Sample records for wood sludge peat

  1. HISTORICAL WOOD COLLECTION AT THE DENDROCHRONOLOGY LABORATORY, VYTAUTAS MAGNUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    investigations. Subfossil oaks from river gravels, pines from peat bogs and wood from archeological excavations.) samples were collected in two peat bogs with pine trunks embedded in oligotrophic peat layers. One more than 300 samples of pine stumps and stems preserved in oligotrophic peat layers were coll

  2. Overview of peat gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of recent research show that peat is an excellent raw material for making synthetic fuels. Therefore, the objective of most of the recent efforts in various countries is to produce synthetic fuels from peat. This paper presents an overview of the worldwide activity relating to research and development for peat gasification. The review includes thermal as well as biological peat gasification processes. 21 refs.

  3. Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance on peat soils 1 | Peat | Helen Cariss Forestry and deep peat Purpose This policy guidance on forestry and deep peat acts as the country level guidance for FCW. It applies to regulatory functions: conserving and enhancing biodiversity climate change mitigation maintaining the peat and soil resource

  4. PEAT: an energy alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schora, F.C.; Punwani, D.V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Even though peat is a low-heating value and low-bulk density fossil fuel which in its natural state contains over 80 percent moisture, it can be an economical alternative to coal, and fuel oil, as is the case in Iceland and Finland for direct combustion applications. This is because of the relative ease with which peat can be harvested, and the generally low sulfur and ash content of peat. Recent studies show that peat also has very favorable characteristics for conversion to synthetic fuels. Tests show that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is a better raw material than coal for production of synthetic fuels. Recent estimates also show that conversion of peat to high-Btu gas (>950 Btu/scf) is competitive with other alternatives of synthetic high-Btu gas. Therefore, peat can be an economical energy alternative depending upon location of peat deposits, region of energy need, scale of operation and cost of other energy alternatives.

  5. Chlorinated hydrocarbons in peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapaport, R.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrations (ng/g), accumulation rates (ug/m/sup 2/=yr) and burdens were determined for DDT (1,1,1-trichlorophenyl2-2'bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane), polychlorinated biphenyls. Toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and a,b,g-hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) in peat cores taken across the mid-latitudes of North America. Because peat bogs are ombrotrophic, thereby receiving all contaminant inputs from the atmosphere and because peat cores were dated, atmospheric input functions were constructed for all of the compounds listed above excepting the HCHs. Compound inventories (burdens) in peat cores of PCBs, HCB, HCHs, Toxaphene, DDT, Pb and Zn were compared, indicating a strong influence from areas proximate to industrial sources and the atmospheric transport from source regions. Untransformed parent DDT (p,p' and o,p'-DDT) in surface peat and in precipitation provides evidence for the long range transport of DDT from neighboring countries where use has increased over the past 10-15 years. Present accumulation rates of DDT in peat are about 10-20% of maximum levels associated with peak use in the US around 1960. The DDT input function that was developed can be used to date peat cores. Transformations of DDT and PCBs were also examined in peat cores. First order transformation rates of DDT (p,p' and o,p') to DDD in anaerobic peat core environments ranged from 0.03 to 0.09 yr/sup -1/ with differences related to temperature. Aerobic transformation of PCB congeners in peat cores and microcosms was rapid for 2,3 and several 4 chlorinated congeners (T/sub 1/2 less than or equal to 0.2 to 3 years) and declined with increasing chlorine number.

  6. Third technical contractors' conference on peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The conference dealt with the estimation of US peat reserves, methods for the gasification of peat, including biogasification, techniques for dewatering peat, and the harvesting of peat. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

  7. Fourth technical contractors' conference on peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The papers presented dealt with peat dewatering, international peat programs, environmental and socio-economic factors, peat gasification, peat harvesting, and the state peat surveys for 14 states. Separate abstracts were prepared for the individual papers. (CKK)

  8. Peat as an energy alternative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This symposium, Peat as an Energy Alternative, was organized to facilitate in-depth discussion of the various topics at the last conference. The scope of the symposium was international and included papers from Brazil, Canada, Finland, Israel, Jamaica, and Sweden. The presentations were designed to provide the latest information relating to the following areas of interest: peat resources; peat deposit location; countries using peat for energy; countries showing inerest in considering peat for energy; status of the technologies for harvesting, dewatering, beneficiation, combustion, and conversion to synthetic fuels; environmental and socioeconomic issues relating to large-scale peat utilization; peat reclamation options; Federal and State government plans for peat utilization; and organizations working on developments relating to peat as an energy alternative. The symposium, sponsored by the Institute of Gas Technology, was held at Arlington, VA, December 1-3, 1980. Forth-six papers have been entered individually into EDB and ten also into ERA; two paper had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  9. International symposium on peat utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuchsman, C.H.; Spigarelli, S.A. (eds.)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This symposium was designed to provide a forum for peat scientists and engineers to discuss recent developments in the utilization of peat. It is thus the second international peat symposium to be held in Bemidji, the first having occurred two years earlier. Delegates to the 1983 Symposium represented eight nations (Finland, Sweden, Ireland, The Netherlands, Poland, Hungary, Canada, and the US), and a broad spectrum of peat interests. The objective was to survey world-wide activities in peat utilization and to report interesting developments and research results. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 50 items; all will appear in the Energy Data Base, 2 in Energy Research Abstracts, and 16 in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis. One paper was processed earlier.

  10. Growth of chrysanthemums in sewage sludge amended media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlutt, Edward Frederick

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979 ABSTRACT Growth of Chrysanthemums in Sewage Sludge Amended Media. (December 1979) Edwaz d Fnedez ick Schlutt, Jr . B. S. , Texas AFN University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Everett R. Emino Chr santhemum morifolium cv. 'Bz ight Golden... porosity, total postharvest porosity, non-capillazy pore space, pre- harvest pH and postharvest pH in sewage sludge amended peat-perlite media. 40 TABLE 14. Average heavy metal content in 100% sewage sludge (ug/gm) . 42 TABLE 16. Zinc content (ug/gm...

  11. Second technical contractors' conference on peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference reported the status of the US Department of Energy Peat Program. The program includes peat resource surveys of eleven states, peat gasification process and equipment studies, dewatering studies, and environmental and socioeconomic factors in the development of peat technology. Separate abstracts were prepared for selected papers. (CKK)

  12. Modeling Northern Peatland Decomposition and Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    Modeling Northern Peatland Decomposition and Peat Accumulation Steve Frolking,1 * Nigel T. Roulet,2´al, Quebec, H3C 3J7, Canada ABSTRACT To test the hypothesis that long-term peat accumula- tion is related to contemporary carbon flux dynamics, we present the Peat Decomposition Model (PDM), a new model of long-term peat

  13. Measurements of dynamic impedance for a model levee on peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinert, Edward T; Brandenberg, Scott J; Stewart, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of Sherman Island peat,” 2013 Geo Congress, Sanlevee resting on very soft peat soil was used to measureof levees resting on peat. 1. INTRODUCTION The seismic

  14. Sludge sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Ralph C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a sludge sampler comprising an elongated generally cylindrical housing containing a baffle containing an aperture. Connected to the aperture is a flexible tubing having a valve for maintaining and releasing pressure in the lower end of the housing and exiting the upper end of the housing. The lower end of the housing contains a ball check valve maintained in closed position by pressure. When the lower end of the device contacts the sludge bed, the pressure valve is opened, enabling sludge to enter the lower end of the housing. After the sample is collected the valve is closed. An upsetting pin opens the valve to empty a sludge sample after the sample is removed from the fluid.

  15. Sludge sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, R.C.

    1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a sludge sampler comprising an elongated generally cylindrical housing containing a baffle containing an aperture. Connected to the aperture is a flexible tubing having a valve for maintaining and releasing pressure in the lower end of the housing and exiting the upper end of the housing. The lower end of the housing contains a ball check valve maintained in closed position by pressure. When the lower end of the device contacts the sludge bed, the pressure valve is opened, enabling sludge to enter the lower end of the housing. After the sample is collected the valve is closed. An upsetting pin opens the valve to empty a sludge sample after the sample is removed from the fluid.

  16. Sewage Sludge (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sewage sludge utilization permits are required prior to the use, processing, and disposal of sewage sludge in Maryland.

  17. Production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodle, W.W.; Punwani, D.; Weil, S.A.

    1982-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for production of synthetic hydrocarbon fuels from peat providing wide variation of the composite proportion of liquid-gas output while maintaining high overall carbon conversion to useful fuel. The process and apparatus utilizes three process stages in a single vessel providing functions of drying wet peat, provisions for addition of both wet and dry peat to a hydropyrolysis zone and gasification of the peat char.

  18. 2, 14571486, 2005 Halogens in peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 2, 1457­1486, 2005 Halogens in peat porewater H. Biester et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Halogens in porewater of peat bogs ­ the role of peat decomposition and dissolved organic matter H. Biester 1 , D. Selimovi´c 1 , S. Hemmerich 1

  19. CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    CANADIAN PEAT HARVESTING AND THE ENVIRONMENT SECOND EDITION ISSUES PAPER, No. 2001-1 PUBLISHED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH: North American Wetlands Conservation Council Committee Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Tourbe de and funding of: · Canadian Sphagnum Peat Moss Association · Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada

  20. Early diagenetic transformations of peat Original research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Early diagenetic transformations of peat Original research Organic matter sources and decay;KEY WORDS: bioindicators - carbohydrates - labile organic matter - peat botanical composition to the fate of organic matter (OM) in the underlying peat. Our aims were to determine how moisture conditions

  1. Sludge digester

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wight, J.L.; Cook, L.W.

    1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A ballasted, gas-holding, liquid sludge digester is described comprising: a main liquid sludge tank having a bottom wall and upwardly projecting sidewall; a cover having a top and depending side skirt structure which telescopes with respect to the upwardly projecting sidewall of the main tank; ballast supported near the lower edge of said side skirt; a ballast-engaging, liquid-containing well joined to said sidewall of said main tank such that said cover provides a gas-tight seal when said ballast interacts with liquid in said well so as to be partially emerged or fully submerged in the liquid; liquid fill means interacting with said well to maintain a predetermined liquid level in the well when said ballast is at least partially emerged from the liquid in said well; and overflow means interacting with said well to maintain a predetermined liquid level in the well when said ballast is submerged in the liquid in the well.

  2. Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temperature and peat type control CO2 and CH4 production in Alaskan permafrost peats C . C . T R E Hampshire, Durham, NH, USA, 3 Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New carbon (SOC) losses following perma- frost thaw in peat soils across Alaska. We compared the carbon

  3. metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Rosemary

    #12;metry and conventional radiocarbon dating of bulk peat samples from the lowest visually apparent peat horizon in each core. Substantially older radiocarbon ages from organic-rich gytjja (mineral peat- lands throughout the WSL, for a total of 29,350 measurements digitized. (ii) Our own field data

  4. Producing SNG and other fuels from peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1981, PEATGAS process testing advanced into the pilot-plant stage. The modification now in progress is the installation of a pressurized lockhopper system. Along with a series of fluidized-bed gasification tests, studies of a wet-carbonization peat-beneficiation process are underway. Other work includes mapping US peat resources.

  5. Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restoring afforested peat bogs: results of current research The value of peat bogs as open habitats may suffice on lowland raised bogs. Damming furrows is ineffective if the peat is severely cracked sundew, Drosera anglica #12;Introduction In their natural state, peat bogs provide unique habitats

  6. Biodiversity Toolkit Why we DON'T DIG PEAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melham, Tom

    Biodiversity Toolkit Peat free Why we DON'T DIG PEAT The collegiate University is working to help the environment and wildlife by phasing out its use of products containing peat, such as compost and soil improver.admin.ox.ac.uk/estates/environment/biodiversity Cut your carbon emissions Wildlife living in peat bogs includes foxes, Irish hares, pygmy shrews, red

  7. Peat Characterization and Uptake of Nickel (II) and Cobalt (II) in a Saprist Peat E. S. Asapo1, 2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    1 Peat Characterization and Uptake of Nickel (II) and Cobalt (II) in a Saprist Peat Column By E. S should be addressed. Email: esasapo@mun.ca Abstract Fibrist and saprist sphagnum peat soils taken from a bog in Torbay, Newfoundland, Canada were characterized. The saprist and fibrist peat soils had wet

  8. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  9. Pretreatment of microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

  10. Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dioumaeva, Irina; Trumbore, Susan; Schuur, Edward A. G.; Goulden, Michael L.; Litvak, Marcy; Hirsch, Adam I.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2003 Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest:of decomposition for upland boreal peat under black spruceand $50% in sphagnum moss peat), despite slow decomposition

  11. Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Nelson, D. L; Diner, D. J; Logan, J. A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indo- nesiasmoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires insmoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in

  12. Laboratory investigation of the pre- and post-cyclic volume change properties of Sherman Island peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafiee, Ali; Brandenberg, Scott J; Stewart, Jonathan P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    response of Mercer Slough peat. ’’ J. Geotech. & Geoenv.properties of fibrous peats. ” J. Geotech. & Geoenv. Eng. ,Secondary compression of peat with or without surcharge. “J.

  13. Fifth technical contractors' conference on peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifth Technical Contractors' Conference on Peat was held April 28 to 29, 1982, at Bethesda, Maryland. Thirty papers have been entered into EDB and ERA; two had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  14. Peat as an alternaive energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.; Mensinger, M.C.

    1981-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat remains a virtually unexploited energy source in the US in spite of large resources and a long history of use as a fuel in other countries. Areas that lack other fossil fuels are often the site of large peat lands. US resources are estimated at 1443 quadrillion Btus, with over half located in Alaska outside the permanent frostline. The Soviet Union, with over four times the US resource, is the largest commercial user. Harvesting techniques include dry and wet methods that utilize both thermal and mechanical dewatering. Peat is well suited for gasification by several processes, including the PEAT GAS process now being tested. Harvested peatlands can be made into productive farm and forest land if proper techniques are used to preserve water and air quality. (DCK)

  15. Experiments and Observation of Peat Smouldering Fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashton, Clare; Rein, Guillermo; Dios, JD; Torero, Jose L; Legg, C; Davies, M; Gray, A

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If a subsurface layer of peat is ignited, it smoulders (flameless combustion) slowly but steadily. These fires propagate for long periods of time (days, weeks, even years), are particularly difficult to extinguish and can spread over very extensive...

  16. Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage,...

  17. Carbon Emissions from Smouldering Peat in Shallow and Strong Fronts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rein, Guillermo; Cohen, Simon; Simeoni, Albert

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments of shallow and strong smouldering fronts in boreal peat have been conducted under laboratory conditions to study the CO and CO2 emissions. Peat samples of 100 mm by 100 mm in cross section and 50 ...

  18. Origin of Lead in Eight Central European Peat Bogs Determined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieder, R. Kelman

    Research Origin of Lead in Eight Central European Peat Bogs Determined from Isotope Ratios was identified in 210Pb-dated profiles through eight peat bogs distributed over an area of 60 000 km2 with Germany, Austria, and Poland. Basal peat 14C-dated at 11 000 years BP had a relatively high 206Pb/207Pb

  19. Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roulet, Nigel T.

    Ecosystem Respiration in a Cool Temperate Bog Depends on Peat Temperature But Not Water Table P-summer (July-August). As anticipated, there was a strong relationship between ER and peat temperatures (r2 = 0-table depth (r2 = 0.11). A laboratory incubation of peat cores at different moisture contents showed that CO2

  20. Metagenomic analysis of phosphorus removing sludge communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kinase from activated sludge performing enhanced biologicalbetween flocculation of activated sludge and composition oforganisms from activated sludge systems. Wat Res 31,

  1. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of carbon released from peat and forest fires in Indonesiaforest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997–2009) G. R. vanin 2004: Importance of peat burn- ing and pyroconvective

  2. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

  3. Composting Manure and Sludge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweeten, John M.

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Composted manure and sludge can be a valuable fertilizer, but special equipment is required. Composting can be done with windrow operations, aerated windrow operations or aerated bins. Factors that affect composting rates are included....

  4. Mires and Peat, Volume 6 (2010), Article 02, 1 6, http://www.mires-and-peat.net/, ISSN 1819-754X 2010 International Mire Conservation Group and International Peat Society 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mires and Peat, Volume 6 (2010), Article 02, 1 6, http://www.mires-and-peat.net/, ISSN 1819-754X © 2010 International Mire Conservation Group and International Peat Society 1 The physical properties of peat: a key factor for modern growing media J-C. Michel AGROCAMPUS OUEST, Research Unit EPHOR, Angers

  5. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  6. agricultural peat soil: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Boyer, Edmond 4 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Environmental Sciences and...

  7. agricultural peat soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Boyer, Edmond 4 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Environmental Sciences and...

  8. Synthetic fuels from peat: state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world has significant resources of peat. Total energy contained in these resources is estimated to be equivalent to over 1800 billion barrels of oil. Peat has been used extensively in Europe and Russia for years as a source of energy. In the United States, where peat resources are estimated at equivalent to 240 billion barrels of oil, peat is not used commercially as a source of energy. In 1974, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) initiated peat gasification research under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco). The results of that work, continued at IGT under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Minnegasco, show that on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is a better raw material for making synthetic fuels than coal. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art of the total system of taking peat from the ground and converting it to synthetic fuels. This system incorporates subsystems on harvesting, dewatering, and conversion processes. The world peat resources and environmental effects on large-scale peat utilization are also reviewed.

  9. Residential Wood Residential wood combustion (RWC) is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Residential Wood Combustion Residential wood combustion (RWC) is increasing in Europe because PM2.5. Furthermore, other combustion- related sources of OA in Europe may need to be reassessed. Will it affect global OA emission estimates? Combustion of biofuels is globally one of the major OA sources

  10. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  11. Wood Resources International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .3% Sweden 5.3% Finland 4.1% Russia 13.8% US 37.3% Germany 3.3% France 2.8% Poland 2.1% Other Europe 14 International Wood Fuel Removals in Europe 2002 Turkey 12.2% Poland 3.6% Romania 5.3% Hungary 4.1% Germany 7;Wood Resources International Production of energy from wood fuels in 2000 Source: EUBIONET 0 50 100 150

  12. Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Trace Element Leaching from Metalliferous Peats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Temperature and Microbial Activity Effects on Trace Element Leaching from Metalliferous PeatsDue to geochemical processes, peat soils often have elevated con- sulfides (Cannon, 1955). The maximum Zn concentra as high as 10 g kg 1 . Theperatures to vary microbial activity in two metalliferous peats (M7 acidic peat

  13. Algal flora of subalpine peat bog pools in the Krkonose Mts asy tn krkonosskch subalpnskch raselinis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algal flora of subalpine peat bog pools in the Krkonose Mts asy tní krkonosských subalpínských, Czech Repub- lic, e-mail: sylnova@natur.cuni.cz Nováková S. (2002): Algal flora of subalpine peat bog raselinist peat bog and the Pancavské raselinist peat bog in the Krkonose Mts (Czech Republic) about 228 taxa

  14. DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

  15. Nutrient limitations on peat decomposition and nutrient loading in Atlantic White Cedar swamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Nutrient limitations on peat decomposition and nutrient loading in Atlantic White Cedar swamps examined the effects of nutrient increases on peat decomposition. I analyzed peat and porewater nutrients of surface water nutrients. The initial C:N and C:P ratios of the peat were higher than the molar ratios

  16. K Basins sludge removal temporary sludge storage tank system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mclean, M.A.

    1997-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipment of sludge from the K Basins to a disposal site is now targeted for August 2000. The current path forward for sludge disposal is shipment to Tank AW-105 in the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). Significant issues of the feasibility of this path exist primarily due to criticality concerns and the presence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) in the sludge at levels that trigger regulation under the Toxic Substance Control Act. Introduction of PCBs into the TWRS processes could potentially involve significant design and operational impacts to both the Spent Nuclear Fuel and TWRS projects if technical and regulatory issues related to PCB treatment cannot be satisfactorily resolved. Concerns of meeting the TWRS acceptance criteria have evolved such that new storage tanks for the K Basins sludge may be the best option for storage prior to vitrification of the sludge. A reconunendation for the final disposition of the sludge is scheduled for June 30, 1997. To support this decision process, this project was developed. This project provides a preconceptual design package including preconceptual designs and cost estimates for the temporary sludge storage tanks. Development of cost estimates for the design and construction of sludge storage systems is required to help evaluate a recommendation for the final disposition of the K Basin sludge.

  17. Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Modelling and Control of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Dottorato di Ricerca of Activated Sludge Processes Michela Mulas Supervisors: Prof. Roberto Baratti Ing. Stefania Tronci Dottorato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 ASP Models and Simulations 7 2.1 The Activated Sludge Process

  18. Long-term investigation of microbial fuel cells treating primary sludge or digested sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Microbial fuel cell Primary sludge Digested sludge Energy Biogas a b s t r a c t The long-term performance. Digested sludge can be further composted for agriculture uses, and biogas can be con- vertedLong-term investigation of microbial fuel cells treating primary sludge or digested sludge Zheng Ge

  19. James F. Wood

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    James F. Wood is currently Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal in the Office of Fossil Energy (FE). In this position, he is responsible for the management and direction of the Office's...

  20. Progress on project to produce SNG and other fuels from peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developments in peat gasification research projects at the Institute of Gas Technology are briefly described. This includes developments in the Peatgas pilot plant and in the wet carbonization process. US peat resources are tabulated.

  1. A Reusable Process Control System Framework for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and NPP Sounder PEATE missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    PEATE missions Chris A. Mattmann, Dana Freeborn, Dan Crichton, Brian Foster, Andrew Hart, David Woollard missions: the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and NPP Sounder PEATE projects. 1 Introduction Data volume

  2. Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfrender, Michael

    Where's the ecology in molecular ecology? Jerald B. Johnson, Scott M. Peat and Byron J. Adams J. B. Johnson (jerry.johnson@byu.edu), S. M. Peat and B. J. Adams, Evolutionary Ecology Laboratories, Dept

  3. Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

  4. Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

  5. Synthetic fuels from peat by the IGT PEATGAS Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punwani, D.V.; Rader, A.M.; Kopstein, M.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat gasification research at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) began in 1974 under the sponsorship of the Minnesota Gas company (Minnegasco). The preliminary evaluation conducted under that program showed encouraging results and led to an expanded program under the joint sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and Minnegasco. The current program is also funded by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) and the Northern Natural Gas Company (NNGC). Since 1976 IGT has completed tests with peats from Minnesota, North Carolina, and Maine in laboratory-scale equipment and process development units (PDU's). Tests in the hydrogasification PDU (which represents a scale-up of 250 times the laboratory-scale equipment) confirm the laboratory results. Preparations are being made for pilot-plant scale gasification tests in a modified coal gasification pilot plant (HYGAS) in Chicago. Based on the experimental results obtained in the laboratory-scale tests, IGT conceived a two-stage gasifier (named PEATGAS) for converting peat to synthetic fuels. The PEATGAS Process can be used for making medium- or high-Btu gas as well as liquid fuels. A complete process design and cost estimates have been prepared for a plant producing 250 million cubic feet of SNG per day from Minnesota peat containing 50% moisture. These estimates show that the conversion of peat (containing 50% moisture) is competitive with other alternative methods of SNG production. This paper discusses the important and significant gasification characteristics of the peats evaluated. The paper also describes the use of the PEATGAS Process for production of medium-Btu gas, methanol, and gasoline.

  6. Czech Phycology, Olonwuc, J: 41-52, 200J 41 Aigae and cyanoprokaryotic species from peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czech Phycology, Olonwuc, J: 41-52, 200J 41 Aigae and cyanoprokaryotic species from peat bogs peat bogs and backwatersin Bohemia. Localities in the vicinity of the reservoir and in the core zone microbiotopes (Table 1) in the following investigated areas: acidophilous peat bog Mrtvý Iuh, Smrèinský

  7. CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat Catherine E. Lovelock1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruess, Roger W.

