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Sample records for wolfgang moehler ihs

  1. User:WolfgangFahl | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WolfgangFahl Jump to: navigation, search Name Wolfgang Fahl Edits 1 Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleUser:WolfgangFahl&oldid877450...

  2. IHS Standards Expert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Standards » IHS IHS Standards Expert 1354608000000 IHS Standards Expert Los Alamos researchers can access IHS Standards from offsite via Remote Access. / / No / Question? 667-5809 library@lanl.gov IHS Standards Expert Los Alamos researchers can access IHS Standards from offsite via Remote Access. Login For each collection (society), one person may access pdfs at a time, per the Library's subscription license. Please free up the collection for another user when finished: download or print your

  3. Wolfgang and Gabriele Wismeth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Wolfgang and Gabriele Wismeth Place: Germany Sector: Solar Product: Was CEO and majority shareholder (95.24%) of GWU Solar GmbH and is now of Sunline AG after the...

  4. Wolfgang Eberhardt on Light Sources: Getting the Balance Right

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wolfgang Eberhardt conducted his first experiment at the old DESY synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. A so-called "parasitic" operation on a high-energy physics ring, it had...

  5. Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1978 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1978 The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & ... Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1978 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Citation For his ...

  6. New DOE IH Manual Chapter on Exposure Assessment | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    New DOE IH Manual Chapter on Exposure Assessment New DOE IH Manual Chapter on Exposure Assessment August 2009 Presenter: Danny Field, National Nuclear Security Administration Track...

  7. Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1961 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1961 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 1960's Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1961 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physics: For

  8. Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and ...

  9. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, L.; Li, F.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H{sub 2}O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Frster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  10. High Temperature Compatibility of 60-Watt IHS Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worley, C. M.; Merten, C. W.

    1995-11-21

    The 60-Watt Isotopic Heat Source (IHS) utilizes a variety of materials which have been selected for their properties at elevated temperatures. These include iridium, molybdenum, and the T-111 alloy which consists of 90 wt% tantalum, 8 wt% tungsten, and 2 wt% hafnium. Properties of interest in radioisotopic heat source applications include high temperature strength, resistance to oxidation, weldability, and ability to act as a diffusion barrier. Iridium is utilized as a clad for fuel pellets because of its high temperature mechanical properties and good compatibility with carbon and plutonium oxide. Molybdenum retains good high temperature strength and has been used as a diffusion barrier in past applications. However, molybdenum also exhibits poor resistance to oxidation. Therefore, it is necessary to enclose molybdenum components so that they are not exposed to the atmosphere. T-111 exhibits moderate oxidation resistance, good high temperature mechanical properties, and good weldability. For these reasons, it is used as the outer containment boundary for the 60-Watt IHS. Because the temperature in GPHS fueled dads is on the order of 1000 degrees Celsius in the 60-W configuration, the potential for diffusion of dissimilar materials from one into another exists. Deleterious effects of diffusion can include degradation of mechanical strength through the formation of brittle intermetallics, degradation of mechanical properties through simple alloying, or formation of voids through the Kirkendall effect. Because of the possibility of these effects, design methodology calls for use of diffusion barriers between materials likely to exhibit interdiffusion at elevated temperatures. The necessity to assure the long term integrity of the 60-Watt IHS dictates that the diffusion behavior of its component materials be known. This report describes the high temperature compatibility studies which were conducted on the component materials of the 60-Watt IHS.

  11. The New Era: NOCs Reach Out for Resources Bob Fryklund, IHS Energy

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    supply and market impacts of US unconventional oil production growth Andrew Slaughter, Vice-President, Energy Insight, IHS Presentation to EIA 2013 Energy Conference June 18 th 2013 Washington, DC CONFIDENTIAL © 2013, All rights reserved, IHS CERA., 55 Cambridge Parkway, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142 No portion of this presentation may be reproduced, reused or otherwise distributed in any form without prior written consent. Copyright © 2013HS Inc. All Rights Reserved. 1 Today's Themes * US

  12. First-principles Study of the Infrared Spectrum of the Ice Ih (0001)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility principles Study of the Infrared Spectrum of the Ice Ih (0001) Surface Authors: Pham, T.A., Huang, P., Schwegler, E., Galli, G. Ice particles catalyze a number of processes relevant to atmospheric and environmental chemistry, and the elucidation of these reactions require knowledge of the ice surface structure. Although it is well known that the structure of bulk ice-Ih is proton disordered, the understanding of the microscopic structure of the

  13. Secretary Moniz's Remarks on "The North American Energy Powerhouse" at IHS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy CERAWeek 2015 -- As Delivered | Department of Energy "The North American Energy Powerhouse" at IHS Energy CERAWeek 2015 -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Remarks on "The North American Energy Powerhouse" at IHS Energy CERAWeek 2015 -- As Delivered April 22, 2015 - 6:00pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well, let me start by saying thanks to Dan (Yergin) and to my colleagues, Minister Rickford and Secretary Joaquin Coldwell. Also, I do

  14. Long Term Processing Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis plus Hydroconversion (IH2) for the Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, Terry; Roberts, Michael; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Wangerow, Jim; McLeod, Celeste; Del Paggio, Alan; Gephart, John; Starr, Jack; Hahn, John

    2013-06-09

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of a new, economical, technology named integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The life cycle analysis (LCA) shows that the use of the IH2 process to convert wood to gasoline and diesel results in a greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emission compared to that found with fossil derived fuels. The technoeconomic analysis showed the conversion of wood using the IH2 process can produce gasoline and diesel at less than $2.00/gallon. In this project, the previously reported semi-continuous small scale IH2 test results were confirmed in a continuous 50 kg/day pilot plant. The continuous IH2 pilot plant used in this project was operated round the clock for over 750 hours and showed good pilot plant operability while consistently producing 26-28 wt % yields of high quality gasoline and diesel product. The IH2 catalyst showed good stability, although more work on catalyst stability is recommended. Additional work is needed to commercialize the IH2 technology including running large particle size biomass, modeling the hydropyrolysis step, studying the effects of process variables and building and operating a 1-50 ton/day demonstration scale plant. The IH2 is a true game changing technology by utilizing U.S. domestic renewable biomass resources to create transportation fuels, sufficient in quantity and quality to substantially reduce our reliance on foreign crude oil. Thus, the IH2 technology offers a path to genuine energy independence for the U. S., along with the creation of a significant number of new U.S. jobs to plant, grow, harvest, and process biomass crops into fungible

  15. QR'SE¨£F8F£TIH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ©! "©#£$!%& '£¦¡(!) 01& 23¤)45 76¢3& #£¦98 @A 23¤)CB3D£¦E¨£F8G£$IH P¥B QR'SE¨£F8F£TIH £¦¥ UVP98F8W D8X©232¨8F£W£W)Y¥¡ `ba'cedfhgIcDiqpsr'tvuxwCd€y‚ƒy'„u…cD†

  16. Y H-S I-H HATIOHAL LEAth~~Y~~OF' OtUO ' Industrial Hygiene No...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    H-S I-H HATIOHAL LEAthYOF' OtUO ' Industrial Hygiene No. P.O. Box 158)At.' He&bykation Sample Nos. ? Sk. 0 qq Cinchnail 31;Obio Type of SampleCI" lz -- HEALTH AND SAFETY ...

  17. Wolfgang Eberhardt on Light Sources: Getting the Balance Right

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    talk, "Diffraction Limited Storage Rings and Free Electron Lasers-Why Do We Need Both?" ... month on "Diffraction Limited Storage Rings and Free Electron Lasers-Why Do We Need Both?" ...

  18. Ormesa IH Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    processes (afday) Daily Operation Water Use (afday) Well Field Water Use (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (annual average) (afday) Cooling Tower Water use (summer average) (af...

  19. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of Factory-Built Housing Units (1) Company CMH Manufacturing 20% Champion Enterprises, Inc. 19% Palm Harbor Homes, Inc. 10% Fleetwood Enterprises, Inc. 9% Skyline Corporation 6% Note(s): Source(s): 8,207 376.4 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the factory-built home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey.

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of Modular/3D Housing Units (1) Company Champion Enterprises, Inc. 27% CMH Manufacturing 14% All American Homes, LLC 10% Palm Harbor Homes, Inc. 10% Excel Homes LLC 7% Note(s): Source(s): 1,200 110.6 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the Modular/3D home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey. In 2007,

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2007 Top Five Manufacturers of HUD-Code (Mobile) Homes (1) Company CMH Manufacturing 23% Champion Enterprises, Inc. 18% Fleetwood Enterprises, Inc. 12% Palm Harbor Homes 11% Skyline Corporation 8% Note(s): Source(s): 8,207 376 1) Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market shares based on total gross sales volume of the HUD-Code home producers included in the list of the top 25 factory-built producers responding to the survey. In 2007,

  2. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 2004 Top Five Manufacturers of Factory-Fabricated Components (1) Company Carpenter Contractors 175.0 1,130 Automated Building Company 102.5 702 Landmark Truss 45.0 425 Southern Building Products 25.9 180 Dolan Lumber & Truss 25.1 260 Note(s): Source(s): Automated Builder Magazine, Sept. 2005, p. 40-41. 26% 15% 7% 4% 4% 1) Factory-fabricated components include trusses, wall panels, and doors. Data based on mail-in surveys from manufacturers, which may not be entirely complete. 2) Market

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 2004 Number of Industrialized Housing Manufacturers Versus Production (Stick-Builders) Companies Type Panelized Modular (1) HUD-Code Production Builders Component Manufacturers Special (Commercial) Units Note(s): Source(s): 170 1) 170 of these companies also produce panelized homes. Automated Builder Magazine, Mar. 2005, p. 34-35; Automated Builder Magazine, Jan. 2004, p. 16. Number of Companies 3,500 200 90 7,000 2,200

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.7 Industrialized Housing (IH)

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 1980-2009 Manufactured Home Shipments, Estimated Retail Sales and Average Sales Prices Year 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Note(s): Source(s): Estimated Average Sales Price (2010$) Manufactured Home Retail Sales Shipments (2010$ Million) Single Section Multi-Section 238,808 9,396 $34,349 $56,715 295,079 11,905 $33,811 $58,592 221,091 10,146 $37,079 $66,046 240,313 10,133

  5. Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and Horizons Session 2–C: Navigating Roadblocks on the Path to Advanced Biofuels Deployment Alan A. Del Paggio, Vice President of Upstream & Renewables, CRI Catalyst Company

  6. Microsoft Word - word_39rhNNng8xZUNBezIH2C.docx

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... the theoretical predictions at least on a qualitative level. ... the applied experimental method also provides information ... Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation ...

  7. IH&R DEPARTMENT MONTHLY REPORT FOR JULY & AUGUST 1979 R. C. Heatherton

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... FMPC Air SGnling Station - A job order request has been submitted for the construction of ... A,subscription was obtained for a service providing information about pollution control ...

  8. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schmidt, A. Czasch, O. Jagutzki, H. Schmidt-Bcking, and R. Drner (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main, Germany); D. Akoury (Johann Wolfgang...

  9. Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LK48 IH LK48 IH IH LJ15 Berrah LK09 Russell LJ69 Day LK24 Shpyrko IH LJ32 LJ32 IH-Sci Hoffman Night LJ51 Fuchs LK48 IH LK48 LJ32 LK48 Det LK34 Thibault DD-SPI IH IH PCS LJ69...

  10. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L. Ph.H. Schmidt, A. Czasch, O. Jagutzki, H. Schmidt-Bcking, and R. Drner (Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universitt Frankfurt am Main, Germany); D. Akoury (Johann Wolfgang...

  11. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Cusanno, Francesco ; Dalton, Mark ; De Leo, Raffaele ; De Jager, Cornelis ; Deconinck, ... Vincent ; Sutera, Concetta ; Tobias, William ; Troth, Wolfgang ; Urciuoli, Guido ; ...

  12. Microsoft Word - 15-GM.02, Rev. 8 - ready to issue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Process Gases; WP 12-IH.02-11, WIPP Industrial Hygiene Program - Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs); WP 12-IH.02-1, for diesel emissions; WP 12-IH1022, Sampling for Carbon ...

  13. 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the specific standard. To print IHS file go to http:www.ihs.com Thomson Reuters TECHSTREET ENTERPRISE at techstreet.subscriptions@thomsonreuters.com. The contractor...

  14. Isostructural Metal-Organic Frameworks Assembled from Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assembled from Functionalized Diisophthalate Ligands through a Ligand-Truncation Strategy Previous Next List Yangyang Liu, Jian-Rong Li, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Tian-Fu Liu,...

  15. Parity-Violating Electron Deuteron Scattering and the Proton...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Kenneth ; Hannelius, Lars ; Hasty, R. ; Allen, Alice ; Herda, M.C. ; Jones, CE ; King, Paul ; Korsch, Wolfgang ; Kowalski, Stanley ; Kox, Serge ; Kramer, Kevin ; Lee, P. ; ...

