National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wolc radio tower

  1. CXAllenRadioTower2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B LReports from the CloudGEGR-N Goods POCTBT |CUD-55 /Allen Radio

  2. Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎ |RENERCO RenewableRGSRadarEnergyRadio

  3. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1996-01-16

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water. 6 figs.

  4. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  5. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode.

  6. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, Melvin L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air, of generating electricity, and of producing fresh water utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity, and condensers produce fresh water.

  7. Convection towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-02-08

    Convection towers which are capable of cleaning the pollution from large quantities of air and of generating electricity utilize the evaporation of water sprayed into the towers to create strong airflows and to remove pollution from the air. Turbines in tunnels at the skirt section of the towers generate electricity. Other embodiments may also provide fresh water, and operate in an updraft mode. 5 figures.

  8. Tokyo Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William; Ashworth, William

    2007-01-03

    Broadcast Transcript: Scanning the skyline of the Japanese capital today, it's hard to catch sight of Tokyo Tower. Modeled on the Eiffel Tower and 333 meters in height, the orange-and-white landmark is the world's tallest self-supporting steel...

  9. Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve Water Efficiency Cooling Towers: Understanding Key Components of Cooling Towers and How to Improve...

  10. THE TOWER, REFLECTED IN THE TOWER GARDEN PONDS THE GENERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE TOWER, REFLECTED IN THE TOWER GARDEN PONDS THE GENERAL UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS INFORMATION O Box 7216, Austin TX 78713- 7216. Cover: The Tower, reflected in one of the Tower Garden ponds

  11. Wireless Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!...

  12. Albritton Bell Tower - 8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-03-24

    to preventing future formation and further propagation. This study examines a currently existing structure known as the Watt’s Towers, or The Towers of Simon Rodia which exhibits extensive cracking. The effects of thermal cycles, both daily and annual...

  13. Albritton Bell Tower - 38 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    TOWER PERFORMANCE REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS, CHEMICAL PLANTS, AND POWER PLANTS ALL HAVE A RESOURCE QUIETLY AWAITING EXPLOITATION - COLD WATER!! ROBERT BURGER President Burger and Associates, Inc. Dallas, Texas Cooling towers, because... of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty...

  14. Albritton Bell Tower - 43 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane

    2006-03-24

    SAVINGS ROUTE MATT SMITH President L.S. Enterprises 9801 West Bahia Vista Fort Myers, ABSTRACT In most operations, cooling towers are not purposely overlooked by Plant Personnel. However, the lack of knowledge about their importance prevents... energy managers from making intelligent, informed decisions. This paper will compare the various types of cooling towers in use. Their operational and energy usage considerations will be discussed with old and new techniques explained. Cooling towers...

  15. Solar power tower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The solar power tower section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  16. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  17. Cooling Towers- Energy Conservation Strategies Understanding Cooling Towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, M.

    1991-01-01

    Cooling towers are energy conservation devices that Management, more often than not, historically overlooks in the survey of strategies for plant operating efficiencies. The utilization of the colder water off the cooling tower is the money maker!...

  18. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1983-01-01

    Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating ...

  19. Cooling Towers, The Debottleneckers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1998-01-01

    and procedures to upgrade the large industrial cross-flow cooling towers to increase their performance, or to overcome poor operational deficiencies. One of the earlier methods was to introduce slabs of highl)(. .efficient counter-flow celIular filI packs...

  20. Albritton Bell Tower - 7 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-03-24

    A cooling tower is often an overlooked source of easy energy savings. As long as it's running not much thought is usually given to it, but when numbers are applied to how much a degree of colder water is worth it can become a valuable and ready...

  1. How to Build a Tower

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explain: The purpose of a tower and BPA's role in designing and building them. Show picturesschematics. Distribute materials to each team. Instruct the teams to work together to...

  2. Tower at University of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    2011-08-29

    Cooling towers have been on the scene for more than 50 years. It is because they have proven to be an economic choice for waste heat dissipation. But it seems, for some reason, that after installation very little attention is paid to the cooling-tower...

  3. Best Management Practice #10: Cooling Tower Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cooling towers regulate temperature by dissipating heat from recirculating water used to cool chillers, air-conditioning equipment, or other process equipment. Heat is rejected from the tower...

  4. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1980-01-01

    Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water...

