOR TIMBER WHOLESALERS

362

Wood anomalies in resonant photonic quasicrystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theory of light diffraction from planar quasicrystalline lattice with resonant scatterers is presented. Rich structure, absent in the periodic case, is found in specular reflection spectra, and interpreted as a specific kind of Wood anomalies, characteristic for quasicrystals. The theory is applied to semiconductor quantum dots arranged in Penrose tiling.

Poddubny, A N

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Milnor-Wood inequalities for products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove Milnor-Wood inequalities for local products of manifolds. As a consequence, we establish the generalized Chern Conjecture for products $M\\times \\Sigma^k$ for any product of a manifold $M$ with a product of $k$ copies of a surface $\\Sigma$ for $k$ sufficiently large.

Bucher, Michelle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Harvested Wood Products -an Incentive for Deforestation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Harvested Wood Products - an Incentive for Deforestation? Andreas Fischlin1 Abstract Mitigation for deforestation is real. To curb the disadvantages of HWP, some debiting of non-sustainable forest management activities are implemented that provide true disincentives to deforestation, HWP may continue to create some

Fischlin, Andreas

365

Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An alternative approach to accelerated PF curing can be accomplished with the addition amines or amides. The later functionality undergoes base catalyzed hydrolysis yielding the corresponding carboxyl ate and free amine which rapidly reacts with the phenolic methylol groups facilitating polymerization and curing of the PF resin (Pizzi, 1997).

Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986--1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the Oak Ridge Reservation since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under Tennessee permits issued to the city of Oak Ridge for land disposal of sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE reservations and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed or injected on pasture sites or surface applied in forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Anaerobically digested liquid sludge (2% to 4% solids) from the city of Oak Ridge had a relatively high nitrogen content (8% dry weight) and average to low concentrations of potentially problematic metals, compared with typical municipal sludges. Few potentially hazardous organic chemicals were detected in the sludge, and when found, these were at very low concentrations. Oak Ridge sludge is somewhat unique in that it contains radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 131}I, uranium isotopes, {sup 90}Sr, and occasionally {sup 99}Tc) at concentrations much higher than typical municipal sludges. Land application of sewage sludge can dilute or destroy problematic sludge constituents while improving soil fertility. Correct management has made these sludge applications a model of environmentally responsible waste management.

Gunderson, C.A.; Larsen, I.L.; Boston, H.L.; Bradburn, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Van Miegroet, H. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Morris, J.L. [Jaycor, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Walzer, A.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Environmental Compliance; Adler, T.C. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huq, M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

368

K Basin sludge polychlorinated biphenyl removal technology assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two Hanford K Basins are water-filled concrete pools that contain over 2,100 metric tons of N Reactor fuel elements stored in aluminum or stainless steel canisters. During the time the fuel has been stored, approximately 50 m3 of heterogeneous solid material have accumulated in the basins. This material, referred to as sludge, is a mixture of fuel corrosion products, metallic bits of spent fuel and zirconium clad iron and metal corrosion products and silica from migrating sands. Some of the sludges also contain PCBs. The congener group of PCBs was identified as Aroclor 1254. The maximum concentration of sludge PCBS was found to be 140 ppm (as settled wet basis). However, the distribution of the PCBs is non-uniform throughout the sludge (i.e., there are regions of high and low concentrations and places where no PCBs are present). Higher concentrations could be present at various locations. Aroclors 1016/1242, 1221, 1248, 1254, and 1260 were identified and quantified in K West (KW) Canister sludge. In some of these samples, the concentration of 1260 was higher than 1254. The sludge requires pre-treatment to meet tank farm waste acceptance criteria, Among the numerous requirements, the sludge should be retreated so that it does not contain regulated levels of Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) compounds. Because of their stable chemistry and relative insolubility in water, PCBs are difficult to treat. They also resist degradation from heat and electrical charges. This stability has resulted in environmental persistence which has prompted the development of a variety of new cleanup processes including supercritical processes, advanced oxidation, dehalogenation and others. Hopefully, most of the new processes are discussed herein. Information on new processes are being received and will be evaluated in a future revision.

Ashworth, S.C.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

369

In: After Wise Use The Future of Peatlands, C. Farrell & J. Feehan Eds, Proceedings of the 13th International Peat Congress, Ireland, Tullamore, 8-13 June 2008, IPS (Finland), 2008, pp. 599-602.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International Peat Congress, Ireland, Tullamore, 8-13 June 2008, IPS (Finland), 2008, pp. 599-602. Effects), the microbial diversity and activity in Sphagnum mosses and in peat, and the dynamics of labile and recalcitrant organic matter of peat. The ultimate objective is the creation of a insu-00321910,version1-16Sep2008

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

Coir Dust, A Viable Alternative to Peat Moss http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/Environmental/Media_Nutrition/COIR%20p... 1 of 6 2/8/2007 11:05 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coir Dust, A Viable Alternative to Peat Moss http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/Environmental/Media_Nutrition/COIR%20p... 1 of 6 2/8/2007 11:05 AM Coir Dust, A Viable Alternative to Peat Moss Alan W. Meerow Associate dust could function remarkably well as a substitute for various peat products in soilless container

Mazzotti, Frank

371

In situ quantification of CH4 bubbling events from a peat soil using a new infrared laser spectrometer Sbastien Gogo Christophe Guimbaud Fatima Laggoun-Dfarge Valry Catoire Claude Robert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 In situ quantification of CH4 bubbling events from a peat soil using a new infrared laser in May 2009, in Sphagnum and Betula plots, and in a wet artificially bared peat area with Eriophorum of increased CH4 production and accumulation in peat. In May, bubbling was higher at nighttime (65.5%) than

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

Bogs are a specialized wetland community with saturated, acidic, peat soils that have low concentra-tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen). They  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, acidic, peat soils that have low concentra- tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential of living Sphagnum mosses growing over a layer of saturated, acidic peat. Sedges, forbs and/or the low), pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) and sundew (Drosera rotundifolia). SOILS: Fibric peat (Histosols

US Army Corps of Engineers

373

High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Effects of essential element concentration upon growth and development of tomato seedlings grown in a peat-perlite medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESSENTIAL EIENENT CONCENTRATION UPON GRQPZH AND BEVE~ OF TOTO BKDLINGS GRQlM IN A PEAT-IKRIZTE NEDIQ4 A Thesis Vernon Ross Sihes APPrped as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of DePartment Nay 196R Ths nutbar wishes to exyress bis... perlite snd s~Lnum peat moss consis- tently produced higher qual1ty floriculture crops than sny other xxLs- ture used, They xeported that varLations in plant grosth from ths use of animal senores and organLc compounds~ and differences in dec...