  16. High-Throughput Analytical Model to Evaluate Materials for Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Throughput Analytical Model to Evaluate Materials for Temperature Swing Adsorption Processes Previous Next List mcontent.jpg Julian P. Sculley, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Weigang...

  17. Building multiple adsorption sites in porous polymer networks...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building multiple adsorption sites in porous polymer networks for carbon capture applications Previous Next List Weigang Lu, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Jiamei Yu, Perla B Balbuena,...

  18. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Lorenzon, Wolfgang ; Mammei, Juliette ; Martin, J W ; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet ; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana more ; Piercey, Rodney ; Potterveld, David ; Smith, Gregory ; Spurlock, Kurt ; ...

  19. untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    resellersretailers responding to EIA-782B, W i,h is inversely proportional to the probability of inclusion. For all cer- tainty units W i,h 1. The certainty units are all...

  20. Trends in U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Upstream Costs

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Average 2015 well drilling and completion costs in five onshore areas decline 25% and 30% below their level in 2012 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) commissioned IHS Global Inc. (IHS) to perform a study of upstream drilling and production costs. The IHS report assesses capital and operating costs associated with drilling, completing, and operating wells and facilities.

  1. Panofsky Agonisters: 1950 Loyalty Oath at Berkeley; Pief navigates the crisis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, John David

    2008-08-14

    In 1949-1951 the University of California was traumatized and seriously damaged by a Loyalty Oath controversy. Wolfgang K. H. Panofsky, a young and promising physics professor and researcher at Lawrence's Radiation Laboratory, was caught up in the turmoil.

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Eberhardt, Wolfgang (4) Roth, Friedrich (4) Arion, Tiberiu (3) Dronskowski, R. (3) Schilling, H. (3) Wolff, H. (3) Baehtz, C. (2) Becker, K.-D. (2) Bimberg, D. (2) Bluhm, Hendrik ...

  3. Isotopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eva Birnbaum (505) 665-7167 Email Wolfgang Runde (505) 667-3350 Email Isotope Production and Applications isotopes Isotopes produced at IPF are critical for medical diagnosis and ...

  4. Speech and council's dinner

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le D.G. L.van Hove rend hommage à deux personnalités, les Prof. Wolfgang Gendner (?) et ?, quittants le conseil du Cern. Elles prendront ensuite la parole.

  5. Mind, matter, and Pauli

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1992-09-10

    The role of subjective experience in physical theory is discussed, with particular attention to the later ideas of Wolfgang Pauli. These ideas appear to open the door to a unified framework for the development of science.

  6. Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jan 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Day IH IH IH IH Night Feb 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Day L733 Night IH IH L767 Seeman L785 Mar 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

  7. Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    IHS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. CHINA'S COAL MARKET: Did peak demand come and go? EIA Energy Conference: World Coal Markets JULY 12, 2016 Xizhou Zhou Senior Director Head of Asia Gas, Power & Coal Research +86 10 6533 4536 xizhou.zhou@ihs.com © 2016 IHS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Key implications * China's industrial economy is experiencing a "hard landing" as the economic transition accelerates, impacting major industrial fuels, with coal feeling the most pain. * This long-term

  8. Chombo-Crunch Case Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IHS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. CHINA'S COAL MARKET: Did peak demand come and go? EIA Energy Conference: World Coal Markets JULY 12, 2016 Xizhou Zhou Senior Director Head of Asia Gas, Power & Coal Research +86 10 6533 4536 xizhou.zhou@ihs.com © 2016 IHS. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Key implications * China's industrial economy is experiencing a "hard landing" as the economic transition accelerates, impacting major industrial fuels, with coal feeling the most pain. * This long-term

  9. Biomass to Gasoline and DIesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marker, Terry; Roberts, Michael; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Wangerow, Jim; Tan, Eric; Gephart, John; Shonnard, David

    2013-01-02

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The DOE funding enabled rapid development of the IH2 technology from initial proof-of-principle experiments through continuous testing in a 50 kg/day pilot plant. As part of this project, engineering work on IH2 has also been completed to design a 1 ton/day demonstration unit and a commercial-scale 2000 ton/day IH2 unit. These studies show when using IH2 technology, biomass can be converted directly to transportation quality fuel blending components for the same capital cost required for pyrolysis alone, and a fraction of the cost of pyrolysis plus upgrading of pyrolysis oil. Technoeconomic work for IH2 and lifecycle analysis (LCA) work has also been completed as part of this DOE study and shows IH2 technology can convert biomass to gasoline and diesel blending components for less than $2.00/gallon with greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. As a result of the work completed in this DOE project, a joint development agreement was reached with CRI Catalyst Company to license the IH2 technology. Further larger-scale, continuous testing of IH2 will be required to fully demonstrate the technology, and funding for this is recommended. The IH2 biomass conversion technology would reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil, reduce the price of transportation fuels, and significantly lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is a breakthrough for the widespread conversion of biomass to transportation fuels.

  10. Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's ... SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's ...

  11. The Secretary of Energy Advisory Board (SEAB) Task Force to Support...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Steven Specker, Former President, EPRI Dr. Susan Tierney, Analysis Group Dan Yergin (ex-officio), IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates* *SEAB Member Designated Federal Officer: ...

  12. Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Subcommittee (SEAB) on Shale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Defense Fund; Kathleen McGinty, Weston Solutions; Susan Tierney, Analysis Group; Daniel Yergin, IHS-Cambridge Energy Research Associates; Mark Zoback, Stanford University. ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... to investigate aging mechanisms in a vinyl ... (IH) and the subsequent formation of stenotic lesions, ... to dislodge and grip the thrombus while it is withdrawn ...

  14. US Energy Sector Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Cambridge Energy Research Associates (IHS CERA 2010) similarly estimates that by 2030, ... Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. http:amap.noacia. AMS (American Meteorological ...

  15. Trends in U.S. Oil and Natural Gas Upstream Costs - Energy Information...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The IHS report assesses capital and operating costs associated with drilling, completing, and operating wells and facilities. The report focuses on five onshore regions, including ...

  16. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Engineering Standards Manual, Master Specifications Index, Drafting Manual, Design Guides, and more. IHS Standards Expert login information Collections include ANSI,...

  17. Research Library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For more resources see the Reports page. First try: IHS Standards Expert login more ... Library Catalog Los Alamos Authors Los Alamos Research Online Review & Approval System ...

  18. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... gas analysis (1) gas analyzer (1) heating (1) hydropyrolysis (1) ih2 (1) infrared spectrometers (1) inorganic, organic, physical, and analytical chemistry (1) Filter by Author ...

  19. Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Brawley Geothermal Power Plant + 520 + O Ormesa IH Geothermal Facility + 296 + R Raft River Geothermal Facility + 270 + Reykjanes Geothermal Power Station + 590 + Retrieved...

  20. Daniel Yergin | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Yergin co-founded IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates. Its offices are in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Beijing, Calgary, Dubai, Mexico City, Moscow, Oslo, Paris, San Francisco, ...

  1. MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    March 11, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS PAUL ... (DOE) Walter Gazda (DOTVolpe) Kevin Green (DOTVolpe) Christopher Grillo (IHS) Ken ...

  2. Annual Energy Outlook 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... GDP Gross domestic product. Btu British thermal unit. - - Not applicable. Sources: 2012 and 2013: IHS Economics, Industry and Employment models, November 2014. Projections: ...

  3. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (5 1/4 inch, 1. 2mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  4. National Radon Database. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon survey: CA, HI, ID, LA, NE, NV, NC, OK, SC, the Navajo Nation, and the Billings, MT IHS Area 1989-1990 (3 1/2 inch, 1. 44mb) (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The National Radon Database (NRDB) was developed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to distribute information in two recent radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys and the National Residential Radon Survey. The National Residential Radon Surveys collected annual average radon measurements on all levels of approximately 5,700 homes nationwide. Information collected during survey includes a detailed questionnaire on house characteristics, as well as radon measurements. The radon survey data for Volume 6 is contained on two diskettes. The data diskettes are accompanied by comprehensive documentation on the design and implementation of the survey, the development and use of sampling weights, a summary of survey results, and information concerning the household questionnaire.

  5. Performance analysis of an OTEC plant and a desalination plant using an integrated hybrid cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uehara, Haruo; Miyara, Akio; Ikegami, Yasuyuki; Nakaoka, Tsutomu

    1996-05-01

    A performance analysis of an OTEC plant using an integrated hybrid cycle (I-H OTEC Cycle) has been conducted. The I-H OTEC cycle is a combination of a closed-cycle OTEC plant and a spray flash desalination plant. In an I-H OTEC cycle, warm sea water evaporates the liquid ammonia in the OTEC evaporator, then enters the flash chamber and evaporates itself. The evaporated steam enters the desalination condenser and is condensed by the cold sea water passed through the OTEC condenser. The optimization of the I-H OTEC cycle is analyzed by the method of steepest descent. The total heat transfer area of heat exchangers per net power is used as an objective function. Numerical results are reported for a 10 MW I-H OTEC cycle with plate-type heat exchangers and ammonia as working fluid. The results are compared with those of a joint hybrid OTEC cycle (J-H OTEC Cycle).

  6. Science and Society-Arms Control

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le Prof.Weisskopf(?) présente le physicien Wolfgang Panofsky qui parle de la stratégie concernant la prolifération nucléaire entre les Etats Unis et l'Union Soviétique

  7. Meeting LEP

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG J.Adams fait l'introduction et présente les deux autres orateurs. Pierre Darriulat qui fait un doscours sur la physique à l'occasion du LEP, Wolfgang Schnell, qui parle du projet de la machine LEP et le DG lui-même contribue avec quelques réflexions. Présentation des dias

  8. Power5_NUG_final.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bassi/Power5 Architecture John Shalf NERSC Users Group Meeting Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory June 2005 Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy POWER5 IH Overview . POWER5 IH System  2U rack chassis Rack: 24" X 43 " Deep, Full Drawer POWER5 IH Node Architecture 4W or 8W POWER5 Processors L3 Cache 144MB / 288MB (total) Memory 2GB - 128/256GB Packaging 2U ( 24" rack ) 16 Nodes / Rack DASD / Bays 2 DASD ( Hot Plug) I/O Expansion 6 slots ( Blindswap) Integrated SCSI

  9. Testimony of David L. Goodin President and CEO, MDU Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... N.D. It's the first greenfield refinery built in the United States since 1976. ... Representatives, February 11, 2014 2 The Value of US Power Diversity, http:www.ihs.com...

  10. Brandon Mercado 2012 poster

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mercado, B.Q.; Ihly, R.; Liu, Y.; Gibbs, M.; Tolintino, J.; Law, M. Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, 2337 Natural Sciences II, Irvine, CA, 92697 QD PVs ...

  11. Secretary Chu Op-Ed on Energy Efficiency from the World Economic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Washington, DC -- An op-ed by Secretary Steven Chu appears in a new report by the World Economic Forum and IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates entitled "Energy Vision 2010: ...

  12. Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jul 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day IH IH IH Night IH Aug 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day Night Sep 13 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

  13. L>_

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    manuscript has beenauthored by* conu'actorof IhU.S. Gore.wail(mtund contract No. ... U. S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-S4OR21400 with Martin Marietta ...

  14. Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2013 - March 2014 Ver 6: 1814 IH Feng L703 Gruebel LA41 Doniach L688 Fajardo Prop. No. Instr. Spokes Person Title LA06 CXI Barends, Thomas Seeded FEL Beams for...

  15. WCAP-10574

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... TABLE l-l r ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF PFDL-FABRICATED FUEL RODS Program Pu-238 Isotope ... Protection Test Chamber CS-IH-0702 Medical Approval for Using Respiratory Protection ...

  16. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Ohmart Corp - OH 0-06

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    of Air Force Plant 36; January 19, 1981 OH.06-3 - DOE Letter (with Enclosures); J. Fiore to C. Schafer; Information on DOD FUSRAP sites; May 29, 1987 OH.06-4 - IH&R Dept. ...