  5. Tower Temperature and Humidity Sensors (TWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2010-02-01

    Three tall towers are installed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility: a 60-meter triangular tower at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Central Facility (CF), a 21-meter walkup scaffolding tower at the SGP Okmulgee forest site (E21), and a 40-meter triangular tower at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site. The towers are used for meteorological, radiological, and other measurements.

  6. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    enabled Wind Tower Systems to develop the Space Frame tower, a new concept for wind turbine towers. Instead of a solid steel tube, the Space Frame tower consists of a highly...

  7. CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a concentrating solar power tower air Brayton combustor project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot CSP R&D award program. The team, led by the Southwest Research Institute, is working to develop an external combustor that allows for the mixing of CSP-heated air with natural gas in hybridized power plants. This project aims to increase the temperature capabilities of the CSP tower air receiver and gas turbine to 1,000ºC and achieve energy conversion efficiencies greater than 50%.

  8. Improving Process Cooling Tower Eddiciency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turpish, W.

    2013-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-13-05-08.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 7120 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-13-05-08.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Cooling Towers... in Process Applications Improving Process Cooling Tower Efficiency By: William (Bill) Turpish, PE, CEM, PEM, CEA W J Turpish and Associates, PC Shelby, North Carolina Rev 1.10 ESL-IE-13-05-08 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy...

  9. Cooling Tower Inspection with Scuba 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, W.

    1982-01-01

    tower pump suction basin was accomplished by diving into the basin using SCUBA gear. It was possible to see a build-up of debris on the pump suction basket strainers and on the floor of the sumps. Also, it was discovered that one of the four baskets had...

  10. Captive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Captive Radio (working title) – Fine Cut Transcript,TRT: 23:20 Jungle aerials RADIO VOICE, It is 5:21 in theas the day breaks on Caracol Radio’s program, The Voices of

  11. 2004 Savannah River Cooling Tower Collection (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, Alfred [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Parker, Matthew J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Villa-Aleman, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2005-05-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected ground truth in and around the Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area cooling tower during the spring and summer of 2004. The ground truth data consisted of air temperatures and humidity inside and around the cooling tower, wind speed and direction, cooling water temperatures entering; inside adn leaving the cooling tower, cooling tower fan exhaust velocities and thermal images taken from helicopters. The F-Area cooling tower had six cells, some of which were operated with fans off during long periods of the collection. The operating status (fan on or off) for each of the six cells was derived from operations logbooks and added to the collection database. SRNL collected the F-Area cooling tower data to produce a database suitable for validation of a cooling tower model used by one of SRNL's customer agencies. SRNL considers the data to be accurate enough for use in a model validation effort. Also, the thermal images of the cooling tower decks and throats combined with the temperature measurements inside the tower provide valuable information about the appearance of cooling towers as a function of fan operating status and time of day.

  12. Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    Multi-objective optimization of solar tower power plants Pascal Richter Center for Computational · Optimization of solar tower power plants 1/20 #12;Introduction ­ Solar tower power plants Solar tower PS10 (11 MW) in Andalusia, Spain · Solar tower with receiver · Heliostat field with self-aligning mirrors

  13. Vortex-augmented cooling tower - windmill combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAllister, J.E. Jr.

    1982-09-02

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passage to provide power as a by-product.

  14. Untapped Energy Savings from Cooling Towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phelps Jr., P.

    2011-01-01

    on the above number. We had a customer who ran their fans at 150 HP instead of their design 200 HP because their gear boxes failed rapidly at the higher horsepower. They weren?t losing fan operation since the gear boxes weren?t failing, but what... cooling tower?s performance is also measured referred to in percentages. A performance test will show if a tower is operating at 100% or something above or below that. A tower that is operating at 100% means it can cool 100% of its design flow...

  15. Sandia Energy - Power Towers for Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Towers for Utilities Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) National Solar Thermal Test Facility Central Receiver...