    CO2 Efflux from Cleared Mangrove Peat Catherine E. Lovelock1 *, Roger W. Ruess2 , Ilka C. Feller3 1 on the islands of Twin Cays, Belize. We also disturbed these cleared peat soils to assess what disturbance. Disturbing peat leads to short term increases in CO2 efflux (27 umol m22 s21 ), but this had returned

  8. A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    A total of 377 peat age-depth relationships were used to quantify Holocene subsidence rates. Subsidence rates were calculated using peat ages calibrated to the sidereal time scale and burial depths a polynomial that relates the peat age to the position of sea-level at that time in the past. The "sea

  9. Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 Peat groundwater as a medium for surficial geochemical exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract, International Applied Geochemistry Symposium, 2009 1 Peat groundwater as a medium-mail: stew.hamilton@ontario.ca) ABSTRACT: Kimberlite-specific chemical responses are visible in shallow peat and migrated through the Tyrell Sea sediment into shallow peat groundwater. The presence of elevated values

  10. Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvak, Marcy

    Decomposition of peat from upland boreal forest: Temperature dependence and sources of respired boreal peat under black spruce forest with sphagnum and feather moss understory using incubation increments. At temperatures below 0°C, significant decomposition was observed in feather moss peat

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF A HORTICULTURAL PEAT FOR TREATING MINING ASAPO, Emmanuel S and COLES, Cynthia A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    CHARACTERIZATION OF A HORTICULTURAL PEAT FOR TREATING MINING WASTEWATER ASAPO, Emmanuel S and COLES. Peat has been identified as a cheap, natural and available material capable of adsorbing several heavy the properties of peat in order to capture dissolved heavy metals. This paper investigates the surface

  12. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Université d'Orléans, BP 6759, 45067 Orléans Cedex 2, France Abstract Seven samples from a 1 m long peat core targets because of their dominant or even exclusive OM content, peat deposits have received relatively

  13. The role of peat decomposition in patterned mires: a case study from the central Swiss Alps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    The role of peat decomposition in patterned mires: a case study from the central Swiss Alps., Stefanova V., van Leeuwen J. F. N., van der Knaap W. O., Colombaroli D. & Tinner W. (2013): The role of peat and is unique in its pattern. In two of five pools there is in the contact zone between the basal peat

  14. Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Effects of Nitrate on Decomposition in Salt Marsh Peats Arianna Goodman Oberlin College `13 Advisor and loss. Rapid nitrate addition to salt marshes may stimulate bacterial decomposition of existing peat, and the decomposition may contribute to creek bank destabilization and collapse. Alternately, peat deposited in high

  15. Carbon isotope evidence for recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon isotope evidence for recent climate-related enhancement of CO2 assimilation and peat change. In this study, peat cores up to 2 m in depth from four moss banks on Signy Island were used included radiocarbon dating (to determine peat accumulation rates) and stable carbon isotope composition

  16. Small-scale spatial variation of benthic algal assemblages in a peat bog Katerina Cerna n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small-scale spatial variation of benthic algal assemblages in a peat bog Katerina Cerna´ n test Peat bog a b s t r a c t Spatial patterns on a very small scale (10 cm), and the effect microhabitat types were investigated. Samples were taken in a peat bog along linear transects on a scale of 10

  17. Mercury(II) Sorption to Two Florida Everglades Peats: Evidence for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Mercury(II) Sorption to Two Florida Everglades Peats: Evidence for Strong and Weak Binding and Competition by Dissolved Organic Matter Released from the Peat R . T O D D D R E X E L , M A R K U S H A I 80309 The binding of mercury(II) to two peats from Florida Everglades sites with different rates

  18. OCEANOGRAPHY Stratigraphic Distribution of Amino Acids in Peats from Cedar Creek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    in Peats from Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota, and Dismal Swamp, Virginia' F. M. SWAIN, A. BLUMENTALS, AND R the bog waters and waters squeezed from the peats. Attempts to detect proteins in these substances by means of paper electrophoresis were unsuccessful. Fibrous proteins may be present, however. In both peat

  19. Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada and their application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemical responses in peat groundwater over Attawapiskat kimberlites, James Bay Lowlands, Canada.sader@mmg.com) ABSTRACT: Peat groundwater compositions at depths of 0.4 and 1.1 m below ground surface in the Attawapiskat on hydrogeological measurements and variations in peat groundwater geochemical parameters (pH and EC are high

  20. Original article Mechanical behaviour of silty clay loam/peat mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Mechanical behaviour of silty clay loam/peat mixtures: cyclic compression or amended with 20 or 40 % by volume of spagh- num peat, were studied at different values of water contentPa is increased to about 55 and 115 % for 20 and 40 % peat contents, respectively. A comparison of the cyclic test

  1. Long-term records of atmospheric deposition of mercury in peat cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Long-term records of atmospheric deposition of mercury in peat cores from Arctic, and comparisonD dissertation February 2004 #12;Long-term records of atmospheric deposition of mercury in peat cores from Arctic in southern Ontario recorded by peat cores from three bogs: comparison with natural "background" values (past

  2. Historical mining and smelting in the Vosges Mountains (France) recorded in two ombrotrophic peat bogs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Historical mining and smelting in the Vosges Mountains (France) recorded in two ombrotrophic peat online 4 June 2010 Keywords: Environment Pollution Geochemistry Archaeology Lead isotopes Peat Mining Metal Vosges Medieval Two peat sequences were sampled in the vicinity of the main mining districts

  3. Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia), Dynamics of fire plumes and smoke clouds associated with peat and deforestation fires in Indonesia, J. Geophys. Res., 116, D08207, doi:10.1029/2010JD015148. 1. Introduction [2] Peat and deforestation fires

  4. PEAT-FORMING PLANT SPECIFIC BIOMARKERS AS INDICATORS OF PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN SPHAGNUM-DOMINATED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    PEAT-FORMING PLANT SPECIFIC BIOMARKERS AS INDICATORS OF PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL CHANGES IN SPHAGNUM and rapid burial make the peat archives particularly useful for reconstructing natural or anthropogenic environmental changes. Nevertheless, up to now biochemical composition of peat OM has rarely been used

  5. Microbial Respiration and Its Consequences on Oxygen Availability in Peat Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    91 Microbial Respiration and Its Consequences on Oxygen Availability in Peat Substrate R. Naasz, J to Horticulture 2, rue Le Nôtre, F-49045 Angers Cedex 01 France Keywords: peat, oxygen uptake, microorganisms (Sphagnum peat) on oxygen transport and availability to the root. This is why, a one-dimensional transfer

  6. Association of postfire peat accumulation and microtopography in boreal bogs1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benscoter, Brian W.

    Association of postfire peat accumulation and microtopography in boreal bogs1 Brian W. Benscoter, Dale H. Vitt, and R. Kelman Wieder Abstract: Peatlands accumulate organic matter as peat because of disproportionate rates of production and decomposi- tion. However, peat accumulation heterogeneity has not been

  7. Title: Peat Resource Management in the Context of Climate Change in Malaysia Presenter: Shashi Kumaran

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Peat Resource Management in the Context of Climate Change in Malaysia Presenter: Shashi://register.eventarc.com/event/view/6129/tickets/peat-resource-management-in- the-context-of-climate-change-in-malaysia Abstract: As one-utilised and peat fires, which are linked with high emissions of carbon dioxide, have become an annually recurring

  8. Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spatio-temporal community structure of peat bog benthic desmids on a microscale Jiri´ Neustupa- scale transects were delimited at 4 temperate lowland peat bog localities to investigate spatial represented by dynamics of the common species. Keywords Desmidiales Á Microscale Á Microphytobenthos Á Peat

  9. Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geochemistry of peat over kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area, James Bay Lowlands, northern Canada by peatlands. Peat samples were examined in the Attawapiskat area, a region of discontinuous permafrost, where more than 19 kimberlite pipes have been found beneath a cover of peat (2­4 m thick) and Quaternary

  10. Characterization of Brazilian peat samples by applying a multi-method F. Girardelloa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Characterization of Brazilian peat samples by applying a multi-method approach F. Girardelloa , R Peat is a mixture of compounds formed by the decomposition of plant residues and mineral materials heterogeneity and natural variety, the physical and chemical properties of peat can vary widely within

  11. Precision wood particle feedstocks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  12. A STUDY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEWATERING IN EXPERIMENTAL REED-PLANTED OR UNPLANTED SLUDGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    94/0169 A STUDY OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE DEWATERING IN EXPERIMENTAL REED-PLANTED OR UNPLANTED SLUDGE of the reeds in bed 2 died in spite of the influent sludge dose of 70 g. of SS.m"2.d~l. During the second phase (917 days) the 3 beds were aerated from the bottom and fed with sludge, directly extracted from

  13. Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Sludge drying reed beds: a full and pilot-scales study for activated sludge treatment S. Troesch.troesch@cemagref.fr, dirk.esser@sint.fr Abstract Sludge drying reed beds have been used for dewatering and mineralization of sludge since the beginning of the 90's, but their insufficient performances in terms of Dry Matter [DM

  14. WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    not require extensive cultivation and extraction methods, and it uses less manmade energy to manufacture, these trees are a vital component of wildlife and plant ecosystems, water quality, recreation, and esthetic and firewood harvesting are two activities that consume large quantities of wood from oak woodlands. Finding

  15. Rheological Model for Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad Masoud Hassani; Falk K. Wittel; Stefan Hering; Hans J. Herrmann

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood as the most important natural and renewable building material plays an important role in the construction sector. Nevertheless, its hygroscopic character basically affects all related mechanical properties leading to degradation of material stiffness and strength over the service life. Accordingly, to attain reliable design of the timber structures, the influence of moisture evolution and the role of time- and moisture-dependent behaviors have to be taken into account. For this purpose, in the current study a 3D orthotropic elasto-plastic, visco-elastic, mechano-sorptive constitutive model for wood, with all material constants being defined as a function of moisture content, is presented. The corresponding numerical integration approach, with additive decomposition of the total strain is developed and implemented within the framework of the finite element method (FEM). Moreover to preserve a quadratic rate of asymptotic convergence the consistent tangent operator for the whole model is derived. Functionality and capability of the presented material model are evaluated by performing several numerical verification simulations of wood components under different combinations of mechanical loading and moisture variation. Additionally, the flexibility and universality of the introduced model to predict the mechanical behavior of different species are demonstrated by the analysis of a hybrid wood element. Furthermore, the proposed numerical approach is validated by comparisons of computational evaluations with experimental results.

  16. Wastewater sludge management options for Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Mahua, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge management is a fundamental area of concern across wastewater treatment systems in Honduras. The lack of timely sludge removal has led to declining plant performance in many facilities throughout the country. In ...

  17. Chemical records of environmental pollution in ombrotrophic peat bogs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloy, Joanna Marie

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and environmental health. In recent years ombrotrophic peat bogs have been used to study the changing rates and sources of atmospheric metal deposition, as they receive all their water and nutrients from the atmosphere by dry and wet deposition alone. Cores from...

  18. Explosive silicic eruptions in Iceland: from vent to peat bog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to an analytical model for tephra transportation and sedimentation (at distances of 20-200 km) that will allow be found in peat bogs and lake sediments across Scotland and the rest of Northern Europe (Figure 1; Larsen-range dispersal of tephra is the generation of fine (

  19. Laser removal of sludge from steam generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

  20. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  1. Rheology of spinel sludge in molten glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mika, M (.); Hrma, Pavel R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schweiger, M J. (.)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinel sludge, which forms while vitrifying high-level waste, obstructs the flow of molten glass and damages the melter. The effectiveness of removing spinel sludge from a high-level waste glass melter depends on its rheological behavior. We prepared spinel sludge in a laboratory crucible by allowing spinel to settle from molten glass and measured the response of the sludge to shear using a rotating spindle viscometer. The shear stress increased nonlinearly with the velocity gradient (the shear rate) and with time at a constant velocity gradient, as is typical for a pseudoplastic rheopectic liquid. The apparent viscosity of the sludge substantially increased when RuO-2 needles were present.

  2. Treatment of dredged sludge by mechanical dehydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maekawa, T.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge deposits in the water area damage the ecosystems and environments; their elimination has always been an urgent task for human communities. Generally, sludge deposits are dredged out of the bottom of the water area, transported to, and discharged at a large disposal area on land. Recently, however, it has become increasingly difficult to secure disposal areas and routes of speedy transportation for disposal of dredged sludge. Accordingly, there is an urgent need to reduce both the volume of dredged sludge and the size of the disposal area. This mechanical method is different from the conventional engineering dehydration by loading, consolidation, and drainage in that the dredged sludge is separated into sludge cakes and clean water that can be returned to the water area through mechanical centrifugal dehydration. Sludge deposits are distributed thin and wide on the bottom of the water area, and a pump dredge has been proved effective in many cases for dredging the upper layers of sludge deposits accurately and without creating turbidity in water. This mechanical sludge treatment technique can be most efficient when used in combination with a pump dredge. This method offers the following advantages: (a) It requires smaller space for treatment and disposal of dredged sludge than the conventional method. (b) Facilities and costs for transportation can be reduced. (c) Various systems can be adopted for transportation of sludge cakes. (d) This system is transportable and compact and can be constructed anywhere either on land or on water.

  3. Fermentation and chemical treatment of pulp and paper mill sludge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Yoon Y; Wang, Wei; Kang, Li

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of chemically treating partially de-ashed pulp and/or paper mill sludge to obtain products of value comprising taking a sample of primary sludge from a Kraft paper mill process, partially de-ashing the primary sludge by physical means, and further treating the primary sludge to obtain the products of value, including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge as a substrate to produce cellulase in an efficient manner using the resulting sludge as the only carbon source and mixtures of inorganic salts as the primary nitrogen source, and including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge to produce ethanol.

  4. Secondary compression of peat with or without surcharging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesri, G.; Stark, T.D.; Ajlouni, M.A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Chen, C.S. [Sino Geotechnology, Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary compression is important in peat deposits because they exist at high void ratios and exhibit high values of compression index C{sub c}, display the highest values of C{sub {alpha}}/C{sub c} among geotechnical materials, and primary consolidation is completed in weeks or months in typical field situations. Secondary compression of Middleton peat was investigated by odometer tests on undisturbed specimens. The observed secondary compression behavior of this fibrous peat, with or without surcharging, is in accordance with the C{sub {alpha}}/C{sub c} concept of compressibility. Near the preconsolidation pressure, the secondary compression index, C{sub {alpha}}, increases significantly with time. In the compression range C{sub {alpha}} decreases only slightly with time, and for most practical purposes a constant C{sub {alpha}} with time can be used to compute secondary settlement. Postsurcharge secondary compression index, C{prime}{sub {alpha}}, always increases with time. This is predicted by the C{sub {alpha}}/C{sub c} concept of compressibility. A secant post-surcharge secondary compression index, C{double_prime}{sub {alpha}}, is therefore introduced for a simple computation of secondary settlement.

  5. High Btu gas from peat. Existing social and economic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High Btu Gas from Peat. The proposed study was designed to assess the overall viability of the design, construction and operation of a commercial facility for the production of high-Btu substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. In order to complete the study, Minnegasco assembled an experienced project team with the wide range of expertise required. In addition, the State of Minnesota agreed to participate in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic impact assessment. Ertec (The Earth Technology Corporation) was selected to conduct the site evaluation and environmental assessment portions of the feasibility study. The site evaluation was completed in March of 1981 with the submittal of the first of several reports to Minnegasco. This report describes the existing social and economic conditions of the proposed project area in northern Minnesota. The baseline data presented will be used to assess the significance of potential project impacts in subsequent phases of the feasibility study. Wherever possible, the data base was established using 1980 Bureau of Census statistics. However, where the 1980 data were not yet available, the most recent information is presented. 11 figures, 46 tables.

  6. Natural Resources Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    /Loll ThermoWood Hybrid Poplars Peat A boost for the peat industry Value in Minnesota peat deposits Natural che

  7. FAO Forestry Department Wood Energy WISDOM Slovenia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in developing pellet production and district heating systems; the formulation of a national wood energy strategyFAO ­ Forestry Department ­ Wood Energy WISDOM ­ Slovenia Spatial woodfuel production Rudi Drigo Forestry Specialist - Wood energy planning and forest resources monitoring Zivan Veseli

  8. DIVISION 6 -WOOD AND PLASTICS 06000 GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIVISION 6 - WOOD AND PLASTICS ________________________________________________________________________ 06000 GENERAL 1. For both woods and plastics, special attention is called to matters of flame spread-dried. 3. For exterior wood or plastic framed structures, see Division 4 for dimensions of Sample Panel

  9. Low-rank coal study: national needs for resource development. Volume 6. Peat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements and potential for development of US peat resources for energy use are reviewed. Factors analyzed include the occurrence and properties of major peat deposits; technologies for extraction, dewatering, preparation, combustion, and conversion of peat to solid, liquid, or gaseous fuels; environmental, regulatory, and market constraints; and research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) needs. Based on a review of existing research efforts, recommendations are made for a comprehensive national RD and D program to enhance the use of peat as an energy source.

  10. Beverly Woods | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beverly Woods Beverly Woods Oral History Videos Speakers INTRODUCTION Ed Bailey Jim Bailey Kay Bailey Ken Bernander Willard Brock Wilma Brooks Elmer Brummitt Naomi Brummitt Blake...

  11. Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Environmental Impacts of Treated Wood 6495_C000.fm Page iii Wednesday, February 1, 2006 5:48 PM #12 through the Florida Center for Environmental Solutions, National Science Foundation Grant No. 0126172. Any of treated-wood research and their efforts in organizing the con- ference entitled Environmental Impacts

  12. The Asian Wood Pellet Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Asian Wood Pellet Markets Joseph A. Roos and Allen M. Brackley United States Department Wood Pellet plant in North Pole, Alaska. Clockwise from upper left: pelleting machine; pellets bagged for home use; a Superior Pellet Fuels bag; inventory of product ready for shipment to retailers. Upper

  13. GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GLOBAL WOOD SUPPLY Sten Nilsson Biomass and Resource Efficiency: the need for a supply led approach the wood come from? Western EU Deficit Eastern EU Deficit Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Rest of Eastern Europe Balanced Russia Is probably at production ceiling under current conditions Japan

  14. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for reducing the moisture content of a moist sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50% to 80% and formed of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water is provided. A hot liquid metal is circulated in a circulation loop and the moist sewage sludge is injected in the circulation loop under conditions of temperature and pressure such that the confined water vaporizes and ruptures the cellular bodies. The vapor produced, the dried sludge, and the liquid metal are then separated. Preferably, the moist sewage sludge is injected into the hot liquid metal adjacent the upstream side of a venturi which serves to thoroughly mix the hot liquid metal and the moist sewage sludge. The venturi and the drying zone after the venturi are preferably vertically oriented. The dried sewage sludge recovered is available as a fuel and is preferably used for heating the hot liquid metal.

  15. Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENAC/ Formation of aerobic granular sludge biofilms for sustainable wastewater treatment David G Research, Microbiology of Interfaces, Magdeburg (Germany) EDCE 2011 / From activated sludge flocs

  16. activated sludge oxygen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Effects of oxygen transport limitation on nitrification in the activated sludge process Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: sludge age (MCRT), pH,...

  17. Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors), so in peat pots; they are slow to germinate, so be patient. Seedlings may be transplanted in June. Crowns

  18. Holocene blanket peat development in south west Scotland : the roles of human activity, climate change and vegetation change 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flitcroft, Catherine Esther

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the role of autogenic and allogenic forces in determining the timing and development of blanket peat initiation and how the occurrence and growth of blanket peat subsequently constrains human activities. A number of factors...

  19. Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy Patterson b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, Timothy

    Evaluating periodicities in peat-based climate proxy records Graeme T. Swindles a,*, R. Timothy). Palaeohydrological reconstructions from ombrotrophic peat- lands agree well with other proxy climate data (Baker et

  20. Comparative analysis of peat gasification reactor configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the comparative analysis of two generic gasifiers (fluidized bed and entrained bed) and two specific hydrogasifiers (IGT's Peat-gas and Rockwell International's hydrogasifier). The objective is to establish a basis for recommending a peat gasification reactor configuration for testing in a DOE peat gasification pilot plant project. The approach involved the following four steps: data base evaluation, regression analysis, a chemical engineering evaluation of upstream and downstream equipment requirement, and computer simulation. Mathematical models and computer programs were developed to simulate the entrained-bed and fluidized-bed reactors. Parametric analyses were made, using these computer programs, to test the sensitivity and effects of significant operating variables (temperature, pressure and feed gas composition, for instance) on the product gas composition in the IGT gasifier and Rockwell International gasifier. This review and analysis concentrates primarily upon the Peatgas process of the Institute of Gas Technology and the Rockwell International Hydrogasification Process. The two-stage Peatgas process appears to have advantages in higher thermal efficiency, smaller capital investment, and its application of existing commercial operations and proven design practices from other types of fluidized solids processing units. There are two problems concerning operability of the Peatgas process: (1) the design of a fluidized solids unit for quite low standpipe densities (approximately 11 to 15 pounds per cubic foot), which may become even lower upon operating upsets, and (2) the potential problem of ash sintering in the very hot combustion zone of the steam-oxygen gasifier. On a relative time scale of development, the Peatgas would seem to be much closer to possible early commercialization than is the Rockwell system.

  1. HELSINKI UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY ENE-47.153 Trace elements and alkaliTrace elements and alkali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuelsTrace elements in fossil - and waste-derived fuels Coal Peat Heavy fuel oil Pet coke MSW RDF Wood Waste wood Waste paper Scrap tyres Sew. sludge Hg 0.02-3 ~0.07 .153 Behaviour of trace elements in coalBehaviour of trace elements in coal combustion flue gasescombustion flue

  2. Batch and Kinetic Studies of ni adsorption on Highly Humified newfoundland Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    was air dried and sieved and fractions 850 µm constituting about 90% of the peat were separated and used. Analytical grade Nickel (II) nitrate hexahydrate (Anachemia Chemicals) were diluted in distilled water.4, 0.84, and 1.6g air dried saprist peat. Kinetic tests were performed in 500 ml plastic serum bottles

  3. The Severity of Smouldering Peat Fires and Damage to the Forest Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rein, Guillermo; Cleaver, Natalie; Ashton, Clare; Pironi, Paolo; Torero, Jose L

    and the large loss of soil mass but poorly documented in the literature. A series of smouldering experiments with boreal peat have been conducted under laboratory conditions to quantify these effects using small-scale samples. Peat samples of 100 mm by 100 mm...

  4. Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Successful biomass (wood pellets ) implementation in Estonia Biomass Utilisation of Local of primary energy in Estonia ! Wood fuels production ! Pellet firing projects in Estonia ­ SIDA Demo East Production of wood fuels in Estonia in 2002 Regional Energy Centres in Estonia Wood pellets production

  5. Wood Fuel Task Force Response 2 | Wood Fuel Task Force Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood Fuel Task Force Response #12;2 | Wood Fuel Task Force Response #12;Wood Fuel Task Force Response | 3 Wood Fuel Task Force Response Scottish Government response by Minister for Environment, Michael Russell I am pleased to present on behalf of the Scottish Government our response to the Wood Fuel

  6. Field Assessment Tool for Deep Peat This methodology is designed to be undertaken at a site which has already been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field Assessment Tool for Deep Peat This methodology is designed to be undertaken at a site which. The surveyor should have undertaken training in the application of this tool and the interpretation of the score. Tools you will require: Peat depth probe Pruning saw Clinometer Peat core sampler Map of the area

  7. A Comparison of the Abundance and Diversity of Fossil Pigments in Wetland Peats and Woodland Humus Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    A Comparison of the Abundance and Diversity of Fossil Pigments in Wetland Peats and Woodland Humus PEATS AND WOODLAND HUMUS LAYERS' JON E. SANGER Departmentof Botany and Bacteriology, Ohio Wesleyan) in woodland humus layers and in circumneutral to moderately acid swamp peats are shown to increase with degree

  8. Metal binding to dissolved organic matter and adsorption to ferrihydrite in shallow peat groundwaters: Application to diamond exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metal binding to dissolved organic matter and adsorption to ferrihydrite in shallow peat t The speciation and solubility of kimberlite pathfinder metals (Ni, Nd, Ba and K) in shallow peat ground- waters with kimberlite pathfinder metals and determine the spatial distribution of those metals in shallow peat

  9. An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la Possession, Iles Crozet, sub-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    An integrated palaeoenvironmental investigation of a 6200 year old peat sequence from Ile de la;Abstract A 6200 year old peat sequence, cored in a volcanic crater on the sub-Antarctic Ile de la the proxy data the following changes could be inferred. From the onset of the peat formation (6200 cal yr BP

  10. School of Animal, Rural and Environmental Sciences Management of carbon budgets for severely eroded upland blanket peat bogs impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    upland blanket peat bogs ­ impacts of restoration Blanket bog is an important carbon sink and an Annex 1 Habitat priority under the EU Habitats Directive, but in the Peak District National Park much suffers peat by Natural England as an important site for studies of vegetation history and peat erosion in the Pennines

  11. Assessment of peat quality by molecular and bulk geochemical analysis: Application to the Holocene record of the Chautagne

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assessment of peat quality by molecular and bulk geochemical analysis: Application to the Holocene in general from a limited variety of local plants, peat is however sensitive to physicochemical changes the information on peat quality provided by various families of biochemical components (lipids, lignin, sugars

  12. THE WRONG, THE GOOD, AND THE BETTER BOOK REVIEW OF BOHM AND PEAT: SCIENCE, ORDER, AND CREATIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dürr, Detlef

    THE WRONG, THE GOOD, AND THE BETTER BOOK REVIEW OF BOHM AND PEAT: SCIENCE, ORDER, AND CREATIVITY to think that we do not. Reading the book by Bohm and Peat one is almost assured that we do not. I do part an encyclopedia of failures of science and society to be good. Bohm and Peat wish instead to lead

  13. Modeling Oxygen and Water Flows in Peat Substrate with Root Uptakes R. Naasz, J.-C. Michel and S. Charpentier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    191 Modeling Oxygen and Water Flows in Peat Substrate with Root Uptakes R. Naasz, J.-C. Michel to Horticulture Angers France Keywords: peat, simulation, substrate-plant system, water and oxygen availability, we first precisely characterized all transfer properties of a peat substrate (water retention

  14. Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Micromorphological and (bio)chemical organic matter changes in a formerly cutover peat bog : Le. In order to moniter peat reaccumulation and hence long-term carbon sequestration in peatlands which have ([1]). Among these indicators, it has previously been shown that physico-chemical properties of peat

  15. 2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. 2008 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. High sensitivity of peat decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    rights reserved. LETTERS High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climate change through water of the high water-holding capacity of peat and its low hydraulic conductivity, accumulation of soil organic­biogeochemical soil model with peat depths that are continuously updated from the dynamic balance of soil organic

  16. Preliminary evaluation of environmental issues on the use of peat as an energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R.; Richardson, S.; Walters, A.; Boesch, L.; Thomson, W.; Irons, J.

    1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A study to characterize the environmental issues, that would arise from an extensive peat utilization program has been initiated. The objectives of this preliminary report are to: identify the environmental issues and potential problems; examine the significance of issues in the geographical regions where peat use could be developed; and establish a methodology by which issues can be resolved or clarified through future coordinated private, state, and federal programs. An overview of peat development including discussions on conversion technologies, extraction and harvesting procedures, and land reclamation is presented. Environmental concerns are in the areas of water resources and quality, air quality, health and safety issues, solid waste management, and land reclamation. The general environmental issues, resource availability, and attitudes associated with potential peat development in ten states, containing an estimated 90 percent of US peat resources were described. The ten states reviewed are Alaska, Minnesota, Michigan, Maine, North and South Carolina, Wisconsin, New York, Florida, and Louisiana. (DMC)

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Algae production on pig sludge Attila Bai & László Stündl & Péter Bársony & Milán- ied an economical method of algae production on pig sludge that can be operated on animal farms in Hungary with modest levels of investment. We analyzed four algae spe- cies, Chlorella vulgaris

  18. Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, L.W.

    1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the dewatering of sludge, and more particularly to the dewatering of a sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50 to 80% in the form of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water.