  17. NERC-LV-539-1 EBVfRONl4EfjTA.L MONITORING REPORT FOR TRE NEVADA TEST SITE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study Release date: February 3, 2015 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies

  18. The Future of Biofuels an Agricultural Perspective

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Biofuels An Agricultural Perspective Beth J. Calabotta Monsanto Company POPULATION GROWING AT 1.1% EACH YEAR Source: UN Population Division, Monsanto analysis INCOMES GROWING AT 3.5% PER YEAR... $5 BILLION PER DAY Source: IHS Global Insight, Agriculture Division, Monsanto analysis FOOD DEMAND GROWING AT ~1.75% EACH YEAR Source: IHS Global Insights, Agriculture Division, Monsanto analysis WATER DEMAND IS GROWING AT ~2% PER YEAR Source: McKinsey Resource Revolution 2011, Monsanto Analysis ENERGY

  19. NOI1VU1SININQV NOLLVINUOdNI A9H3N3 AO^HNH

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Administration NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study Release date: February 3, 2015 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies

  20. 2013 DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Long Term Processing using Integrated Hydropyrolysis plus Hydroconversion (IH 2 ) for Production of Gasoline and Diesel from Biomass May 23, 2012 Bio-Oil Technology Area Review Terry Marker GTI This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Big Picture Goals and Objectives * Demonstrate a new game changing technology, IH 2 , in a continuous pilot plant which - Solves the current technical and economic issues for biomass conversion to

  1. NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration NEMS Freight Transportation Module Improvement Study Release date: February 3, 2015 The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) contracted with IHS Global, Inc. (IHS) to analyze the relationship between the value of industrial output, physical output, and freight movement in the United States for use in updating analytic assumptions and modeling structure within the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) freight transportation module, including forecasting methodologies

  2. Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging Supercomputing: Eye-Opening Possibilities in Imaging September 20, 2013 - 5:00pm Addthis This overlay of mass spectrometry images shows the spatial distribution of three different kind of lipids across a whole mouse cross-section. Lipids act as the structural components of cell membranes and are responsible for energy storage, among other things. | Photo courtesy of Wolfgang Reindl (Berkeley Lab). This overlay of mass spectrometry images shows

  3. WCI Book - WCI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New Guide to Authors DYNAMICS AND THERMODYNAMICS WITH NUCLEONIC DEGREES OF FREEDOM I-Introduction Science Goals (The WCI steering committee) II-Transport properties Editorial Committee: Pawel Danielewicz, William G. Lynch, Wolfgang Trautmann 1. Modelization of the EOS (C.Fuchs, H.Wolter) 2. Deducing the nuclear matter incompressibility coefficient from data on isoscalar compression modes (S.Shlomo, V.M.Kolomietz, G.Colo) 3. Systematics of Stopping and Flow in Au+Au Collisions (A. Andronic,

  4. Giggle:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giggle: A Framework for Constructing Scalable Replica Location Services Ann Chervenak 1 Ewa Deelman 1 Ian Foster 2,3 Leanne Guy 4 Wolfgang Hoschek 4 Adriana Iamnitchi 2 Carl Kesselman 1 Peter Kunszt 4 Matei Ripeanu 2 Bob Schwartzkopf 1 Heinz Stockinger 4 Kurt Stockinger 4 Brian Tierney 5 1 Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Marina del Rey, CA 90292 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 3 Mathematics and Computer Science

  5. Isotopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science » Nuclear Physics » Isotopes Isotopes Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Get Expertise Eva Birnbaum (505) 665-7167 Email Wolfgang Runde (505) 667-3350 Email Isotope Production and Applications isotopes Isotopes produced at IPF are critical for medical diagnosis and disease treatment. These positron emission tomography images were made possible using isotopes produced at LANL.

  6. INSTITUTE COLLOQUIA AND SEMINARS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09-March 31, 2010 2009 April 17 Professor Jian-Wei Qiu, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa and Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York QCD and High Energy Nuclear Collisions April 21 Dr. Peter Levai, KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest, Hungary Can We Find Quark-Gluon Plasma in pp Collision at LHC? April 28 Professor Wolfgang Mittig, NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Nuclear Power and Global Energy

  7. Summary of April 22, 2014 Teleconference

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 22, 2014 Teleconference Subject: Questions Regarding Federal Register "Notice of Intent to Withdraw from Production and Distribution of the Radioisotope Germanium-68 Used for Calibration Sources" (79 FR 19610, April 9, 2014) Participants: Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals, Inc: Dan Brague, Sandy Borgschulte, Roy Brown, Bill Franco, Joe Westner, Dave Gerber Department of Energy (DOE): Marc Garland, Jehanne Gillo, Robert Waxman National Isotope Development Center: Wolfgang Runde Dan

  8. Journal articles published by Ames Laboratory interns | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal articles published by Ames Laboratory interns 2015 Ludovico G. Tulli, Wenjie Wang, William R. Lindemann (2010), Ivan Kuzmenko, Wolfgang Meier ,David Vaknin, and Patrick Shahgaldian, "Interfacial Binding of Divalent Cations to Calixarene-Based Langmuir Monolayers," Langmuir, Article ASAP DOI: 10.1021/acs.langmuir.5b00262, Publication Date (Web): February 20, 2015. Anup D. Sharma, Pavel A. Brodskiy (2010, 2011 SULI), Emma M. Petersen (2013 SULI), Melih Dagdeviren, Eun-Ah Ye,

  9. Registration List - WCI-III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WCI-III Registration List Sandro Barlini, INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Wolfgang Bauer, Michigan State Aldo Bonasera, Laboratorio Nazionale del Sud, INFN Alexander Botvina, Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, Moscow Kyrill Bugaev, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Xavier Campi, LPTMS Abdou Chbihi, GANIL Philippe Chomaz, GANIL Marco Cinausero, INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro Gianluca Colo', Dipartimento di Fisica Romualdo deSouza, Indiana University/IUCF Massimo Di Toro,

  10. Linear accelerator design study with direct plasma injection scheme for warm dense matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondo, K.; Kanesue, T; Okamura, M.

    2011-03-28

    Warm Dense Matter (WDM) is a challenging science field, which is related to heavy ion inertial fusion and planetary science. It is difficult to expect the behavior because the state with high density and low temperature is completely different from ideal condition. The well-defined WDM generation is required to understand it. Moderate energy ion beams ({approx} MeV/u) slightly above Bragg peak is an advantageous method for WDM because of the uniform energy deposition. Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) with a Interdigital H-mode (IH) accelerator has a potential for the beam parameter. We show feasible parameters of the IH accelerator for WDM. WDM physics is a challenging science and is strongly related to Heavy Ion Fusion science. WDM formation by Direct Plasma Injection Scheme (DPIS) with IH accelerator, which is a compact system, is proposed. Feasible parameters for IH accelerator are shown for WDM state. These represents that DPIS with IH accelerator can access a different parameter region of WDM.

  11. Magnetic rotation (MR) band crossing in N=78 odd-Z nuclei: Tilted axis cranking (TAC) calculations to explore the role of nucleons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Suresh

    2014-08-14

    Magnetic Rotation (MR) band crossing is studied systematically in N=78 isotones (La, Pr, Pm and Eu) using Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) model. The observables such as I(h) vs h?, excitation energy E(MeV) vs spin I(h), and the B(M1)/B(E2) vs I(h) were considered to pinpoint MR crossing in these nuclei. The results of tilted axis cranking were compared with these experimental observables. The B(M1) and B(E2) values were also reported and used to understand the crossing behaviour of these MR bands. The systematic evolution of this phenomenon in N=78 odd-Z istotones leads to understand the role of nucleons in MR band crossing.

  12. WBGT Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  13. 100 years of elementary particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, issue 1, Spring 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K.H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  14. General Motors Perspective

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Motors Perspective Dr.-Ing. Wolfgang Oelerich Adam Opel AG GM Alternative Propulsion Center Europe Compressed & Cryo- Compressed Hydrogen Storage Workshop 14 th / 15 th February 2011 Washington DC Chevrolet Equinox as Part of GM's Global "Project Driveway" Power: 73 kW Acceleration (0-100 km/h): 12 s Top speed: 160 km/h Fuel: 4.2 kg Compressed Hydrogen Gas (70 MPa) in three Type 4 filament wound carbon fiber composite vessels Range: 320 km Over 2.5 million km (1.5 million miles)

  15. Microsoft Word - Document11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wolfgang L osert B io: Dr. Losert received a Diploma in Applied Physics in 1995 from the Technical University of Munich, and a Doctorate in Physics from the City College of the City University o f N ew Y ork i n 1 998. H e i s c urrently A ssociate P rofessor o f P hysics a t t he University of Maryland and co---founder and Director of the University of Maryland--- National C ancer I nstitute P artnership f or C ancer T echnology. Dr. L osert's r esearch g roup s tudies t he d ynamics o f l

  16. 1970's | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    's The Enrico Fermi Award Fermi Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's 1950's Ceremony The Life of Enrico Fermi Contact Information The Enrico Fermi Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us Award Laureates 1970's Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Laureates Wolfgang K.H. Panofsky, 1978 Harold M. Agnew, 1978 William L. Russell,

  17. Using weeds to fight wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-10-01

    Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and New Mexico State University have discovered that jimson weed and wild tomato plants can remove the toxic wastes in wastewater associated with the production of trinitrotoluene (TNT). According to Wolfgang F. Mueller of New Mexico State, tissue-cultured cells of jimson weed rapidly absorb and break down toxic and carcinogenic elements in {open_quotes}pink water,{close_quotes} a by-product of the manufacture of TNT. Mueller and his colleagues have found similar results with the wild tomato plant.

  18. 100 years of Elementary Particles [Beam Line, vol. 27, issue 1, Spring 1997

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Pais, Abraham; Weinberg, Steven; Quigg, Chris; Riordan, Michael; Panofsky, Wolfgang K. H.; Trimble, Virginia

    1997-04-01

    This issue of Beam Line commemorates the 100th anniversary of the April 30, 1897 report of the discovery of the electron by J.J. Thomson and the ensuing discovery of other subatomic particles. In the first three articles, theorists Abraham Pais, Steven Weinberg, and Chris Quigg provide their perspectives on the discoveries of elementary particles as well as the implications and future directions resulting from these discoveries. In the following three articles, Michael Riordan, Wolfgang Panofsky, and Virginia Trimble apply our knowledge about elementary particles to high-energy research, electronics technology, and understanding the origin and evolution of our Universe.

  19. A MANUAL FOR THE PREDICTION OF BLAST AND FRAGMENT LOADINGS ON...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... n Da t t l e s i i i p Hardware. (loaded motor and n o r r l e 10.654 Ih) wetgilt of ... r r s t t o p t t con- t a i n i n g one motor; L I n room ad- j o i n i n g sol- v e n t ...

  20. CX-006946: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operation of Accredited Industrial Hygiene (IH) Laboratory in Building 772-F, Revision 1CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 09/29/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  1. I I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    IlCGI.t-11 1'11ysicist IhCSOSUWS r I -. . ;- N . . . r.i : ' * . ) * - ' SMEA1-I ,:< ;s",--rs LOCAT 1 ON OF SURVEY- c,. 1' . I:. lrlllJ.;lJ I.' .? Ib1TI: 01: SURVEY. ...

  2. Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Day LL41 He DD Day IH Night LK86 Albert SPI 412016 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27...

  3. M E M O R A N D U M D A T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    iH: GLLdiJ a- ---e M E M O R A N D U M D A T E d e - S U B J E C T : A L T E R N A T E ' N A M E : --- O W N E R (S) -----w-m P a It:...

  4. VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, A.; Podolak, M.; Sasselov, D.

    2013-05-20

    Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

  5. LCLS-scheduling-run_6_Ver4.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Day IH L431 Frank Com HR CXI inhouse L456 Krasniqi L481/ L481/ Com. IH MEC L525 Night Feng RD Timing L481/494 Com L481/494 L406 Berrah L434 Fuchs June 12 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

  6. Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    /2015 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day LJ54 Gessner LJ67 Khalil IH LJ49 Fromme Night LK21 Sension IH LJ41 Fennel LJ43 Fiuza DS 11/1/2015 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu

  7. Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Day LL41 He DD Day IH Night LK86 Albert SPI 4/1/2016 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Day DD - SPI IH Coffee LL72

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Conference

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 EIA Energy Conference Presentations More than 900 thought leaders from industry, government, and academia turned out for EIA's 2014 Energy Conference, July 14 and 15 at the JW Marriott Hotel in Washington, DC. Participants discussed current and future challenges facing domestic and international energy markets and policymakers. Fred Upton, House Energy & Commerce Committee Maria van der Hoeven, International Energy Agency Eric Slifka, Global Partners LP Daniel Yergin, IHS José Manuel

  9. Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments - Wood Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Wood Energy Program for Yukon Flats Villages DOE Tribal Energy Program 20 November 2008 Feasibility for Wood Heat Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments (CATG) * Non-Profit Consortium of Ten Tribal Governments within the Yukon Flats. * CATG Administers several Tribal Programs on behalf of the Tribes. * CATG also applies for and administers several other grants. - IHS, Regional Clinic (Fort Yukon), Health Aids in Each Village, drug and alcohol programs, and other health related

  10. AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 August 12, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR: JOHN CONTI ASSISTANT ADMINISTRATOR FOR ENERGY ANALYSIS FROM: ANGELINA LAROSE TEAM LEAD NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAM JOHN STAUB TEAM LEAD EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ANALYSIS TEAM EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION and NATURAL GAS MARKETS TEAMS SUBJECT: First AEO2014 Oil and Gas Working Group Meeting Summary (presented on July 25, 2013) Attendees: Anas Alhajji (NGP)* Samuel Andrus (IHS)* Emil Attanasi (USGS)* Andre Barbe (Rice University) David J. Barden (self) Joseph

  11. AEO2015 Transportation Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 Transportation Working Group Meeting Wednesday, July 30, 2014 2:00 - 3:00 p.m. Attendees in person: Austin Brown (NREL) Christopher Ramig (EPA) David Babson (EPA) Devi Mishra (EIA) John Maples (EIA) Lauren Rafelski (EPA) Mindi Farber-DeAnda (EIA) Nicholas Chase (EIA) Patricia Hutchins (EIA) Salil Deshpande (Energetics) Tom Stephens (ANL) Tom White (DOE) Attendees on the phone: Aaron Hula (EPA) Alicia Birky (TA Engineering) Chris Nevers (EPA) Chris Roof (Volpe) Christopher Grillo (IHS) Dallas

  12. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD A Site Specific Advisory Board, Chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Subject: Ind. Evaluation of Procedures & Industrial Hygiene Equipment Used to Monitor Tank Vapors Adopted: February 8, 2013 Page 1 February 8, 2013 Kevin Smith, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 (H6-60) Richland, WA 99352 Re: Independent Evaluation of Procedures and Industrial Hygiene Equipment Used to Monitor Tank Vapors and Flammable Gas Dear Mr. Smith, Background In December 2012, health physics technicians discovered that industrial hygiene (IH)

  13. Occupational Exposure to Benzene from Painting with Epoxy and Other High Performance Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JAHN, STEVEN

    2005-04-20

    Following the discovery of trace benzene in paint products, an assessment was needed to determine potential for benzene exposures to exceed the established ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during painting operations. Sample data was collected by area industrial hygienists for benzene during routine maintenance and construction activities at Savannah River Site. A set of available data from the IH database, Sentry, was analyzed to provide guidance to the industrial hygiene staff and draw conclusions on the exposure potential during typical painting operations.