  16. Wind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    towers represent 26% of the total WTG (Wind Turbine Generator) cost #12;Why concrete towerWind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy output? · Energy output is proportional to the cube of wind velocity, 100m towers (versus

  17. Pueblo Towers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url JumpTechnology JumpPrueba 1 JumpDistrict No 1 JumpTowers

  18. Wind turbine tower for storing hydrogen and energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fingersh, Lee Jay (Westminster, CO)

    2008-12-30

    A wind turbine tower assembly for storing compressed gas such as hydrogen. The tower assembly includes a wind turbine having a rotor, a generator driven by the rotor, and a nacelle housing the generator. The tower assembly includes a foundation and a tubular tower with one end mounted to the foundation and another end attached to the nacelle. The tower includes an in-tower storage configured for storing a pressurized gas and defined at least in part by inner surfaces of the tower wall. In one embodiment, the tower wall is steel and has a circular cross section. The in-tower storage may be defined by first and second end caps welded to the inner surface of the tower wall or by an end cap near the top of the tower and by a sealing element attached to the tower wall adjacent the foundation, with the sealing element abutting the foundation.

  19. Cooling tower environmental considerations for cogeneration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, K.L.; Putnam, R.A.; Schott, G.A.

    1994-12-31

    Careful consideration must be given to the potential environmental impacts resulting from cooling tower operations in cogeneration projects. Concerns include visible plumes, fogging and icing of nearby roadways, emissions, water use, aesthetics, and noise. These issues must be properly addressed in order to gain public acceptance and allow for easier permitting of the facility. This paper discusses the various evaporative type cooling tower technologies from an environmental standpoint. In addition, typical concerns and questions raised by the public are presented, along with suggested guidelines for addressing these concerns. The use of modeling to predict the potential environmental impacts from cooling tower operations is sometimes required by regulatory agencies as a condition for obtaining approval for the facility. This paper discusses two of the models that are currently available for predicting cooling tower environmental impacts such as fogging, icing, salt deposition, and visible plumes. The lack of standardized models for cooling tower noise predictions, and the means by which the modeling requirements may be achieved are also addressed. An overview of the characteristics of cooling tower noise, the various measures used for noise control and the interdependency of the control measures and other cooling tower performance parameters are presented. Guidance is provided to design cost effective, low noise installations. The requirements for cooling tower impact assessments to support permitting of a cogeneration facility are also presented.

  20. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

  1. Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Hydrogen Storage in Wind Turbine Towers: Cost Analysis and Conceptual Design Preprint 34851.pdf More Documents &...

  2. Optimal sequencing of a cooling tower with multiple cells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper evaluates the energy savings potential of multi-cell cooling tower optimal sequencing control methods. Annual tower fan energy usage is calculated for a counter-flow tower with multiple variable-speed fans. Effectiveness-NTU tower model...

  3. On thermal performance of seawater cooling towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharqawy, Mostafa H.

    Seawater cooling towers have been used since the 1970s in power generation and other industries, so as to reduce the consumption of freshwater. The salts in seawater are known to create a number of operational problems, ...

  4. Advanced wet-dry cooling tower concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, Troxell Kimmel

    The purpose of this years' work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity ...

  5. Projective preservation : reframing Rudolph's Tower for Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Jessica K

    2012-01-01

    By 2012, the fate of Paul Rudolph's tower in downtown Boston has been in question for years while a vision of a denser city calls for its demolition. Projected development on the site currently argues that to move forward, ...

  6. Cooling Tower Considerations for Energy Optimizations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1986-01-01

    Energy conservation strategies and production economies involve more than examining the cooling tower fan consumption of horse power. Colder water provides vast potentials for savings. Ask yourself, "What is the dollar and energy utilization value...

  7. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matson, J.

    1991-01-01

    A cooling water system can be optimized by operating the cooling tower at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling of heat exchanger surfaces, tube bundles, refrigeration equipment, overhead condensers...

  8. Cooling Towers, The Neglected Energy Resource 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1987-01-01

    -effective rapid dollar return for cooling tower upgrading expenditures. Whether it be heat rejection from compressors, electric motor, or chemical . process equipment, the cost of "hotter" cooling water is expensive in requiring additional energy to run... elements of the typical types of cooling towers currently used, delineates their functions and shows how to upgrade them in the real world for energy savings and profitability of operation. Hard before and after statistics of costs and profits...

  9. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study that summarizes the Wind Tower Systems and its Space Frame tower. Describes their new wind tower design and explains how DOE funding made this possible.

  10. Radio Transmitter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    ? Intelligent Radio Frequency (RF) Monitoring ? 2009 Armstrong International, Inc. www.armstronginternational.com 2 ?Expect many enjoyable experiences!? David M. Armstrong Present Process Challenges ? Identifying a failure ? Procedure...