Sikes, Vernon Ross

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge bacterial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: activated sludge bacterial Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Summary: is a traditional build plant base don the...

376

Systematic Multimodeling Methodology Applied to an Activated Sludge Reactor Anca Maria Nagy,*,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic Multimodeling Methodology Applied to an Activated Sludge Reactor Model Anca Maria Nagy for analysis or control purpose. This method is applied to an activated sludge reactor model. Introduction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

DEVELOPMENT OF DATABASE ON FECAL SLUDGE COLLECTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL IN THACHIN,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i DEVELOPMENT OF DATABASE ON FECAL SLUDGE COLLECTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL IN THACHIN, CHAOPRAYA Sludge (FS) management and lacking of data on FS collection, treatment and disposal. Nevertheless, FS

Richner, Heinz

378

Survivorship of meadow voles, Microtus pennsylvanicus, from sewage sludge-treated fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term field study was begun in 1977 at Miami University to evaluate the effects of land application of sewage sludge on experimental old-field communities. The effects of sludge application on toxic metal concentrations in meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) organs during the first two years of the study have been reported. During the first two years of sludge application, no detrimental effects were observed in vole survivorship as a result of sludge treatment.

Maly, M.S.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Environmental regulations and technology: use and disposal of municipal waste-water sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document describes the five major sludge use/disposal options currently available--land application, distribution and marketing of sludge products, land-filling, incineration, and ocean disposal--and factors influencing their selection and implementation. It also provides an initial framework for evaluating sludge use/disposal alternatives, and describes accepted and proven use/disposal technologies and Federal regulations pertinent to sludge management.

Not Available

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

Vail, T.S.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sewage sludge Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 66 Advanced Wastewater Treatment Processes Summary: Treatment Plant Conventional Activated Sludge Process...

382

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge microorganisms Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Computer Science, Texas Woman's University Collection: Mathematics 8 Advanced Wastewater Treatment Processes Summary: Treatment Plant Conventional Activated Sludge Process...

383

Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development: Results of FY 1993 studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes experimental results from work conducted in FY 1993 under the Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development Task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experiments were conducted in the following six general areas: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge leaching, (3) sludge dissolution, (4) actinide separation by solvent extraction and extraction chromatography, (5) Sr separation by solvent extraction, and (6) extraction of Cs from acidic solution.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Barrington, R.J.; Rapko, B.M.; Carlson, C.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Technical aspects associated with the disposal of domestic sludge into the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Marine Environment. . 147 Discussion. 155 LITERATURE CITED. 157 VITA. 165 LIST OF TABLES Table Page Typical Chemical Composition of Raw and Digested Sludge (after Metcalf and Eddy, 1972) 38 Chemical Composition of Representative Sewage... and concentration of the digested sludge. It also allows for the formation of a supernatant, which is drawn off. The function of aerobic digestion is to stabilize a waste sludge through long term aeration. The process is similar to the activated sludge treatment...

Baskin, Charles Henry

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

Stone, M; David Best, D

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for treatment in EU, followed by spreading on land, which accounted for 37% of the sewage sludge produced allow recycling of nutrients. Hence, bioprocessed sewage sludge application on agricultural soilRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N

388

ASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES TOOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.pradel@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In 2007, 1 100 000 tons of sewage sludge were produced in France. This figure is constantly increasing and sludges have to be eliminated. Four disposal routes are currently possible: landASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES ­ THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES

Boyer, Edmond

389

ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

digestion, aerobic digestion, dewatering, al composting, drying) and sludge disposal route (land applicationORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for rural wastewater treatment. However, there are serious environmental and human health effects associ for wastewater treatment. Fecal sludge FS is defined as the sludge of variable consistency collected from onOptimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica Ana Martha

Vogel, Richard M.

391

A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process B. Boulkrounea , M : Activated sludge, wastewater treatment process, Lyapunov function, Lips- chitz singular discrete the recent results of [2] and [5]. In the last decades, the modeling of the activated sludge wastewater

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

Short Communication Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short Communication Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Electricity Primary sludge Fermentation Power density a b s t r a c t Single sludge. Fermentation (30 °C, 9 days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1­16.5 g/L), volatile suspended

393

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

394

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

395

Improving rheological sludge characterization with electrical measurements1 Dieud-Fauvel E.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Improving rheological sludge characterization with electrical measurements1 2 Dieudé-Fauvel E.1 to obtain information on the rheological behaviour of sewage11 sludge by performing electrical resistivity suitable for implementation in the field. The viscosity and resistivity of sludges containing17 between 4

396

Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and aerobic granular sludge A. Mañasa,b,c,e , M. Spérandioa,b,c , F. Deckerd and B. Biscanse aINSA, UPS, INP X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) applied to granular sludge used for biological treatment of high sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and two aerobic granular sequenced batch reactors (GSBR) were evaluated

Boyer, Edmond

397

Effects of oxygen transport limitation on nitrification in the activated sludge process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of oxygen transport limitation on nitrification in the activated sludge process ABSTRACT: Apseudohomogeneous model ofthe nitrifying activated sludge process was developed to investigate the effects ofmass and autotrophic ammonia oxidation within activated sludge flocs were described by an interactive-type, multiple

Stenstrom, Michael K.

398

Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process Leon S. Downing wastewater. Air-filled hollow-fiber membranes are incorporated into an activated sludge tank removal in activated sludge. ª 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The removal

Nerenberg, Robert

399

The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft-glassy materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft confronted with a dramatically increasing flow of sewage sludge. To improve treatment efficiency, process reliable flow properties to simulate the process, this work is an attempt to approach sludge rheological

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

400

Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds S. Troesch***, A systems by local authorities. This will result in a large increase of the quantity of sludge from septic to treat this sludge because they may have reached their nominal load or they are not so numerous in rural

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Using water activity measurements to evaluate rheological consistency and structure strength of sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sludge G. Agoda-Tandjawa, E. Dieudé-Fauvel*, R. Girault. and J.-C. Baudez Irstea, UR TSCF, Domaine des/solid matter interactions in sewage sludge has been developed, based on both rheological characteristics parameters (G' and G'') of both raw and flocculated sewage sludge at optimal dose of polymer increase

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

402

Effect of Processing Mode on Trace Elements in Dewatered Sludge Products Brian K. Richards1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Processing Mode on Trace Elements in Dewatered Sludge Products Brian K. Richards1 *, John considering the land application of wastewater sludges. The effects of pelletization/drying, composting compared. A single day's production of dewatered anaerobically-digested sludge (Syracuse, NY) was used