  19. Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Monthly status report, February 1-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Task 1 (Single-Stage Fluidized-Bed Gasification Tests), one test was conducted with Minnesota peat in the process development unit (PDU), using steam and oxygen. The test was performed at a pressure of 268 psia, a fluidization velocity of 1.0 ft/s, and an average bed temperature of 1680/sup 0/F. The objective was to determine the effects of high feed moisture content (22-weight-percent moisture) and low gasification pressure on the gasification characteristics of peat. Most of the previous tests had been conducted at a nominal pressure of 500 psia. The test was successful; about 1 hour of steady-state operation was achieved before sintering began and the test was ended. The results of a test conducted previously with Minnesota peat containing about 8-weight-percent moisture were analyzed and are presented this month. The test was conducted at an average bed temperature of 1700/sup 0/F, a pressure of 522 psia, and a steam-to-carbon feed ratio of 1.1 mol/mol; it achieved a carbon conversion of about 84%. In Task 2 (Wet-Carbonization PDU-Scale Tests), orders were placed for long-lead-time equipment for the PDU. The design and specifications for the slurry heater/cooler system and the shell-and-tube heat exchangers have been finalized. The installation of the instrumentation and the control panel for the PDU is continuing. In Task 3 (Kinetic Data on Alaska and Florida Peats), efforts were made to obtain representative samples of peats from Alaska and Florida. A sample of Florida reed-sedge peat has been obtained and is being analyzed. Samples of Alaskan peat have been taken by the company conducting the US Department of Energy (DOE) peat resource assessment work; however, they have not yet been received. In Task 4 (Effect of Dewatering Methodology on Peat Gasification), efforts to obtain peat dewatered by various methods were continued.

  20. Disposable sludge dewatering container and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cole, Clifford M. (1905 Cottonwood Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for preparing sludge for disposal comprising a box with a thin layer of gravel on the bottom and a thin layer of sand on the gravel layer, an array of perforated piping deployed throughout the gravel layer, and a sump in the gravel layer below the perforated piping array. Standpipes connect the array and sump to an external ion exchanger/fine particulate filter and a pump. Sludge is deposited on the sand layer and dewatered using a pump connected to the piping array, topping up with more sludge as the aqueous component of the sludge is extracted. When the box is full and the free standing water content of the sludge is acceptable, the standpipes are cut and sealed and the lid secured to the box.

  1. Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement for natural gas in textile drying. The Georgia Tech updraft gasifier was used for the experimental program. During preliminary tests, the 1 million...

  2. Textile Drying Via Wood Gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGowan, T. F.; Jape, A. D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was carried out to investigate the possibility of using wood gas as a direct replacement for natural gas in textile drying. The Georgia Tech updraft gasifier was used for the experimental program. During preliminary tests, the 1 million...

  3. Integrated Industrial Wood Chip Utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, E. T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources of supply of wood residues for energy generation are described and the rationale for exploring the potential available from forest harvesting is developed. Details of three industrial-scale projects are presented and the specific...

  4. FIELD PERFORMANCE OF GEOTEXTILE REINFORCED SLUDGE CAPS AHMET H. AYDILEK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    589 FIELD PERFORMANCE OF GEOTEXTILE REINFORCED SLUDGE CAPS AHMET H. AYDILEK UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN the filtration performance of sludge-geotextile systems and investigate their durability, ten sludge lagoon test be effectively used in filtering contaminated wastewater treatment sludges. Considering the constructability

  5. IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS Jacek Makinia*, Scott A in a full-scale activated sludge reactor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was used to describe for dissolved oxygen. KEYWORDS Activated sludge; dispersion; dissolved oxygen dynamics; mass transfer

  6. BEHAVIOR CANOLA (BRASSICA NAPUS) FOLLOWING A SEWAGE SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    especially Zn. Key words: heavy metals, accumulation, Brassica Napus, urban sludge, industrial sludge. 1. When purifying wastewater, heavy metals accumulate in the sludge. Thus, the sludge contains significant activities, heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Cr) actually raise issues of particular concern. These non

  7. Concentrations of Heavy Metals in Soil and Cassava Plant on Sewage Sludge Dump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Igbozuruike, Chris Washington Ifeanyi Mr.; Opara-Nadi, Achilihu Oliver Prof; Okorie, Ikechukwu Kennedy DR

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    JM. (1989). Assessment of sludge regulation assumptions: AMunicipal Wasteland and Sludge on Land. Univ. of California,1998). Effects of sewage sludge pre-treatment on microbial

  8. Trends in atmospheric haze induced by peat fires in Sumatra Island, Indonesia and El Nin~o phenomenon from 1973 to 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Field, Robert

    Trends in atmospheric haze induced by peat fires in Sumatra Island, Indonesia and El Nin by peat fires on the peat land area of the island of Sumatra, Indonesia. Visibility and the anomalies). Citation: Wang, Y., R. D. Field, and O. Roswintiarti (2004), Trends in atmospheric haze induced by peat

  9. Sludge Batch 2 (Macrobatch 3) Rheology Studies with Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, D.C.

    2001-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-radioactive sludge-only process simulations of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were conducted for a 50:50 blend of Tank 8 and Tank 40 washed sludge and Tank 40 washed sludge by itself. Rheological characterization of the sludge, SRAT product, and SME product material was requested as part of the simulant program.

  10. Peat-Gasification Pilot-Plant Program. Final report, April 9, 1980-March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program was twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities included the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. After shakedown of the new feed preparation equipment (drying, screening, and crushing) was successfully completed, the first integrated pilot plant test was conducted in April 1981 to provide solids flow data and operating experience with the new PEATGAS gasifier configuration. Three gasification tests were subsequently conducted using the existing slurry feed system. The lockhopper feed system, capable of providing a continuous, measured flow of 1 to 4 tons of dry feed at pressures up to 500 psig, was then successfully integrated with the gasifier. Two gasification tests were conducted, expanding the data to more economical operating conditions. The operation of the PEATGAS pilot plant has confirmed that peat is an excellent raw material for SNG production. Peat conversions over 90% were consistently achieved at moderate gasification temperatures and at sinter-free conditions. A large data base was established for Minnesota peat at pressure 1.0. The technical feasibility of the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated. However, an economic assessment of the peat gasification process indicates that the cost of the peat feedstock delivered to a plant site has a significant effect on the cost of the product SNG. 28 figures, 36 tables.

  11. activated sludge bacterial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wastes in Georgia are discussed. The main groups of microbiological community of the peat suspension used in the experiments of bacterial leaching are investigated and the...

  12. activated sludge microbial: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Websites Summary: ) powders made from different precursor materials (coal, peat, coconut shell, hardwood, and phenolic resin, and their kinetic activities were...

  13. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

  14. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational Awareness Review HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within...

  15. CHEMISTRY AND STOICHIOMETRY OF WOOD LIQUEFACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, H.G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of the wood-oil product derived from the above2 g It is probable that oil products with oxygen contentscollected with the wood-oil product. The condensate contains

  16. Marin County- Wood Stove Replacement Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The County of Marin has created a rebate program to encourage homeowners to remove or replace non-EPA certified wood-burning heaters (wood stoves and fireplace inserts) with cleaner burning stoves...

  17. Leonard Wood and the American Empire 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruitt, James Herman

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    During the ten years following the Spanish American War (1898 to 1908), Major General Leonard Wood served as the primary agent of American imperialism. Wood was not only a proconsul of the new American Empire; he was a ...

  18. Structure-Infesting Wood-Boring Beetles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Several kinds of beetles damage stored wood, structural timbers and other wood products. This publication explains how to detect, identify, prevent and control powderpost beetle, old house borer and others....

  19. Decreasing the leachibility of boron wood preservatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gezer, Engin Derya

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of boron in wood preservatives has been growing since the 1930s, primarily in various boric acid/borax mixtures. Boron preservatives have several advantages for application as wood preservatives including a broad spectrum of activity...

  20. Emerging Technologies in Wood Energy Wood can already be used to produce heat and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    established technologies of District Energy and Combined Heat and Power plants. Using wood to makeEmerging Technologies in Wood Energy Wood can already be used to produce heat and electricity using such as flooring and siding. In Europe, torrefaction has been explored to produce an improved wood pellet

  1. Environmental aspects of alternative wet technologies for producing energy/fuel from peat. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.T.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat in situ contains up to 90% moisture, with about 50% of this moisture trapped as a colloidal gel. This colloidal moisture cannot be removed by conventional dewatering methods (filter presses, etc.) and must be removed by thermal drying, solvent extraction, or solar drying before the peat can be utilized as a fuel feedstock for direct combustion or gasification. To circumvent the drying problem, alternative technologies such as wet oxidation, wet carbonization, and biogasification are possible for producing energy or enhanced fuel from peat. This report describes these three alternative technologies, calculates material balances for given raw peat feed rates of 1000 tph, and evaluates the environmental consequences of all process effluent discharges. Wastewater discharges represent the most significant effluent due to the relatively large quantities of water removed during processing. Treated process water returned to the harvested bog may force in situ, acidic bog water into recieving streams, disrupting local aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddington, C L

    Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

  3. Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 1, October 1, 1980-August 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 200 peat gasification tests were conducted in laboratory-scale and PDU-scale (process development unit) equipment since 1976. A kinetic model for peat gasification was developed from laboratory and PDU data. The encouraging results of these tests and the model projections show that on the basis of its chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent raw material for commercial synthetic natural gas (SNG) production. To further advance peat gasification technology, DOE and GRI initiated a pilot-plant-scale program using an existing coal gasification pilot plant. This facility was adapted to peat processing and can convert 50 tons of peat to about 0.5 million standard cubic feet of SNG daily. The pilot plant is described in Appendix A. Only three major pieces of equipment - a peat dryer, a grinder, and a screener - were required to prepare the pilot plant for peat processing. This modification phase was completed in the winter of 1980-1981. After a number of drying, grinding, and screening tests, peat was first fed to the gasifier in April 1981, initiating the pilot plant studies to develop the PEATGAS process. Since that time, the gasification of Minnesota peat by the PEATGAS process has been successfully demonstrated in a series of gasification tests. This report covers the work done between October 1, 1980, and August 31, 1981, under DOE Contract No. AC01-80ET14688.

  4. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  5. Assessment of the peat resources of Florida, with a detailed survey of the northern everglades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, G.M.; Wieland, C.C.; Hood, L.Q.; Goode, R.W. III; Sawyer, R.K.; McNeill, D.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available data, including previous publications, modern soil surveys, and detailed coring in the Northern Everglades for this project have been used to update information on Florida's peat resources. It is now estimated that Florida could, if no other constraints existed, produce 606 million tons of moisture-free fuel-grade peat, which may yield approximately 10.0 x 10/sup 15/ Btu of energy. These estimates are much lower than previously published projections for the state. The principal effort of this survey was in the largest peat region of the state, the Northern Everglades of Palm Beach and adjacent counties, where more than 800 core holes were drilled. Based on analyses of these cores, the Northern Everglades is now estimated to contain 191 million tons of moisture-free peat, with a potential energy yield of 2.98 x 10/sup 15/ Btu. These values are considerably less than previously published estimates, probably due to bacterial oxidation and other forms of drainage-induced subsidence in the Everglades agricultural areas. The present fuel-peat resources of the Northern Everglades occur in 19 separate deposits. Of these, the deposits in the Port Mayaca, Bryant, Six Mile Bend, and Loxahatchee Quadrangles comprise the highest concentration of the resource. These lands are generally privately owned and used for sugar cane and other crops, and the conversion of these lands to peat removal seems unlikely. It seems even less likely that the extensive peat deposits within the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge will be available for fuel use, barring a dire national emergency. The utilization of peat as a fuel must be approached with caution and careful study; large scale use may require state or federal action. 34 references.

  6. Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

  7. Creating Value Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisiana Forest Products Development Center #12;2 Louisiana is blessed with quality timberland for the Wood Products Industry The forest industry contributes more than 50 percent of the total value of all for quality information, research and education in forest products in Louisiana, recognized regionally

  8. Optical computing Damien Woods a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract In this survey we consider optical computers of such optical computing archi- tectures, including descriptions of the type of hardware commonly used in optical

  9. Optical computing Damien Woods a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Damien

    Optical computing Damien Woods a aDepartment of Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Institute, Vierimaantie 5, 84100 Ylivieska, Finland Abstract We consider optical computers that encode data using images and compute by transforming such images. We give an overview of a number of such optical

  10. Potential adverse health effects of wood smoke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierson, W.E.; Koenig, J.Q.; Bardana, E.J. Jr.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wood stoves has increased greatly in the past decade, causing concern in many communities about the health effects of wood smoke. Wood smoke is known to contain such compounds as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, aldehydes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and fine respirable particulate matter. All of these have been shown to cause deleterious physiologic responses in laboratory studies in humans. Some compounds found in wood smoke--benzo(a)pyrene and formaldehyde--are possible human carcinogens. Fine particulate matter has been associated with decreased pulmonary function in children and with increased chronic lung disease in Nepal, where exposure to very high amounts of wood smoke occurs in residences. Wood smoke fumes, taken from both outdoor and indoor samples, have shown mutagenic activity in short-term bioassay tests. Because of the potential health effects of wood smoke, exposure to this source of air pollution should be minimal.29 references.

  11. COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i COMPARATIVE HEALTH IMPACT ASSESSMENTS ON FECAL SLUDGE MANAGEMENT PRACTICES: A CASE STUDY OF KLONG Fecal sludge (FS) is widely acknowledged as a major source of infectious pathogens. However, the proper

  12. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  13. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

  14. Global fire emissions and the contribution of deforestation, savanna, forest, agricultural, and peat fires (1997-2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use and burning of agricultural waste in the developingsa- vanna, forest, agricultural waste, and peat fires toex- tratropics, 15%), agricultural waste burning (3%), and

  15. Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WESTRA, A.G.

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

  16. Caustic Leaching of Sludges from Selected Hanford Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, C.W.; Egan, B.Z.; Spencer, B.B.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to measure the caustic dissolution behavior of sludge components from selected Hanford waste tank sludge samples under different conditions. The dissolution of aluminum, chromium, and other constituents of actual sludge samples in aqueous sodium hydroxide solution was evaluated using various values of temperature, sodium hydroxide concentration, volume of caustic solution per unit mass of sludge (liquid:solids ratio), and leaching time.

  17. Phase Chemistry of Tank Sludge Residual Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Krumhansl

    2002-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has millions of gallons of high level nuclear waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford, Washington and Savannah River, South Carolina. These tanks will eventually be emptied and decommissioned. This will leave a residue of sludge adhering to the interior tank surfaces that may contaminate nearby groundwaters with radionuclides and RCRA metals. Performance assessment (PA) calculations must be carried out prior to closing the tanks. This requires developing radionuclide release models from the sludges so that the PA calculations can be based on credible source terms. These efforts continued to be hindered by uncertainties regarding the actual nature of the tank contents and the distribution of radionuclides among the various phases. In particular, it is of vital importance to know what radionuclides are associated with solid sludge components. Experimentation on actual tank sludges can be difficult, dangerous and prohibitively expensive. The research funded under this grant for the past three years was intended to provide a cost-effective method for developing the needed radionuclide release models using non-radioactive artificial sludges. Insights gained from this work will also have more immediate applications in understanding the processes responsible for heel development in the tanks and in developing effective technologies for removing wastes from the tanks.

  18. Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Review article The use of urban sewage sludge on pastures: the cysticercosis threat Jacques appears to be one of the major pathological threats when sewage sludge is used to fertilise cattle highly prevalent) and Asia (Taenia saginata-like are prevalent). The processing of sludge and the delay

  19. PROPERTIES OF TREATMENT SLUDGE DURING SEDIMENTATION AND CONSOLIDATION TESTS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    PROPERTIES OF TREATMENT SLUDGE DURING SEDIMENTATION AND CONSOLIDATION TESTS1 Lincar Pedroni2 , Jean on sludge produced from an acid mine drainage (AMD) treatment plant. The testing program involved test, physical and geotechnical properties of the resulting sludge were measured. In this paper

  20. Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study Jacek Makinia, Scott A. Wells, Piotr Zima ABSTRACT: A model of temperature dynamics was developed as part of a general model of activated-sludge biochemical-energy inputs and other activated-sludge, heat-balance terms. All the models were tested under

  1. Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

  2. Incineration of biological sludge in a fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, W.C.P.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incineration rate, ash properties, and percentage destruction of the combustible material were evaluated under different operating conditions. Experimental measurements were made for temperature, air flow rate, sludge size, ash size and sludge composition. A model based on the heat transfer consideration was derived to describe the drying and devolatilization process during sludge incineration. The model assumes that the drying and devolatilization of a sludge particle is manly caused by the heat flowing into the sludge particle from the bed. Parameters affecting the simulation results included sludge size, inert particle size, sludge heat capacity, sludge heat conductivity, operating flow rate and incinerator temperature. A model developed to simulate a batch type air-sand fluidized bed considered the incineration process as being composed of three consecutive operations, namely, drying, devolatilization, and char combustion. The simulation model predicted the dynamic characteristics of sludge incineration in the bed including its percentage completion and the incinerator temperature. The effects of sludge moisture level, sludge size and incinerator operating conditions on the incinerator behavior were also evaluated. The model developed to simulate the behavior of a fluidized bed incinerator under continuous operation was capable of predicting the time to reach steady state, the stack gas composition, the percentage combustion and the auxiliary heat required under various operating conditions, including sludge feed rate and size, air feed rate, and incinerator temperature.

  3. Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, September 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the production of biogas based power and heat besides reduce the power consumption from handling and treatment of sludge as if established at the existing sludge digester system. The Esbjerg Renseanlæg Vest is a traditional build plant base don the activated sludge concept besides traditional digester technology

  4. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume II. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first is the Executive Summary. This Volume II contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. Contents of Volume II are: introduction; project scope and objectives; commercial plant description; engineering specifications; design and construction schedules; capital cost estimates; operating cost estimates; financial analysis; and future areas for investigation. 15 figures, 17 tables.

  5. High-Btu gas from peat. Feasibility study. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial, technical, economic, and environmental viability of producing 80 million Standard Cubic Feet per day (SCF/day) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco assigned the work for this study to a project team consisting of the following organizations: Dravo Engineers and Constructors for the design, engineering and economic evaluation of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems; Ertec, Inc. for environmental and socioeconomic analyses; Institute of Gas Technology for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support; and Deloitte Haskins and Sells for management advisory support. This report presents the work performed by Dravo Engineers and Constructors to meet the requirements of: Task 1, peat harvesting; Task 2, peat dewatering; Task 3, peat gasification; Task 4, long lead items; and Task 9.1, economic analysis. The final report comprises three volumes, the first of which is this Executive Summary. Subsequent volumes include Volume II which contains all of the text of the report, and Volume III which includes all of the specifications, drawings, and appendices applicable to the project. As part of this study, a scale model of the proposed gasification facility was constructed. This model was sent to Minnegasco, and photographs of the model are included at the end of this summary.

  6. Acceptance Test Plan for the Sludge Pickup Adaptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan documents the acceptance testing of the sludge pickup adapter for potential use during PSI Phases 3 and 4 fuel cleanliness inspection activities. The adaptex is attached to the strainer tip of the vacuum wand and used to suction up residual sludge captured in a sludge collection tray. The material is vacuumed into a chamber of known volume in the sludge pickup adapter. The device serves as an aid in helping to determine whether the observed quantity of sludge is within allowable limits (1.4 cm{sup 3} per fuel assembly). This functionality test involves underwater testing in the 305 Building Cold Test Facility to verify that sludge can be successfully vacuumed from a collection tray. Ancillary activities in this acceptance test include demonstration that the sludge pickup adapter CM be successfully attached to and detached from the vacuum wand underwater.

  7. High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 9. 2. Financial risk analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic, and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for management structural support.) This final report presents the work conducted under Task 9.2 (Risk Assessment) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process selected for the study. At this time, there is little technical doubt that the PEATGAS gasifier can indeed operate. In order to assess the risks associated with the peat gasification facility, it was subdivided according to the following risk areas; (1) peat harvesting; (2) peat dewatering; (3) peat gasification; and (4) environmental. In summary, the risks associated with the peat gasification facility are manageable. Even under the extreme risk of no peat availability, the gasification facility can be operated with lignite at a slightly higher SNG price. 1 figure, 5 tables.

  8. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  9. The conservation of waterlogged wood using sucrose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrent, James Michael

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such as resins or creosote, which are 13 volatilized by heating, the standard methods for moisture determination yield false values (Panshin a de Zeeuw 1980:203). This should not be a problem when working with waterlogged wood since only small samples... water. Formation of hydrogen bonds releases energy which can be measured as the "heat of wetting" for dry wood. In turn, energy must be supplied to wet wood to remove any water that is present. 14 "The forces of attraction between dry wood and water...

  10. One on One- Douglas K Woods

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A September 2014 interview with Douglas K Woods, the President of the Association for Manufacturing Technology, on the state of US manufacturing.

  11. WoodPolymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood­Polymer Composites Prepared by the In Situ Polymerization of Monomers Within Wood Yong-Feng Li in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com). ABSTRACT: Wood­polymer composites (WPCs) were prepared words: composites; mechanical properties; modifi- cation; monomers; renewable resources INTRODUCTION

  12. Seneca Creek Associates, LLC Wood Resources International, LLC "Illegal" Logging and Global Wood Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneca Creek Associates, LLC Wood Resources International, LLC "Illegal" Logging and Global Wood@aol.com; hekstrom@wri-ltd.com October, 2004 #12;Page ES - 1 Illegal Logging and Global Wood Markets: The Competitive, LLC Executive Summary Illegal logging has been high on the agenda, if not directly at the center

  13. Seneca Creek Associates, LLC Wood Resources International, LLC "Illegal" Logging and Global Wood Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seneca Creek Associates, LLC Wood Resources International, LLC SUMMARY "Illegal" Logging and Global Resources International, LLC Illegal Logging and Global Wood Markets: The Competitive Impacts on the U.S. Wood Products Industry1 Summary Study Objectives Illegal logging and illegal forest activities, in one

  14. Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake, Madagascar): diagenesis appraisal and consequences for palaeoenvironmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Sequential fatty acid analysis of a peat core covering the last two millennia (Tritrivakely lake and petrographical work [2], we applied such an approach to the analysis of a peat core section to get additional (saturated and unsaturated n-FAs, plus i-C16) at the surface of the peat sequence and low amounts

  15. An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 2332 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties of peat soils 23 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 23­32 (2003) © EGU An easily installable groundwater lysimeter to determine water balance components and hydraulic properties of peat soils.Schwaerzel@TU-Berlin.de Abstract A simple method for the installation of groundwater lysimeters in peat soils was developed which

  16. CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark,' Associate Member, ASCE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark of natural materials, including peats. organic silts, highly sensitive clays, shales, as well as granular this statement and credit Mesri and Castro (1987) for reporting a C)Cc range of 0.02-0.10 for peats. Ac tually

  17. Integrating BES in the wastewater and sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    , denitrification, and anaerobic digester treatment systems, while chemical methods include phosphate removal, dye of WAS, including treatment of influent or the accumulated sludge with anaerobic digesters (Rulkens 2008; Seghezzo et al. 1998). This is a more sustainable treatment method because methane in biogas can partly

  18. NORDIC WASTE WATER TREATMENT SLUDGE TREATMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    biogas, electricity and fertilizer from 30 000 tons of annually waste. The plant was opened in March 2008 together it an- nually produces 18,9 GWh biogas and around 10 GWh of elec- tricity. The Cambi THP ­process biological sludge, which normally is very difficult to digest and dewater. The THP treats both municipal

  19. SLUDGE BATCH 5 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; David Best, D; David Koopman, D

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing to Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in early fiscal year 2009. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB5 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2007-0007, Rev. 1 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB5 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB5 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the washing plan to prepare SB5 and the estimated SB4 heel mass. Nine DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using both a batch simulant (Tank 51 simulant after washing is complete) and a blend simulant (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). Each simulant had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (115%, 130%, 145% and 160%). One additional run was made using blend simulant at 130% acid that included additions of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) waste prior to acid addition and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) waste following SRAT dewatering. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB5 sludge: (1) This is the first batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution. (2) The sludge is high in mercury. (3) The sludge is high in noble metals. (4) The sludge is high in U and Pu--components that are not added in sludge simulants. Two SB5 processing issues were noted during testing. First, high hydrogen generation rates were measured during experiments with both the blend and batch simulant at high acid stoichiometry. Also, the reflux time was extended due to the high mercury concentration in both the batch and blend simulant. Adding ARP will extend processing times in DWPF. The ARP caustic boil took approximately six hours. The boiling time during the experiment with added MCU was 14 hours at the maximum DWPF steam flux rate. This is comparable to the DWPF processing time for dewatering plus reflux without MCU at a 5000 lbs/hr boil-up rate, but would require significantly more time at boiling at 2000-2500 lbs/hr boil-up rate. The addition of ARP and MCU did not cause any other processing issues, since foaming, rheology and hydrogen generation were less of an issue while processing with ARP/MCU.

  20. Daniel Wood | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOfficeOctoberDaniel Wood About Us Daniel

  1. automatic wood furnaces: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pressure differences that included standard rating points 11 Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: Wood Products 201213 Student...

  2. Permeation of Tank C-103 sludge simulant by organic solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.A.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The plan for stabilizing underground storage tanks (USTs) calls for draining the supernate from the tanks; however, there is concern that draining the supernate from Tank C-103 will degrade safety in the tank. The sludge in Tank C-103 contains ranges in depth from 1 to 1.5 m and is covered by both an aqueous phase and a separate organic layer. The main concern is that draining the supernate will cause the solvent to permeate the sludge solids and provide a source of fuel for a fire on the surface of the drained sludge. The question of whether the solvent will permeate sludge that is 1 to 1.5 m deep after the tank is dewatered is the purpose of the tests conducted and described in this report. Evaluation of the solvent permeation mechanism required the preparation of solvent, supernate, and sludge simulants based on the known chemistry of Tank C-103. Solvent and aqueous phase supernate simulants are based on the results of fiscal year 1994 sampling of the tank solvent and supernate. Sludge simulant is based on the chemical analyses of tank sludge samples retrieved in 1986. Experiments were conducted with each simulant to evaluate solvent permeation under matric potentials ranging from 0.8 m to 1.8 m of supernate. The amount of solvent recovered for each experiment was recorded as well as the maximum amount of solvent that could be din the sludge based on solvent recovered from resuspended sludge and solvent not recovered. The wt% of water remaining in the sludge was also recorded for each experiment, which was determined by measuring the weight of the sludge after drying it. One observation noted from the test results is that the finer sludge material tended to have a greater amount of solvent loss compared to the coarser sludge material at comparable levels of vacuum. At this time, there is no explanation.