  14. EIA Energy Conference

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tinker, 2015 EIA Energy Conference June, 2015 EIA Energy Conference June, 2015 Shale Gas Plays Inevitable Updates Bureau of Economic Geology University of Texas at Austin Tinker, 2015 Acknowledgements and Disclosures Acknowledgements and Disclosures  Alfred P. Sloan Foundation  IHS and DrillingInfo  EIA  BHP, ExxonMobil, Southwestern Energy, Devon, Range Resources, Cimarex, Carrizo for discussions ----------------------------------------  Potential conflicts of interest have been

  15. The mechanical properties of T-111 at low to intermediate temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, H.E.; DiStefano, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    In the design of the 60-W Isotopic Heat Source (IHS), a tantalum alloy (T-111) strength member serves as the primary containment shell for the IHS during operation (He-gas internal environment and inert gas or vacuum external environment). An outer Hastelloy S clad is used to protect the T-111 from oxidation, and both the Hastelloy S clad and the T-111 strength member are sealed by automatic gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding. The expected life of the IHS is 5 years at about 650 C preceded by up to 5 years of storage at approximately 300 C. For this application, one important concern is failure of the T-111 strength member due to capsule pressurization arising from helium generation as a fuel decay product. To provide specific data on the mechanical behavior of base and solid metal T-111 under conditions appropriate to the IHS use conditions, a testing program was formulated and carried out. Three types of mechanical tests were conducted. Tensile properties were measured over the temperature range of 25 to 1100 C on T-111 base metal and samples with either longitudinal or transverse autogenous welds. Creep tests on base metal and samples with transverse welds were run to failure over the temperature range of 1100 to 850 C. Creep tests were also run on several transverse weld samples over the temperature range of 500 to 900 C at stresses where failure did not occur, and the creep rates were measured. Two prototypical capsules of the T-111 strength member were fabricated by EG and G Mound Applied Technologies (Mound Laboratories). To verify the mechanical properties design data developed above, these were tested to failure (leak) in a vacuum chamber with the inside of the capsule pressurized by either argon or helium.

  16. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels Breakout Session IA-Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute carroll_biomass_2014.pdf (1.38 MB) More Documents & Publications Commercialization of IH2® Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology

  17. Other Exports by Rail out of the U.S. | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma ØFederally Recognized Indian Tribe ØCentral Oklahoma (between OKC & Tulsa) ØStrong Commitment to Energy Efficiency & Renewables * BKJ Solutions, Inc. ØTribally Owned Construction Company ØConstruction with USACE, IHS, BIA & Tribe ØFuture Renewable Energy Development Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma's traditional jurisdictional lands FEASIBILITY GRANT * Objectives ØConduct in-Depth Feasibility Study of Wind Energy ØIdentify & Address Technical Issues Related

  18. EIAs Proposed Definitions for Natural Gas Liquids

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tinker, 2015 EIA Energy Conference June, 2015 EIA Energy Conference June, 2015 Shale Gas Plays Inevitable Updates Bureau of Economic Geology University of Texas at Austin Tinker, 2015 Acknowledgements and Disclosures Acknowledgements and Disclosures  Alfred P. Sloan Foundation  IHS and DrillingInfo  EIA  BHP, ExxonMobil, Southwestern Energy, Devon, Range Resources, Cimarex, Carrizo for discussions ----------------------------------------  Potential conflicts of interest have been

  19. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Economic Assumptions Recent Economic Indicators The Bureau of Economic Analysis reported that real gross domestic product (GDP) increased at an annual rate of 1.2% in the second quarter of 2016. Real GDP grew by 0.8% in the first quarter of 2016. The increase in real GDP in the second quarter reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures and exports. Production, Income, and Employment EIA used the July 2016 version of the IHS macroeconomic model with EIA's energy price

  20. Nanostructure, Chemistry and Crystallography of Iron Nitride Magnetic

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services Audit Report Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories DOE/IG-0788 February 2008 Department of Energy Washington, DC 2 0 5 8 5 February 28, 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR FROM: Inspector General SUBJECT: IhTFORMATION: Audit Report on "Nanoscale Materials Safety at the Department's Laboratories" BACKGROUND The National Nanotechnology Initiative was established as a multi-agency research and

  1. Organization: Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma ØFederally Recognized Indian Tribe ØCentral Oklahoma (between OKC & Tulsa) ØStrong Commitment to Energy Efficiency & Renewables * BKJ Solutions, Inc. ØTribally Owned Construction Company ØConstruction with USACE, IHS, BIA & Tribe ØFuture Renewable Energy Development Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma's traditional jurisdictional lands FEASIBILITY GRANT * Objectives ØConduct in-Depth Feasibility Study of Wind Energy ØIdentify & Address Technical Issues Related

  2. Industrial Hygiene | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hygiene Ames Laboratory's Industrial Hygiene (IH) Program is dedicated to providing employees a workplace free from or protected against recognized hazards that could potentially cause illness or injury. The basic principles of industrial hygiene are applied: Anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control of workplace hazards. The industrial hygienist participates on Readiness Review committees to assist in anticipation and recognition of chemical, physical, biological, or ergonomic hazards.

  3. Construction of the BNL EBIS preinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi,J.; Barton, D.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lessard, E.; Lockey, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McCafferty, D.; McNerney, A.; Okamura, M.; Pendzick, A.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Scaduto, J.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A. et al.

    2009-05-04

    A new heavy ion preinjector, consisting of an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), an RFQ, and IH linac, is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector win provide ions of any species at an energy of 2 MeV/u, resulting in increased capabilities for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory programs. The RF'Q has been commissioned with beam, and most of the remaining elements are either installed or being assembled.

  4. Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Wind Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Wind Feasibility Study ORGANIZATION * Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma Federally Recognized Indian Tribe Central Oklahoma (between OKC & Tulsa) Strong Commitment to Energy Efficiency & Renewables * BKJ Solutions, Inc. Tribally Owned Construction Company Construction with USACE, IHS, BIA & Tribe Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma's traditional jurisdictional lands FEASIBILITY GRANT * Objectives Conduct in-Depth Feasibility Study of Wind Energy Identify & Address Technical

  5. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction and Raman studies of the phase transition mechanisms of methane hydrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirai, Hisako Kadobayashi, Hirokazu; Hirao, Naohisa; Ohishi, Yasuo; Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Satoshi

    2015-01-14

    The mechanisms by which methane hydrate transforms from an sI to sH structure and from an sH to filled-ice Ih structure were examined using time-resolved X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy in conjunction with charge-coupled device camera observation under fixed pressure conditions. The XRD data obtained for the sI–sH transition at 0.8 GPa revealed an inverse correlation between sI and sH, suggesting that the sI structure is replaced by sH. Meanwhile, the Raman analysis demonstrated that although the 12-hedra of sI are retained, the 14-hedra are replaced sequentially by additional 12-hedra, modified 12-hedra, and 20-hedra cages of sH. With the sH to filled-ice Ih transition at 1.8 GPa, both the XRD and Raman data showed that this occurs through a sudden collapse of the sH structure and subsequent release of solid and fluid methane that is gradually incorporated into the filled-ice Ih to complete its structure. This therefore represents a typical reconstructive transition mechanism.

  6. Memorial W.Gentner

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le DG H.Schopper fait une introduction pour la commémoration et cérémonie de la vie et du travail du Prof.Wolfgang Gentner. W. Gentner, physicien allemand, né en 1906 à Francfort et mort en septembre 1980 à Heidelberg, était directeur au Cern de 1955 à 1960, président du "scientific policy commitee" de 1968 à 1971 et président du Conseil du Cern de 1972 à 1974. Il était un des fondateurs du Cern et 4 personnes qui l'ont bien connu lui rendent hommage, entre autres un de ses élèves, ainsi que Mme ?, J.B.Adams et O.Sheffard(?)

  7. Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication, Environmental Protection Agency Number ID4890008952

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzemer, Michael J.; Hart, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Storage and Treatment Permit Reapplication for the Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Partial Permit, PER-116. This Permit Reapplication is required by the PER-116 Permit Conditions I.G. and I.H., and must be submitted to the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality in accordance with IDAPA 58.01.05.012 [40 CFR §§ 270.10 and 270.13 through 270.29].

  8. 110th Congress 2D Session H.R. 5746

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VerDate Aug 31 2005 03:31 Apr 11, 2008 Jkt 069200 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 6652 Sfmt 6201 E:\BILLS\H5746.IH H5746 wwoods2 on PRODPC68 with BILLS I 110TH CONGRESS 2D SESSION H. R. 5746 To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to establish the infrastructure foundation for the hydrogen economy, and for other purposes. IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES APRIL 9, 2008 Mr. LARSON of Connecticut (for himself, Mr. DENT, Mr. WYNN, Mr. INGLIS of South Carolina, Ms. DELAURO, Mr. DOYLE, Mr. HOLDEN, Mr. WAMP,

  9. Task

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IH Activity/Hazard Table - Does not include all construction activities. Review the rules of use on Page 1 before determining the applicable controls required for your work. 1/4/2016 REV 10 1 Rules for the use of this table 1. DO NOT just copy from the table without modifying the hazards and control sets to the specific scope of work, means and methods of how work will be performed, applying the requirements of approved CSSPs, and duration, frequency, location, and extent of work to be

  10. C

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Table o f C ontents 1. Comments o f t he E dison E lectric I nstitute o n t he D epartment o f E nergy Quadrennial Energy Review 2. IHS-Fuel-Diversity-Study-18-July-2014 3. Joint-Shipper-Letter-Urging-Congress-to-Act-on-Freight-Rail-Reform 4. Letter to Patricia Hoffman re EEI Support for Review of Presidential Permitting Process Department o f E nergy Quadrennial E nergy R eview Second s et o f C omments o f t he E dison E lectric I nstitute Executive S ummary The Edison Electric Institute

  11. * United States Government

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- DE;$r,e /q f-j * I3 - I * United States Government memorandum MAY 21 I991 DATE: REPLY TO Al-fN OF: 4ih55YhL Department of Energy JT:,i 5, f&A 0 ' - j4.~, ' -/ jl.a' \ A t -3 __..-_-. EM-421 SUBJECT: Elimination of the American Potash and Chemical Site The File TO: I have reviewed the attached site summary and elimination recommendation for the American Potash and Chemical Company Site in West Hanover, Massachusetts. I have determined that there is little likelihood of radioactive

  12. Enfmt Plaza. S. W.. Washingron, DC 200262174. Tekphonr: (202) 488~MU0

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    369s . I Suite 300, 955 L' Enfmt Plaza. S. W.. Washingron, DC 200262174. Tekphonr: (202) 488~MU0 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 CA Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility 8 Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: IhI . o-01 nA.os ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES iVA.0-05 kl Q.O3- The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance ML.05 with your suggestion during our meeting on 22

  13. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10). Environmental Guidance Program Reference Book, Revision 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  14. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  15. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today?s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the ?industrialization? of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the Healthcare Sector. In addition he is the CTO of Siemens AG and Head of Corporate Technology, the central research department at Siemens.After completing his studies in physics and philosophy at the Darmstadt University of Technology and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt and receiving a doctorate in biophysics, he worked at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center.In 1984 he joined the Medical Technology Group of Siemens AG, where he was responsible for projects in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) division. He was appointed head of the division in 1995. From 2001 to 2006, as a member of the Executive Management of the Medical Solutions Group, he was responsible for several areas, including technological development.In 2006 he became a Member of the Siemens? Managing Board and head of Corporate Technology. He was additionally appointed as the Sector Healthcare CEO in 2008.Since 2006 he is an honorary professor in physics of the Johann

  16. Innovation Concepts in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-01-06

    AbstractDemographic change and advances in medical science pose increased challenges to healthcare systems globally: The economic basis is aging and thus health is becoming more and more a productivity factor. At the same time, with today’s new communication possibilities the demand and expectations of effective medical treatment have been increased. This presentation will illustrate the need for the “industrialization” of healthcare in order to achieve highest results at limited budgets. Thereby, industrialization is not meaning the medical treatment based on the assembly line approach. Rather it is to recognize the cost of medical care as an investment with respective expectations on the return of the investment. Innovations in imaging and pharmaceutical products as well as in processes - that lead to similar medical results, but with lower efforts - are keys in such scenarios.BiographyProf. Dr. Hermann Requardt, 54, is a member of the Managing Board of Siemens AG and Chief Executive Officer of the Healthcare Sector. In addition he is the CTO of Siemens AG and Head of Corporate Technology, the central research department at Siemens.After completing his studies in physics and philosophy at the Darmstadt University of Technology and Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt and receiving a doctorate in biophysics, he worked at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center.In 1984 he joined the Medical Technology Group of Siemens AG, where he was responsible for projects in the Magnetic Resonance (MR) division. He was appointed head of the division in 1995. From 2001 to 2006, as a member of the Executive Management of the Medical Solutions Group, he was responsible for several areas, including technological development.In 2006 he became a Member of the Siemens’ Managing Board and head of Corporate Technology. He was additionally appointed as the Sector Healthcare CEO in 2008.Since 2006 he is an honorary professor in physics of the

  17. Hydrogen passivation of titanium impurities in silicon: Effect of doping conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, P.; Coutinho, J. Torres, V. J. B.; Rayson, M. J.; Briddon, P. R.