Walter, M.Todd

403

Impact of sludge mechanical behaviour on spatial distribution parameters obtained with centrifugal spreader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Impact of sludge mechanical behaviour on spatial distribution parameters obtained to analyse organic spreading and opens the way to more developments. Keywords: sludge rheological behaviour a large amount of residues which are spread on agricultural fields. This process of sludge reuse is mainly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

A modified Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) with two-step nitrificationedenitrification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A modified Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) with two-step nitrificationedenitrification Ilenia of the Activated Sludge Models (ASM) [Henze, M., Gujer, W., Mino, T., van Loosdrecht, M.C.M., 2000. Ac- tivated Sludge Models ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d, and ASM3. IWA Scientific and Technical Report No. 9. IWA Publishing

405

Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

406

Water Research 36 (2002) 11811192 Accuracy analysis of a respirometer for activated sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Research 36 (2002) 1181­1192 Accuracy analysis of a respirometer for activated sludge dynamic transfer, pH, and the influence of sludge condition on ``start-up'' behaviour. It is shown to what extent Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Respirometry; Oxygen uptake rate; Activated sludge

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Calorific and porosity development in carbonized wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wood of four species (red oak, southern yellow pine, black cherry, and hybrid poplar) were carbonized in a flowing nitrogen atmosphere at an average heating rate of 3 degrees Centigrade/minute to selected final temperatures up to 700 degrees Centigrade. The effects of final carbonization temperature on selected properties of the char were obtained using an adiabatic oxygen bomb calorimeter to investigate heat of combustion and a mercury porosimeter to investigate total porosity, real density, apparent density, and pore size distribution. Pore characteristics of carbonized wood developed before 300 degrees Centigrade in southern yellow pine and before 400 degrees Centigrade in red oak, black cherry, and hybrid poplar. Statistical analysis established linear relationships between heat of combustion versus final carbonization temperature in the carbonization temperature ranges investigated. The results of this study will aid in understanding optimum pryrolysis conditions for the development of calorific and porosity values. (Refs. 22).

Baileys, R.T.; Blankenhorn, P.R.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

Land treatment of contaminated sludge with wastewater irrigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large-scale field experiment was conducted to test the feasibility of land application of sludge from industrial and domestic wastewater treatment to determine the fate and environmental impact of the contaminants. The sludge contained 13 organic priority pollutants, 16 additional environmentally significant organic compounds, and high concentrations of several metals (zinc, copper, lead, nickel, and cadmium). Each compound was monitored as the irrigation water percolated through the soil and the groundwater over time. Most of the organic compounds diminished to non-detectable levels by the end of the study, and the metals proved harmless to the environment. The effectiveness of land application of sludge with wastewater irrigation was clearly demonstrated. 1 figure, 11 tables.

Demirjian, Y.A.; Westman, T.R.; Joshi, A.M.; Rop, D.J.; Buhl, R.V.; Clark, W.R.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Impacts on groundwater due to land application of sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was designed to demonstrate the potential benefits of utilizing sewage sludge as a soil conditioner and fertilizer on Sassafras sandy loam soil. Aerobically digested, liquid sewage sludge was applied to the soil at rates of 0, 22.4, and 44.8 Mg of dry solids/ha for three consecutive years between 1978 and 1981. Groundwater, soil, and crop contamination levels were monitored to establish the maximum sewage solids loading rate that could be applied without causing environmental deterioration. The results indicate that application of 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha of sludge is the upper limit to ensure protection of the groundwater quality on the site studied. Application rates at or slightly below 22.4 Mg of dry solids/ha are sufficient for providing plant nutrients for the dent corn and rye cropping system utilized in the study.

Higgins, A.J.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

413

Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Generation, Use, Disposal, and Management Options for CCA-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation, Use, Disposal, and Management Options for CCA-Treated Wood May 1998 Helena Solo, INVENTORY OF CCA-TREATED WOOD IN FLORIDA II.1 Characteristics of the Florida Wood Treatment Industry in 1996 10 II.2 Generation and Disposal of Cca-treated Wood 14 II.3 Disposal Reservoirs for Cca-treated Wood

Florida, University of

415

Wood elastic characterization from a single sample by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood elastic characterization from a single sample by resonant ultrasound spectroscopy R. Longoa materials such as wood using only one sample. To do so, two complementary methods are used. First, the wood: Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy, spherical and cubic samples, wood, elastic constants 1. Introduction Wood

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

416

Society of Wood Science and Technology State-of-the-Art Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Society of Wood Science and Technology State-of-the-Art Review CHEMICAL COUPLING IN WOOD FIBER. In this paper, we review coupling agents, pretreatment, and mixing technology for wood fiber and polymer and adhesion Wood ond trhc,r S c r r ~ ~ Society of Wood Sclencc

417

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Method for improving separation of carbohydrates from wood pulping and wood or biomass hydrolysis liquors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for separating carbohydrates from pulping liquors includes the steps of providing a wood pulping or wood or biomass hydrolysis pulping liquor having lignin therein, and mixing the liquor with an acid or a gas which forms an acid upon contact with water to initiate precipitation of carbohydrate to begin formation of a precipitate. During precipitation, at least one long chain carboxylated carbohydrate and at least one cationic polymer, such as a polyamine or polyimine are added, wherein the precipitate aggregates into larger precipitate structures. Carbohydrate gel precipitates are then selectively removed from the larger precipitate structures. The method process yields both a carbohydrate precipitate and a high purity lignin.

Griffith, William Louis; Compere, Alicia Lucille; Leitten Jr., Carl Frederick

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in the future.

Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Using waste wood as fuel saves $2000 per day  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sawdust and wood residue replaced natural gas or number 2 fuel oil to fire 2 kilns at the Cherokee Brick Co. in Raleigh, NC, resulting in savings of $2000/day. Exhaust air from the kilns was sent directly back to a rotating dryer to dry the waste wood. The dried wood containing 8 to 12% moisture was supplied, around the clock, at a rate of 140 ton/day of dry material. (BLM)

Ragland, W. (Cherokee Brick Co., Raleigh, NC); Byrnes, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

422

GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was very low throughout all SRAT cycles. (2) The mercury concentration of the SRAT product was below the 0.8 wt% limit in all runs. (3) Nitrite in the SRAT product was <100 mg/kg for all runs. (4) Foaminess was not an issue using the nominal antifoam addition strategy in these tests. (5) The high aluminum sludges (LoFe, HM type sludges) were much more viscous than the Hi Fe sludges. At 100% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very viscous but at 150% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very thin. This makes the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet an improvement for processing more viscous sludges. (6) The pH of the SRAT products was from 2.7-3.1 for the 150% acid stoichiometry runs and 5.1-6.1 for the 100% acid stoichiometry runs, significantly lower than is typical of the baseline nitric acid/formic acid flowsheet.

Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Development of risk-assessment methodology for municipal-sludge landfilling. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is one of a series of reports that present methodologies for assessing the potential risks to humans or other organisms from the disposal or reuse of municipal sludge. The sludge management practices addressed by this series include land application practices, distribution and marketing programs, landfilling, incineration and ocean disposal. These reports provide methods for evaluating potential health and environmental risks from toxic chemicals that may be present in sludge. The document addresses risks from chemicals associated with landfilling of municipal sludge. These proposed risk assessment procedures are designed as tools to assist in the development of regulations for sludge management practices. The criteria may address management practices (such as site design or process control specifications), limits on sludge disposal rates or limits on toxic chemical concentrations in the sludge.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

arsenate cca wood: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of primary energy in Estonia Wood fuels production Pellet firing projects in Estonia - SIDA Demo East firing projects in...

425

Wood-Coal Fired "Small" Boiler Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extremely attrac t:i.ve to today's capital investment market. 7. Several states, including North Carolina, have enacted 15% State Tax Credits to further the use of wood fuel boilers. Specific examples of the utilization of wood as a boiler fuel include... on the fact that Galaxy would be purchasing all of its waste wood fuel, as well as supplemental coal if needed. Efficiency guarantees of 80% on wood waste with less than 10% moisture content were given, as well as 78.5% on coal. These efficiencies were...

Pincelli, R. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

FIEA Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

year. Forestry and wood products companies, key product suppliers, researchers and technology qualification. This FIEA Scholarship has also been set up to encourage and support an outstanding student

Hickman, Mark

427

Microsoft Word - CX-Murray-CusterWoodPoles_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Steve Scott Line Foreman III - TFNF-Snohomish Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at selected locations along the...

428

Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the DOE (U.S. Department of Energy) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under State of Tennessee permits issued to the City of Oak Ridge for land disposal of. sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE ORR, and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed onto or injected into pasture sites or applied to the surface of forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Land application has been recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a desirable alternative for disposal of ORR waste. Municipal sewage sludge is in many ways similar to dilute animal manure fertilizer, but it also contains metals, organic chemicals, human pathogens, and other constituents reflective of inputs into the municipal sewage treatment plant. When applied to land, nutrients in the sludge improve soil fertility, and minerals and organic matter in the sludge improve soil structure. Under optimal conditions, metals are immobilized, and organic chemicals and pathogens are immobilized or destroyed. If the sludge is not managed effectively, however, sludge constituents have the potential to affect human health and the environment.

Gunderson, C.A.; Boston, H.L.; Van Miegroet, H., Morris, J.L.; Larsen, I.L.; Walzer, A.E.; Adler, T.C.; Bradburn, D.M.; Huq, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

Lumetta, G.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Stabilization of a mixed waste sludge for land disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solidification and stabilization technique was developed for a chemically complex mixed waste sludge containing nitrate processing wastes, sewage sludge and electroplating wastewaters, among other wastes. The sludge is originally from a solar evaporation pond and has high concentrations of nitrate salts; cadmium, chromium, and nickel concentrations of concern; and low levels of organic constituents and alpha and beta emitters. Sulfide reduction of nitrate and precipitation of metallic species, followed by evaporation to dryness and solidification of the dry sludge in recycled high density polyethylene with added lime was determined to be a satisfactory preparation for land disposal in a mixed waste repository. The application of post-consumer polyethylene has the added benefit of utilizing another problem-causing waste product. A modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure was used to determine required treatment chemical dosages and treatment effectiveness. The waste complexity prohibited use of standard chemical equilibrium methods for prediction of reaction products during treatment. Waste characterization followed by determination of thermodynamic feasibility of oxidation and reduction products. These calculations were shown to be accurate in laboratory testing. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Powers, S.E.; Zander, A.K. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nutrients without resulting in damage to the tree stand. Soil pH will be affected by the application or increase pH · Most immobilise metal contamination · Act as slow release fertiliser (nitrogen and phosphorus NOTE 6 PAGE 2 Applications of sewage sludges and composts Forestry Tree growth on nutrient

432

BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. INTRODUCTION In Tunisia, the amount of sludge produced by wastewater treatment stations is constantly waste water treatment stations, in other words, most of it is wastewater from domestic sources. The second type is obtained from the treatment of industrial wastewater or partly from industrial wastewater

Boyer, Edmond

433

Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This project researches the use of nanoscale materials (a broadly defined set of substances that haveNovel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge Dewatering Industrial process, requiring up to 6000 kilowatt hours/year per million gallons per day. Project Description

434

Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

irradiated fuel prior to Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing. In 1980, irradiated N-Reactor fuel was placed products and uranium. This sludge must be removed and disposed as part of the basin decommissioning) and the definition of High Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

435

Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

Modolo, R., E-mail: regina.modolo@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ferreira, V.M. [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Machado, L.M. [RAIZ - Forest and Paper Research Institute, Portucel-Soporcel, Eixo (Portugal); Rodrigues, M.; Coelho, I. [CIMIANTO - Sociedade Tecnica Hidraulica, S.A., Alhandra (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Stacy Wood's Personal Biography Dr. Wood's research focuses on how consumers respond and adapt to change or innovation. This applies both to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stacy Wood's Personal Biography Dr. Wood's research focuses on how consumers respond and adapt, Journal of Marketing, Journal of Consumer Psychology, and Journal of Retailing. Dr. Wood joined the NC Undergraduate Teaching Award, the University of South Carolina's top undergraduate teaching honor. Dr. Wood

Reif, John H.

437

Wood Pulp Digetster Wall Corrosion Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modeling of the flow in a wood pulp digester is but one component of the investigation of the corrosion of digesters. This report describes the development of a Near-Wall-Model (NWM) that is intended to couple with a CFD model that determines the flow, heat, and chemical species transport and reaction within the bulk flow of a digester. Lubrication theory approximations were chosen from which to develop a model that could determine the flow conditions within a thin layer near the vessel wall using information from the interior conditions provided by a CFD calculation of the complete digester. The other conditions will be determined by coupled solutions of the wood chip, heat, and chemical species transport and chemical reactions. The NWM was to couple with a digester performance code in an iterative fashion to provide more detailed information about the conditions within the NW region. Process Simulations, Ltd (PSL) is developing the digester performance code. This more detailed (and perhaps more accurate) information from the NWM was to provide an estimate of the conditions that could aggravate the corrosion at the wall. It is intended that this combined tool (NWM-PSL) could be used to understand conditions at/near the wall in order to develop methods to reduce the corrosion. However, development and testing of the NWM flow model took longer than anticipated and the other developments (energy and species transport, chemical reactions and linking with the PSL code) were not completed. The development and testing of the NWM are described in this report. In addition, the investigation of the potential effects of a clear layer (layer reduced in concentration of wood chips) near the wall is reported in Appendix D. The existence of a clear layer was found to enhance the flow near the wall.