  3. Autonomy for Aurora's Mars Missions Mark Woods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Michael

    Autonomy for Aurora's Mars Missions Mark Woods, SciSys Ltd., Clothier Road, Bristol, UK BS4 5SS Email: mark.woods@scisys.co.uk Tel: +44 117 9717251 ESA's Aurora programme incorporates a strategy for European involvement in future robotic and human exploration of our Solar System. The Aurora roadmap calls

  4. Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas...

  5. Leonard Wood and the American Empire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruitt, James Herman

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    During the ten years following the Spanish American War (1898 to 1908), Major General Leonard Wood served as the primary agent of American imperialism. Wood was not only a proconsul of the new American Empire; he was a symbol of the empire...

  6. Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Bolling

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

  7. Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Process designs and cost estimates for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu/day SNG from peat by the PEATGAS Process. Interim report No. 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arora, J.L.; Tsaros, C.L.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents process designs for the manufacture of 250 billion Btu's per day of SNG by the PEATGAS Process from peats. The purpose is to provide a preliminary assessment of the process requirements and economics of converting peat to SNG by the PEATGAS Process and to provide information needed for the Department of Energy (DOE) to plan the scope of future peat gasification studies. In the process design now being presented, peat is dried to 35% moisture before feeding to the PEATGAS reactor. This is the basic difference between the Minnesota peat case discussed in the current report and that presented in the Interim Report No. 5. The current design has overall economic advantages over the previous design. In the PEATGAS Process, peat is gasified at 500 psig in a two-stage reactor consisting of an entrained-flow hydrogasifier followed by a fluidized-bed char gasifier using steam and oxygen. The gasifier operating conditions and performance are necessarily based on the gasification kinetic model developed for the PEATGAS reactor using the laboratory- and PDU-scale data as of March 1978 and April 1979, respectively. On the basis of the available data, this study concludes that, although peat is a low-bulk density and low heating value material requiring large solids handling costs, the conversion of peat to SNG appears competitive with other alternatives being considered for producing SNG because of its very favorable gasification characteristics (high methane formation tendency and high reactivity). As a direct result of the encouraging technical and economic results, DOE is planning to modify the HYGAS facility in order to begin a peat gasification pilot plant project.

  8. Behavior of Uranium(VI) during HEDPA Leaching for Aluminum Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.; Rao, Linfeng; Nash, Kenneth L.; Martin, Leigh

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissolution in Tank Waste Sludges Brian A. Powell 1 ,to produce a clay-like sludge layer, a slurry phase, and anto be concentrated in the sludge phase, which is primarily

  9. Examination of Uranium(VI) Leaching During Ligand Promoted Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Brian A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Hanford waste tank sludge simulants. J. Nucl. Sci.from simulated tank waste sludges. Sep. Sci. Tech. 38(2),Dissolution of Waste Tank Sludge Surrogates. In preparation,

  10. Use of nutrients of sewage sludge in the initial development of Copaifera langsdorffii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampaio, Thalita Fernanda; Guerrini, Iraê Amaral; Croce, Ciro; de Toledo, Maria Angélica; Morales, Marina

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    under the 20 t ha -1 of sludge rate. Figure 1: CopaibaSupl. K) and sewage sludge doses (2.5, 5, 10, 15 e 20 t ha -dm Fe Mn Zn Table 2: Sewage sludge chemical characteristics.

  11. Field-Measured Oxidation Rates of Biologically Reduced Selenium in Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Sally M.; Daggett, John; Zawislansi, Peter

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced Selenium in Sludge Sally M. Benson, John Daggett andCalifornia 94720 U.S.A. Sludge generated during surface-Finding safe and economical sludge disposal methods requires

  12. Functions and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge retrieval and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall functions and requirements for sludge retrieval and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin.

  13. Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Transport of lead and diesel fuel through a peat soil near Juneau, AK: a pilot study Julian Deissa potential of lead (Pb) and diesel range organics (DRO) in palustrine slope wetlands near Juneau, AK; Lead (Pb); Diesel range organic (DRO); Macropore; Rifle range; Wetland 0169-7722/$ - see front matter D

  14. Feedback control of the rate of peat formation Lisa R. Belyea1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    or net sinks at present. Second, long-term rates of peat accumulation (and hence carbon sequestration and carbon sequestration. Keywords: peatlands; soil organic matter; ecosystem dynamics; carbon cycle 1). As a result of these discrepancies, estimates of the rates of carbon sequestration and emission derived from

  15. Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 2, September 1-November 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant; and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities include the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. Drying, grinding, and screening equipment for peat was installed and operated during the previous reporting periods. Three gasification tests (PT-1 through PT-3) had also been conducted using the toluene slurry feed system. Installation of the lockhopper dry feed system was completed on schedule. Shakedown of the system has begun. Operation of the modified 400-ton storage and transport system was successfully demonstrated with peat containing 10% moisture. Preparations for Test PT-4 are currently underway. Data analyses for Test PT-2 were completed and are presented. The low-pressure Plexiglas unit was modified to investigate the use of a downflowing pneumatic feed system for the dryer bed. Initial testing was begun.

  16. High btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 1. Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September, 1980, the US Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a Grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million standard cubic feet per day (SCFD) of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. The proposed product, high Btu SNG would be a suitable substitute for natural gas which is widely used throughout the Upper Midwest by residential, commercial and industrial sectors. The study team consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors, Ertec Atlantic, Inc., The Institute of Gas Technology, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells and Minnegasco. Preliminary engineering and operating and financial plans for the harvesting, dewatering and gasification operations were developed. A site in Koochiching County near Margie was chosen for detailed design purposes only; it was not selected as a site for development. Environmental data and socioeconomic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential economic data were gathered and reconciled. Potential impacts - both positive and negative - were identified and assessed. The peat resource itself was evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Markets for plant by-products were also assessed. In summary, the technical, economic, and environmental assessment indicates that a facility producing 80 billion Btu's per day SNG from peat is not commercially viable at this time. Minnegasco will continue its efforts into the development of peat and continue to examine other options.

  17. Site suitability and evaluation study for Minnegasco's proposed peat gasification facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980, the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) submitted a proposal to the US Department of Energy entitled, A Feasibility Study - High BTU Gas from Peat. The proposal covered a feasibility study to assess the overall viability of designing, constructing, and operating a commercial facility for the production of high-BTU substitute natural gas (SNG) from Minnesota peat. On September 30, 1980, Minnegasco was awarded a grant by the Department of Energy to perform the proposed study. To complete the study, Minnegasco assembled a project team having a wide range of expertise. In addition, the State of Minnesota will participate in some parts of the study in an advisory capacity. The items to be investigated by the project team during the feasibility study include peat harvesting, dewatering, gasification process design, economic and risk assessment, site evaluation, environmental and socioeconomic matters. This report, the first of several to be submitted to Minnegasco by Ertec, has been prepared to outline the status of the site suitability and evaluation study. The purpose of this initial phase of the feasibility study was to identify and evaluate several potential sites in northeastern Minnesota. These sites will be studied in further detail to assess the economic and environmental feasibility of developing the proposed peat gasification facility described in Minnegasco's proposal. 33 figures, 12 tables.

  18. Review of pre-treated peat applied in treating domestic wastewaters and oily waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Cynthia

    has been used as a biogas or green combustible fuel for heating, especially where peat deposits used as a green energy source for heating in the northern parts of Europe and North America. Nowadays are considerable and easy to exploit (Buivid et al., 1980). Recently, for heating purposes, alternative fuels

  19. Phase chemistry and radionuclide retention from simulated tank sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUMHANSL,JAMES L.; LIU,J.; ARTHUR,SARA E.; HUTCHERSON,SHEILA K.; QIAN,MORRIS; ANDERSON,HOWARD L.

    2000-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning high level nuclear waste tanks will leave small amounts of residual sludge clinging to the walls and floor of the structures. The permissible amount of material left in the tanks depends on the radionuclide release characteristics of the sludge. At present, no systematic process exists for assessing how much of the remaining inventory will migrate, and which radioisotopes will remain relatively fixed. Working with actual sludges is both dangerous and prohibitively expensive. Consequently, methods were developed for preparing sludge simulants and doping them with nonradioactive surrogates for several radionuclides and RCRA metals of concern in actual sludges. The phase chemistry of these mixes was found to be a reasonable match for the main phases in actual sludges. Preliminary surrogate release characteristics for these sludges were assessed by lowering the ionic strength and pH of the sludges in the manner that would occur if normal groundwater gained access to a decommissioned tank. Most of the Se, Cs and Tc in the sludges will be released into the first pulse of groundwater passing through the sludge. A significant fraction of the other surrogates will be retained indefinitely by the sludges. This prolonged sequestration results from a combination coprecipitated and sorbed into or onto relatively insoluble phases such as apatite, hydrous oxides of Fe, Al, Bi and rare earth oxides and phosphates. The coprecipitated fraction cannot be released until the host phase dissolves or recrystallizes. The sorbed fraction can be released by ion exchange processes as the pore fluid chemistry changes. However, these releases can be predicted based on a knowledge of the fluid composition and the surface chemistry of the solids. In this regard, the behavior of the hydrous iron oxide component of most sludges will probably play a dominant role for many cationic radionuclides while the hydrous aluminum oxides may be more important in governing anion releases.

  20. Organic Matter Transformation in the Peat Column at Marcell Experimental Forest: Humification and Vertical Stratification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tfaily, Malak [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Cooper, Bill [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Chanton, Patrick R [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Chanton, Jeff P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale ecosystem manipulation (Spruce and Peatland Responses under Climatic and Environmental Change, SPRUCE) is being constructed in the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota, USA, to determine the effects of climatic forcing on ecosystem processes in northern peatlands. Prior to the initiation of the manipulation, we characterized the solid-phase peat to a depth of 2 meters using a variety of techniques, including peat C:N ratios, 13C and 15N isotopic composition, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT IR), and 13C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy (13C NMR). FT IR determined peat humification-levels increased rapidly between and 75 cm, indicating a highly reactive zone. We observed a rapid drop in the abundance of O-alkyl-C, carboxyl-C, and other oxygenated functionalities within this zone and a concomitant increase in the abundance of alkyl- and nitrogen-containing compounds. Below 75-cm, minimal change was observed except that aromatic functionalities accumulated with depth. Incubation studies revealed the highest methane production rates and greatest CH4:CO2 ratios within this and 75 cm zone. Hydrology and surface vegetation played a role in belowground carbon cycling. Radiocarbon signatures of microbial respiration products in deeper porewaters resembled the signatures of dissolved organic carbon rather than solid phase peat, indicating that more recently photosynthesized organic matter fueled the bulk of subsurface microbial respiration. Oxygen-containing functionalities, especially O-alkyl-C, appear to serve as an excellent proxy for soil decomposition rate, and in addition should be a sensitive indicator of the response of the solid phase peat to the climatic manipulation.

  1. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDY FOR TANK 241-AY-102 SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes the analyses performed on core samples from the sludge region of the waste in Tank 241-AY-102 to determine the electrochemical corrosion potential.

  2. activated sludge wastewater: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The wastewater shows 7 Temperature Modeling in Activated Sludge Systems: A Case Study Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: steady-state and dynamic...

  3. SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

  4. Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Disposal of CCA-treated Wood: An Evaluation of Existing and Alternative Management Options (FINAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CCA-TREATED WOOD ASH II.1 Sample Preparation 10 II.2 Laboratory Methods 15 II.3 Laboratory Results 24 CHAPTER III, SORTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR SEPARATING TREATED WOOD FROM UNTREATED WOOD III.1

  5. North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash North American wood markets hit by United States housing crash

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    themes were: 1. softwood market developments, and 2. wood energy and wood mobilization. The main use of wood for energy throughout the UNECE region, driven by policy measures and high oil prices development, which will have to try to balance the needs of the established wood products sector and the bio-energy

  6. The Role of Alternative Respiration Pathways and the Effect of Nutrient Loading on Peat Decomposition in Plum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    1 The Role of Alternative Respiration Pathways and the Effect of Nutrient Loading on Peat by stimulating soil metabolism and increasing translocation of belowground resources to aboveground plant biomass

  7. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels From the Woods to the Refinery Stephen S. Kelley, Principal and Department Head, Department of Forest Biomaterials, North Carolina State University

  8. Residential Wood Heating Fuel Exemption (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New York exempts retail sales of wood used for residential heating purposes from the state sales tax. The law also permits local governments (municipalities and counties) to grant an exemption from...

  9. Wood Fired Steam Plants in Georgia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulpitt, W. S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    suppliers. Based upon the designs submitted and subsequent negotiations, the Applied Engineering Company (APCO) in Orangeburg, South Carolina, was chosen to do the job. Applied Engineering has been working on wood gasification systems for several years...-20, 1983 company has a large manufacturing plant in Orange burg and is fully capable of fabricating large pressure vessels and heavy industrial equipment. The overall wood gasification system is shown in Figure 1. The fuel for the gasifier is green...

  10. A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

    A WOOD-FIRED GAS TURBINE PLANT Sam H. Powell, Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga, Tennessee Joseph T. Hamrick, Aerospace Research Corporation, RBS Electric, Roanoke, VA Abstract This paper covers the research and development of a wood...-fired gas turbine unit that is used for generating electricity. The system uses one large cyclonic combustor and a cyclone cleaning system in series to provide hot gases to drive an Allison T-56 aircraft engine (the industrial version is the 50l-k). A...

  11. Selective hydrolysis of wastewater sludge Part 1, December 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the production of biogas based power and heat besides reduce the power consumption from handling and treatment selective hydrolysis of sludge as if established at the existing sludge digester system . The Esbjerg digester technology .l'he plant treats combined household and industrial wastewater with a considerable

  12. Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

  13. APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6 Best Practice Guidance for Land Regeneration harmful organisms (plant, animal and human pathogens) in insufficiently composted materials · If C NOTE 6 PAGE 2 Applications of sewage sludges and composts Forestry Tree growth on nutrient

  14. Resources recovery of oil sludge by pyrolysis: Kinetics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shie, J.L.; Chang, C.Y.; Lin, J.P.; Wu, C.H.; Lee, D.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil sludge, if unused, is one of the major industrial wastes needed to be treated for the petroleum refinery plant or petrochemical industry. It contains a large amount of combustibles with high heating values. The treatment of waste oil sludge by burning has certain benefit; however, it cannot provide the useful resource efficiently. On the other hand, the conversion of oil sludge to lower molecule weight organic compounds by pyrolysis not only solves the disposal problem but also matches the appeal of resource utilization. The major sources of oil sludge include the oil storage tank sludge, the biological sludge, the dissolve air flotation (DAF) scum, the American Petroleum Institute (API) separator sludge and the chemical sludge. In this study, the oil sludge from the oil storage tank of a typical petroleum refinery plant located in the northern Taiwan is used as the raw material of pyrolysis. Its heating value of dry basis and low heating value of wet basis are about 10,681 k cal/kg and 5,870 k cal/kg, respectively. The removal of the moisture of oil sludge significantly increases its heating value. The pyrolysis of oil sludge is conducted by the use of nitrogen as the carrier gas in the temperature range of 380 {approximately} 1,073 K and at various constant heating rates of 5.2, 12.8 and 21.8 K/min. The pyrolytic reaction is significant in 450 {approximately} 800 K and complex. For the sake of simplicity and engineering use, a one-reaction kinetic model is proposed for the pyrolysis of oil sludge, and is found to satisfactorily fit the experimental data. The activation energy, reaction order and frequency factor of the corresponding pyrolysis reaction in nitrogen for oil sludge are 78.22 kJ/mol, 2.92 and 9.48 105 l/min, respectively. These results are very useful for the proper design of the pyrolysis system of the oil sludge under investigation.

  15. WOODS FROM TERRESTRIAL SITES DETERIORATION IN HISTORIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanchette, Robert A.

    that survive the many forms of biological and chemical deterioration are extremely valuable resources since in saturated soils or peat bogs in a waterlogged condition. The major factor responsible for protecting

  16. High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KETUSKY, EDWARD

    2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

  17. Solidification of low-volume power plant sludges. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, N.E.; Halverson, M.A.; Mercer, B.M.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review was conducted to obtain information on the status of hazardous waste solidification technology and application of this technology to low-volume power plant waste sludges. Because of scarcity of sludge composition data, anticipated major components were identified primarily by chemical reactions that are known to occur during treatment of specific wastewaters. Chemical and physical properties of these sludges were critically analyzed for compatibility with several types of commercially available solidification processes. The study pointed out the need for additional information on the nature of these sludges, especially leaching characteristics and the presence of substances that will interfere with solidification processes. Laboratory studies were recommended for evaluation of solidification process which have the greatest potential for converting hazardous low-volume sludges to non-hazardous waste forms.

  18. High-Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Task 11. Technical support. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded grant No. DE-FG01-80RA50348 to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the commercial viability - technical, economic and environmental - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG) from peat. Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering and gasification systems); Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socioeconomic analyses); Institute of Gas Technology (for gasification process information, and technical and engineering support). This report presents the work conducted under Task II (Technical Support) by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the developer of the PEATGAS process, which was selected for the study. Task achievements are presented for: gasifier design and performance; technical support; and task management. 12 figures, 22 tables.

  19. SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

  20. Sludge Treatment Evaluation: 1992 Technical progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva, L J; Felmy, A R; Ding, E R

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents Fiscal Year 1992 technical progress on the Sludge Treatment Evaluation Task, which is being conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of this task is to develop a capability to predict the performance of pretreatment processes for mixed radioactive and hazardous waste stored at Hanford and other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Significant cost savings can be achieved if radionuclides and other undesirable constituents can be effectively separated from the bulk waste prior to final treatment and disposal. This work is initially focused on chemical equilibrium prediction of water washing and acid or base dissolution of Hanford single-shell tank (SST) sludges, but may also be applied to other steps in pretreatment processes or to other wastes. Although SST wastes contain many chemical species, there are relatively few constituents -- Na, Al, NO[sub 3], NO[sub 2], PO[sub 4], SO[sub 4], and F -- contained in the majority of the waste. These constituents comprise 86% and 74% of samples from B-110 and U-110 SSTS, respectively. The major radionuclides of interest (Cs, Sr, Tc, U) are present in the sludge in small molal quantities. For these constituents, and other important components that are present in small molal quantities, the specific ion-interaction terms used in the Pitzer or NRTL equations may be assumed to be zero for a first approximation. Model development can also be accelerated by considering only the acid or base conditions that apply for the key pretreatment steps. This significantly reduces the number of chemical species and chemical reactions that need to be considered. Therefore, significant progress can be made by developing all the specific ion interactions for a base model and an acid dissolution model.

  1. Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolaei, Alireza Rezania

    Biodegradation of triclosan and formation of methyl-triclosan in activated sludge under aerobic in activated sludge from a standard activated sludge WWTP equipped with enhanced biological phosphorus removal) and anaerobic conditions rather low removal rates were determined. In a laboratory-scale activated sludge

  2. Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Pilot Scale Study of Excess Sludge Production Reduction in Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Yuan Ma-scale reactors were operated at the LaPrairie Wastewater Treatment plant (one control and one ozonated) to investigate the sludge reduction potential of partially ozonating sludge return activated sludge (RAS

  3. European Panel FederationEuropean Panel Federation viewpoint on wood energy policiesviewpoint on wood energy policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    --called "green energy"called "green energy" ·· Simultaneously, the taxes on the use of fossil fuelsSimultaneously, the taxes on the use of fossil fuels increaseincrease ·· This leads to increasing costs for wood productsIncreasing use of wood for energy production ·· Governments in Europe are granting subsidies for

  4. Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Closed Loop Recycling of PreservativeClosed Loop Recycling of Preservative Treated WoodTreated Wood.2 million cubic meters) of lumber treated with CCA are produced annually in the United States (Micklewright 1998). ·In 1997, for example, some 581.4 million cu. ft. was treated with waterborne preservatives

  5. Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.P.

    2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

  6. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. “Utilization of sewage sludge in EU application of old2007. “Cost evaluation of sludge treatment options andwastewater treatment plant sludge treating leather tanning

  7. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestion for2010). The biogas produced by sludge anaerobic digestion canThickener Sludge pretreatment Biogas Digester Residual

  8. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

  9. SLUDGE BATCH 4: MODEL BASED ASSESSMENTS OF THE FEBRUARY 2007 SLUDGE PROJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Kevin Fox, K

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed, and continues to enhance, its integrated capability to evaluate the impact of proposed sludge preparation plans on the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF's) operation. One of the components of this integrated capability focuses on frit development which identifies a viable frit or frits for each sludge option being contemplated for DWPF processing. A frit is considered viable if its composition allows for economic fabrication and if, when it is combined with the sludge option under consideration, the DWPF property/composition models (the models of DWPF's Product Composition Control System (PCCS)) indicate that the combination has the potential for an operating window (a waste loading (WL) interval over which the sludge/frit glass system satisfies processability and durability constraints) that would allow DWPF to meet its goals for waste loading and canister production. This report documents the results of SRNL's efforts to identify candidate frit compositions and corresponding predicted operating windows (defined in terms of WL intervals) for the February 2007 compositional projection of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) developed by the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO). The nominal compositional projection was used to assess projected operating windows (in terms of a waste loading interval over which all predicted properties were classified as acceptable) for various frits, evaluate the applicability of the 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} PCCS limit to the glass systems of interest, and determine the impact (or lack thereof) to the previous SB4 variability studies. It should be mentioned that the information from this report will be coupled with assessments of melt rate to recommend a frit for SB4 processing. The results of this paper study suggest that candidate frits are available to process the nominal SB4 composition over attractive waste loadings of interest to DWPF. Specifically, two primary candidate frits for SB4 processing, Frit 510 and Frit 418, have projected operating windows that should allow for successful processing at DWPF. While Frit 418 has been utilized at DWPF, Frit 510 is a higher B{sub 2}O{sub 3} based frit which could lead to improvements in melt rate. These frits provide relatively large operating windows and demonstrate robustness to possible sludge compositional variation while avoiding potential nepheline formation issues. In addition, assessments of SO{sub 4}{sup =} solubility indicate that the 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} limit in PCCS is applicable for the Frit 418 and the Frit 510 based SB4 glass systems.

  10. A new method of petroleum sludge disposal and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanakamedala, R.D.; Islam, M.R. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Disposal of the oil sludge is one of the fundamental problems of petroleum production. Increasingly stringent environmental control regulations, lack of final disposal sites, and high costs involved in disposal have resulted in limitations off oil sludge disposal options. In this study, two options for disposing the oil sludge are investigated. One option is the use of solid-liquid centrifugal separation. The second option is the use of the oil sludge as a cementing material. It is shown that the two options can be used in tandem for total remediation of the petroleum sludge. If the initial oil concentration in the sludge is high, high temperature centrifugation with biodegradable surfactant is recommended to lower the concentration to a reasonable value. The resulting solid extract was mixed with cement and silica fume and examined for cementing properties. Evaluation of compressive strengths of the mortar cubes indicates that it is possible to produce cement from the oil sludge which will satisfy the strength requirements in the ASTM standard for masonry cement.

  11. SLUDGE RETRIEVAL FROM HANFORD K WEST BASIN SETTLER TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERPENBECK EG; LESHIKAR GA

    2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was deployed to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from ten submerged tanks in Hanford's K-West Basin. As part of K-West Basin cleanup, the accumulated sludge needed to be removed from the 0.5 meter diameter by 5 meter long settler tanks and transferred approximately 45 meters to an underwater container for sampling and waste treatment. The abrasive, dense, non-homogeneous sludge was the product of the washing process of corroded nuclear fuel. It consists of small (less than 600 micron) particles of uranium metal, uranium oxide, and various other constituents, potentially agglomerated or cohesive after 10 years of storage. The Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS) was developed to access, mobilize and pump out the sludge from each tank using a standardized process of retrieval head insertion, periodic high pressure water spray, retraction, and continuous pumping of the sludge. Blind operations were guided by monitoring flow rate, radiation levels in the sludge stream, and solids concentration. The technology developed and employed in the STRS can potentially be adapted to similar problematic waste tanks or pipes that must be remotely accessed to achieve mobilization and retrieval of the sludge within.

  12. 15th International Conference Ramiran, May 3-6, 2013, Versailles Accounting GHG emissions from sludge treatment and disposal routes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sludge treatment and disposal routes ­ methodological problems focused on sludge land spreading% of sewage sludge is directly land spreading or composted before land spreading. Sludge application to quantify GHG emissions emitted during sludge treatment and disposal routes. This paper aims to present how

  13. Shear Strength Measurement Benchmarking Tests for K Basin Sludge Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Luna, Maria; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Equipment development and demonstration testing for sludge retrieval is being conducted by the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) at the MASF (Maintenance and Storage Facility) using sludge simulants. In testing performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (under contract with the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company), the performance of the Geovane instrument was successfully benchmarked against the M5 Haake rheometer using a series of simulants with shear strengths (?) ranging from about 700 to 22,000 Pa (shaft corrected). Operating steps for obtaining consistent shear strength measurements with the Geovane instrument during the benchmark testing were refined and documented.

  14. 241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal.

  15. 241-Z-361 Sludge Characterization Sampling and Analysis Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BANNING, D.L.

    1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis plan (SAP) identifies the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to support characterization of the sludge that remains in Tank 241-2-361. The procedures described in this SAP are based on the results of the 241-2-361 Sludge Characterization Data Quality Objectives (DQO) (BWHC 1999) process for the tank. The primary objectives of this project are to evaluate the contents of Tank 241-2-361 in order to resolve safety and safeguards issues and to assess alternatives for sludge removal and disposal.

  16. Department of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geldenhuys, Jaco

    ; harvesting and supply; biomass conversion; energy production; marketing of bio-energy; economicsDepartment of Forest and Wood Science Academic Programmes for 2014 Postgraduate Diploma Enquiries: Head of Department Contact details: Department of Forest and Wood Science Stellenbosch University

  17. Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies Bengt Hillring SLU SWEDEN http://www.unece.org/trade/timber/docs/tc-sessions/tc-61/presentations/10-hillring.pdf #12;Introduction · Industrial use of wood fibre has increased · Oil

  18. A study of the molecular mechanics of wood cell walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, David, S.M. (David C.). Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood is the original structural material, developed by nature to support tall plants. Every advantageous feature of wood as used in artificial structures is rooted in the plant's evolved capability to withstand the conditions ...