    2014-07-21

    While the contamination of solar silicon by fast diffusing transition metals can be now limited through gettering, much attention has been drawn to the slow diffusing species, especially the early 3d and 4d elements. To some extent, hydrogen passivation has been successful in healing many deep centers, including transition metals in Si. Recent deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements concerning hydrogen passivation of Ti revealed the existence of at least four electrical levels related to Ti{sub i}H{sub n} in the upper-half of the gap. These findings challenge the existing models regarding both the current level assignment as well as the structure/species involved in the defects. We revisit this problem by means of density functional calculations and find that progressive hydrogenation of interstitial Ti is thermodynamically stable in intrinsic and n-doped Si. Full passivation may not be possible to attain in p-type Si as Ti{sub i}H{sub 3} and Ti{sub i}H{sub 4} are metastable against dissociation and release of bond-centered protons. All DLTS electron traps are assigned, namely, E40? to Ti{sub i}H(-/0), E170? to Ti{sub i}H{sub 3}(0/+), E(270) to Ti{sub i}H{sub 2}(0/+), and E170 to Ti{sub i}H(0/+) transitions. Ti{sub i}H{sub 4} is confirmed to be electrically inert.

  18. Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Day Day Night Apr 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue Wed Day LA63 Day Night LA63 Night IH- LA63 May 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

  19. H O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O I - * , TWl rrporl «lf pnpmd u u iccouni of work fponiortd by fbc Unfad Suirs Gomuncnl. KtHka U» Unllii s u m nor Ih. Vaiui SHIM Atomic EnotT Comminjon, oar cur or tncir cnptoynf. nor Mr of ihtk caatrutott, ubcoRtmuirB, or tlwk cmptorra. milMsuir w n a f r . «prM§orimp&cd.of iMnmauy _ { l i . UBl Ibbililr or raponiiMlitr ror Ui. n e o n , , cum- *** pUUuu or tmfol«B or W larornutloa. ippiniia. proaoct or procac rfiKlowd. or rtprucnu Out iu use would not fafrinf* pririirly owned

  20. Building Toxic Metal Characterization and Decontamination Report: Area 6, Building 914

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Industrial Hygiene

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to outline the toxic metal characterization and decontamination efforts in Area 6, Building 914. This includes the initial building inspection, the hotspot sampling, results/findings, building cleanup, and the verification sampling. Building 914 is a steel light frame building that was constructed in 1992. It is about 16,454 square feet, and five employees are assigned to this building. According to the building's floor plan blueprints, it could be inferred that this building was once a Wiremen/Lineman shop. In 2002-2004, the National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office embarked on a broad characterization of beryllium (Be) surface concentrations throughout the North Las Vegas Facility, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), and ancillary facilities like the Special Technologies Laboratory, Remote Sensing Laboratory, etc. Building 914 was part of this characterization. The results of the 2002 study illustrated that the metal housekeeping limits were within acceptable limits and from a Be standpoint, the building was determined to be fit for occupancy. On March 2, 2011, based on a request from Building 914 users, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) Industrial Hygiene (IH) collected bulk samples from the southwest corner of Building 914 at heights above 6 feet where black dust had been noticed on this particular wall. IH conducted surface swipe sampling of the area and analyzed the samples for toxic metals, namely, beryllium (Be), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), and manganese (Mn). The sample results indicated values two to four times above the housekeeping threshold for Be, Cd, Cr, Pb, and Mn. Subsequently, the facility was closed and posted; the necessary personnel were notified; and controls were instituted for ingress and egress of the building. On March 17, 2011, IH performed an extensive sampling event involving the entire warehouse in accordance with NSTec Organization Procedure OP-P250

  1. National radon database documentation. Volume 4. The EPA/state residential radon surveys: Year 4. Final report 1986-1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The National Radon Database has been developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to distribute information collected in two recently completed radon surveys: the EPA/State Residential Radon Surveys, Years 1 to 6; and The National Residential Radon Survey. The goals of the state radon surveys were twofold. Some measure of the distribution of radon levels among residences was desired for major geographic areas within each state and for each state as a whole. In addition, it was desired that each state survey would be able to identify areas of potentially high residential radon concentrations (hot spots) in the state, enabling the state to focus its attention on areas where indoor radon concentrations might pose a greater health threat. The document discusses year 4, 1989-90. The areas surveyed are: California; Hawaii; Idaho; Louisiana; Nebraska; Billings, MT IHS Area; Nevada; North Carolina; Oklahoma; South Carolina; and Navajo Nation.

  2. EBIS preinjector construction status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi,J.; Barton, D.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lessard, E.; Lockey, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McCafferty, D.; McNerney, A.; Okamura, M.; Pendzick, A.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Scaduto, J.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; et al.

    2008-09-29

    A new heavy ion preinjector is presently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an WQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory. Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both physics programs. Fabrication of all major components for this preinjector is in process, with testing of the EBIS and WQ starting this year. The status of this construction is presented.

  3. Commissioning of the EBIS-based heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Hoff, L.; Kondo, K.; Lambiase, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Schempp, A.; Ratzinger, U.; Kanesue, T.

    2010-09-12

    The status is presented of the commissioning of a new heavy ion preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This preinjector uses an Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS), and an RFQ and IH Linac, both operating at 100.625 MHz, to produce 2 MeV/u ions of any species for use, after further acceleration, at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Among the increased capabilities provided by this preinjector are the ability to produce ions of any species, and the ability to switch between multiple species in 1 second, to simultaneously meet the needs of both science programs. For initial setup, helium beam from EBIS was injected and circulated in the Booster synchrotron. Following this, accelerated Au{sup 32+} and Fe{sup 20+} beams were transported to the Booster injection point, fulfilling DOE requirements for project completion.

  4. END-TO-END SIMULATIONS FOR THE EBIS PREINJECTOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RAPARIA,D.; ALESSI, J.; KPONOU, A.; PIKIN, A.; RITTER, J.; MINAEV, S.; RATZINGER, U.; SCHEMPP, A.; TIEDE, R.

    2007-06-25

    The EBIS Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory is in the second year of a four-year project. It will replace the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators with an Electron Beam Ion Source, an RFQ, and one IH Linac cavity, as the heavy ion preinjector for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), and for the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). The preinjector will provide all ions species, He to U, (Q/m >0.16) at 2 MeV/amu at a repetition rate of 5 Hz, pulse length of 10-40 {micro}s, and intensities of {approx}2.0 mA. End-to-end simulations (from EBIS to the Booster injection) as well as error sensitivity studies will be presented and physics issues will be discussed.

  5. Performance of the new EBIS preinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi, J.; Beebe, E.; Binello, S.; Gardner, C.; Gould, O.; Hoff, L.; Kling, N.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; LoDestro, V.; Mapes, M.; McNerney, A.; Morris, J.; Okamura, M.; Pendzick, A.; Phillips, D.; Pikin, A.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Shrey, T.; Smart, L.; Snydstrup, L.; Theisen, C.; Wilinski, M.; Zaltsman, A.; Zeno, K.; Ratzinger, U.; Schempp, A.

    2011-03-28

    The construction and initial commissioning phase of a new heavy ion preinjector was completed at Brookhaven in September, 2010, and the preinjector is now operational. This preinjector, using an EBIS source to produce high charge state heavy ions, provided helium and neon ion beams for use at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in the Fall of 2010, and gold and uranium beams are being commissioned during the 2011 run cycle for use in RHIC. The EBIS operates with an electron beam current of up to 10 A, to produce mA level currents in 10-40 {micro}s beam pulses. The source is followed by an RFQ and IH linac to accelerate ions with q/m > 0.16 to an energy of 2 MeV/amu, for injection into the Booster synchrotron. The performance of the preinjector is presented, including initial operational experience for the NASA and RHIC programs.

  6. Hydrogen effect on remaining life of hydroprocessing reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwadate, T.; Nomura, T.; Watanabe, J.

    1988-02-01

    Old vintage 2.25Cr-1Mo steels used for high-temperature/pressure hydroprocessing reactors have a high potential for temper embrittlement. The cracks caused by hydrogen embrittlement (HE) have been experienced in a stainless steel overlay and base metal of hydroprocessing reactors. In this paper, the temper embrittlement behavior during long-term service is discussed using the results of isothermal temper embrittlement tests up to 30,000 h of exposure. HE susceptibility of base metals, i.e., the threshold stress intensity factor K/sub IH/ and hydrogen-assisted crack growth rate behavior are also discussed. Based on the experimental data obtained, the remaining life assessment of a 2.25Cr-1Mo steel hydroprocessing reactor is analyzed from knowledge of HE.

  7. PICKUP ION MEDIATED PLASMAS. I. BASIC MODEL AND LINEAR WAVES IN THE SOLAR WIND AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zank, G. P.; Hunana, P.; Mostafavi, P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-12-20

    Pickup ions (PUIs) in the outer heliosphere and the local interstellar medium are created by charge exchange between protons and hydrogen (H) atoms, forming a thermodynamically dominant component. In the supersonic solar wind beyond >10 AU, in the inner heliosheath (IHS), and in the very local interstellar medium (VLISM), PUIs do not equilibrate collisionally with the background plasma. Using a collisionless form of Chapman-Enskog expansion, we derive a closed system of multi-fluid equations for a plasma comprised of thermal protons and electrons, and suprathermal PUIs. The PUIs contribute an isotropic scalar pressure to leading order, a collisionless heat flux at the next order, and a collisionless stress tensor at the second-order. The collisionless heat conduction and viscosity in the multi-fluid description results from a non-isotropic PUI distribution. A simpler one-fluid MHD-like system of equations with distinct equations of state for both the background plasma and the PUIs is derived. We investigate linear wave properties in a PUI-mediated three-fluid plasma model for parameters appropriate to the VLISM, the IHS, and the solar wind in the outer heliosphere. Five distinct wave modes are possible: Alfvn waves, thermal fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves, PUI fast and slow magnetoacoustic waves, and an entropy mode. The thermal and PUI acoustic modes propagate at approximately the combined thermal magnetoacoustic speed and the PUI sound speed respectively. All wave modes experience damping by the PUIs through the collisionless PUI heat flux. The PUI-mediated plasma model yields wave properties, including Alfvn waves, distinctly different from those of the standard two-fluid model.

  8. DETAILED ABUNDANCES OF TWO VERY METAL-POOR STARS IN DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Cohen, Judith G.

    2012-12-01

    The most metal-poor stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies (dSphs) can show the nucleosynthetic patterns of one or a few supernovae (SNe). These SNe could have zero metallicity, making metal-poor dSph stars the closest surviving links to Population III stars. Metal-poor dSph stars also help to reveal the formation mechanism of the Milky Way (MW) halo. We present the detailed abundances from Keck/HIRES spectroscopy for two very metal-poor stars in two MW dSphs. One star, in the Sculptor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -2.40. The other star, in the Ursa Minor dSph, has [Fe I/H] = -3.16. Both stars fall in the previously discovered low-metallicity, high-[{alpha}/Fe] plateau. Most abundance ratios of very metal-poor stars in these two dSphs are largely consistent with very metal-poor halo stars. However, the abundances of Na and some r-process elements lie at the lower end of the envelope defined by inner halo stars of similar metallicity. We propose that the metallicity dependence of SN yields is the cause. The earliest SNe in low-mass dSphs have less gas to pollute than the earliest SNe in massive halo progenitors. As a result, dSph stars at -3 < [Fe/H] < -2 sample SNe with [Fe/H] << -3, whereas halo stars in the same metallicity range sample SNe with [Fe/H] {approx} -3. Consequently, enhancements in [Na/Fe] and [r/Fe] were deferred to higher metallicity in dSphs than in the progenitors of the inner halo.