Giles, GE

2003-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Life in the woods : production and consumption of the urban forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of wood is fraught with paradox. Wood as a building material is embraced for its naturalness, while the cutting of trees is indicted as a destruction of nature. Wood is lauded for its structural properties and ...

Volicer, Nadine (Nadine M.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagram of a Wood Chip Moisture Content Measurement DeviceMeasurement of Moisture Content in Wood Chips Using NMR andWood chip water-content tests were done over a broad range of moisture contents

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank 12 samples were pulled on February 9, 2010 following slurry operations by H-Tank Farm. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 4 and two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 12 were received in the SRNL Shielded Cells. Each tank's samples were composited into clean 500 mL polyethylene storage bottles and weighed. The composited Tank 4 sample was 428.27 g and the composited Tank 12 sample was 502.15 g. As expected there are distinct compositional differences between Tank 4 and Tank 12 sludges. The Tank 12 slurry is much higher in Al, Hg, Mn, and Th, and much lower in Fe, Ni, S, and U than the Tank 4 slurry. The Tank 4 sludge definitely makes the more significant contribution of S to any sludge batch blend. This S, like that observed during SB6 washing, is best monitored by looking at the total S measured by digesting the sample and analyzing by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Alternatively, one can measure the soluble S by ICP-AES and adjust the value upward by approximately 15% to have a pretty good estimate of the total S in the slurry. Soluble sulfate measurements by ion chromatography (IC) will be biased considerably lower than the actual total S, the difference being due to the non-sulfate soluble S and the undissolved S. Tank 12 sludge is enriched in U-235, and hence samples transferred into SRNL from the Tank Farm will need to be placed on the reportable special nuclear material inventory and tracked for total U per SRNL procedure requirements.

Bannochie, C.; Click, D.; Pareizs, J.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

442

Calorimetric analysis of fungal degraded wood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Endothermic transition and gross heat of combustion of aspenwood subjected to degradation by Lenzites trabea and Polyporus versicolor were determined by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and an adiabatic O bomb. Endothermic peak areas of undegraded and fungi-degraded wood differed from each other at all levels of weight loss. The regression analysis of the DSC data vs. weight loss revealed a significant relations, although not highly correlated, for P. versicolor-degraded specimens and a nonsignificant relation for L. trabea-degraded specimens; weight loss and gross heat of combustion values of degraded specimens were significantly correlated.

Blankenhorn, P.R.; Baldwin, R.C.; Merrill, W. Jr.; Ottone, S.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Rachel Woods-Robinson | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems Engineering Research and DevelopmentDepartmentinBatteryRachel Woods-Robinson About

444

Beverly Woods | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScienceCareers Apply for a JobBernardthe AlcatorBeverly Woods Beverly

445

Final Report - Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basin Sludge and in Grouted Sludge Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being considered for the disposal of K Basin sludge as RH-TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the 55-gallon RH-TRU sealed drums to be transported to WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the uranium metal-water reaction (U + 2 H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}) in combination with the hydrogen generated from water and organic radiolysis. Gas generation testing was conducted with uranium metal particles of known surface area, in simulated K West (KW) Basin canister sludge and immobilized in candidate grout solidification matrices. This study evaluated potential for Portland cement and magnesium phosphate grouts to inhibit the reaction of water with uranium metal in the sludge and thereby permit higher sludge loading to the disposed waste form. The best of the grouted waste forms decreased the uranium metal-water reaction by a factor of four.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Gano, Sue; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

A MULTITRACER STUDY ON PEAT PROFILES FROM TUNGUSKA, SIBERIA TOSITTI LAURA1*, FORLANI LUISA2, BUOSO CRISTA3, DE POLI MARIO3, CECCATO DANIELE3,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as artificial Cesium-137 and Americium-241. Data presented concerns only KEM21 CORE collected by trace Americium-241 at a peat depth corresponding to a layer dated 1963. Cesium-137 activity peak has

Curci, Gabriele

447

Strength Measurements of Archive K Basin Sludge Using a Soil Penetrometer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent fuel radioactive sludge present in the K East and K West spent nuclear fuel storage basins now resides in the KW Basin in six large underwater engineered containers. The sludge will be dispositioned in two phases under the Sludge Treatment Project: (1) hydraulic retrieval into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport to interim storage in Central Plateau and (2) retrieval from the STSCs, treatment, and packaging for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In the years the STSCs are stored, sludge strength is expected to increase through chemical reaction, intergrowth of sludge crystals, and compaction and dewatering by settling. Increased sludge strength can impact the type and operation of the retrieval equipment needed prior to final sludge treatment and packaging. It is important to determine whether water jetting, planned for sludge retrieval from STSCs, will be effective. Shear strength is a property known to correlate with the effectiveness of water jetting. Accordingly, the unconfined compressive strengths (UCS) of archive K Basin sludge samples and sludge blends were measured using a pocket penetrometer modified for hot cell use. Based on known correlations, UCS values can be converted to shear strengths. Twenty-six sludge samples, stored in hot cells for a number of years since last being disturbed, were identified as potential candidates for UCS measurement and valid UCS measurements were made for twelve, each of which was found as moist or water-immersed solids at least 1/2-inch deep. Ten of the twelve samples were relatively weak, having consistencies described as 'very soft' to 'soft'. Two of the twelve samples, KE Pit and KC-4 P250, were strong with 'very stiff' and 'stiff' consistencies described, respectively, as 'can be indented by a thumb nail' or 'can be indented by thumb'. Both of these sludge samples are composites collected from KE Basin floor and Weasel Pit locations. Despite both strong sludges having relatively high iron concentrations, attribution of their high strengths to this factor could not be made with confidence as other measured sludge samples, also from the KE Basin floor and of high iron concentration, were relatively weak. The observed UCS and shear strengths for the two strong sludges were greater than observed in any prior testing of K Basin sludge except for sludge processed at 185 C under hydrothermal conditions.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

448

How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wood: effect of chip size, acid, moisture content andis the wood chip width, M is the moisture content (%), G is

Tam, Jerry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Use of wastewater ER sludges for the immobilization of heavy metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The distribution, mobility, and bioavailability of heavy metals in soils, surface water, and ground water have been of major interest and concern from both environmental and geochemical standpoints. Wastewater sludges represent an important anthropogenic factor whose impact on these processes is not fully understood. In the past, incineration and landfilling were common practices for discarding wastewater sludges. However, as local and state laws governing the disposal of these materials have become more stringent, land application has been used as an alternative. Reported studies have shown that the impact of land application of sludges can vary widely and is influenced by a number of factors, including the source of the sludge; the organic matter content of the sludge; the form in which the sludge is applied; and the prevailing conditions of the receiving soils. It has also been shown that sewage sludge can have solubilizing effects on solid-phase heavy metals, thereby causing geochemical shifts of the insoluble fractions of metals to the more soluble forms. The work presented in this paper utilized synthetic minerals, standard solutions, sludges, and agricultural soils obtained from different sources to determine the mechanisms involved in the mineralization of heavy metals by sludge; the influence of soil conditions; interelemental effects; the influence of natural organic matter; and possible microbial activity that may come into play. Several types of sludge were evaluated for lead binding capacity.