  19. Method of predicting mechanical properties of decayed wood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelley, Stephen S.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the mechanical properties of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms, comprising: a) illuminating a surface of decayed wood that has been exposed to wood decay microorganisms with wavelengths from visible and near infrared (VIS-NIR) spectra; b) analyzing the surface of the decayed wood using a spectrometric method, the method generating a first spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra region; and c) using a multivariate analysis to predict mechanical properties of decayed wood by comparing the first spectral data with a calibration model, the calibration model comprising a second spectrometric method of spectral data of wavelengths in VIS-NIR spectra obtained from a reference decay wood, the second spectral data being correlated with a known mechanical property analytical result obtained from the reference decayed wood.

  20. Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    ForReview Only Assembly history dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer change, community assembly, ecosystem functioning, New Zealand Nothofagus (beech) forests, priority dictates ecosystem functioning: evidence from wood decomposer communities Tadashi Fukami1,2,3 , Ian A

  1. Clean-Burning Wood Stove Grant Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) now offers the Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program as part of its Residential Clean Energy Grant Program. The Clean Burning Wood Stove Grant program...

  2. Guide to Using Wood Ash as an Agricultural Soil Amendment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    from larger commercial sources such as wood-burning biomass plants which produce heat or electricity in the soil. Wood ash is more soluble and reactive than ground limestone, and brings about a Benefits Recycles

  3. International Trade of Wood Pellets (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of wood pellets has increased dramatically in recent years due in large part to aggressive emissions policy in the European Union; the main markets that currently supply the European market are North America and Russia. However, current market circumstances and trade dynamics could change depending on the development of emerging markets, foreign exchange rates, and the evolution of carbon policies. This fact sheet outlines the existing and potential participants in the wood pellets market, along with historical data on production, trade, and prices.

  4. Peat gasification pilot plant program. Project 70105 quarterly report No. 3, December 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this program is twofold: (1) to modify an existing pilot plant; and (2) to operate the pilot plant with peat to produce substitute natural gas (SNG). Activities include the design, procurement, and installation of peat drying, grinding, screening, and lockhopper feed systems. Equipment installed for the program complements the existing pilot plant facility. The lockhopper system was successfully integrated with the gasifier, and shakedown of the newly installed unit was completed. Test PT-4, the first test using this system, was completed during January. Results far exceeded the objectives set for this test. One hundred fifty tons of Minnesota peat containing up to 25-weight-percent moisture were fed to the gasifier at a pressure of 300 psig. Peat conversions averaged more than 90%. Over 57 hours of steady operating time were selected for data analysis. Post-run inspection following Test PT-4 was completed. Peat dried to 10 and 20-weight-percent moisture is currently being stored in preparation for Test PT-5, scheduled to begin in March.

  5. The Storage and Seasoning of Pecan Bud Wood.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brison, Fred R. (Fred Robert)

    1933-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be returned to cold storage and will remain ready for use at a later date. It has been found that bud wood cut late in the dormant period seasons in a shorter time than that cut early. Bud wood of the Delmas variety seasons more readiIy than that of Stuart... _._-_._.--__..__------~-..._..--_...._.--_.....-. Relation of Time of Cutting Bud Wood to Seasoning ._.__....._._-___._------------ ., Relative Response of Stuart and Delmas in Seasoning _---..__._.__....._.---....-....--.- 10 Number of Days for Seasoning Bud Wood During Different Months .... 12 Storage...

  6. OVERVIEW OF TESTING TO SUPPORT PROCESSING OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site began processing of its third sludge batch in March 2004. To avoid a feed outage in the facility, the next sludge batch will have to be prepared and ready for transfer to the DWPF by the end of 2006. The next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), will consist of a significant volume of HM-type sludge. HM-type sludge is very high in aluminum compared to the mostly Purex-type sludges that have been processed to date. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with Liquid Waste Operations to define the sludge preparation plans and to perform testing to support qualification and processing of SB4. Significant challenges have arisen during SB4 preparation and testing to include poor sludge settling behavior and lower than desired projected melt rates. An overview of the testing activities is provided.

  7. APPLIED ISSUES Effects of agriculture on wood breakdown and microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Jackson R.

    creating the potential for recovery of ecosystem processes. 2. We examined wood breakdown and microbial breakdown. Wood may not be desirable as a tool for Correspondence: M. E. McTammany, Biology DepartmentAPPLIED ISSUES Effects of agriculture on wood breakdown and microbial biofilm respiration

  8. Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris: Arsenic phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills

  9. Wood Fuel Future: The Potential Web Text December 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood Fuel Future: The Potential Web Text 31st December 2010 Wood Fuel Future: The Potential Wood Fuel Future : The Potential Renewable Energy is a key part of our Energy Policy. This UK Government by 2020. This should reduce carbon emissions from fossil fuel by 60% by the year 2050. The Welsh Assembly

  10. Center for Wood Utilization Progress Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    , Asia, and Latin America. A business plan was developed to capture 1% of the $2.5 billion h manufacturing; and (c) lead to more efficient use of renewable wood-based materials for the benefit of Americans. Renewable wood is essential to human existence. Wood utilization research is critical to national needs

  11. anaerobic sewage sludge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and staff available for flue gas scrubbing test with dry lime sludge. The Ames Power Plant provided fly ash for the construction of the test embankment. iii Disclaimer "The...

  12. aerobic activated sludge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and staff available for flue gas scrubbing test with dry lime sludge. The Ames Power Plant provided fly ash for the construction of the test embankment. iii Disclaimer "The...

  13. Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

  14. Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

  15. acid tar sludges: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to my peers Jaewoo Chung, Drew Harry, Andrea Colaco, Dori Lin, and Matt 10 Composting Manure and Sludge Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: composting,thefinalproductgener-...

  16. Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

  17. activated sludge samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on website http:www.wrc.org.za Plant-soil interactions of sludge-borne heavy metals and the Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: of the wastewater treatment works in...

  18. Temperature effects on seawater batch activated sludge systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wigley, Henry Albert

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON SEAMATER BATCH ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by HENRY ALBERT WIGLEY, JR. Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1972 Major Subject: Civil Engineerinq TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON SEAWATER BATCH ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by HENRY ALBERT WIGLEY, JR. Approved as to style and content by: C ai rman o ommi ttee Head of D partmen Member Member May 1972...

  19. Ahmet H. Aydilek, 1 Tuncer B. Edil, 1 Patrick J. Fox2 Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    Sludge ________________________________________________________________________ Reference: Aydilek, A. H., Edil, T. B., and Fox, P. J., "Consolidation Characteristics of Wastewater Sludge", Geotechnics of High contaminated sludge. The Madison Metropolitan Sewerage District evaluated different remediation alternatives

  20. Evolution of organic matter indicators in response to major environmental changes: The case of a formerly cut-over peat bog (Le Russey, Jura Mountains, France)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    peat re-accumulation and long term carbon sequestration in formerly exploited peatlands of pristine peatlands to act as carbon sinks is now well established (Gorham, 1991). Nevertheless, peat bogs for their specific biodiversity and suitability for long term carbon storage. Thus, much work has been carried out

  1. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS SUMMARY REPORT [VOLUME 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FREDERICKSON JR; ROURK RJ; HONEYMAN JO; JOHNSON ME; RAYMOND RE

    2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly radioactive sludge (containing up to 300,000 curies of actinides and fission products) resulting from the storage of degraded spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in temporary containers located in the 105-K West storage basin near the Columbia River. The background, history, and known characteristics of this sludge are discussed in Section 2 of this report. There are many compelling reasons to remove this sludge from the K-Basin. These reasons are discussed in detail in Section1, and they include the following: (1) Reduce the risk to the public (from a potential release of highly radioactive material as fine respirable particles by airborne or waterborn pathways); (2) Reduce the risk overall to the Hanford worker; and (3) Reduce the risk to the environment (the K-Basin is situated above a hazardous chemical contaminant plume and hinders remediation of the plume until the sludge is removed). The DOE-RL has stated that a key DOE objective is to remove the sludge from the K-West Basin and River Corridor as soon as possible, which will reduce risks to the environment, allow for remediation of contaminated areas underlying the basins, and support closure of the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The environmental and nuclear safety risks associated with this sludge have resulted in multiple legal and regulatory remedial action decisions, plans,and commitments that are summarized in Table ES-1 and discussed in more detail in Volume 2, Section 9.

  2. Wood Fired Steam Plants in Georgia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulpitt, W. S.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Shortly after that time, Georgia Tech and the Georgia Forestry Commission embarked on a number of projects directed toward providing the use of wood as an industrial energy source. This paper will present an overview of these programs with an emphasis...

  3. Woods Safety SFRC UF 7/09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Woods Safety SFRC UF 7/09 #12;Working alone #12;Poison Plants Poison ivy (Toxicodendron radicans) Poison oak (Toxicodendron pubescens) #12;Commonly Mistaken Plants Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) Blackberry (Rubus spp.) Three leaflets let it be! #12;Poison Ivy/Oak Prevention: · Wear long

  4. Updated 1-12 Bryan H. Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as an attorney with the Department of the Navy's Office of the General Counsel (OGC). Initially appointed as ONR Counsel in 2007, he was the first Navy OGC attorney to deploy to a combat zone in his civilian OGC Force-Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) in Djibouti, Africa. Mr. Wood began his career with Navy OGC

  5. A Wood-Fired Gas Turbine Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, S. H.; Hamrick, J. T.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper covers the research and development of a wood-fired gas turbine unit that is used for generating electricity. The system uses one large cyclonic combustor and a cyclone cleaning system in series to provide hot gases to drive an Allison T...

  6. CORRUPTION AND ILLEGAL LOGGING IN THE WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pettenella, Davide

    CORRUPTION AND ILLEGAL LOGGING IN THE WOOD PRODUCTS MARKET: the Italian experience in controlling Science 7 May 2004 Paper organization 1. State of the problem 2. Are Italian companies involved in deforestation and trade of illegal logging? 3. Which are the most affected countries? 4. Why do we need

  7. PASSION FOR WOOD THE DLH GROUP 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    countries on 5 continents · 19 timber merchant companies in Denmark, 10 of which have do-it-yourself stores Division consists of 19 timber merchant companies in Denmark, just over half of which have an adjacent doPASSION FOR WOOD THE DLH GROUP 2006 #12;54% 21% 25% ONE OF THE WORLD'S MAJOR TIMBER WHOLESALERS

  8. Energie-Cits 2001 BIOMASS -WOOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energie-Cités 2001 BIOMASS - WOOD Gasification / Cogeneration ARMAGH United Kingdom Gasification is transferring the combustible matters in organic waste or biomass into gas and pure char by burning the fuel via it allows biomass in small-scaled engines and co-generation units ­ which with conventional technologies

  9. Harvested Wood Products -an Incentive for Deforestation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    1 Harvested Wood Products - an Incentive for Deforestation? Andreas Fischlin1 Abstract Mitigation for deforestation is real. To curb the disadvantages of HWP, some debiting of non-sustainable forest management activities are implemented that provide true disincentives to deforestation, HWP may continue to create some

  10. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An alternative approach to accelerated PF curing can be accomplished with the addition amines or amides. The later functionality undergoes base catalyzed hydrolysis yielding the corresponding carboxyl ate and free amine which rapidly reacts with the phenolic methylol groups facilitating polymerization and curing of the PF resin (Pizzi, 1997).

  11. Biotechnology to separate and treat metals in sludge and wastewater: A literature review. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, B.; Cha, D.K.; Song, J.S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Army industrial sludge may be classified as a hazardous waste when it contains oil and grease, metals, and energetic compounds. Biologic separation/treatment of metals from industrial sludge has been identified as a possible alternative to conventional technologies for treating industrial sludge. Biologic treatment of sludge uses naturally occurring biochemical reactions in which pollutants can be used as resources. The process offers a low-cost, highly efficient alternative to existing sludge treatment methods. This report summarizes a literature review that examined the development and status of biotechnology to separate and treat metals in sludge and wastewater.

  12. Air emissions assessment and air quality permitting for a municipal waste landfill treating municipal sewage sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, J. [Woodward-Clyde International -- Americas, Oakland, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a case study into the air quality permitting of a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill in the San Francisco Bay Area undergoing a proposed expansion in operations to increase the life of the landfill. The operations of this facility include MSW landfilling, the treatment and disposal of municipal sewage sludge, the aeration of petroleum-contaminated soils, the construction of a new on-site plant to manufacture soil amendment products from waste wood and other organic material diverted from the landfill, and the installation of a vaporator to create steam from leachate for injection into the landfill gas flare. The emissions assessment for each project component relied upon interpretation of source tests from similar operations, incorporation of on-site measurements into emissions models and mass balances, and use of AP-42 procedures for emissions sources such as wind-blown dust, material handling and transfer operations, and fugitive landfill gas. Air permitting issues included best available control technology (BACT), emission offset thresholds, new source performance standards (NSPS), potential air toxics health risk impacts, and compliance with federal Title V operating permit requirements. With the increasing difficulties of siting new landfills, increasing pressures to reduce the rate of waste placement into existing landfills, and expanding regulatory requirements on landfill operations, experiences similar to those described in this paper are likely to increase in the future as permitting scenarios become more complex.

  13. In: After Wise Use The Future of Peatlands, C. Farrell & J. Feehan Eds, Proceedings of the 13th International Peat Congress, Ireland, Tullamore, 8-13 June 2008, IPS (Finland), 2008, pp. 599-602.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    International Peat Congress, Ireland, Tullamore, 8-13 June 2008, IPS (Finland), 2008, pp. 599-602. Effects), the microbial diversity and activity in Sphagnum mosses and in peat, and the dynamics of labile and recalcitrant organic matter of peat. The ultimate objective is the creation of a insu-00321910,version1-16Sep2008

  14. Coir Dust, A Viable Alternative to Peat Moss http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/Environmental/Media_Nutrition/COIR%20p... 1 of 6 2/8/2007 11:05 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzotti, Frank

    Coir Dust, A Viable Alternative to Peat Moss http://flrec.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/Environmental/Media_Nutrition/COIR%20p... 1 of 6 2/8/2007 11:05 AM Coir Dust, A Viable Alternative to Peat Moss Alan W. Meerow Associate dust could function remarkably well as a substitute for various peat products in soilless container

  15. In situ quantification of CH4 bubbling events from a peat soil using a new infrared laser spectrometer Sbastien Gogo Christophe Guimbaud Fatima Laggoun-Dfarge Valry Catoire Claude Robert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 In situ quantification of CH4 bubbling events from a peat soil using a new infrared laser in May 2009, in Sphagnum and Betula plots, and in a wet artificially bared peat area with Eriophorum of increased CH4 production and accumulation in peat. In May, bubbling was higher at nighttime (65.5%) than

  16. Bogs are a specialized wetland community with saturated, acidic, peat soils that have low concentra-tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential nutrients (phosphorus, nitrogen). They

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    , acidic, peat soils that have low concentra- tions of minerals (e.g., calcium, magnesium) and essential of living Sphagnum mosses growing over a layer of saturated, acidic peat. Sedges, forbs and/or the low), pitcher plant (Sarracenia purpurea) and sundew (Drosera rotundifolia). SOILS: Fibric peat (Histosols

  17. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 2. Management plans for project continuation. Task 10. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to determine the needs of the project upon completion of the feasibility study and determine how to implement them most effectively. The findings of the study do not justify the construction of an 80 billion Btu/day SNG from peat plant. At the present time Minnegasco will concentrate on other issues of peat development. Other processes, other products, different scales of operation - these are the issues that Minnegasco will continue to study. 3 references.

  18. Effects of essential element concentration upon growth and development of tomato seedlings grown in a peat-perlite medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sikes, Vernon Ross

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ESSENTIAL EIENENT CONCENTRATION UPON GRQPZH AND BEVE~ OF TOTO BKDLINGS GRQlM IN A PEAT-IKRIZTE NEDIQ4 A Thesis Vernon Ross Sihes APPrped as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head of DePartment Nay 196R Ths nutbar wishes to exyress bis... perlite snd s~Lnum peat moss consis- tently produced higher qual1ty floriculture crops than sny other xxLs- ture used, They xeported that varLations in plant grosth from ths use of animal senores and organLc compounds~ and differences in dec...

  19. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

  20. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part B. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco), and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasibility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part B of Volume 3 contains the following contents: (1) project impact assessment which covers geological impacts, hydrology, ecological impacts, air quality and meteorology, land use, archaeology, aesthetics, acoustics, socioeconomic impacts, and peat resources; (2) impact mitigation which covers hydrology, ecology, air quality, archaeology, acoustics, and socioeconomics; (3) conclusions; and (4) appendices. 2 figures, 18 tables.

  1. K Basin sludge polychlorinated biphenyl removal technology assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The two Hanford K Basins are water-filled concrete pools that contain over 2,100 metric tons of N Reactor fuel elements stored in aluminum or stainless steel canisters. During the time the fuel has been stored, approximately 50 m3 of heterogeneous solid material have accumulated in the basins. This material, referred to as sludge, is a mixture of fuel corrosion products, metallic bits of spent fuel and zirconium clad iron and metal corrosion products and silica from migrating sands. Some of the sludges also contain PCBs. The congener group of PCBs was identified as Aroclor 1254. The maximum concentration of sludge PCBS was found to be 140 ppm (as settled wet basis). However, the distribution of the PCBs is non-uniform throughout the sludge (i.e., there are regions of high and low concentrations and places where no PCBs are present). Higher concentrations could be present at various locations. Aroclors 1016/1242, 1221, 1248, 1254, and 1260 were identified and quantified in K West (KW) Canister sludge. In some of these samples, the concentration of 1260 was higher than 1254. The sludge requires pre-treatment to meet tank farm waste acceptance criteria, Among the numerous requirements, the sludge should be retreated so that it does not contain regulated levels of Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) compounds. Because of their stable chemistry and relative insolubility in water, PCBs are difficult to treat. They also resist degradation from heat and electrical charges. This stability has resulted in environmental persistence which has prompted the development of a variety of new cleanup processes including supercritical processes, advanced oxidation, dehalogenation and others. Hopefully, most of the new processes are discussed herein. Information on new processes are being received and will be evaluated in a future revision.

  2. Systematic Multimodeling Methodology Applied to an Activated Sludge Reactor Anca Maria Nagy,*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Systematic Multimodeling Methodology Applied to an Activated Sludge Reactor Model Anca Maria Nagy for analysis or control purpose. This method is applied to an activated sludge reactor model. Introduction

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF DATABASE ON FECAL SLUDGE COLLECTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL IN THACHIN,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    i DEVELOPMENT OF DATABASE ON FECAL SLUDGE COLLECTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL IN THACHIN, CHAOPRAYA Sludge (FS) management and lacking of data on FS collection, treatment and disposal. Nevertheless, FS

  4. Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N nature of the polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) they are mostly bound to the sludge and escape aerobic

  5. Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development: Results of FY 1993 studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Barrington, R.J.; Rapko, B.M.; Carlson, C.D.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes experimental results from work conducted in FY 1993 under the Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development Task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experiments were conducted in the following six general areas: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge leaching, (3) sludge dissolution, (4) actinide separation by solvent extraction and extraction chromatography, (5) Sr separation by solvent extraction, and (6) extraction of Cs from acidic solution.

  6. Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vail, T.S.

    1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

  7. SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M; David Best, D

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

  8. INTEC SBW Solid Sludge Surrogate Recipe and Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maio, Vince; Janikowski, Stuart; Johnson, Jim; Maio, Vince; Pao, Jenn-Hai

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nonhazardous INTEC tank farm sludge surrogate that incorporated metathesis reactions to generate solids from solutions of known elements present in the radioactive INTEC tank farm sodium-bearing waste sludges was formulated. Elemental analyses, physical property analyses, and filtration testing were performed on waste surrogate and tank farm waste samples, and the results were compared. For testing physical systems associated with moving the tank farm solids, the surrogate described in this report is the best currently available choice. No other available surrogate exhibits the noted similarities in behavior to the sludges. The chemical morphology, particle size distribution, and settling and flow characteristics of the surrogate were similar to those exhibited by the waste sludges. Nonetheless, there is a difference in chemical makeup of the surrogate and the tank farm waste. If a chemical treatment process were to be evaluated for final treatment and disposition of the waste sludges, the surrogate synthesis process would likely require modification to yield a surrogate with a closer matching chemical composition.

  9. A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A nonlinear observer design for an activated sludge wastewater treatment process B. Boulkrounea , M of the proposed observer are shown through the application to an activated sludge process model. Keywords : Activated sludge, wastewater treatment process, Lyapunov function, Lips- chitz singular discrete

  10. Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Adsorption of Chromium (VI) by metal hydroxide sludge from the metal finishing Loïc Perrin Ecole sludge (MHS) during the treatment of their liquid effluents charged with heavy metals. Generally, a small part of these sludge is valorized because of their important metal fickleness. Consequently

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic Controlled Variable Selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity Analysis of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model for Economic operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test-bed benchmark simulation model no. 1 (BSM1) and the activated sludge model no. 1 (ASM1). The objective is to search for a control

  12. IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    IMPACT OF HEAVY METALS IN SEWAGE SLUDGE ON SOIL AND PLANTS (COLZA and WHEAT) Najla LASSOUED1@emse.fr Abstract We are testing the impact of heavy metals in sludge from urban and industrial wastewater treatment> Cu> Ni> Co> Cd The contents of heavy metals in the sludge is made very high and exceed European

  13. Improving rheological sludge characterization with electrical measurements1 Dieud-Fauvel E.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Improving rheological sludge characterization with electrical measurements1 2 Dieudé-Fauvel E.1 to obtain information on the rheological behaviour of sewage11 sludge by performing electrical resistivity suitable for implementation in the field. The viscosity and resistivity of sludges containing17 between 4

  14. ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORBIT2012 G ESTABoues, a decision tool to assess greenhouse gases of sewage sludge treatment and di-laure.reverdy@irstea.fr EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Sewage sludge production increases continuously reaching almost 20% (946 700 t 1 118 795% was incinerated (with or without household wastes) or landfilled. Nowadays, sludge reduction is a major concern

  15. Location and chemical composition of microbially induced phosphorus precipitates in anaerobic and aerobic granular sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and aerobic granular sludge A. Mañasa,b,c,e , M. Spérandioa,b,c , F. Deckerd and B. Biscanse aINSA, UPS, INP X-ray analysis (SEM-EDX) applied to granular sludge used for biological treatment of high sludge blanket (UASB) reactors and two aerobic granular sequenced batch reactors (GSBR) were evaluated

  16. Effects of oxygen transport limitation on nitrification in the activated sludge process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stenstrom, Michael K.

    Effects of oxygen transport limitation on nitrification in the activated sludge process ABSTRACT: Apseudohomogeneous model ofthe nitrifying activated sludge process was developed to investigate the effects ofmass and autotrophic ammonia oxidation within activated sludge flocs were described by an interactive-type, multiple

  17. Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nerenberg, Robert

    Total nitrogen removal in a hybrid, membrane-aerated activated sludge process Leon S. Downing wastewater. Air-filled hollow-fiber membranes are incorporated into an activated sludge tank removal in activated sludge. ª 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The removal

  18. The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft-glassy materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 The viscoelastic behaviour of raw and anaerobic digested sludge: strong similarities with soft confronted with a dramatically increasing flow of sewage sludge. To improve treatment efficiency, process reliable flow properties to simulate the process, this work is an attempt to approach sludge rheological

  19. Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    Optimal Siting of Regional Fecal Sludge Treatment Facilities: St. Elizabeth, Jamaica Ana Martha- ated with their mismanagement and deterioration. Historically, fecal sludge management has been-9496 2008 134:1 55 CE Database subject headings: Sludge; System analysis; Waste stabilization ponds

  20. Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Treatment of septage in sludge drying reed beds: a case study on pilot-scale beds S. Troesch***, A systems by local authorities. This will result in a large increase of the quantity of sludge from septic to treat this sludge because they may have reached their nominal load or they are not so numerous in rural

  1. Study of two sampling procedures for the valorization of metal hydroxide sludge as pollutant trapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Study of two sampling procedures for the valorization of metal hydroxide sludge as pollutant@emse.fr Abstract: For the valorisation of metal hydroxide sludge as adsorbent of pollutant, it is necessary to make sure that the adsorption matrix (sludge) has characteristics allowing a reproducibility

  2. Using water activity measurements to evaluate rheological consistency and structure strength of sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of sludge G. Agoda-Tandjawa, E. Dieudé-Fauvel*, R. Girault. and J.-C. Baudez Irstea, UR TSCF, Domaine des/solid matter interactions in sewage sludge has been developed, based on both rheological characteristics parameters (G' and G'') of both raw and flocculated sewage sludge at optimal dose of polymer increase

  3. Effect of Processing Mode on Trace Elements in Dewatered Sludge Products Brian K. Richards1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Effect of Processing Mode on Trace Elements in Dewatered Sludge Products Brian K. Richards1 *, John considering the land application of wastewater sludges. The effects of pelletization/drying, composting compared. A single day's production of dewatered anaerobically-digested sludge (Syracuse, NY) was used

  4. Impact of sludge mechanical behaviour on spatial distribution parameters obtained with centrifugal spreader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Impact of sludge mechanical behaviour on spatial distribution parameters obtained to analyse organic spreading and opens the way to more developments. Keywords: sludge rheological behaviour a large amount of residues which are spread on agricultural fields. This process of sludge reuse is mainly

  5. A modified Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) with two-step nitrificationedenitrification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A modified Activated Sludge Model No. 3 (ASM3) with two-step nitrificationedenitrification Ilenia of the Activated Sludge Models (ASM) [Henze, M., Gujer, W., Mino, T., van Loosdrecht, M.C.M., 2000. Ac- tivated Sludge Models ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d, and ASM3. IWA Scientific and Technical Report No. 9. IWA Publishing

  6. Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models and spreader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Assessing nitrogen losses after sewage sludge spreading: A method based on simulation models performances. We define 45 sewage sludge spreading scenarios covering a wide range of situations in France. Several models are used to (i) assess nitrogen losses due to sewage sludge spreading and (ii) calculate

  7. Water Research 36 (2002) 11811192 Accuracy analysis of a respirometer for activated sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Research 36 (2002) 1181­1192 Accuracy analysis of a respirometer for activated sludge dynamic transfer, pH, and the influence of sludge condition on ``start-up'' behaviour. It is shown to what extent Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Respirometry; Oxygen uptake rate; Activated sludge

  8. PEAT ACCRETION HISTORIES DURING THE PAST 6000 YEARS IN MARSHES OF THE SACRAMENTO - SAN JOAQUIN DELTA, CALIFORNIA, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drexler, J Z; de Fontaine, C S; Brown, T A

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat cores were collected in 4 remnant marsh islands and 4 drained, farmed islands throughout the Sacramento - San Joaquin Delta of California in order to characterize the peat accretion history of this region. Radiocarbon age determination of marsh macrofossils at both marsh and farmed islands showed that marshes in the central and western Delta started forming between 6030 and 6790 cal yr BP. Age-depth models for three marshes were constructed using cubic smooth spline regression models. The resulting spline fit models were used to estimate peat accretion histories for the marshes. Estimated accretion rates range from 0.03 to 0.49 cm yr{sup -1} for the marsh sites. The highest accretion rates are at Browns Island, a marsh at the confluence of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers. Porosity was examined in the peat core from Franks Wetland, one of the remnant marsh sites. Porosity was greater than 90% and changed little with depth indicating that autocompaction was not an important process in the peat column. The mean contribution of organic matter to soil volume at the marsh sites ranges from 6.15 to 9.25% with little variability. In contrast, the mean contribution of inorganic matter to soil volume ranges from 1.40 to 8.45% with much greater variability, especially in sites situated in main channels. These results suggest that marshes in the Delta can be viewed as largely autochthonous vs. allochthonous in character. Autochthonous sites are largely removed from watershed processes, such as sediment deposition and scour, and are dominated by organic production. Allochthonous sites have greater fluctuations in accretion rates due to the variability of inorganic inputs from the watershed. A comparison of estimated vertical accretion rates with 20th century rates of global sea-level rise shows that currently marshes are maintaining their positions in the tidal frame, yet this offers little assurance of sustainability under scenarios of increased sea-level rise in the future.