  9. MO-C-17A-13: Uncertainty Evaluation of CT Image Deformable Registration for H and N Cancer Adaptive Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, A; Yan, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate uncertainties of organ specific Deformable Image Registration (DIR) for H and N cancer Adaptive Radiation Therapy (ART). Methods: A commercial DIR evaluation tool, which includes a digital phantom library of 8 patients, and the corresponding “Ground truth Deformable Vector Field” (GT-DVF), was used in the study. Each patient in the phantom library includes the GT-DVF created from a pair of CT images acquired prior to and at the end of the treatment course. Five DIR tools, including 2 commercial tools (CMT1, CMT2), 2 in-house (IH-FFD1, IH-FFD2), and a classic DEMON algorithms, were applied on the patient images. The resulting DVF was compared to the GT-DVF voxel by voxel. Organ specific DVF uncertainty was calculated for 10 ROIs: Whole Body, Brain, Brain Stem, Cord, Lips, Mandible, Parotid, Esophagus and Submandibular Gland. Registration error-volume histogram was constructed for comparison. Results: The uncertainty is relatively small for brain stem, cord and lips, while large in parotid and submandibular gland. CMT1 achieved best overall accuracy (on whole body, mean vector error of 8 patients: 0.98±0.29 mm). For brain, mandible, parotid right, parotid left and submandibular glad, the classic Demon algorithm got the lowest uncertainty (0.49±0.09, 0.51±0.16, 0.46±0.11, 0.50±0.11 and 0.69±0.47 mm respectively). For brain stem, cord and lips, the DVF from CMT1 has the best accuracy (0.28±0.07, 0.22±0.08 and 0.27±0.12 mm respectively). All algorithms have largest right parotid uncertainty on patient #7, which has image artifact caused by tooth implantation. Conclusion: Uncertainty of deformable CT image registration highly depends on the registration algorithm, and organ specific. Large uncertainty most likely appears at the location of soft-tissue organs far from the bony structures. Among all 5 DIR methods, the classic DEMON and CMT1 seem to be the best to limit the uncertainty within 2mm for all OARs. Partially supported by

  10. Refinery Upgrading of Hydropyrolysis Oil From Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Michael; Marker, Terry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Wangerow, Jim; Swanson, Dan; McLeod, Celeste; Del Paggio, Alan; Urade, Vikrant; Rao, Madhusudhan; Narasimhan, Laxmi; Gephart, John; Starr, Jack; Hahn, John; Stover, Daniel; Parrish, Martin; Maxey, Carl; Shonnard, David; Handler, Robert; Fan, Jiquig

    2015-08-31

    Cellulosic and woody biomass can be converted to bio-oils containing less than 10% oxygen by a hydropyrolysis process. Hydropyrolysis is the first step in Gas Technology Institute’s (GTI) integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion IH2®. These intermediate bio-oils can then be converted to drop-in hydrocarbon fuels using existing refinery hydrotreating equipment to make hydrocarbon blending components, which are fully compatible with existing fuels. Alternatively, cellulosic or woody biomass can directly be converted into drop-in hydrocarbon fuels containing less than 0.4% oxygen using the IH2 process located adjacent to a refinery or ethanol production facility. Many US oil refineries are actually located near biomass resources and are a logical location for a biomass to transportation fuel conversion process. The goal of this project was to work directly with an oil refinery partner, to determine the most attractive route and location for conversion of biorenewables to drop in fuels in their refinery and ethanol production network. Valero Energy Company, through its subsidiaries, has 12 US oil refineries and 11 ethanol production facilities, making them an ideal partner for this analysis. Valero is also part of a 50- 50 joint venture with Darling Ingredients called Diamond Green Diesel. Diamond Green Diesel’s production capacity is approximately 11,000 barrels per day of renewable diesel. The plant is located adjacent to Valero’s St Charles, Louisiana Refinery and converts recycled animal fats, used cooking oil, and waste corn oil into renewable diesel. This is the largest renewable diesel plant in the U.S. and has successfully operated for over 2 years For this project, 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oil from wood and 25 liters of hydropyrolysis oils from corn stover were produced. The hydropyrolysis oil produced had 4-10% oxygen. Metallurgical testing of hydropyrolysis liquids was completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratories (Oak Ridge) and showed the

  11. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramírez, Rafael; Singh, Jayant K.; Müller-Plathe, Florian; Böhm, Michael C.

    2014-11-28

    Ice and water droplets on graphite have been studied by quantum path integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations. The point-charge q-TIP4P/F potential was used to model the interaction between flexible water molecules, while the water-graphite interaction was described by a Lennard-Jones potential previously used to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural properties of water droplets with sizes between 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval of 50–350 K. The vibrational density of states of crystalline and amorphous ice drops was correlated to the one of ice Ih to assess the influence of the droplet interface and molecular disorder on the vibrational properties. The average distance of covalent OH bonds is found 0.01 Å larger in the quantum limit than in the classical one. The OO distances are elongated by 0.03 Å in the quantum simulations at 50 K. Bond distance fluctuations are large as a consequence of the zero-point vibrations. The analysis of the H-bond network shows that the liquid droplet is more structured in the classical limit than in the quantum case. The average kinetic and potential energy of the ice and water droplets on graphite has been compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic energy shows a temperature dependence similar to the one of liquid water, without apparent discontinuity at temperatures where the droplet is solid. However, the droplet potential energy becomes significantly larger than the one of ice or water at the same temperature. In the quantum limit, the ice droplet is more expanded than in a classical description. Liquid droplets display identical density profiles and liquid-vapor interfaces in the quantum and classical limits. The value of the contact angle is not influenced by quantum effects. Contact angles of droplets decrease as the size of the water droplet

  12. THE COS/UVES ABSORPTION SURVEY OF THE MAGELLANIC STREAM. I. ONE-TENTH SOLAR ABUNDANCES ALONG THE BODY OF THE STREAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Andrew J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Richter, Philipp [Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Haus 28, Karl-Liebknecht-Str. 24/25, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Wakker, Bart P. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lehner, Nicolas; Howk, J. Christopher [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Ben Bekhti, Nadya [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bland-Hawthorn, Joss [Institute of Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Lucas, Stephen, E-mail: afox@stsci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a massive and extended tail of multi-phase gas stripped out of the Magellanic Clouds and interacting with the Galactic halo. In this first paper of an ongoing program to study the Stream in absorption, we present a chemical abundance analysis based on HST/COS and VLT/UVES spectra of four active galactic nuclei (RBS 144, NGC 7714, PHL 2525, and HE 0056-3622) lying behind the MS. Two of these sightlines yield good MS metallicity measurements: toward RBS 144 we measure a low MS metallicity of [S/H] = [S II/H I] = -1.13 {+-} 0.16 while toward NGC 7714 we measure [O/H] = [O I/H I] = -1.24 {+-} 0.20. Taken together with the published MS metallicity toward NGC 7469, these measurements indicate a uniform abundance of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 solar along the main body of the Stream. This provides strong support to a scenario in which most of the Stream was tidally stripped from the SMC Almost-Equal-To 1.5-2.5 Gyr ago (a time at which the SMC had a metallicity of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 solar), as predicted by several N-body simulations. However, in Paper II of this series, we report a much higher metallicity (S/H = 0.5 solar) in the inner Stream toward Fairall 9, a direction sampling a filament of the MS that Nidever et al. claim can be traced kinematically to the Large Magellanic Cloud, not the Small Magellanic Cloud. This shows that the bifurcation of the Stream is evident in its metal enrichment, as well as its spatial extent and kinematics. Finally we measure a similar low metallicity [O/H] = [O I/H I] = -1.03 {+-} 0.18 in the v{sub LSR} = 150 km s{sup -1} cloud toward HE 0056-3622, which belongs to a population of anomalous velocity clouds near the south Galactic pole. This suggests these clouds are associated with the Stream or more distant structures (possibly the Sculptor Group, which lies in this direction at the same velocity), rather than tracing foreground Galactic material.

  13. Role of pigment epithelium-derived factor in the involution of hemangioma: Autocrine growth inhibition of hemangioma-derived endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Yun, Jang-Hyuk; Heo, Jong-Ik; Lee, Eun Hui; Min, Hye Sook; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cho, Chung-Hyun

    2014-11-14

    Highlights: • PEDF was expressed and induced during the involuting phase of IH. • PEDF inhibited the cell growth of the involuting HemECs in an autocrine manner. • PEDF suppression restored the impaired cell growth of the involuting HemECs. - Abstract: Hemangioma is a benign tumor derived from abnormal blood vessel growth. Unlike other vascular tumor counterparts, a hemangioma is known to proliferate during its early stage but it is followed by a stage of involution where regression of the tumor occurs. The critical onset leading to the involution of hemangioma is currently not well understood. This study focused on the molecular identities of the involution of hemangioma. We demonstrated that a soluble factor released from the involuting phase of hemangioma-derived endothelial cells (HemECs) and identified pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) as an anti-angiogenic factor that was associated with the growth inhibition of the involuting HemECs. The growth inhibition of the involuting HemECs was reversed by suppression of PEDF in the involuting HemECs. Furthermore, we found that PEDF was more up-regulated in the involuting phase of hemangioma tissues than in the proliferating or the involuted. Taken together, we propose that PEDF accelerates the involution of hemangioma by growth inhibition of HemECs in an autocrine manner. The regulatory mechanism of PEDF expression could be a potential therapeutic target to treat hemangiomas.

  14. Turbulence elasticityA new mechanism for transport barrier dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Z. B.; Diamond, P. H.; Kosuga, Y.; Grcan, . D.

    2014-09-15

    We present a new, unified model of transport barrier formation in elastic drift wave-zonal flow (DW-ZF) turbulence. A new physical quantitythe delay time (i.e., the mixing time for the DW turbulence)is demonstrated to parameterize each stage of the transport barrier formation. Quantitative predictions for the onset of limit-cycle-oscillation (LCO) among DW and ZF intensities (also denoted as I-mode) and I-mode to high-confinement mode (H-mode) transition are also given. The LCO occurs when the ZF shearing rate (|?v?{sub ZF}{sup ?}|) enters the regime ??{sub k}<|?V?{sub ZF}{sup ?}|I-H transition occurs when |?V?{sub EB}{sup ?}|>?{sub cr}{sup ?1}, where the mean E??B shear flow driven by ion pressure locks the DW-ZF system to the H-mode by reducing the delay time below the threshold value.

  15. Prediction of the phase equilibria of methane hydrates using the direct phase coexistence methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalis, Vasileios K.; Costandy, Joseph; Economou, Ioannis G.; Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N.; Stubos, Athanassios K.

    2015-01-28

    The direct phase coexistence method is used for the determination of the three-phase coexistence line of sI methane hydrates. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out in the isothermalisobaric ensemble in order to determine the coexistence temperature (T{sub 3}) at four different pressures, namely, 40, 100, 400, and 600 bar. Methane bubble formation that results in supersaturation of water with methane is generally avoided. The observed stochasticity of the hydrate growth and dissociation processes, which can be misleading in the determination of T{sub 3}, is treated with long simulations in the range of 10004000 ns and a relatively large number of independent runs. Statistical averaging of 25 runs per pressure results in T{sub 3} predictions that are found to deviate systematically by approximately 3.5 K from the experimental values. This is in good agreement with the deviation of 3.15 K between the prediction of TIP4P/Ice water force field used and the experimental melting temperature of ice Ih. The current results offer the most consistent and accurate predictions from MD simulation for the determination of T{sub 3} of methane hydrates. Methane solubility values are also calculated at the predicted equilibrium conditions and are found in good agreement with continuum-scale models.

  16. The melting temperature of liquid water with the effective fragment potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brorsen, Kurt R.; Willow, Soohaeng Y.; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2015-09-17

    Direct simulation of the solid-liquid water interface with the effective fragment potential (EFP) via the constant enthalpy and pressure (NPH) ensemble was used to estimate the melting temperature (Tm) of ice-Ih. Initial configurations and velocities, taken from equilibrated constant pressure and temperature (NPT) simulations at T = 300 K, 350 K and 400 K, respectively, yielded corresponding Tm values of 37816 K, 38214 K and 38415 K. These estimates are consistently higher than experiment, albeit to the same degree with previously reported estimates using density functional theory (DFT)-based Born-Oppenheimer simulations with the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functional plus dispersion corrections (BLYP-D). KRB was supported by a Computational Science Graduate Fellowship from the Department of Energy. MSG was supported by a U.S. National Science Foundation Software Infrastructure (SI2) grant (ACI 1047772). SSX acknowledges support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle.