Macha, S.; Murray, D.; Urasa, I.T. [Hampton Univ., VA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Characteristics of KE Basin Sludge Samples Archived in the RPL - 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of sludge were collected from the K East fuel storage basin (KE Basin) floor, contiguous pits (Weasel Pit, North Load Out Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, and Tech View Pit), and fuel storage canisters between 1995 and 2003 for chemical and radionuclide concentration analysis, physical property determination, and chemical process testing work. Because of the value of the sludge in this testing and because of the cost of obtaining additional fresh samples, an ongoing program of sludge preservation has taken place with the goals to track the sludge identities and preserve, as well as possible, the sludge composition by keeping the sludge in sealed jars and maintaining water coverage on the sludge consistent with the controlling Fluor Hanford (FH) Sampling and Analysis plans and FH contracts with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was originally initiated to provide material for planned hydrothermal treatment testing in accordance with the test plan for the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) corrosion process chemistry follow on testing (Delegard et al. 2007). Although most of the planned hydrothermal testing was canceled in July 2007 (as described in the forward of Delegard et al. 2007), sample consolidation and characterization was continued to identify a set of well-characterized sludge samples that are suited to support evolving STP initiatives. The work described in the letter was performed by the PNNL under the direction of the Sludge Treatment Project, managed by Fluor Hanford.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

451

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-h batch- treated wood at concentrations above the U.S. federal toxicity characteristic limit (5 mg/L). All

Florida, University of

452

A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood (FINAL) Submitted June 23, 2006 Amy Omae.2 Motivation 4 I.3 Objectives 5 CHAPTER II, DEVELOPMENT OF A CHEMICAL STAIN FOR IDENTIFYING ARSENIC-TREATED Applications 22 II.5 Resulting Stain to Identify Arsenic-Treated Wood and Methods of Testing 25 CHAPTER III

Florida, University of

453

Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies Bengt Hillring SLU SWEDEN http://www.unece.org/trade for energy is expected to increase · Trade of wood products is also expected to increase · COMPETITION is the main international energy source · Climate change ­ Energy production ­ CO2 · European Union different

454

SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

Betts, W. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Fibre Based Modeling of Wood Dynamics and Fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fibre Based Modeling of Wood Dynamics and Fracture by Sean Meiji Sutherland B.Sc., The University for the simulation of the dynamics and fracturing char- acteristics of wood, specifically its anisotropic behaviour bundles of fibres. Additionally, we describe the conditions under which fracture occurs in the material

Bridson, Robert

456

Through-thickness ultrasonic characterization of wood and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the form of bark, wood chips, sawdust, cotton gin trash, rice hulls, and sugar ba- gasse (Kleit et al. 1994. It was found that the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) was positively related to particulate sizeThrough-thickness ultrasonic characterization of wood and agricultural fiber composites Ronnie Y

457

Wood, energy and households: Perspectives on rural Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book presents papers on the use of wood fuels in Kenya. Topics considered include domestic energy consumption, historical aspects, the Kenyan economy, ecology, supply and demand, forests, aspects of energy consumption in a pastoral ecosystem, estimation of present and future demand for wood fuels, and energy source development.

Barnes, C.; Ensminger, J.; O'Keefe, P.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

K Basin Sludge Conditioning Testing Nitric Acid Dissolution Testing of K East Area Sludge Composite, Small- and Large-Scale Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to support the development of the K Basin Sludge Treatment System. For this work, testing was performed to examine the dissolution behavior of a K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite, referred to as K East area sludge composite, in nitric acid at the following concentrations: 2 M, 4 M, 6 M and 7.8 M. With the exception of one high solids loading test the nitric acid was added at 4X the stoichiometric requirement (assuming 100% of the sludge was uranium metal). The dissolution tests were conducted at boiling temperatures for 24 hours. Most of the tests were conducted with {approximately}2.5 g of sludge (dry basis). The high solids loading test was conducted with {approximately}7 g of sludge. A large-scale dissolution test was conducted with 26.5 g of sludge and 620 mL of 6 M nitric acid. The objectives of this test were to (1) generate a sufficient quantity of acid-insoluble residual solids for use in leaching studies, and (2) examine the dissolution behavior of the sludge composite at a larger scale.

Carlson, C.D.; Delegard, C.H.; Burgeson, I.E.; Schmidt, A.J.; Silvers, K.L.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

460

Separation of flue-gas scrubber sludge into marketable products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A tremendous amount of wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge (estimated 20 million metric tons per year in the US) is currently being landfilled at a huge cost to utility companies. Scrubber sludge is the solid precipitate produced during desulfurization of flue-gas from burning high sulfur coal. The amount of this sludge is expected to increase in the near future due to ever increasing governmental regulation concerning the amount of sulfur emissions. Scrubber sludge is a fine, grey colored powder that contains calcium sulfite hemihydrate (CaSO{sub 3} {center_dot} 1/2H{sub 2}), calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O), limestone (CaCO{sub 3}), silicates, and iron oxides. This material can continue to be landfilled at a steadily increasing cost, or an alternative for utilizing this material can be developed. This study explores the characteristics of a naturally oxidized wet flue-gas desulfurization scrubber sludge and uses these characteristics to develop alternatives for recycling this material. In order for scrubber sludge to be used as a feed material for various markets, it was necessary to process it to meet the specifications of these markets. A physical separation process was therefore needed to separate the components of this sludge into useful products at a low cost. There are several physical separation techniques available to separate fine particulates. These techniques can be divided into four major groups: magnetic separation, electrostatic separation, physico-chemical separation, and density-based separation. The properties of this material indicated that two methods of separation were feasible: water-only cycloning (density-based separation), and froth flotation (physico-chemical separation). These processes could be used either separately, or in combination. The goal of this study was to reduce the limestone impurity in this scrubber sludge from 5.6% by weight to below 2.0% by weight. The resulting clean calcium sulfite/sulfate material can be oxidized into a synthetic gypsum that can be used in several markets which include: wallboard manufacturing, plaster, portland cement, and as a soil conditioner. Single stage water-only cycloning removed nearly 50% of the limestone by weight from the scrubber sludge and maintained a weight recovery of 76%. Froth flotation produced a calcium sulfite/sulfate that contained 4.30% limestone by weight with a 71% weight recovery. These methods were successful in removing some of the limestone impurity, but were not able to meet the specifications needed. However, the combination of water-only cycloning and froth flotation provided a clean, useful calcium sulfite/sulfate material with a limestone grade of 1.70% by weight and a total weight recovery of nearly 66%.