  9. Generation, Use, Disposal, and Management Options for CCA-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Generation, Use, Disposal, and Management Options for CCA-Treated Wood May 1998 Helena Solo, INVENTORY OF CCA-TREATED WOOD IN FLORIDA II.1 Characteristics of the Florida Wood Treatment Industry in 1996 10 II.2 Generation and Disposal of Cca-treated Wood 14 II.3 Disposal Reservoirs for Cca-treated Wood

  10. Society of Wood Science and Technology State-of-the-Art Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Society of Wood Science and Technology State-of-the-Art Review CHEMICAL COUPLING IN WOOD FIBER. In this paper, we review coupling agents, pretreatment, and mixing technology for wood fiber and polymer and adhesion Wood ond trhc,r S c r r ~ ~ Society of Wood Sclencc

  11. Comparative assessment of municipal sewage sludge incineration, gasification and pyrolysis for a sustainable sludge-to-energy management in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samolada, M.C. [Dept. Secretariat of Environmental and Urban Planning – Decentralized Area Macedonian Thrace, Taki Oikonomidi 1, 54008 Thessaloniki (Greece); Zabaniotou, A.A., E-mail: azampani@auth.gr [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University Box 455, University Campus, 541 24 Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • The high output of MSS highlights the need for alternative routes of valorization. • Evaluation of 3 sludge-to-energy valorisation methods through SWOT analysis. • Pyrolysis is an energy and material recovery process resulting to ‘zero waste’. • Identification of challenges and barriers for MSS pyrolysis in Greece was investigated. • Adopters of pyrolysis systems face the challenge of finding new product markets. - Abstract: For a sustainable municipal sewage sludge management, not only the available technology, but also other parameters, such as policy regulations and socio-economic issues should be taken in account. In this study, the current status of both European and Greek Legislation on waste management, with a special insight in municipal sewage sludge, is presented. A SWOT analysis was further developed for comparison of pyrolysis with incineration and gasification and results are presented. Pyrolysis seems to be the optimal thermochemical treatment option compared to incineration and gasification. Sewage sludge pyrolysis is favorable for energy savings, material recovery and high added materials production, providing a ‘zero waste’ solution. Finally, identification of challenges and barriers for sewage sludge pyrolysis deployment in Greece was investigated.

  12. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  13. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

  14. Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

  15. Method for improving separation of carbohydrates from wood pulping and wood or biomass hydrolysis liquors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, William Louis; Compere, Alicia Lucille; Leitten Jr., Carl Frederick

    2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for separating carbohydrates from pulping liquors includes the steps of providing a wood pulping or wood or biomass hydrolysis pulping liquor having lignin therein, and mixing the liquor with an acid or a gas which forms an acid upon contact with water to initiate precipitation of carbohydrate to begin formation of a precipitate. During precipitation, at least one long chain carboxylated carbohydrate and at least one cationic polymer, such as a polyamine or polyimine are added, wherein the precipitate aggregates into larger precipitate structures. Carbohydrate gel precipitates are then selectively removed from the larger precipitate structures. The method process yields both a carbohydrate precipitate and a high purity lignin.

  16. Wood-boring Insects of Trees and Shrubs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drees, Bastiaan M.; Jackman, John A.; Merchant, Michael E.

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains how to identify and control wood-boring insects that invade shrubs and shade trees in Texas. 12 pages, 9 figures, 6 photographs, 1 table...

  17. From: FERGAS To: Wood, Natalie (CONTR); Moore, Larine Subject...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wood, Natalie (CONTR); Moore, Larine Subject: FW: FE Docket No. 14-96-LNG Date: Friday, October 24, 2014 3:17:49 PM Attachments: image001.png ---...

  18. arsenate cca wood: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of primary energy in Estonia Wood fuels production Pellet firing projects in Estonia - SIDA Demo East firing projects in...

  19. anisotropic olivier wood: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of primary energy in Estonia Wood fuels production Pellet firing projects in Estonia - SIDA Demo East firing projects in Estonia:...

  20. Microsoft Word - CX-Murray-CusterWoodPoles_WEB.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Covington SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Steve Scott Line Foreman III - TFNF-Snohomish Proposed Action: Wood pole replacement at selected locations along the...

  1. FIEA Advancing Wood Technology Forest Industry Engineering Scholarship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    year. Forestry and wood products companies, key product suppliers, researchers and technology qualification. This FIEA Scholarship has also been set up to encourage and support an outstanding student

  2. Geochemical evidence for the hydrology of a Tamarack-peat bog, Brimfield Township, Portage County, Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, T.P.; Miller, L.A. (Kent State Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Geology and Water Resources)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peat Bogs and wetlands represent unique environmental settings what are increasingly subjected to anthropogenic stresses involving inputs of water and chemicals. This study used geochemical and hydrologic monitoring to determine the inputs and fates of elements of the Kent-Brimfield bog located in Portage County, Ohio. Based on physical and chemical information collected over one year, a model is proposed here describing the hydrologic connection between a bog and shallow ground water surrounding the bog. The chemical composition of precipitation, soil water and ground water in the bog vicinity were monitored for one year. Field measurements included water levels, pH, Eh, alkalinity and temperature. Trace metal content of the peat, the pore waters, soil water and ground waters were determined by GFAA, ICP and LIC methods. This bog was found to function as part of a perched water table aquifer. Water in the upper 3 m of the bog is found to be chemically similar to precipitation, but modified by reactions involving dissolution of mineral matter and biologic processes. The chemistry of water deeper in the bog (> 3m) resembles shallow ground water surrounding the bog, modified by weathering of underlying geologic materials and sulfate reduction. This similarity, along with ground water elevations within and outside of the bog, supports that shallow ground water interacts with, and helps maintain water levels in the upper surface of the bog. From these results, a model is proposed for the seasonal variations in hydrologic processes operating in the wetland and surrounding basin, and describes how wetlands may change seasonally from being influent to effluent systems.

  3. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

  4. PILOT-SCALE TESTING OF THE SUSPENSION OF MST, CST, AND SIMULATED SLUDGE SLURRIES IN A SLUDGE TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poirier, M.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Steeper, T.; Williams, M.; Herman, D.

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) process is being developed to remove cesium, strontium, and actinides from Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste using an existing waste tank (i.e., Tank 41H) to house the process. Following strontium, actinide, and cesium removal, the concentrated solids will be transported to a sludge tank (i.e., monosodium titanate (MST)/sludge solids to Tank 42H or Tank 51H and crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to Tank 40H) for eventual transfer to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is conducting pilot-scale mixing tests to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST, CST, and simulated sludge. The purpose of this pilot scale testing is to determine the pump requirements for mixing MST and CST with sludge in a sludge tank and to determine whether segregation of particles occurs during settling. Tank 40H and Tank 51H have four Quad Volute pumps; Tank 42H has four standard pumps. The pilot-scale tank is a 1/10.85 linear scaled model of Tank 40H. The tank diameter, tank liquid level, pump nozzle diameter, pump elevation, and cooling coil diameter are all 1/10.85 of their dimensions in Tank 40H. The pump locations correspond to the current locations in Tank 40H (Risers B2, H, B6, and G). The pumps are pilot-scale Quad Volute pumps. Additional settling tests were conducted in a 30 foot tall, 4 inch inner diameter clear column to investigate segregation of MST, CST, and simulated sludge particles during settling.

  5. GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was very low throughout all SRAT cycles. (2) The mercury concentration of the SRAT product was below the 0.8 wt% limit in all runs. (3) Nitrite in the SRAT product was <100 mg/kg for all runs. (4) Foaminess was not an issue using the nominal antifoam addition strategy in these tests. (5) The high aluminum sludges (LoFe, HM type sludges) were much more viscous than the Hi Fe sludges. At 100% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very viscous but at 150% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very thin. This makes the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet an improvement for processing more viscous sludges. (6) The pH of the SRAT products was from 2.7-3.1 for the 150% acid stoichiometry runs and 5.1-6.1 for the 100% acid stoichiometry runs, significantly lower than is typical of the baseline nitric acid/formic acid flowsheet.

  6. Home Page > Business > Industrial > Global Trade Of Wood Chips Down 26% In 2009 As Pulpmills Reduce Production Worldwide, Reports Wood Resources International

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Europe searching for additional sources of woody biomass, it is likely that trade with wood chips On March 16-17, 2010, the 4th Global Wood Fiber Conference: Trade in Wood chips and Biomass worldwide, European demand for pellets and biomass chips, outlook for plantation wood chip supply, ocean

  7. Life in the woods : production and consumption of the urban forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volicer, Nadine (Nadine M.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wood is fraught with paradox. Wood as a building material is embraced for its naturalness, while the cutting of trees is indicted as a destruction of nature. Wood is lauded for its structural properties and ...

  8. How Wood Chip Size Affects Pretreatment Effectiveness of Woody Biomass for Biological Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Jerry

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature treatment of aspen. Wood Sci Technol 40:371-391size- reduction of Poplar and Aspen wood. Biotechnology andHydrothermal Pretreatment of Aspen Wood Chips 5.1. Abstract

  9. Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunderson, C.A.; Boston, H.L.; Van Miegroet, H., Morris, J.L.; Larsen, I.L.; Walzer, A.E.; Adler, T.C.; Bradburn, D.M.; Huq, M.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the DOE (U.S. Department of Energy) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under State of Tennessee permits issued to the City of Oak Ridge for land disposal of. sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE ORR, and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed onto or injected into pasture sites or applied to the surface of forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Land application has been recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a desirable alternative for disposal of ORR waste. Municipal sewage sludge is in many ways similar to dilute animal manure fertilizer, but it also contains metals, organic chemicals, human pathogens, and other constituents reflective of inputs into the municipal sewage treatment plant. When applied to land, nutrients in the sludge improve soil fertility, and minerals and organic matter in the sludge improve soil structure. Under optimal conditions, metals are immobilized, and organic chemicals and pathogens are immobilized or destroyed. If the sludge is not managed effectively, however, sludge constituents have the potential to affect human health and the environment.

  10. Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumetta, G.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

  11. Volatile constituents in a wood pyrolysis oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Shih-Chien

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1958]. . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Pyrolysis products of cellulose and treated cellulose at 600oC f Chin, 1973]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3. Pyrolysis products of lignin at 450-550 C [Allen and Nattil a, 1971] Properties of wood pyrolysis oil. 12... and decom- 0 poses at 225-325 C. Cellulose decompos s at higher temp- eratures within a narrow range of 320-375 C. In other 0 words, the cell wall polysaccharides provide most of the vol ati) e products, while lignin predominantly forms a charred...

  12. Wood, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: Energy Resources JumpWood, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Jump

  13. Wood3 Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project JumpWisconsin: Energy ResourcesWolverineWood3

  14. Wood Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWindManitoba,WisconsinWonder SourceWood

  15. Wood To Fuel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWindManitoba,WisconsinWonderWood To Fuel

  16. Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This project researches the use of nanoscale materials (a broadly defined set of substances that haveNovel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge Dewatering Industrial process, requiring up to 6000 kilowatt hours/year per million gallons per day. Project Description

  17. Example of latest techniques for bottom-sludge dredging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamasuna, J.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently in Japan, the biggest problems of the bottom sludge dredging are lack of enough room for dumping areas and preventing water contamination during dredging in terms of environmental aspects. The new dredging system introduced at this time has been developed for the above purposes.

  18. Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    irradiated fuel prior to Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing. In 1980, irradiated N-Reactor fuel was placed products and uranium. This sludge must be removed and disposed as part of the basin decommissioning) and the definition of High Level Waste (HLW) and Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) from the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982

  19. Construction materials as a waste management solution for cellulose sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modolo, R., E-mail: regina.modolo@ua.pt [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Ferreira, V.M. [University of Aveiro, Civil Engineering Department/CICECO, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Machado, L.M. [RAIZ - Forest and Paper Research Institute, Portucel-Soporcel, Eixo (Portugal); Rodrigues, M.; Coelho, I. [CIMIANTO - Sociedade Tecnica Hidraulica, S.A., Alhandra (Portugal)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sustainable waste management system for effluents treatment sludge has been a pressing issue for pulp and paper sector. Recycling is always recommended in terms of environmental sustainability. Following an approach of waste valorisation, this work aims to demonstrate the technical viability of producing fiber-cement roof sheets incorporating cellulose primary sludge generated on paper and pulp mills. From the results obtained with preliminary studies it was possible to verify the possibility of producing fiber-cement sheets by replacing 25% of the conventional used virgin long fiber by primary effluent treatment cellulose sludge. This amount of incorporation was tested on an industrial scale. Environmental parameters related to water and waste, as well as tests for checking the quality of the final product was performed. These control parameters involved total solids in suspension, dissolved salts, chlorides, sulphates, COD, metals content. In the product, parameters like moisture, density and strength were controlled. The results showed that it is possible to replace the virgin long fibers pulp by primary sludge without impacts in final product characteristics and on the environment. This work ensures the elimination of significant waste amounts, which are nowadays sent to landfill, as well as reduces costs associated with the standard raw materials use in the fiber-cement industrial sector.

  20. ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil by stimulating indigenous microbes contaminants. On the other hand, biological treatment (bioremediation) appears to be among the most promising in the complete destruction of hazardous compounds into innocuous products (Bal- ba et al. 1998). For this reason

  1. SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.; Pareizs, J.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank 12 samples were pulled on February 9, 2010 following slurry operations by H-Tank Farm. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 4 and two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 12 were received in the SRNL Shielded Cells. Each tank's samples were composited into clean 500 mL polyethylene storage bottles and weighed. The composited Tank 4 sample was 428.27 g and the composited Tank 12 sample was 502.15 g. As expected there are distinct compositional differences between Tank 4 and Tank 12 sludges. The Tank 12 slurry is much higher in Al, Hg, Mn, and Th, and much lower in Fe, Ni, S, and U than the Tank 4 slurry. The Tank 4 sludge definitely makes the more significant contribution of S to any sludge batch blend. This S, like that observed during SB6 washing, is best monitored by looking at the total S measured by digesting the sample and analyzing by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Alternatively, one can measure the soluble S by ICP-AES and adjust the value upward by approximately 15% to have a pretty good estimate of the total S in the slurry. Soluble sulfate measurements by ion chromatography (IC) will be biased considerably lower than the actual total S, the difference being due to the non-sulfate soluble S and the undissolved S. Tank 12 sludge is enriched in U-235, and hence samples transferred into SRNL from the Tank Farm will need to be placed on the reportable special nuclear material inventory and tracked for total U per SRNL procedure requirements.

  2. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

  3. Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood-Fiber/High-Density-Polyethylene Composites: Compounding Process J. Z. Lu,1 Q. Wu,1 I. I strength and flexural modulus of the resultant composites. With 50 wt % wood fiber, the optimum compounding of the modified blends and the dynamic mechanical properties of the resultant composites. The melt torque

  4. Wood for energy at Bedgebury Forest Bedgebury visitor centre's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood for energy at Bedgebury Forest Bedgebury visitor centre's woodfuel boiler provides a renewable source of energy and demonstrates that locally- produced wood has economic and sustainable value is stored outside but stacked off the ground to allow air to circulate. It is essential that the chips

  5. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  6. Wood, energy and households: Perspectives on rural Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, C.; Ensminger, J.; O'Keefe, P.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents papers on the use of wood fuels in Kenya. Topics considered include domestic energy consumption, historical aspects, the Kenyan economy, ecology, supply and demand, forests, aspects of energy consumption in a pastoral ecosystem, estimation of present and future demand for wood fuels, and energy source development.

  7. Emerging Markets for Wood Energy Richard Vlosky, Director

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) are Woody Biomass Utilization Grants (Woody BUG) and Biomass Crop Assistance Program (BCAP) Renewable Fuel · The Louisiana Forest Products Development Center · Wood-to-Energy · Wood Biomass · Energy Options · Current Forest Products Development Center School of Renewable Natural Resources, LSU AgCenter & School

  8. SECO - Dow Corning's Wood Fueled Industrial Cogeneration Project 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betts, W. D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979, Dow Corning Corporation decided to build a wood fueled steam and electric cogeneration (SECO) power plant at Midland, Michigan. This decision was prompted by the high cost of oil and natural gas, an abundant supply of wood in mid Michigan...

  9. Wood-based Energy Technologies Michigan offers some significant advantages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    quality stan- dards. Wood pellets are an attractive alternative for home heating or for larger individual--ground wood. Pellet storage area. #12;distributed through a District Energy grid. Efficiencies are high on municipal solid waste. Both district heating and CHP plants can also pro- duce pellets for local housing

  10. Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Relative Leaching and Aquatic Toxicity of Pressure-Treated Wood Products Using Batch Leaching Tests treated with one of five different waterborne chemical preservatives, were leached using 18-h batch- treated wood at concentrations above the U.S. federal toxicity characteristic limit (5 mg/L). All

  11. A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    A Chemical Stain for Identifying Arsenic-Treated Wood (FINAL) Submitted June 23, 2006 Amy Omae.2 Motivation 4 I.3 Objectives 5 CHAPTER II, DEVELOPMENT OF A CHEMICAL STAIN FOR IDENTIFYING ARSENIC-TREATED Applications 22 II.5 Resulting Stain to Identify Arsenic-Treated Wood and Methods of Testing 25 CHAPTER III

  12. FAO Forestry Department Wood Energy WISDOM East Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FAO ­ Forestry Department ­ Wood Energy WISDOM ­ East Africa Woodfuel Integrated Supply and Tropical Southern Africa woodfuels, mainly fuelwood, contribute from 75 to 86 percent of total primary African countries Rudi Drigo Consultant - Wood energy planning and forest resources monitoring August 2005

  13. SURFACE CHARACTERIZATION OF CHEMICALLY MODIFIED WOOD: DYNAMIC WETTABILITY1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wetting slope and K value) were used to illustrate the dynamic wetting process. Dynamic contact angle the dynamic wettability of wood surfaces modified with different coupling agents. Keywords: Chemical articles on dynamic wetting process for wood adhesion have been published (Scheikl and Dunky 1998

  14. Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blijderveen, Maarten van [TNO, Schoemakerstraat 97, 2628 VK Delft (Netherlands); University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Bramer, Eddy A. [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Brem, Gerrit, E-mail: g.brem@utwente.nl [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model piloted ignition times of wood and plastics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is applied on a packed bed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When the air flow is above a critical level, no ignition can take place. - Abstract: To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

  15. HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

  16. Strength Measurements of Archive K Basin Sludge Using a Soil Penetrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel radioactive sludge present in the K East and K West spent nuclear fuel storage basins now resides in the KW Basin in six large underwater engineered containers. The sludge will be dispositioned in two phases under the Sludge Treatment Project: (1) hydraulic retrieval into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport to interim storage in Central Plateau and (2) retrieval from the STSCs, treatment, and packaging for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In the years the STSCs are stored, sludge strength is expected to increase through chemical reaction, intergrowth of sludge crystals, and compaction and dewatering by settling. Increased sludge strength can impact the type and operation of the retrieval equipment needed prior to final sludge treatment and packaging. It is important to determine whether water jetting, planned for sludge retrieval from STSCs, will be effective. Shear strength is a property known to correlate with the effectiveness of water jetting. Accordingly, the unconfined compressive strengths (UCS) of archive K Basin sludge samples and sludge blends were measured using a pocket penetrometer modified for hot cell use. Based on known correlations, UCS values can be converted to shear strengths. Twenty-six sludge samples, stored in hot cells for a number of years since last being disturbed, were identified as potential candidates for UCS measurement and valid UCS measurements were made for twelve, each of which was found as moist or water-immersed solids at least 1/2-inch deep. Ten of the twelve samples were relatively weak, having consistencies described as 'very soft' to 'soft'. Two of the twelve samples, KE Pit and KC-4 P250, were strong with 'very stiff' and 'stiff' consistencies described, respectively, as 'can be indented by a thumb nail' or 'can be indented by thumb'. Both of these sludge samples are composites collected from KE Basin floor and Weasel Pit locations. Despite both strong sludges having relatively high iron concentrations, attribution of their high strengths to this factor could not be made with confidence as other measured sludge samples, also from the KE Basin floor and of high iron concentration, were relatively weak. The observed UCS and shear strengths for the two strong sludges were greater than observed in any prior testing of K Basin sludge except for sludge processed at 185 C under hydrothermal conditions.

  17. Final Report - Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basin Sludge and in Grouted Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Gano, Sue; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being considered for the disposal of K Basin sludge as RH-TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the 55-gallon RH-TRU sealed drums to be transported to WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the uranium metal-water reaction (U + 2 H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}) in combination with the hydrogen generated from water and organic radiolysis. Gas generation testing was conducted with uranium metal particles of known surface area, in simulated K West (KW) Basin canister sludge and immobilized in candidate grout solidification matrices. This study evaluated potential for Portland cement and magnesium phosphate grouts to inhibit the reaction of water with uranium metal in the sludge and thereby permit higher sludge loading to the disposed waste form. The best of the grouted waste forms decreased the uranium metal-water reaction by a factor of four.

  18. Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely reliant on wood chip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely's biomass energy sector could be undermined unless businesses move to resolve the supply chain issues-scale biomass plants will leave generators largely reliant on biomass from overseas such as wood chips, elephant

  19. Multipass comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction one or more times through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel.

  20. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Testing Nitric Acid Dissolution Testing of K East Area Sludge Composite, Small- and Large-Scale Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, C.D.; Delegard, C.H.; Burgeson, I.E.; Schmidt, A.J.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) to support the development of the K Basin Sludge Treatment System. For this work, testing was performed to examine the dissolution behavior of a K East Basin floor and Weasel Pit sludge composite, referred to as K East area sludge composite, in nitric acid at the following concentrations: 2 M, 4 M, 6 M and 7.8 M. With the exception of one high solids loading test the nitric acid was added at 4X the stoichiometric requirement (assuming 100% of the sludge was uranium metal). The dissolution tests were conducted at boiling temperatures for 24 hours. Most of the tests were conducted with {approximately}2.5 g of sludge (dry basis). The high solids loading test was conducted with {approximately}7 g of sludge. A large-scale dissolution test was conducted with 26.5 g of sludge and 620 mL of 6 M nitric acid. The objectives of this test were to (1) generate a sufficient quantity of acid-insoluble residual solids for use in leaching studies, and (2) examine the dissolution behavior of the sludge composite at a larger scale.

  1. Implementing Strategies for Drying and Pressing Wood Without Emissions Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujit Banerjee; Terrance Conners

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Drying and pressing wood for the manufacture of lumber, particleboard, oriented strand board (OSB), veneer and medium density fiberboard (MDF) release volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the atmosphere. These emissions require control equipment that are capital-intensive and consume significant quantities of natural gas and electricity. The objective of our work was to understand the mechanisms through which volatile organic compounds are generated and released and to develop simple control strategies. Of the several strategies developed, two have been implemented for OSB manufacture over the course of this study. First, it was found that increasing final wood moisture by about 2-4 percentage points reduced the dryer emissions of hazardous air pollutants by over 70%. As wood dries, the escaping water evaporatively cools the wood. This cooling tapers off wood when the wood is nearly dry and the wood temperature rises. Thermal breakdown of the wood tissue occurs and VOCs are released. Raising the final wood moisture by only a few percentage points minimizes the temperature rise and reduces emissions. Evaporative cooling also impacts has implications for VOC release from wood fines. Flaking wood for OSB manufacture inevitable generates fines. Fines dry out rapidly because of their high surface area and evaporative cooling is lost more rapidly than for flakes. As a result, fines emit a disproportionate quantity of VOCs. Fines can be reduced in two ways: through screening of the green furnish and through reducing their generation during flaking. The second approach is preferable because it also increased wood yield. A procedure to do this by matching the sharpness angle of the flaker knife to the ambient temperature was also developed. Other findings of practical interests are as follows: Dielectric heating of wood under low-headspace conditions removes terpenes and other extractives from softwood; The monoterpene content in trees depend upon temperature and seasonal effects; Method 25A emissions from lumber drying can be modeled from a knowledge of the airflow through the kiln; A heat transfer model shows that VOCs released during hot-pressing mainly originate from the surface of the board; and Boiler ash can be used to adsorb formaldehyde from air streams.