  17. A high-performance electron beam ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessi,J.; Beebe, E.; Bellavia, S.; Gould, O.; Kponou, A.; Lambiase, R.; Lockey, R.; McCafferty, D.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A. I.; Raparia, D.; Ritter, J.; Syndstrup, L.

    2009-06-08

    At Brookhaven National Laboratory, a high current Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) has been developed as part of a new preinjector that is under construction to replace the Tandem Van de Graaffs as the heavy ion preinjector for the RHIC and NASA experimental programs. This preinjector will produce milliampere-level currents of essentially any ion species, with q/A {ge} 1/6, in short pulses, for injection into the Booster synchrotron. In order to produce the required intensities, this EBIS uses a 10A electron gun, and an electron collector designed to handle 300 kW of pulsed electron beam power. The EBIS trap region is 1.5 m long, inside a 5T, 2m long, 8-inch bore superconducting solenoid. The source is designed to switch ion species on a pulse-to-pulse basis, at a 5 Hz repetition rate. Singly-charged ions of the appropriate species, produced external to the EBIS, are injected into the trap and confined until the desired charge state is reached via stepwise ionization by the electron beam. Ions are then extracted and matched into an RFQ, followed by a short IH Linac, for acceleration to 2 MeV/A, prior to injection into the Booster synchrotron. An overview of the preinjector is presented, along with experimental results from the prototype EBIS, where all essential requirements have already been demonstrated. Design features and status of construction of the final high intensity EBIS is also be presented.

  18. NON-LOCAL THERMODYNAMICAL EQUILIBRIUM EFFECTS ON THE IRON ABUNDANCE OF ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS IN 47 TUCANAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapenna, E.; Mucciarelli, A.; Lanzoni, B.; Ferraro, F. R.; Dalessandro, E.; Massari, D.

    2014-12-20

    We present the iron abundance of 24 asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, members of the globular cluster 47 Tucanae, obtained with high-resolution spectra collected with the FEROS spectrograph at the MPG/ESO 2.2 m Telescope. We find that the iron abundances derived from neutral lines (with a mean value [Fe I/H]=0.94 0.01, ? = 0.08 dex) are systematically lower than those derived from single ionized lines ([Fe II/H] =0.83 0.01, ? = 0.05 dex). Only the latter are in agreement with those obtained for a sample of red giant branch (RGB) cluster stars, for which the Fe I and Fe II lines provide the same iron abundance. This finding suggests that non-local thermodynamical equilibrium (NLTE) effects driven by overionization mechanisms are present in the atmosphere of AGB stars and significantly affect the Fe I lines while leaving Fe II features unaltered. On the other hand, the very good ionization equilibrium found for RGB stars indicates that these NLTE effects may depend on the evolutionary stage. We discuss the impact of this finding on both the chemical analysis of AGB stars and on the search for evolved blue stragglers.

  19. Control Banding and Nanotechnology Synergist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Paik, S

    2009-12-15

    The average Industrial Hygienist (IH) loves a challenge, right? Okay, well here is one with more than a few twists. We start by going through the basics of a risk assessment. You have some chemical agents, a few workers, and the makings of your basic exposure characterization. However, you have no occupational exposure limit (OEL), essentially no toxicological basis, and no epidemiology. Now the real handicap is that you cannot use sampling pumps, cassettes, tubes, or any of the media in your toolbox, and the whole concept of mass-to-dose is out the window, even at high exposure levels. Of course, by the title, you knew we were talking about nanomaterials (NM). However, we wonder how many IHs know that this topic takes everything you know about your profession and turns it upside down. It takes the very foundations that you worked so hard in college and in the field to master and pulls it out from underneath you. It even takes the gold standard of our profession, the quantitative science of exposure assessment, and makes it look pretty darn rusty. Now with NM there is the potential to get some aspect of quantitative measurements, but the instruments are generally very expensive and getting an appropriate workplace personal exposure measurement can be very difficult if not impossible. The potential for workers getting exposures, however, is very real, as evidenced by a recent publication reporting worker exposures to polyacrylate nanoparticles in a Chinese factory (Song et al. 2009). With something this complex and challenging, how does a concept as simple as Control Banding (CB) save the day? Although many IHs have heard of CB, most of their knowledge comes from its application in the COSHH Essentials toolkit. While there is conflicting published research on COSHH Essentials and its value for risk assessments, almost all of the experts agree that it can be useful when no OELs are available (Zalk and Nelson 2008). It is this aspect of CB, its utility with

  20. Description of work for 200-UP-1 characterization of monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Innis, B.E.; Kelty, G.G.

    1994-02-01

    This description of work (DOW) details the field activities associated with the drilling, soil sampling, and construction of groundwater monitoring and dual-use wells in the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit (Tasks 2, 3, and 5 in the 200-UP-1 RI/FS Work Plan DOE/RL 1993a) and will serve as a field guide for those performing the work. It will be used in conjunction with the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater operable Unit (DOE-RL 1993a, [LFI]) and Site Characterization Manual (WHC 1988a). Groundwater wells are being constructed to characterize the vertical and horizontal extent of the Uranium and {sup 99}{Tc} plumes and to define aquifer properties such as hydraulic communication between aquifers and hydrostratigraphy. Some of these wells may be utilized for extraction purposes during the IRM phase anticipated at this operable unit and are being designed with a dual use in mind. These data will be used to optimize the Interim Remedial Measures (IRM) for the cleanup of these two plumes. The data will also be used with later Limited Field Investigation (LFI) data to perform a Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) for the operable unit. The locations for the proposed groundwater wells are presented in Figure 1. The contaminants of concern for the project are presented ih Table 1.

  1. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Ross, Nancy L.; Huang, Baiyu; Woodfield, Brian F.; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.

    2013-12-28

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (γ-alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (C{sub p}) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of γ-alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (C{sub v}) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice‑Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four γ-alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated γ-alumina nanoparticles.

  2. The thermodynamic properties of hydrated -Al2O3 nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Elinor; Huang, Baiyu; Parker, Stewart F.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Ross, Dr. Nancy; Woodfield, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report a combined calorimetric and inelastic neutron scattering (INS) study of hydrated -Al2O3 ( -alumina) nanoparticles. These complementary techniques have enabled a comprehensive evaluation of the thermodynamic properties of this technological and industrially important metal oxide to be achieved. The isobaric heat capacity (Cp) data presented herein provide further critical insights into the much-debated chemical composition of -alumina nanoparticles. Furthermore, the isochoric heat capacity (Cv) of the surface water, which is so essential to the stability of all metal-oxides at the nanoscale, has been extracted from the high-resolution INS data and differs significantly from that of ice Ih due to the dominating influence of strong surface-water interactions. This study also encompassed the analysis of four -alumina samples with differing pore diameters [4.5 (1), 13.8 (2), 17.9 (3), and 27.2 nm (4)], and the results obtained allow us to unambiguously conclude that the water content and pore size have no influence on the thermodynamic behaviour of hydrated -alumina nanoparticles.

  3. Tank waste remediation system heat stress control program report, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carls, D.R.

    1995-09-28

    Protecting employees from heat stress within tank farms during the summer months is challenging. Work constraints typically experienced in tank farms complicate the measures taken to protect employees from heat stress. TWRS-Industrial Hygiene (IH) has endeavored to control heat stress injuries by anticipating, recognizing, evaluating and controlling the factors which lead or contribute to heat stress in Tank Farms. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program covers such areas as: employee and PIC training, communication of daily heat stress alerts to tank farm personnel, setting work/rest regimens, and the use of engineering and personal protective controls when applicable. The program has increased worker awareness of heat stress and prevention, established provisions for worker rest periods, increased drinking water availability to help ensure worker hydration, and allowed for the increased use of other protective controls to combat heat stress. The TWRS Heat Stress Control Program is the cornerstone for controlling heat stress among tank farm employees. The program has made great strides since it`s inception during the summer of 1994. Some improvements can still be made to enhance the program for the summer of 1996, such as: (1) procurement and use of personal heat stress monitoring equipment to ensure appropriate application of administrative controls, (2) decrease the need for use of containment tents and anti-contamination clothing, and (3) providing a wider variety of engineering and personal protective controls for heat stress prevention

  4. Chemical decontamination technical resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory (2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Murray E

    2008-01-01

    This document supplies information resources for a person seeking to create planning or pre-planning documents for chemical decontamination operations. A building decontamination plan can be separated into four different sections: Pre-planning, Characterization, Decontamination (Initial response and also complete cleanup), and Clearance. Of the identified Los Alamos resources, they can be matched with these four sections: Pre-planning -- Dave Seidel, EO-EPP, Emergency Planning and Preparedness; David DeCroix and Bruce Letellier, D-3, Computational fluids modeling of structures; Murray E. Moore, RP-2, Aerosol sampling and ventilation engineering. Characterization (this can include development projects) -- Beth Perry, IAT-3, Nuclear Counterterrorism Response (SNIPER database); Fernando Garzon, MPA-11, Sensors and Electrochemical Devices (development); George Havrilla, C-CDE, Chemical Diagnostics and Engineering; Kristen McCabe, B-7, Biosecurity and Public Health. Decontamination -- Adam Stively, EO-ER, Emergency Response; Dina Matz, IHS-IP, Industrial hygiene; Don Hickmott, EES-6, Chemical cleanup. Clearance (validation) -- Larry Ticknor, CCS-6, Statistical Sciences.

  5. DAx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    r .*, J ".t , hj rk - DAx Jtdp -I 0 ' ,, i$i? m ;, ;. ESE p L, 21, ).,.G,,YlZ -w F M M c, !. ?Z-=S i%Df J,- :. ?i2& . ti. _ xri ?M SE t.' C z 39-&i stz-eet Fe-rbc;t.e L s;zewr A YI *- co2;$r-:-c' ,;c=;, & the 3ybb SFe& T&*-ehczfc Lnc!E:8ks 502 s*y-,"r=c rte2 ~2 i=GJwe ;ieAL*c--e ih ' ,be =a- ,y,z-t -._ **c -4 Qd"& F-5 Cs??lS' ,e' L XT 7, 3949. CCP L' s.S bt-""d -c, f oaf 22 ' ,be ba.a, tjg ,e$, cn$ op e-;_uf ~r:,t re>. >iz cs kriLcLt.ti on

  6. Static electric dipole polarizabilities of An{sup 5+/6+} and AnO{sub 2}{sup +/2+} (An = U, Np, and Pu) ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, Payal E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu Peterson, Kirk A. E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu; Clark, Aurora E. E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu

    2014-12-21

    The parallel components of static electric dipole polarizabilities have been calculated for the lowest lying spin-orbit states of the penta- and hexavalent oxidation states of the actinides (An) U, Np, and Pu, in both their atomic and molecular diyl ion forms (An{sup 5+/6+} and AnO{sub 2}{sup +/2+}) using the numerical finite-field technique within a four-component relativistic framework. The four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock method formed the reference for MP2 and CCSD(T) calculations, while multireference Fock space coupled-cluster (FSCC), intermediate Hamiltonian Fock space coupled-cluster (IH-FSCC) and Kramers restricted configuration interaction (KRCI) methods were used to incorporate additional electron correlation. It is observed that electron correlation has significant (?5 a.u.{sup 3}) impact upon the parallel component of the polarizabilities of the diyls. To the best of our knowledge, these quantities have not been previously reported and they can serve as reference values in the determination of various electronic and response properties (for example intermolecular forces, optical properties, etc.) relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle and material science applications. The highest quality numbers for the parallel components (?{sub zz}) of the polarizability for the lowest ? levels corresponding to the ground electronic states are (in a.u.{sup 3}) 44.15 and 41.17 for UO{sub 2}{sup +} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, respectively, 45.64 and 41.42 for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, respectively, and 47.15 for the PuO{sub 2}{sup +} ion.

  7. Petroleum supply monthly, June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-28

    Data presented in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics. The tables and figures ih the Summary Statistics section of the PSM present a time series of selected petroleum data on a US level. Most time series include preliminary estimates for one month based on the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System; statistics based on the most recent data from the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS); and statistics published in prior issues of the PSM and PSA. The Detailed Statistics tables of the PSM present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas - - the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the US and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided firom other sources.