Kawatra, S.K.; Eisele, T.C.

1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely reliant on wood chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely's biomass energy sector could be undermined unless businesses move to resolve the supply chain issues-scale biomass plants will leave generators largely reliant on biomass from overseas such as wood chips, elephant

462

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

CARRO CA

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal ? uraninite ? metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume might decrease because of decreases in the water-volume fraction caused by sludge solid reactions, compaction, or intergrowth and recrystallization of metaschoepite. In that case, fewer STSCs may be needed, but the shear strength would increase, and this could challenge recovery by water jet erosion and require more aggressive retrieval methods. Overall, the tests described herein indicate that the settled solids volume remains the same or decreases with time. The only case for which the sludge solids volumes increase with time is for the expansion factor attendant upon the anoxic corrosion of uranium metal to produce UO2 and subsequent reaction with oxygen to form equimolar UO2.25 and UO3•2H2O.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effect of Cd-Enriched Sewage Sludge on Plant Growth, Nutrients and Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Soil–Plant System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from waste-activated sludge, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J, 60:505-utilization of sewage sludge. A twenty-year study atCd-enriched sewage sludge (SS) and diammonium phosphate (

Rusan, Munir Mohammad; Athamneh, Bayan Mahmoud

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Multipass comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction one or more times through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel.

Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

Chemical analysis of distribution and marketing (D and M) municipal sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The land application of municipal wastewater treatment sludges is widely practiced both as an economic treatment or disposal method and to provide an economic soil nutrient amendment for agricultural use. Recent studies have shown that municipal sewage sludge effluents derived from both domestic and industrial wastewater elicited mutagenic activity as determined by the Ames test. Biological treatment processes remove some degradable organic chemicals but many persistent chemicals remain in the sludge and are hence applied to soils. This study was conducted to determine the occurrence of chemicals in D and M sludges to provide a data base of priority pollutant trace metals and organics from sludges produced at facilities in 26 cities across the US. In addition to priority pollutant analysis, efforts were made to characterize non-target organic chemicals that predominated in sample extracts from each city using GC/MS. A total of 67 composite samples were analyzed. This paper discusses the results of chemical analyses of the sludge products.

Coleman, W.E. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (USA)); Baird, R.; Gabrielian, S.M. (County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County, Whittier, CA (USA))

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Use of Municipal Sewage Sludge for Improvement of Forest Sites in the Southeast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In eight field experiments dried municipal sewage sludge was applied to forest sites before planting of seedlings. In all cases, tree growth was faster on sludge-amended plots than on plots that received fertilizer and lime or no amendment. In all studies, concentrations of total nitrogen in the soil were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots, even on good forest sites. In seven of the eight studies, concentrations of phosphorus also were higher on sludge plots than on control or fertilizer plots. Nitrogen and phosphorus tended to be higher in foliage from trees growing on sludge plots. Deep subsoiling was beneficial regardless of soil amendment. Where weeds were plentiful at the outset, they became serious competitors on plots receiving sludge.

Charles R. Berry

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sludge fertilization of state forest land in Northern Michigan. Final report, June 1980-March 1986  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A five-year research-demonstration project to examine the logistic, economic, environmental and sociological aspects of municipal wastewater sludge application was conducted on State Forest land occupied by forest types of major commercial importance in northern Michigan. The procedures utilized for site preparation, sludge transportation and sludge application proved to be cost-effective and made possible uniform distribution of sludge upon the forest floor. As the public comes to recognize the environmental hazards and economic limitations inherent with incineration and the value of sludge as a byproduct resource, forest land application should receive increasing attention as a major sludge management alternative. State regulatory and resource management authorities are committed to use of the newly developed technology in addressing waste management and land management issues.

Brockway, D.G.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

472

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

none,

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

474

Influence of rainfall on the retention of sludge trace metals by the leaves of forage crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suspension containing I-IOZ of various organic and inorganic solids. The material is viscous and may be transported by tank vehicles or pipelines. The chemical composition of liquid digested sludge is highly variable. Digested sludge generally contains..., the Bermudagrass and Rhodesgrass were trimmed to heights of 23 cm and 36 cm respectively to achieve a uniform vegetative surface in preparation for treatment. Leaf area was measured on both grasses with an area meter. Aerobically digested liquid sludge...

Jones, Stephen Grady

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Mutagenic potential of plants grown on a soil amended with mutagenic municipal sewage sludge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and industrial firms contributing to this system, The sludge from the Houston, Texas, Sims Bayou treatment plant was aerobically digested, chemically precipitated with ferric chloride (FeC13) and flash dried in a C. E. Raymond cage mill flash dryer... the edible crop by flaking off of dried sludge or washing off with precipitation and allows for plant regrowth and pathogen die off. CHEMICALS Chemicals entering a wastewater treatment plant will become constituents of sewage sludge unless volatilized...

Fiedler, Daniel Alain

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

477

Wood smoke inhalation increases pulmonary microvascular permeability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of wood smoke inhalation (SI) on pulmonary vascular permeability was studied in open-chested, anesthetized dogs. Animals were divided into two groups. A prenodal lymphatic vessel was cannulated in group I (n = 7), and baseline (BL) lung lymph flow (QL) and lymph (CL) and plasma (CP) protein concentrations were measured. The animals' lungs were then ventilated with wood smoke for 5 minutes. Left atrial pressure (Pla) was increased above baseline (mean 16.7 +/- 2.2 mm Hg), and the ratio of CL to CP was used to assess endothelial permeability at high lymph flows. There was little change in either QL (BL: 27 +/- 9; SI: 27 +/- 5 microliters/min) or CL/CP (BL: 0.76 +/- 0.03; SI: 0.74 +/- 0.02) after SI at normal Pla. Elevation of Pla caused a significant increase in QL (136 +/- 15 microliters/min), but CL/CP (0.67 +/- 0.02) failed to decrease significantly at high lymph flows. In group II (n = 15) total protein concentration of airway fluid was compared with that of plasma after smoke inhalation, intravenous alloxan, and increased Pla. The ratio of protein concentration in airway fluid to plasma after SI (0.70 +/- 0.07) was greater than that obtained with increased Pla (0.64 +/- 0.07) but less than that after alloxan (0.85 +/- 0.04). These data indicate that SI in the dog results in a moderate increase in pulmonary vascular permeability that is less severe than that induced by alloxan.