  2. Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal ? uraninite ? metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume might decrease because of decreases in the water-volume fraction caused by sludge solid reactions, compaction, or intergrowth and recrystallization of metaschoepite. In that case, fewer STSCs may be needed, but the shear strength would increase, and this could challenge recovery by water jet erosion and require more aggressive retrieval methods. Overall, the tests described herein indicate that the settled solids volume remains the same or decreases with time. The only case for which the sludge solids volumes increase with time is for the expansion factor attendant upon the anoxic corrosion of uranium metal to produce UO2 and subsequent reaction with oxygen to form equimolar UO2.25 and UO3•2H2O.

  3. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRO CA

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

  4. Effect of Cd-Enriched Sewage Sludge on Plant Growth, Nutrients and Heavy Metals Concentrations in the Soil–Plant System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusan, Munir Mohammad; Athamneh, Bayan Mahmoud

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from waste-activated sludge, Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J, 60:505-utilization of sewage sludge. A twenty-year study atCd-enriched sewage sludge (SS) and diammonium phosphate (

  5. High Btu gas from peat. A feasibility study. Part 3. Market analysis. Task 8. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this task, which was the responsibility of the Minnesota Gas Company, was to identify and characterize the market potential for the plant by-products - BTX (mixture of benzene, toluene and xylene), phenol, ammonia, sulfur, and sodium sulfate - and to assign value to them. Although traditionally a growth industry, the chemicals market has been generally weakened by the recession, and is experiencing back to back years of declining production. This is due to bad health of specific end uses, such as fertilizer from ammonia. In the long run, this trend is expected to moderate. It is felt that the proposed peat plant has a favorable position in the markets of each of its by-products. This is due to the synergism with nearby industries which are major consumers of these by-products. In the case of sulfur and ammonia, the Red River agricultural area is a large potential market. For sodium sulfate, phenols and perhaps BTX, the nearby paper and timber products industries are large potential markets. The values for these by-products used in the financial analysis were intentionally conservative. This is because of the uncertainty in the quantity and quality. More tests are needed in an integrated facility in order to determine these factors and the variability of each. This is particularly true of the by-product oils which could vary significantly with operating conditions and may even require alternate processing schemes. 18 references, 9 figures, 14 tables.

  6. High Btu gas from peat. Volume III. Part A. Environmental and socioeconomic feasibility assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 1980, the US Department of Energy awarded a grant (No. DE-FG01-80RA50348) to the Minnesota Gas Company (Minnegasco) to evaluate the current commercial viability - technical, economic, environmental, financial, and regulatory - of producing 80 million SCF/day of substitute natural gas (SNG). Minnegasco's project team for this study consisted of Dravo Engineers and Constructors (for design, engineering, and economics of peat harvesting, dewatering, and gasification systems), Ertec, Inc. (for environmental and socio-economic analyses), IGT (for providing gasification process information, and technical and engineering support to Minnegasco) and Deloitte Haskins and Sells (for providing management structural support to Minnegasco). This Final Report presents the work conducted by Ertec, Inc. under tasks 6 and 7. The study objective was to provide an initial environmental and socio-economic evaluation of the proposed facility to assess project feasbility. To accomplish this objective, detailed field studies were conducted in the areas of Hydrology, Air Quality and Socio-Economics. Less extensive surveys were conducted in the areas of Geology, Ecology, Acoustics, Land Use, Archaeology and Resource Assessment. Part A of Volume 3 contains the introduction and plant area conditions which include the following: (1) description of existing conditions-geology; (2) hydrology; (3) terrestrial and aquatic ecology; (4) meteorology; (5) land use existing conditions; (6) archaeology; (7) aesthetics-existing conditions; (8) acoustics; (9) existing socioeconomic conditions; and (10) resource assessment. 25 figures, 55 tables.

  7. Copyright (to be inserted by Humphrey) Thermal and Dynamic-mechanical Properties of Wood-PVC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Citation & Copyright (to be inserted by Humphrey) Thermal and Dynamic-mechanical Properties of Wood-PVC properties, maleation, thermal analysis, wood veneer, wood-PVC composites ABSTRACT The influence of maleation on thermal and dynamic-mechanical properties of wood-PVC composites was investigated in this study

  8. Wood plastic composites based on microfibrillar blends of high density polyethylene/poly(ethylene terephthalate)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood plastic composites based on microfibrillar blends of high density polyethylene January 2010 Keywords: Wood plastic composites Poly(ethylene terephthalate) Polyethylene Extrusion a b into wood plastic composites through a two-step reactive extrusion technology. Wood flour was added into pre

  9. Jmtland County Energy Agency Comfortable use of wood pellets in one-family houses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jämtland County Energy Agency Sweden 1 Comfortable use of wood pellets in one-family houses-operation with the Swedish Energy Agency, carried through the project "Comfortable use of wood pellets in one-family houses of one-family houses to start using wood pellets and an increase of the use of wood pellets in one

  10. Dynamics of wood recruitment in streams of the northeastern US Dana R. Warren a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    : Large woody debris LWD Riparian forest Wood recruitment Wood dynamics Stream restoration Debris dam restoration efforts often incorporate large wood. In most cases, however, stream restoration projectsDynamics of wood recruitment in streams of the northeastern US Dana R. Warren a, *, Clifford E

  11. Author's personal copy Evaluation of methods for sorting CCA-treated wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Author's personal copy Evaluation of methods for sorting CCA-treated wood Gary Jacobi a , Helena contains treated wood including wood treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA). Many recycling options of sorting methods for identifying treated wood. Sorting methods evaluated included visual sorting and visual

  12. PROPERTIES OF HDPE/CLAY/WOOD NANOCOMPOSITES , C. M. Clemons 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from wood, kenaf, flax, hemp, cotton, Kraft pulp, coconut husk, areca fruit, pineapple leaf, oil palm

  13. SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

  14. Waste Acceptance Radionuclides To Be Reported In Tank 51 Sludge Only Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M. Lee

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The first high level waste glass to be generated at SRS will incorporate sludge from Tank 51. This sludge has been characterized by Bibler et al., who measured and estimated the radioisotope composition of the glass that might be derived from this sludge. In this report this characterization is used to determine which isotopes must be quantified to meet the legal criteria for repository placement.

  15. Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

  16. An economical and market analysis of Canadian wood pellets.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, J. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study systematically examined the current and future wood pellet market, estimated the cost of Canadian torrefied pellets, and compared the torrefied pellets with the conventional pellets based on literature and industrial data. The results showed that the wood pellet industry has been gaining significant momentum due to the European bioenergy incentives and the rising oil and natural gas prices. With the new bioenergy incentives in USA, the future pellets market may shift to North America, and Canada can potentially become the largest pellet production centre, supported by the abundant wood residues and mountain pine beetle (MPB) infested trees.

  17. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

  18. Method for lowering the VOCS emitted during drying of wood products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Sujit (1832 Jacksons Creek Point, Marietta, GA 30068); Boerner, James Robert (154 Junedale Rd., Cincinnati, OH 45218); Su, Wei (2262 Orleans Ave., Marietta, GA 30062)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for removal of VOCs from wood products prior to drying the wood products. The method of the invention includes the steps of providing a chamber having an opening for receiving wood and loading the chamber with green wood. The wood is loaded to an extent sufficient to provide a limited headspace in the chamber. The chamber is then closed and the wood is heated in the chamber for a time and at a temperature sufficient to saturate the headspace with moisture and to substantially transfer VOCs from the wood product to the moisture in the headspace.

  19. International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge treatment to increase biogas production. Available atal. , no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestionsludge are mass reduction, biogas production, and improved

  20. PROGRESS WITH K BASINS SLUDGE RETRIEVAL STABILIZATION & PACKAGING AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KNOLLMEYER, P.M.; PHILLIPS, C; TOWNSON, P.S.

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the U.S. and the U.K. to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford Site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, so as to remove the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building, is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout packaging processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. Optimization and simplification of the original sludge corrosion process design is described and the use of transportable and reusable equipment is indicated. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup.

  1. Reactance simulation for the defects in steam generator tube with outside ferrite sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Kwon-sang; Kima, Yong-il [Division of Metrology for Quality Life, KRISS, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Derac [Department of Physics, Hannam University, Daejeon, 336-840 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Duck-gun [Nuclear Material Technique Development Team, KAERI, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jae-kap [Division of Physical Metrology, KRISS, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic sludge is partly produced around the tube sheet outside a steam generator due to stress and heat. The sludge with magnetite is one of the important factors affecting eddy current signals. It causes trouble for the safety of the steam generator tubes and is difficult to detect by conventional eddy current methods. A new type of probe is needed to detect the signals for the magnetic sludge. We designed a new U-type yoke which has two kinds of coils--a magnetizing coil and the other a detecting coil--and we simulated the signal induced by the ferromagnetic sludge in the Inconel 600 tube.

  2. A study of acid sludge obtained in the refining of petroleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Albert Sidney

    1923-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fo. petroleum Refin- eries {S l yellow colo of petroleum after ref in&ng m:y be due to impurities in the sulphurio &icid used ~ Since it is known that nitro. ?en trioxide, nitro en pentoxide, and selenium dioxide will cayuse discolor ~tion... of the sludge with ocustio soda o soda ash, &nd the "mixing" of the neutrul- ised sludge eith fuel oil. Much i&ttentlon h s been:i eu t:& the recover" of tho sludge acid, i. nd but little cr no uttention to thc study of the orgunic c&ntent of the caid sludge...

  3. Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kan, Weiqun

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sludge due to its huge amount and increasing public concern. However, only a few studies were focused on potential use of WTP sludge. The characteristics and potential use of WTP sludge are still not well understood. Previous studies of WTP alum sludge... plants that coagulate, filter, and oxidize a surface water for removal of turbidity, color, bacteria, algae, organic compounds, and iron or manganese. These plants generally use alum Al~(SO4) or iron FeC13 salts for coagulation and produce alum or iron...

  4. Examination of the Potential for Formation of Energetic Compounds in Dry Sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details initial results from an investigation of the potential formation and fate of energetic compounds in Savannah River Site sludge.

  5. Determination of Uranium Metal Concentration in Irradiated Fuel Storage Basin Sludge Using Selective Dissolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Welsh, Terri L.; Pool, Karl N.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium metal corroding in water-saturated sludges now held in the US Department of Energy Hanford Site K West irradiated fuel storage basin can create hazardous hydrogen atmospheres during handling, immobilization, or subsequent transport and storage. Knowledge of uranium metal concentration in sludge thus is essential to safe sludge management and process design, requiring an expeditious routine analytical method to detect uranium metal concentrations as low as 0.03 wt% in sludge even in the presence of 30 wt% or higher total uranium concentrations.

  6. acidic oily sludge-contaminated: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Page Topic Index 1 ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: accidents, and storage tank...

  7. Sociological adaptation among bacterial populations in an activated sludge ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Robert George

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacillus Corynebacterium, and Micrococcus being much less abundant. Unz and Dondero (70) isolated two-hundred and three strains from fifty-one trickling filters and activated sludge zoogloeas, with one-hundred and forty-seven of the strains forming... in the aeration basin or secondary sedimentation biomass; instead, members of the Flavobacterium C'~oh~as group, the genus Achromobacter, and a Pseudomonas-l&e group were most numerous. METHODS AND MATERIALS Batch fermentation s stem. The bench scale batch...

  8. New developments in microwave treatment of steel mill sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwill, J.E.; Schmitt, R.J. [EPRI Center for Materials Production, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Purta, D.A. [Carnegie Mellon Research Inst., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steel mills in the US generate approximately 1 million tons of sludge annually. This is mainly a residue of cooling water, lubricating oils, and metallic fines from hot strip rolling mills and other operations. Currently, the separation of sludge from the liquid requires large settling tanks, takes several hours of time and produces a residue that must be disposed of at high cost. The EPRI Center for Materials Production, sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), has supported development of a microwave-based treatment system. This new process, developed by Carnegie Mellon Research Institute, and patented by EPRI is 30 times faster, requires 90% less space and eliminates land-filling by producing materials of value. Electricity usage is only 0.5 kwhr/gal. A review by the American Iron and Steel Institute Waste Recycle Technology Task Force concluded that further work on the microwave technology was justified. Subsequently, additional work was undertaken toward optimizing the process for treating metallic waste sludges containing lime and polymers. This effort, cofunded by EPRI and AISI, was successfully concluded in late 1994. EPRI/CMP is proceeding to license and commercialize this technology, and to continue research to improve efficiency. A follow-on project is now being organized by CMP to confirm long term recyclability of the oil-release agent and to conduct a large scale (25-ton sample) test of the process.

  9. Removal of fluoride from aqueous solution by using alum sludge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujana, M.G.; Thakur, R.S.; Rao, S.B. [CSIR, Bhubaneswar (India). Regional Research Lab.] [CSIR, Bhubaneswar (India). Regional Research Lab.

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of treated alum sludge to remove fluoride from aqueous solution has been investigated. The studies were carried out as functions of contact time, concentration of adsorbent and adsorbate, temperature, pH, and effect of concentrations of other anions. The data indicate that treated alum sludge surface sites are heterogeneous in nature and that fits into a heterogeneous site binding model. The optimum pH for complete removal of fluoride from aqueous solution was found to be 6. The rate of adsorption was rapid during the initial 5 minutes, and equilibrium was attained within 240 minutes. The adsorption followed first-order rate kinetics. The present system followed the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model. The loading factor (i.e., the milligram of fluoride adsorbed per gram of alum sludge) increased with initial fluoride concentration, whereas a negative trend was observed with increasing temperature. The influence of addition of anions on fluoride removal depends on the relative affinity of the anions for the surface and the relative concentrations of the anions.

  10. Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

  11. Wood Gasification: Where It's At, Where It's Going

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the principles and practice of various designs of biomass/wood gasifiers. In general, the basic principle of gasification is reviewed. A look at existing gasifier schemes, including packed bed updraft, downdraft, and fluidized...

  12. Wood Gasification: Where It's At, Where It's Going 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, M. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the principles and practice of various designs of biomass/wood gasifiers. In general, the basic principle of gasification is reviewed. A look at existing gasifier schemes, including packed bed updraft, downdraft, and fluidized...

  13. The Honorable John T. 'Gregorio 301 N. Wood Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Wood Avenue Linden, 'New Jersey 07036 d. Dear Mayor Gregorio: ,' ,' .' , Secretary of Energy Hazel O'Leary has announced a new approach to openness, in the'llepartment' of...

  14. Disentangling Biodiversity and Climatic Determinants of Wood Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    an important role in carbon sequestration. Methodology/Principal Findings: We tested whether tree wood incorporating the role of biodiversity in management and policy plans for forest carbon sequestration. Citation

  15. Seismic rehabilitation of wood diaphragms in unreinforced masonary buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grubbs, Amber Jo

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the seismic performance of existing and rehabilitated wood floor and roof diaphragms in typical pre-1950's, unreinforced masonry (URM) buildings found in the Central and Eastern portions of the United States...

  16. aspen wood chips: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 COMPARISON OF DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR THE SIMULATION OF BOILERS USING OIL, GAS, PELLETS OR WOOD CHIPS CiteSeer Summary: A detailed model for the simulation of boilers using...

  17. Kilowatts From Waste Wood In The Furniture Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nailen, R. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    recently, the Singer Furniture Co., Lenoir, N. Carolina, purchased a 450 kilowatt steam turbine/induction generator set to use extra steam - produced by 'free' waste wood fuel - in generating 15% of the plant's electrical energy demand. The turbine...

  18. An Overview of the U.S. Wood Preserving Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preservatives · Oilborne Preservatives · Creosote Treatments · Fire Retardants · Additives · Concluding Comments · Waterborne Preservatives · Oilborne Preservatives · Creosote Treatments · Fire Retardants · Additives a baselinewas to develop a baseline profile of the treated woodprofile of the treated wood manufacturing

  19. An Overview of the Louisiana Primary Solid Wood Products Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    goal of this second study is to profile the primary solid wood products industry. In addition (including pulp and paper) and secondary manufacturing establishments (Jacob et al. 1987). The forest

  20. RFPs Due for Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy Grant

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Forest Service requests proposals for the 2014 Hazardous Fuel Wood to Energy (W2E) Grant.  The outcome anticipated under this funding mechanism will advance the United States Department of...

  1. RFPs Due for Statewide Wood Energy Cooperative Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Forest Service requests proposals for the 2014 Statewide Wood Energy Teams (SWET) Cooperative Agreement. The outcome anticipated under this funding mechanism will advance the United States...

  2. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  3. Long-term lime pretreatment of poplar wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Lignocellulosic biomass (e.g., poplar wood) provides a unique and sustainable resource for environmentally safe organic fuels and chemicals. The core of this study is the pretreatment step involved in bioconversion processes. Pretreatment...

  4. Photo by Helvetas Moambique Architecture, Wood and Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Photo by Helvetas Moçambique Architecture, Wood and Civil Engineering #12;IWRM in order to maximize the resultant economic and social welfare in an equitable manner without CAS consists of the following units: - Basic knowledge in order to follow the class

  5. Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood Products Marketing And Value-Added Opportunities In Latin America: A Focus on Brazil Richard School of Renewable Natural Resources Louisiana State University Presented at: PANORAMA Curitiba, Brazil

  6. Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

  7. Habitat selection of the Wood Thrush nesting in east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrie, Neil Ross

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1995 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  8. Kinetic Modeling and Assessment of Lime Pretreatment of Poplar Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra Ramirez, Rocio

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    biomass is one of the most promising feedstocks for producing biofuels through fermentation processes. Among lignocellulose choices, poplar wood is appealing because of high energy potential, above-average carbon mitigation potential, fast growth... KINETIC MODELING AND ASSESSMENT OF LIME PRETREATMENT OF POPLAR WOOD A Dissertation by ROCIO SIERRA RAMIREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  9. TANK 12 SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S; Michael Hay, M; Kristine Zeigler, K; Michael Stone, M

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

  10. Tank 12 Sludge Characterization and Aluminum Dissolution Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Hay, M.; Zeigler, K; Stone, M.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

  11. Development of METHANE de-NOX Reburn Process for Wood Waste and Biomass Fired Stoker Boilers - Final Report - METHANE de-NOX Reburn Technology Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Rabovitser; B. Bryan; S. Wohadlo; S. Nester; J. Vaught; M. Tartan (Gas Technology Institute); R. Glickert (ESA Environmental Solutions)

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of the METHANE de-NOX® (MdN) Reburn process in the Forest Products Industry (FPI) to provide more efficient use of wood and sludge waste (biosolids) combustion for both energy generation and emissions reduction (specifically from nitrogen oxides (NOx)) and to promote the transfer of the technology to the wide range of wood waste-fired stoker boilers populating the FPI. This document, MdN Reburn Commercial Technology Manual, was prepared to be a resource to promote technology transfer and commercialization activities of MdN in the industry and to assist potential users understand its application and installation requirements. The Manual includes a compilation of MdN commercial design data from four different stoker boiler designs that were baseline tested as part of the development effort. Design information in the Manual include boiler CFD model studies, process design protocols, engineering data sheets and commercial installation drawings. Each design package is unique and implemented in a manner to meet specific mill requirements.

  12. STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

    2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

  13. Improvement of the activated sludge treatment by its combination with electro Fenton for the mineralization of sulfamethazine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Improvement of the activated sludge treatment by its combination with electro Fenton and quantified intermediates are proposed. In a second part, biological treatments with fresh activated sludge the relevance of the proposed combined process. Keywords: Activated sludge; Combined process; Degradation

  14. Localised mobilisation of metals, as measured by diffusive gradients in thin-films, in soil historically treated with sewage sludge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    historically treated with sewage sludge Jun Luo a,c , Hao Zhang a, , William Davison a , Ronald G. McLaren b online 11 September 2012 Keywords: Trace metals Soil Sewage sludge Mn oxide Diffusive gradients in thin was investigated in a sandy loam soil historically treated with sewage sludge. After deployment of two DGT

  15. Physical-chemical characterization of sludge and granular materials from a vertical flow constructed wetland for municipal wastewater treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Physical-chemical characterization of sludge and granular materials from a vertical flow considered for phosphorus removal as well. In this article, sludge and granular materials sampled from analyses showed that phosphorus was predominantly captured in the sludge layer accumulated at the surface

  16. Impact on sludge inventory and control strategies using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 with the Brger-Diehl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    Impact on sludge inventory and control strategies using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 concentration predictions, plant sludge inventory and mixed liquor suspended solids based control actions-Diehl model allows for more realistic predictions of the underflow sludge concentration which is essential

  17. Moisture Distribution and Flow During Drying of Wood and Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink-Sharp, Audrey; Hanna, Robert B.

    2001-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New understanding, theories, and techniques for moisture flow and distribution were developed in this research on wood and wood fiber. Improved understanding of the mechanisms of flake drying has been provided. Observations of flake drying and drying rate curves revealed that rate of moisture loss consisted of two falling rate periods and no constant rate drying period was observed. Convective heat transfer controls the first period, and bound water diffusion controls the second period. Influence of lower drying temperatures on bending properties of wood flakes was investigated. Drying temperature was found to have a significant influence on bending stiffness and strength. A worksheet for calculation of the energy required to dry a single strandboard flake was developed but has not been tested in an industrial setting yet. A more complete understanding of anisotropic transverse shrinkage of wood is proposed based on test results and statistical analysis. A simplified mod el of a wood cell's cross-section was drawn for calculating differential transverse shrinkage. The model utilizes cell wall thickness and microfibrillar packing density and orientation. In spite of some phenomena of cell wall structure not yet understood completely, the results might explain anisotropic transverse shrinkage to a major extent. Boundary layer theory was found useful for evaluating external moisture resistance during drying. Simulated moisture gradients were quire comparable to the actual gradients in dried wood. A mathematical procedure for determining diffusion and surface emission coefficients was also developed. Thermal conductivity models of wood derived from its anatomical structure were created and tested against experimental values. Model estimations provide insights into changes in heat transfer parameters during drying. Two new techniques for measuring moisture gradients created in wood during drying were developed. A new technique that utilizes optical properties of cobalt chloride was developed for nondestructive determination of surface moisture content. Fundamental new understanding of drying characteristics in wood and fiber has been provided that can be used by researchers to improve drying of wood and fiber. The three techniques for measuring moisture content and gradients provided in this study are efficient, practical, and economical - easy to apply by industry and researchers. An energy consumption worksheet is provided as a first step toward reducing energy consumed during drying of lumber and strandboard flakes. However, it will need additional verification and testing.

  18. Biohydrogen production from oil palm frond juice and sewage sludge by a metabolically engineered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Biohydrogen production from oil palm frond juice and sewage sludge by a metabolically engineered from oil palm frond (OPF) juice and sewage sludge as substrates. Substrate improvement was accomplished Accepted 16 June 2013 Available online 13 July 2013 Keywords: Biohydrogen Escherichia coli Oil palm frond

  19. ASSESSING GHG EMISSIONS FROM SLUDGE TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL ROUTES THE METHOD BEHIND GESTABOUES TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    stakeholders to better understand the carbon footprint of sludge treatment and disposal options, we developed by a wastewater treatment plant of x per-captia-equivalents (PCE) during one year. The carbon footprint method we developed is adapted to sludge treatment and disposal processes and based on the "Bilan Carbone® " method

  20. K East Basin sludge volume estimates for integrated water treatment system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitner, A.L.

    1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates were made of the volume of sludge expected from Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) processing fuel elements and in the fuel storage canisters in K East Basin, These were based on visual observations of fuel element condition in the basin and laboratory measurements of canister sludge density. The estimates, made in early 1997, are reviewed and the basic assumptions used discussed.

  1. Grout and glass performance in support of stabilization/solidification of ORNL tank sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spence, R.D.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tanks (BVEST) pending treatment for disposal. In addition, some sludges and supernatants also requiring treatment remain in two inactive tank systems: the gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) and the old hydrofracture (OHF) tank. The waste consists of two phases: sludge and supernatant. The sludges contain a high amount of radioactivity, and some are classified as TRU sludges. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be defined as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste. Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization/solidification alternatives for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize/solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as an alternative disposal technology for mixed waste. The objective of this project is to define an envelope, or operating window, for grout and glass formulations for ORNL tank sludges. Formulations will be defined for the average composition of each of the major tank farms (BVEST/MVST, GAAT, and OHF) and for an overall average composition of all tank farms. This objective is to be accomplished using surrogates of the tank sludges with hot testing of actual tank sludges to check the efficacy of the surrogates.

  2. SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

  3. System design description for the consolidated sludge sampling system for K Basins floor and fuel canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HECHT, S.L.

    1999-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This System Design Description describes the Consolidated Sludge Sampling System used in the gathering of sludge samples from K Basin floor and fuel canisters. This document provides additional information on the need for the system, the functions and requirements of the systems, the operations of the system, and the general work plan used in its' design and development.

  4. Short Communication Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Nanjing 210009, China b Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 212 Sackett Building, Penn effluent. Ó 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The costs for sludge management% of total operation costs (Xiao et al., 2011). There- fore, reducing sludge treatment costs can

  5. Effect of initial physical characteristics on sludge compost performance Anne Trmier1,2,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and Conseil, 2006). In this context, biological treatments such as composting are promoted to transform of wastewater sludge, the bulking agent (BA) plays a major role in establishing the recipe structure, exposed to wastewater sludge dry mass ratio of 1/ 6, the ten (10) recipes were repeated using two BA, residues recycled

  6. Grout and Glass Performance in Support of Stabilization/Solidification of the MVST Tank Sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supematant. Some of the supematant from these tanks has been decanted, solidified into a grout, and stored for disposal as a solid low-level waste. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating ,for several years. Some of the sludges contain a high amount of gamma activity (e.g., `37CS concentration range of 0.01 3-11 MBq/g) and contain enough transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes to be classified as TRU wastes. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough in the available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge to be classified as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste.