  8. Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of titanium-tungstate-tellurite glasses doped with dysprosium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jyothi, L. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Upender, G. [Glass Science and Technology Section, Glass Division, CSIR-CGCRI, Kolkata 700032 (India); Kuladeep, R. [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India); Rao, D. Narayana, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: CIE coordinate diagram of different concentrations of the Dy{sup 3+}-doped TTWD glasses with coordinates in the white light region. - Highlights: Radiative lifetime of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level of Dy{sup 3+} ions is longer in the tellurite glass. Quantum efficiency is found to be high. These glasses are suitable materials for generating white light. - Abstract: Structural, thermal, optical properties and simulation of white light of Dy{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glasses of composition TTWD: (75 ? x)TeO{sub 2} ? 10TiO{sub 2} ? 15WO{sub 3} ? xDy{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mol%) were investigated. Raman spectra revealed that the glass contains TeO{sub 4}, TeO{sub 3}, WO{sub 4} and WO{sub 6} units. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements were carried out to measure the glass transition temperature of all the glasses. From the optical absorption spectra, luminescence spectra and using the JuddOfelt (JO) analysis, we estimated the radiative transition probabilities, emission cross-sections, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes. The decay curves at lower concentrations are exponential while they show a non-exponential behavior at higher concentrations (?0.5 mol%) due to energy transfer processes. The effective lifetime for the {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} level decreases with increase in Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration for the glasses under investigation. The non-exponential decay curves could fit well to the InokutiHirayama (IH) model with S = 6, indicating that the nature of interaction responsible for energy transfer is of dipoledipole type. Simulation of white light is examined with varying concentration and the results indicate that these glasses are suitable for white light emitting diode applications.

  9. The photoexcitation of crystalline ice and amorphous solid water: A molecular dynamics study of outcomes at 11 K and 125 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crouse, J.; Loock, H.-P. Cann, N. M.

    2015-07-21

    Photoexcitation of crystalline ice Ih and amorphous solid water at 7-9 eV is examined using molecular dynamics simulations and a fully flexible water model. The probabilities of photofragment desorption, trapping, and recombination are examined for crystalline ice at 11 K and at 125 K and for amorphous solid water at 11 K. For 11 K crystalline ice, a fully rigid water model is also employed for comparison. The kinetic energy of desorbed H atoms and the distance travelled by trapped fragments are correlated to the location and the local environment of the photoexcited water molecule. In all cases, H atom desorption is found to be the most likely outcome in the top bilayer while trapping of all photofragments is most probable deeper in the solid where the likelihood for recombination of the fragments into H{sub 2}O molecules also rises. Trajectory analysis indicates that the local hydrogen bonding network in amorphous solid water is more easily distorted by a photodissociation event compared to crystalline ice. Also, simulations indicate that desorption of OH radicals and H{sub 2}O molecules are more probable in amorphous solid water. The kinetic energy distributions for desorbed H atoms show a peak at high energy in crystalline ice, arising from photoexcited water molecules in the top monolayer. This peak is less pronounced in amorphous solid water. H atoms that are trapped may be displaced by up to ∼10 water cages, but migrate on average 3 water cages. Trapped OH fragments tend to stay near the original solvent cage.

  10. Tailoring surface properties and structure of layered double hydroxides using silanes with different number of functional groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Qi; He, Hongping; Li, Tian; Frost, Ray L.; Zhang, Dan; He, Zisen

    2014-05-01

    Four silanes, trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS), dimethyldiethoxylsilane (DMDES), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), were adopted to graft layered double hydroxides (LDH) via an induced hydrolysis silylation method (IHS). Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) and {sup 29}Si MAS nuclear magnetic resonance spectra ({sup 29}Si MAS NMR) indicated that APTES and TEOS can be grafted onto LDH surfaces via condensation with hydroxyl groups of LDH, while TMCS and DMDES could only be adsorbed on the LDH surface with a small quantity. A combination of X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) and {sup 29}Si MAS NMR spectra showed that silanes were exclusively present in the external surface and had little influence on the long range order of LDH. The surfactant intercalation experiment indicated that the adsorbed and/or grafted silane could not fix the interlamellar spacing of the LDH. However, they will form crosslink between the particles and affect the further surfactant intercalation in the silylated samples. The replacement of water by ethanol in the tactoids and/or aggregations and the polysiloxane oligomers formed during silylation procedure can dramatically increase the value of BET surface area (S{sub BET}) and total pore volumes (V{sub p}) of the products. - Graphical abstract: The replacement of water by ethanol in the tactoids and aggregations of LDHs, and the polysiloxane oligomers formed during silylation process can dramatically increase the BET surface area (S{sub BET}) and the total pore volume (V{sub p}) of the silylated products. - Highlights: Silanes with multifunctional groups were grafted onto LDH surface in C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH medium. The number of hydrolysable groups in silanes affects the structure of grafted LDH. Replacement of H{sub 2}O by C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OH in aggregations increases S{sub BET} and V{sub p} of grafted LDH. Polysiloxane oligomers contribute to the increase of S{sub BET} and V{sub p} of grafted LDH.

  11. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in

  12. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, D. T.; Metcalf, J. R.; North, M. P.; Richardson, T. L.; Underwood, S. A.; Shelton, P. M.; Ray, W. B.; Morrell, M. L.; Caldwell, III, D. C.

    2012-04-16

    ; Non-Occupational Illness and Injury Visits; Occupational Recommendations/Restrictions; Diagnosis/Vital Signs/Blood Pressures; Immunizations; Return to Work Visits Capabilities: Targeted Health Assessments; Patient Input Capabilities for Questionnaires; Medical Health History; Surveillance Programs; Human Reliability Program; Scheduling; Automated Patient Check-in/Check-out; Provider & Patient Workflow; Laboratory Interface & Device Integration; Human Reliability Program Processing; Interoperability with SAP, IH, IS, RADCON; Coding: ICED-9/10; Desktop Integration; Interface/Storage of Digital X-Rays (PACS)

  13. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable waste management practices. The

  14. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-04-16

    ; Allergies; Non-Occupational Illness and Injury Visits; Occupational Recommendations/Restrictions; Diagnosis/Vital Signs/Blood Pressures; Immunizations; Return to Work Visits Capabilities: Targeted Health Assessments; Patient Input Capabilities for Questionnaires; Medical Health History; Surveillance Programs; Human Reliability Program; Scheduling; Automated Patient Check-in/Check-out; Provider & Patient Workflow; Laboratory Interface & Device Integration; Human Reliability Program Processing; Interoperability with SAP, IH, IS, RADCON; Coding: ICED-9/10; Desktop Integration; Interface/Storage of Digital X-Rays (PACS)« less

  15. Gradual crossover in molecular organization of stable liquid H{sub 2}O at moderately high pressure and temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koga, Yoshikata; Westh, Peter; Yoshida, Koh; Inaba, Akira; Nakazawa, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Using the literature raw data of the speed of sound and the specific volume, the isothermal compressibility, κ{sub T}, a second derivative thermodynamic quantity of G, was evaluated for liquid H{sub 2}O in the pressure range up to 350 MPa and the temperature to 50 ºC. We then obtained its pressure derivative, dκ{sub T}/dp, a third derivative numerically without using a fitting function to the κ{sub T} data. On taking yet another p-derivative at a fixed T graphically without resorting to any fitting function, the resulting d{sup 2}κ{sub T}/dp{sup 2}, a fourth derivative, showed a weak but clear step anomaly, with the onset of the step named point X and its end point Y. In analogy with another third and fourth derivative pair in binary aqueous solutions of glycerol, dα{sub p}/dx{sub Gly} and d{sup 2}α{sub p}/dx{sub Gly}{sup 2}, at 0.1 MPa (α{sub p} is the thermal expansivity and x{sub Gly} the mole fraction of solute glycerol) in our recent publication [J. Solution Chem. 43, 663-674 (2014); DOI:10.1007/s10953-013-0122-7], we argue that there is a gradual crossover in the molecular organization of pure H{sub 2}O from a low to a high p-regions starting at point X and ending at Y at a fixed T. The crossover takes place gradually spanning for about 100 MPa at a fixed temperature. The extrapolated temperature to zero p seems to be about 70 – 80 °C for points X and 90 – 110 °C for Y. Furthermore, the mid-points of X and Y seem to extrapolate to the triple point of liquid, ice Ih and ice III. Recalling that the zero x{sub Gly} extrapolation of point X and Y for binary aqueous glycerol at 0.1 MPa gives about the same T values respectively, we suggest that at zero pressure the region below about 70 °C the hydrogen bond network is bond-percolated, while above about 90 ºC there is no hydrogen bond network. Implication of these findings is discussed.

  16. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Rahul P. Nabar

    2006-09-29

    Work continued on the development of a microkinetic model of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) on supported and unsupported Fe catalysts. The following aspects of the FT mechanism on unsupported iron catalysts were investigated on during this third year: (1) the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor based on sequential design of experiments; (2) CO adsorption and CO-TPD for obtaining the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron; and (3) isothermal hydrogenation (IH) after Fischer Tropsch reaction to identify and quantify surface carbonaceous species. Rates of C{sub 2+} formation on unsupported iron catalysts at 220 C and 20 atm correlated well to a Langmuir-Hinshelwood type expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be rate-determining steps. From desorption of molecularly adsorbed CO at different temperatures the heat of adsorption of CO on polycrystalline iron was determined to be 100 kJ/mol. Amounts and types of carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for 5-10 minutes at 150, 175, 200 and 285 C vary significantly with temperature. Mr. Brian Critchfield completed his M.S. thesis work on a statistically designed study of the kinetics of FTS on 20% Fe/alumina. Preparation of a paper describing this work is in progress. Results of these studies were reported at the Annual Meeting of the Western States Catalysis and at the San Francisco AIChE meeting. In the coming period, studies will focus on quantitative determination of the rates of kinetically-relevant elementary steps on unsupported Fe catalysts with/without K and Pt promoters by SSITKA method. This study will help us to (1) understand effects of promoter and support on elementary kinetic parameters and (2) build a microkinetics model for FTS on iron. Calculations using periodic, self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods were performed on models of defected Fe surfaces, most significantly the stepped Fe(211) surface. Binding

  17. California Tribal Nations Technical Water Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben, C; Coty, J

    2005-08-15

    was necessary to confine the analysis to a smaller geographic area, yet still represent the diversity of tribes and context within which tribal water issues arise. The state of California provides this opportunity. California has 106 federally recognized tribes. California is diverse in its geography, environment, demographics, and economic bases; California tribes demonstrate similar diversity. Additionally, no central repository of national or state tribal water issues exists and information must be aggregated, in general, tribe by tribe. This presents research challenges and, for this report, these were overcome by developing a method to essentially ''sub-sample'' the 106 federally recognized tribes in the state, while making every effort to maintain a sub-sample that broadly represents all of the 106 tribes. n an effort to develop an equitable and appropriate method with which to identify this set of representative tribes, multiple entities were contacted for guidance. Consultation with the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Indian Health Services (IHS), U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and Tribal Environmental Directors, provided key information and recommendations to guide the research process. It is hoped that an appropriate representation of the diversity of tribes across the state has been achieved; this includes an adequate representation of similarities and differences between Californian tribes on key water research issues (and the same between regions). This research occurred over a limited time period (i.e., three months) and given a general concern that this may not be sufficient, any information and conclusions in this report should be viewed with this in mind. Finally, it is hoped that this research allows for an (enhanced) informed capacity to better propose further dialog between tribes and LLNL to continue to exchange water research perspectives and define potential research

  18. International Experience in Standards and Labeling Programs for Rice Cookers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Zheng, Nina

    2008-05-01

    of cooked rice. Nonetheless, the efficiency of electromagnetic induction heating (IH) rice cook

  19. CPsuperH2.3: an Updated Tool for Phenomenology in the MSSM with Explicit CP Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J.S.; Carena, M.; Ellis, J.; Pilaftsis, A.; Wagner, C.E.M.

    2013-04-01

    -order logarithmic and threshold corrections, b-quark and @t-lepton Yukawa-coupling resummation effects and improved treatment of Higgs-boson pole-mass shifts. The couplings of the Higgs bosons to the Standard Model gauge bosons and fermions, to their supersymmetric partners and all the trilinear and quartic Higgs-boson self-couplings are also calculated. Also included are a full treatment of the 4x4 (2x2) neutral (charged) Higgs propagator matrix together with the center-of-mass dependent Higgs-boson couplings to gluons and photons, and an integrated treatment of several B-meson observables. The new implementations include the EDMs of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, Deuteron, Radium, and muon, as well as the anomalous magnetic moment of muon, (g_@m-2), the top-quark decays, improved calculations of the Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions, the LEP limits, and the CMS limits on H_i->@t@t@?. It also implements the decay mode H_i->Z@c and includes the corresponding Standard Model branching ratios of the three neutral Higgs bosons in the array GAMBRN(IM,IWB = 2,IH). Solution method: One-dimensional numerical integration for several Higgs-decay modes and EDMs, iterative treatment of the threshold corrections and Higgs-boson pole masses, and the numerical diagonalization of the neutralino mass matrix. Reasons for new version: Mainly to provide the full calculations of the EDMs of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, Deuteron, Radium, and muon as well as (g_@m-2), improved calculations of the Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions, the LEP limits, the CMS limits on H_i->@t@t@?, the top-quark decays, H_i->Z@c decay, and the corresponding Standard Model branching ratios of the three neutral Higgs bosons. Summary of revisions: Full calculations of the EDMs of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, Deuteron, Radium, and muon as well as (g_@m-2). Improved treatment of Higgs-boson masses and mixing including stau contributions. The LEP limits. The CMS limits on H