Nieman, G.F.; Clark, W.R. Jr.; Goyette, D.; Hart, A.K.; Bredenberg, C.E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

PROGRESS WITH K BASINS SLUDGE RETRIEVAL STABILIZATION & PACKAGING AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the U.S. and the U.K. to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford Site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, so as to remove the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building, is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout packaging processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. Optimization and simplification of the original sludge corrosion process design is described and the use of transportable and reusable equipment is indicated. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup.

KNOLLMEYER, P.M.; PHILLIPS, C; TOWNSON, P.S.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge microbial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the soil microbial communities. Sludge... -fold decrease in dehy- drogenase ... Source: Kelly, John J. - Department of Biology, Loyola University Chicago Collection: Environmental...

480

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge unit Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of low-metal (EQ') sewage sludge products were made Source: Cornell University, Soil and Water Laboratory Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 12...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wood sludge peat" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Examination of the Potential for Formation of Energetic Compounds in Dry Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details initial results from an investigation of the potential formation and fate of energetic compounds in Savannah River Site sludge.

Barnes, M.J.

1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

482

Determination of Uranium Metal Concentration in Irradiated Fuel Storage Basin Sludge Using Selective Dissolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium metal corroding in water-saturated sludges now held in the US Department of Energy Hanford Site K West irradiated fuel storage basin can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage. Knowledge of uranium metal concentration in sludge thus is essential to safe sludge management and process design, requiring an expeditious routine analytical method to detect uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of 30 wt% or higher total uranium concentrations.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Welsh, Terri L.; Pool, Karl N.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

An assessment of methyl mercury and volatile mercury in land-applied sewage sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations covering the land-application of municipal sewage sludge. These regulations established maximum pollutant concentrations and were based upon a risk assessment of human exposure. Mercury, assumed to be inorganic and non-volatile, was one pollutant evaluated. From April, 1995 through February, 1996, the authors studied the species of mercury contaminating municipal sludge applied to land, and the potential for volatilization of mercury from land-applied sludge. Methyl mercury was found at 0.1% of total mercury concentrations and was emitted from land-applied sludge to the atmosphere. Elemental mercury (Hg) was formed in land-applied sludge via the reduction of oxidized mercury and was also emitted to the atmosphere. Hg emission from land-applied sludge was significantly elevated over background soil emission. Methyl mercury is more toxic and more highly bioaccumulated than inorganic mercury, and warrants assessment considering these special criteria. Additionally, mercury emission from sludge-amended soil may lead to the contamination of other environmental media with significant concentrations of the metal. Although these pathways were not evaluated in the regulatory risk assessment, they are an important consideration for evaluating the risks from mercury in land-applied sludge. This presentation will summarize the results of a re-assessment of US EPA regulations regarding the land-application of municipal sewage sludge using data on methyl mercury toxicity and mercury transport in the atmosphere.

Carpi, A. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Lindberg, S.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Metal uptake by agricultural plant species grown in sludge-amended soil following ecosystem restoration practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal of municipal sewage sludge is an important environmental problem presently facing society. Because sludge is rich in plant nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorous, land application as a fertilizer has been proposed as a cost-effective means of disposal. This method of disposal, however, is frequently the subject of public health concern since municipal sludge may contain heavy metals that potentially could be introduced into the human food chain. This study examined metal concentrations in two agricultural species at a study site where ecosystem restoration practices (liming and tilling) had been conducted for 5 years following 11 years of sludge enrichment. 11 refs., 2 tabs.

Peles, J.D.; Barrett, G.W. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)] [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Brewer, S.R. [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)] [Miami Univ., Oxford, OH (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sludge due to its huge amount and increasing public concern. However, only a few studies were focused on potential use of WTP sludge. The characteristics and potential use of WTP sludge are still not well understood. Previous studies of WTP alum sludge... plants that coagulate, filter, and oxidize a surface water for removal of turbidity, color, bacteria, algae, organic compounds, and iron or manganese. These plants generally use alum Al~(SO4) or iron FeC13 salts for coagulation and produce alum or iron...

Kan, Weiqun

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid tar sludges Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of diethylphosphorodithioic acid in the production of phorate. K040 Wastewater treatment sludge from the production of phorate... of facilities within the iron and steel...

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative sewage sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 56 Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008 Summary: Report Selective hydrolysis of wastewater...

488

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge treating Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

. This analysis indicates that all the sludge produced by the proposed wastewater treatment plant at McMurdo could Source: United States Army Corps of Engineers, Cold Regions...

489

E-Print Network 3.0 - amended sludge projects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

or experiment... and forest residues, mixed municipal solid waste, and sludge from wastewater treatment. "Renewable energy Source: Reich, Peter B. - Department of Forest...

490

E-Print Network 3.0 - aeration activated sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences 3 Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Summary: , Dominic Frigon Department of Civil...

491

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge oxygen Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 4 Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Summary: is a traditional build plant base don the...

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge wastewater Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

wastewater Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: activated sludge wastewater Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The ABC's of EDCs: Endocrine...

493

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated-sludge microbial community Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(biofilm, 95 h; activated sludge... ). Rich sources of microorganisms, such as wastewater, activated ... Source: Logan, Bruce E.- Department of Civil and Environmental...

494

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge bulking Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TECHNICAL INSTITUTE WASHINGTON, D. C. 20008 WRRC REPORT NO. 5 Summary: from a wastewater sludge consisting of organic solids, aluminum hydroxide and powdered activated...

495

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge micro-organism Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 8 Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Summary: , Dominic Frigon Department of Civil...

496

E-Print Network 3.0 - acclimated activated sludge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 5 Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Summary: , Dominic Frigon Department of Civil...

497

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge aeration Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences 3 Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Summary: , Dominic Frigon Department of Civil...

498

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge performing Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 2 Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Summary: , Dominic Frigon Department of Civil...

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge samples Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Massachusetts at Amherst Collection: Materials Science 6 Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007 Summary: is a traditional build plant base don the...

500

E-Print Network 3.0 - activated sludge exposed Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Civil... : A study of the filtration behaviour of contaminated wastewater treatment sludges was ... Source: Aydilek, Ahmet - Department of Civil and...