  7. Oxygen-enriched multiple-hearth sewage sludge incineration demonstration. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxygen-enhanced multiple-hearth sludge incineration was the focus of a five-month joint study by Praxair and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. Testing and demonstration were conducted in Rochester NY, at Monroe County`s Frank E. Van Lare Sewage Treatment Plant. A simple retrofit of high-momentum oxygen lances created a convection hearth in which convective heat and mass transfer with the drying sludge were greatly enhanced, while hearth temperatures were moderated by the wet sludge to prevent overheating. Based on the results of short- and long-term controlled tests discussed in this report, oxygen enhancement of multiple-hearth sludge incinerators can be economically viable, with a savings between $30 and $60 per hour at Van Lare based upon increased sludge throughput and reduced fuel consumption.

  8. Resuspension and Settling of Monosodium Titanate and Sludge in Supernate Simulate for the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, P.A.; Mattus, C.H.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is testing several methods for their effectiveness in removing the major radionuclides from the supernate solutions that are stored in the high-level waste tanks at the site. One option is to mix the tank contents (sludge and supernate), in situ, with monosodium titanate (MST) powder to remove 90Sr and transuranics. The sludge and MST would be allowed to settle, and thet reated supernate would then be decanted. The sludge and MST would need to be resuspended later so that the solids could be pumped to the Defense Waste Processing Facility for vitrification. Small-scale tests evaluated the effect of various storage conditions on the rheological properties of the sludge/MST slurry. Laboratory-scale and pilot-scale tests were conducted to determine the mixing requirements for resuspending slurries of sludge simulant and MST, following settleing periods of various lengths.`

  9. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

  10. Experimental program for the development of peat gasification. Final report for Project No. 65003, February 10, 1976-January 3, 1983. [Contains list of 15 interim reports and brief summaries of each

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the program have demonstrated that, on the basis of chemistry and kinetics, peat is an excellent feedstock for the production of SNG and other gaseous and liquid fuels. Peat gasifies at a much faster rate than does lignite or other coals, and high carbon conversions can be achieved with peat at relatively low severity conditions. In hydrogasification, the product mix (gases and liquids) can be varied over a much greater range than that of lignite or other coals, to satisfy seasonally changing consumer demands. Over 200 tests were conducted in laboratory- and PDU-scale equipment with different peats to determine the effects of temperature, pressure, feedstock, feed gas composition, residence time, and other operating parameters on the gasification of peat. A mathematical model was developed that closely describes the effects of operating conditions on peat gasification. These results formed the data base for the PEATGAS process development at the pilot-plant scale. Tests with peats from different geographic locations showed the effect of feedstock source on gasification. The effect of peat dewatering methodologies (including harvesting techniques and mechanical and thermal dewatering methods) on gasification was also studied. Wet carbonization tests were conducted. Wet carbonization is a thermochemical beneficiation process that improves the heating value and dewaterability of peat. The laboratory test program was the first systemic study of the effects of wet carbonization on the carbon and oxygen conversions and heating value enhancements of peat to appear in the open literature. The PDU-test program included the design, construction, and operation of an integrated computer-controlled wet carbonization unit.

  11. Decision-maker's guide to wood fuel for small industrial energy users. Final report. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, M. P.; O'Grady, M. J.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology and economics of various wood energy systems available to the small industrial and commercial energy user are considered. This book is designed to help a plant manager, engineer, or others in a decision-making role to become more familiar with wood fuel systems and make informed decisions about switching to wood as a fuel. The following subjects are discussed: wood combustion, pelletized wood, fuel storage, fuel handling and preparation, combustion equipment, retrofitting fossil-fueled boilers, cogeneration, pollution abatement, and economic considerations of wood fuel use. (MHR)

  12. Water washes and caustic leaches of sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 and water washes of sludge from Hanford Tank C-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, R.D.; Collins, J.L.; Chase, C.W.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) selected the enhanced sludge washing (ESW) process as the baseline for pretreatment of Hanford tank sludges. The ESW process uses a series of water washes and caustic leaches to separate nonradioactive components such as aluminum, chromium, and phosphate from the high-level waste sludges. If the ESW process is successful, the volume of immobilized high-level waste will be significantly reduced. The tests on the sludge from Hanford Tank S-101 focused on the effects of process variables such as sodium hydroxide concentration (1 and 3 M), temperature (70 and 95 C), and leaching time (5, 24, 72, and 168 h) on the efficacy of the ESW process with realistic liquid-to-solid ratios. Another goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of water washes on a sludge sample from hanford Tank C-103. The final objective of this study was to test potential process control monitors during the water washes and caustic leaches with actual sludge. Both {sup 137}Cs activity and conductance were measured for each of the water washes and caustic leaches. Experimental procedures, a discussion of results, conclusions and recommendations are included in this report.

  13. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SLUDGE BATCH 5 MELTER FEED RHEOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Stone, M.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Clogging of the melter feed loop at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reduced the throughput of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing. After completing a data review, DWPF attributed the clogging to the rheological properties of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) project. The yield stress of the SB5 melter feed material was expected to be high, based on the relatively high pH of the SME product and the rheological results of a previous Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  14. Comminution process to produce precision wood particles of uniform size and shape with disrupted grain structure from wood chips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of comminution of wood chips (C) having a grain direction to produce a mixture of wood particles (P), wherein the wood chips are characterized by an average length dimension (L.sub.C) as measured substantially parallel to the grain, an average width dimension (W.sub.C) as measured normal to L.sub.C and aligned cross grain, and an average height dimension (H.sub.C) as measured normal to W.sub.C and L.sub.C, and wherein the comminution process comprises the step of feeding the wood chips in a direction of travel substantially randomly to the grain direction through a counter rotating pair of intermeshing arrays of cutting discs (D) arrayed axially perpendicular to the direction of wood chip travel, wherein the cutting discs have a uniform thickness (T.sub.D), and wherein at least one of L.sub.C, W.sub.C, and H.sub.C is greater than T.sub.D.

  15. Properties of concrete containing wood/coal fly ash mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boylan, D.M.; Larrimore, C.L.; Fouad, F.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilities are increasingly interested in co-firing wood with coal in existing pulverized coal units. The co-firing technology is a means of developing a relatively low-cost renewable energy resource, as well as of supporting customers and community by making energy with biomass that might otherwise have been land-filled. However, recent changes in the ASTM C618 standard for fly ash as cement replacement restrict the definition of fly ash that includes non-coal sources. As a result, wood co-firing could affect the market for the fly ash, reducing ash sales revenue, increasing ash disposal costs, and overall substantially increasing the cost of the co-firing technology. In order to address concerns about the effect of wood ash/coal ash mixtures on concrete properties, a study was conducted by University of Alabama at Birmingham, Southern Company, EPRI, and the State of Alabama. This study compared the effects on properties of concrete made with fly ash from coal and made with fly ash from co-firing up to 30% wood with coal. Fly ashes from three plants were used, with two of the ashes from actual co-firing experience and the third an artificial blend of wood and coal ash. Concrete test cylinders were made of several cement/fly ash mixes, and enough were made to allow testing periodically over a one year time period. Test measurements included workability, setting time, air content, compressive and flexural strength, rapid chloride permeability and freeze thaw. It was concluded on the basis of these tests that the wood ash content had no detrimental effect on the plastic and hardened properties of the concrete.

  16. Design considerations for sludge fired fluidized bed incinerator-cum-boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bapat, D.W.; Vishwanathan, K. [Thermax Ltd., Pune (India). Research and Development Centre

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Limited, a major player in the field of Fluidized Bed Boilers in India, has supplied on a turnkey basis, three boilers each of 22.5 tons per hour capacity as a part of Cogeneration system for PT. South Pacific Viscose, Indonesia. The plant generates huge volumes of sludge from its effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). The sludge produced from the ETP has a moisture content of about 98%, which is subsequently reduced to about 78% using a decanter before feeding the sludge into the boiler. The waste sludge has a negative heating value ({minus}150 kcal/kg on NCV basis) and required coal as support fuel for burning. The plant`s requirement was to incinerate the entire sludge generated in the plant, which meant that nearly 50% of the fuel fed to the boiler consisted of the waste sludge. Additional requirements were to burn coal and oil as back-up fuels. This paper deals with the challenges encountered and various design features provided in the configuration of the incinerator-cum-boiler including conveying, feeding and spreading arrangement of the waste sludge for effective incineration in addition to burning coal and oil. Also included in the paper is a brief description of the automatic control logics for combustion control and bed temperature control.

  17. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watson, John L. (Rolla, MO)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed.

  18. Radiowave-based process recovers oil from sludge at Texas site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio frequency (RF)-based sludge treatment process is proving successful in demonstration tests at a Texas site. The process separates petroleum-based sludges into salable oil, treatment-quality water, and disposable solids. The system, called MST-4000, is effective on most sludges, including: dissolved-air-flotation float, slop oil emulsion solids, heat exchanger cleaning sludge, API separator sludge, and leaded tank bottoms. Major components of the system include: four high-power RF/microwave transmitters; four high-power RF/microwave illuminators, which focus the energy on the sludge in a small, cylindrical reactor; four computer-controlled, automatic RF tuners, which improve the quality of the RF/sludge interface by monitoring and adjusting vector impedance; a wave guide, which channels and controls the RF signals from the transmitters through the tuners and to the illuminators; a specially designed instrumentation and control system; and plumbing and piping systems. The paper describes the process and current tests being performed.

  19. Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watson, J.L.

    1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed. 7 figs.

  20. Aluminum Leaching of ''Archived'' Sludge from Tanks 8F, 11H, and 12H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FONDEUR, FERNANDOF.

    2004-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Aluminum can promote formation or dissolution of networks in hydroxide solid solutions. When present in large amounts it will act as a network former increasing both the viscosity and the surface tension of melts. This translates into poor free flow properties that affect pour rate of glass production in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To mitigate this situation, DWPF operations limit the amount of aluminum contained in sludge. This study investigated the leaching of aluminum compounds from archived sludge samples. The conclusions found boehmite present as the predominant aluminum compound in sludge from two tanks. We did not identify an aluminum compound in sludge from the third tank. We did not detect any amorphous aluminum hydroxide in the samples. The amount of goethite measured 4.2 percentage weight while hematite measured 3.7 percentage weight in Tank 11H sludge. The recommended recipe for removing gibbsite in sludge proved inefficient for digesting boehmite, removing less than 50 per cent of the compound within 48 hours. The recipe did remove boehmite when the test ran for 10 days (i.e., 7 more days than the recommended baseline leaching period). Additions of fluoride and phosphate to Tank 12H archived sludge did not improve the aluminum leaching efficiency of the baseline recipe.

  1. DESIGN OF A SYSTEM TO RETRIEVE SLUDGE FROM THE K EAST SPENT FUEL BASIN AT HANFORD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Twitchell, A.L.; MacLean, G.T.; Ho, Q.T.; Fort, D.L.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the Sludge Retrieval System (SRS), which was designed to safely remove radioactive sludge from the K East spent fuel basin at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. Basin water and sludge have the potential to leak to the environment due to the age and condition of the basins. Since the 100 K Area spent fuel basins are located next to the Columbia River, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project mission includes the safe removal, containment, and transportation of sludge from the basins to a secure storage location. The scope of the SRS includes: A system capable of retrieving sludge from the K East basin floor, pits, and fuel canisters; Separation of debris from sludge, where debris is defined as any material greater than 0.64 cm (0.25 in.) in diameter; Collection of sludge particles in a container that can be transported away from the basin; Modifications to the K East basin to allow installation of the SRS. The SRS was designed by Fluor Federal Services. Changes to the designed system were made by Fluor Hanford as a result of full-scale testing performed after design. This paper discusses this testing, as well as operation and control of the system. Construction and startup testing was initially scheduled to be complete by the end of December 2002. Startup of the system is now expected in April 2003.

  2. Engineering Work Plan for Development of Sludge Pickup Adapter for Fuel Cleanliness Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The plan for developing an adapter to suction up sludge into a calibrated tube for fuel cleanliness inspection activities is described. A primary assessment of fuel cleanliness to be performed after processing through the Primary Cleaning Machine is whether the volume of any remaining canister sludge in or on a fuel assembly exceeds the allowable 14 cm{sup 3} limit. It is anticipated that a general visual inspection of the sludge inventory after fuel assembly separation will usually suffice in making this assessment, but occasions may arise where there is some question as to whether or not the observed quantity of sludge exceeds this limit. Therefore a quantitative method of collecting and measuring the sludge volume is needed for these borderline situations. It is proposed to develop an adapter that fits on the end of the secondary cleaning station vacuum wand that will suction the material from the sludge collection tray into a chamber marked with the limiting volume to permit a direct go/no-go assessment of the sludge quantity.

  3. Analytical Modeling of Wood Frame Shear Walls Subjected to Vertical Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyendinh, Hai

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    referred to as Analytical Model of wood frame SHEar walls subjected to Vertical load (AMSHEV) is based on the kinematic behavior of wood frame shear walls and captures significant characteristics observed from experimental testing through appropriate...

  4. Metals Concentrations in Soils Below Decks Made of CCA-Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Metals Concentrations in Soils Below Decks Made of CCA-Treated Wood This report is an excerpt from the report titled: New Lines of CCA-Treated Wood Research, In-Service and Disposal Issues Which was finalized

  5. Simulating the dynamics of flexible wood pulp fibres in suspension John M. Stockie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stockie, John

    , including wood pulp processing, polymer composites, and formation of fibre-reinforced materials elements to form a surface that re- sists bending and stretching. This is a natural construction for wood

  6. CONTROLLING THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ILLEGALLY LOGGED TIMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTROLLING THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ILLEGALLY LOGGED TIMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS A study prepared@riia.org February 2002 #12;Controlling the international trade in illegally logged timber and wood products Page 2...................................................................................................................... 11 ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES IN THE FOREST SECTOR

  7. Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately linked to major changes in the global

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacific Equatorial Age Transect (PEAT): Summary As the largest ocean, the Pacific is intricately the Cenozoic the Pacific plate has had a northward component. Thus, the Pacific is unique, in that the thick to drill an age transect ("flow-line") following the position of the paleo- equator in the Pacific

  8. Wood residuals find big uses in small pieces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With a history of finding economic uses for leftovers, the wood industry explores sustainable options for creating higher value products. Years ago, companies saw the use - any use - of residues as a sound, economic business practice. Today, many companies are looking to go beyond low value products such as mulch, animal bedding and fuel, and market to higher value end users. Additionally, with so much material from the primary industries already accounted for, consumers of wood residue are in need of additional supply from sources such as secondary mills (furniture manufacturers, etc.), as wells as the C&D and MSW streams. This paper discusses these products and markets.

  9. STP K Basin Sludge Sample Archive at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory FY2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiskum, Sandra K.; Smoot, Margaret R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) currently houses 88 samples (~10.5 kg) of K Basin sludge (81 wet and seven dry samples) on behalf of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), which is managed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). Selected samples are intended to serve, in part, as sentinels to enhance understanding of sludge properties after long-term storage, and thus enhance understanding of sludge behavior following transfer to sludge transfer and storage containers (STSCs) and storage at the Hanford 200 Area central plateau. In addition, remaining samples serve in contingency for future testing requirements. At PNNL, the samples are tracked and maintained under a prescriptive and disciplined monthly sample-monitoring program implemented by PNNL staff. This report updates the status of the K Basin archive sludge sample inventory to April 2014. The previous inventory status report, PNNL 22245 (Fiskum et al. 2013, limited distribution report), was issued in February of 2013. This update incorporates changes in the inventory related to repackaging of 17 samples under test instructions 52578 TI052, K Basin Sludge Sample Repackaging for Continued Long Term Storage, and 52578 TI053, K Basin Sludge Sample Repackaging Post-2014 Shear Strength Measurements. Note that shear strength measurement results acquired in 2014 are provided separately. Specifically, this report provides the following: • a description of the K Basin sludge sample archive program and the sample inventory • a summary and images of the samples that were repackaged in April 2014 • up-to-date images and plots of the settled density and water loss from all applicable samples in the inventory • updated sample pedigree charts, which provide a roadmap of the genesis and processing history of each sample in the inventory • occurrence and deficiency reports associated with sample storage and repackaging

  10. Mixing Envelope D Sludge with LAW Intermediate Products with and without Glass Formers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, E.K.

    2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection is in the process of designing a waste treatment system to process the Hanford Reservation High Level Waste (HLW). Envelope D sludge slurries will be blended with the concentrated Cs/Ts eluates, and the Sr/TRU intermediates separated from Envelope A, B, and C feeds. This study produced two washed simulated sludges (representing tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 sludge), a Sr/TRU washed precipitate produced from tank 241-AN-107 simulant, and a concentrated blended eluate simulant based upon eluates from processing 241-AZ-102 supernate.

  11. Rational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    (0)3 85 59 53 85 E-mail: anna.dupleix@ensam.eu Abstract Heating green wood logs by infrared (IR-line IR heating system installed on the peeling lathe. Keywords: green wood; heating; infrared; modelingRational production of veneer by IR-heating of green wood during peeling: Modeling experiments Anna

  12. SECTION 50 Table of Contents 50 Lake Rufus Woods Management Plan .........................................................2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and formation of the Subbasin Work Teams and the process used to develop and adopt the management plan can50-1 SECTION 50 ­ Table of Contents 50 Lake Rufus Woods Management Plan .........................................................................28 #12;50-2 50 Lake Rufus Woods Management Plan The Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Management Plan

  13. European Institute for Wood Preservation Congress 4-6 September 2008, Lausanne, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developments A. Wood raw materials (roundwood) B. Sawn softwood C. Wood energy V. Conclusions VI" · In 2007, US housing construction continued its sharp decline, severely impacting world markets. · Green building systems are a market driver, but also a constraint. · UNECE region consumption of wood and paper

  14. EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECTS OF SAMPLE SIZE ON CHARACTERIZATION OF WOOD-PARTICLE LENGTH DISTRIBUTION Quang V. Cao of sample size on fitting length distribution of wood particles used for manufacturing wood-based composites moments and the ability of the sample distributions to characterize the population represented

  15. Presentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presentation 2.6: Wood waste for energy: lessons learnt from tropical regions Paul Vantomme of forest products with more value adding, and promoting the use of wood waste to increase energy efficiency to promote the use of wood waste for energy production. Not only the financial viability of the process needs

  16. Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Matrix penetration in the bulk:In uence of humidity: Morphological analysis of wood welding.pichelin@b .ch Context: Wood can be welded using linear vibration welding tech- niques similar to the ones in plastic and metal industry[1] . Wood welding allows bonding strength similar to glued joints. However, due

  17. Streamlined LCA of Wood Pellets: Export and Possible Utilization in UBC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Streamlined LCA of Wood Pellets: Export and Possible Utilization in UBC Boiler House CHBE 573 Ann Pa May 15, 2009 #12;2 | P a g e INTRODUCTION Wood pellets are a type of biofuels and are often made. Like all biofuels, wood pellets are carbon- neutral and renewable and are very popular in Europe

  18. Net carbon fluxes at stand and landscape scales from wood bioenergy harvests in the US Northeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    gas emissions implications of wood biomass (`bioenergy') harvests are highly uncer- tain yet of great') on long-term green- house gas emissions are uncertain (McKechnie et al., 2011), yet demand for wood (C) emitted from wood bioenergy may eventually be re-sequestered through regeneration and increased

  19. Management of Discarded Treated Wood Products: A Resource Guide for Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Management of Discarded Treated Wood Products: A Resource Guide for Generators Prepared by have been conducting research on treated wood since 1996. During the course of the research, there have been numerous inquiries about the disposal and management options for treated wood products. There has

  20. Alternative Chemicals and Improved Disposal-End Management Practices for CCA-treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Alternative Chemicals and Improved Disposal-End Management Practices for CCA-treated Wood (FINAL Importation Associated with CCA-Treated Wood Use APPENDIX B: MSDS Sheets for Alternative Chemicals APPENDIX C Members A-1 B-1 C-1 D-1 E-1 F-1 G-1 ATTACHMENT: Treated Wood Resource Book #12;ii This page left

  1. Preservative leaching from weathered CCA-treated wood Timothy Townsenda,*, Brajesh Dubeya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Preservative leaching from weathered CCA-treated wood Timothy Townsenda,*, Brajesh Dubeya , Thabet copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood in landfills raises concerns with respect to leaching of preservative compounds. When unweathered CCA-treated wood is leached using the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure

  2. Implications for the Future of Treated Wood in Four U.S. Demand Sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Implications for the Future of Treated Wood in Four U.S. Demand Sectors Todd F. Shupe Associate extends the life span of lumber, but the Environmental Protection Agency says arsenic treated wood might arsenic-treated wood from Florida's public playgrounds failed to pass. "Wave of opponents kills Crow

  3. Attitudes and Awareness about Treated Wood Products: The U.S. South Homeowner Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Qinglin

    Attitudes and Awareness about Treated Wood Products: The U.S. South Homeowner Perspective is preservative-treated (SFPA 2004). In light of increasing market penetration from non-wood alternatives homeowner attitudes and awareness about using treated wood Strategic decisions can be made to better

  4. U.S. Playground Equipment Manufacturer and Purchaser Perceptions of Treated Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Playground Equipment Manufacturer and Purchaser Perceptions of Treated Wood Todd F. Shupe treated wood might cut life short for our children. "EPA chops down potential killer", 24 Hour News 8, Florida, after his bill to ban arsenic-treated wood from Florida's public playgrounds failed to pass

  5. Quantities of Arsenic-Treated Wood in Demolition Debris Generated by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Research Quantities of Arsenic-Treated Wood in Demolition Debris Generated by Hurricane Katrina B R of the demolition debris is wood waste of which a significant proportion is treated with preservatives, including preservatives containing arsenic. As a result of the large scale destruction of treated wood structures

  6. Mechanical characteristics of aged Hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl.) wood from Japanese historical buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    historical buildings -Comparative analyses with accelerated aging wood- Misao YOKOYAMA*1 , Joseph GRIL*1 Abstract Wood is present in many cultural heritage objects thanks to its capacity to resist odvantage with mechanical characteristics of aged hinoki (Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl.) wood of Japanese historical buildings

  7. Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepcin, Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepción, Chile Global #12;Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepción, Chile Subjects;Society of Wood Science and Technology Convention 10-12 November 2008, Concepción, Chile Main sources

  8. Name: Qinglin Wu Title: Roy O Martin Sr. Professor, Composites and Engineered Wood Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (ASTM), Philadelphia, PA · Forest Products Society, Madison, WI · Society of Wood and Science Technology Organizations · International Research Group in Wood Preservation, Stockholm, Sweden · American Chemical Society (ACS) · American Wood Preservation Association (AWPA) · American Society for Testing and Materials

  9. Final Independent External Peer Review Report Melvin Price Wood River Underseepage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Project Background and Purpose The purpose of the Melvin Price Wood River Underseepage Price Wood River LRR and the overall scope of the project, the final panel members were selectedFinal Independent External Peer Review Report Melvin Price Wood River Underseepage Limited

  10. DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

    2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

  11. APPLICATION OF NELSON'S SORPTION ISOTHERM TO WOOD COMPOSITES AND OVERLAYS'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    APPLICATION OF NELSON'S SORPTION ISOTHERM TO WOOD COMPOSITES AND OVERLAYS' Qinglin Wu Assistant. It was found that Nelson's model can be used to describe the experimental data from different composite composite materials (Suchsland 1972). These relationships, known as sorption isotherms, greatly affect

  12. Influence of Nanoclay on Properties of HDPE/Wood Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Nanoclay on Properties of HDPE/Wood Composites Yong Lei,1 Qinglin Wu,1 Craig M Agricultural Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 2 Performance Engineered Composites, USDA Forest ServiceScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). ABSTRACT: Composites based on high density polyeth- ylene (HDPE), pine

  13. Bryan H. Wood Assistant Deputy Commandant of the Marine Corps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stations throughout the world and for the operating forces across the U.S. Marine Corps. Mr. Wood advisor to the Commander, Combined Joint Task Force- Horn of Africa (CJTF-HOA) in Djibouti, Africa. Mr as the Environmental Law Section Head and Senior Associate Counsel (Environment/ Safety), Naval Sea Systems Command

  14. AN EXAMINATION OF WOOD RECYCLING PROVISIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN GREEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American green building standards, with use of such materials awarded or specified. Construction-consumer materials shall be considered as recycled. In addition to reviewing provisions of various green building! ! ! AN EXAMINATION OF WOOD RECYCLING PROVISIONS IN NORTH AMERICAN GREEN BUILDING PROGRAMS DR. JIM

  15. Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Physiological Insights Towards Improving Fish Culture L. CURRY WOODS III* Department of Animal, and American Fisheries Society (AFS) Fish Culture Section, was held February 26 through March 2, 2007, in San Antonio, Texas. At this meeting, the AFS Fish Culture and Fish Physiol- ogy Sections co

  16. Wood Residues as Fuel Source for Lime Kilns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azarniouch, M. K.; Philp, R. J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main obstacles to total energy self sufficiency of kraft mills appears to be the fossil fuel requirements of the lime kilns. If an economical technology can be developed which allows fossil fuel to be replaced in whole or in part by wood...

  17. Measuring Interfacial Stiffness of Adhesively-Bonded Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    , the interfaces will fail, the elements will cease to share load, and the composite will have poor properties property. Nearly all methods for characterizing wood adhesive bonds consider only strength of the bonds. Typically a bond line is loaded until failure and the final load at failure is recorded. Some common

  18. Marketing of Tropical Hardwood Wood Products from Ghana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    productive · Causes: farming, bush fires, fuel wood, wasteful logging practices, mining and quarrying #12;Fuelwood #12;Current Industry Structure · 8% of GDP · 250 companies involved in primary operations · 180 companies in secondary operations · Over 200 companies involved in tertiary operations · General

  19. 14 November 2010 Wood SA & Timber Times FOREST HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    14 November 2010 Wood SA & Timber Times FOREST HEALTH Aprogramme that begun based on a very small other disciplines within reach of a dynamic forestry industry. Three South African forestry companies was formally launched in 1990.The research directors of these companies Neville Denison (Mondi),Mike Shaw

  20. Pellet Production Wood Pellets are made by compressing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellet Production Wood Pellets are made by compressing clean dry sawdust, under very high pressure into a pellet as it cools. The material used for producing pellets usually comes from industries who are already pellets reduces the volume of material they have to treat as waste, reducing landfill. Pellets have