  11. Lifting system and apparatus for constructing wind turbine towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livingston, Tracy; Schrader, Terry; Goldhardt, James; Lott, James

    2011-02-01

    The disclosed invention is utilized for mounting a wind turbine and blade assembly on the upper end of a wind turbine tower. The invention generally includes a frame or truss that is pivotally secured to the top bay assembly of the tower. A transverse beam is connected to the frame or truss and extends fore of the tower when the frame or truss is in a first position and generally above the tower when in a second position. When in the first position, a wind turbine or blade assembly can be hoisted to the top of the tower. The wind turbine or blade assembly is then moved into position for mounting to the tower as the frame or truss is pivoted to a second position. When the turbine and blade assembly are secured to the tower, the frame or truss is disconnected from the tower and lowered to the ground.

  12. Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

  13. Digital places : rethinking urban elements : the case of the tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gichuhi, Christopher M. (Christopher Mwethera), 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Problem - How can we make working, living and all aspects of our life in the urban tower more palatable? How can we create environment at the urban tower scale. With technology as one of the biggest drivers of social and ...

  14. Experimental Investigation of the Padding Tower for Air Dehumidifier 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Liu, J.; Li, C.; Zhang, G.; An, S.

    2006-01-01

    of the liquid desiccant air conditioning. Of these design parameters, the framework of the padding tower, ratio of the air and the concentration of the inlet solution is largest through the tower, the temperature and effects of the dehumidifying capability...

  15. Boise Air Traffic Control Tower: High Performance and sustainable Building Guiding Principles Technical Assistance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Goel, Supriya; Henderson, Jordan W.

    2013-09-01

    Overview of energy efficiency opportunities for new FAA tower construction using the Boise Air Traffic Control Tower as an example.

  16. New North Dakota Factory to Produce Wind Towers, Jobs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind tower factory could bring back some of the jobs lost when a machine manufacturing plant closed.

  17. Cooling Towers--Energy Conservation Strategies Preservative Spray Treatment Maintains Cooling Tower 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reidenback, R.

    1991-01-01

    Several problems common to most industrial wood framed cooling towers can be easily controlled with annual preservative spray treatment applications to the plenum area framework and drift eliminators. It eliminates the expensive periodic repairs due...

  18. THE UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH APPLETON TOWER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    by vehicle can access APPLETON TOWER via Chapel Street - turning right into Windmill Street. The larger and 80yards from Windmill Street, if heading North and South respectively Location This building;Parking VEHICLE and WHEELCHAIR ACCESS ROUTE PEDSTRIAN ACCESS GEORGE SQUARE WINDMILL STREET CRICHTON ST

  19. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at NSA Handbook - January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MT Ritsche

    2006-01-30

    The Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk (METTWR2H) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors to measure wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity mounted on a 10-m tower. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data from sensors at or near the base of the tower. In addition, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer is located at 1 m for comparison purposes. Temperature and relative humidity probes are mounted at 2 m and 5 m on the tower. For more information, see the Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Atqasuk Handbook.

  20. Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskin, V S; Gwinn, C R; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2015-01-01

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  1. Wet/dry cooling tower and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Rohsenow, Warren R. (Waban, MA)

    1981-01-01

    A wet/dry cooling tower wherein a liquid to-be-cooled is flowed along channels of a corrugated open surface or the like, which surface is swept by cooling air. The amount of the surface covered by the liquid is kept small compared to the dry part thereof so that said dry part acts as a fin for the wet part for heat dissipation.

  2. Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-20

    This technology evaluation assesses side stream filtration options for cooling towers, with an objective to assess key attributes that optimize energy and water savings along with providing information on specific technology and implementation options. This information can be used to assist Federal sites to determine which options may be most appropriate for their applications. This evaluation provides an overview of the characterization of side stream filtration technology, describes typical applications, and details specific types of filtration technology.

  3. Vortex-augmented cooling tower-windmill combination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McAllister, Jr., John E. (Aiken, SC)

    1985-01-01

    A cooling tower for cooling large quantities of effluent water from a production facility by utilizing natural wind forces includes the use of a series of helically directed air inlet passages extending outwardly from the base of the tower to introduce air from any direction in a swirling vortical pattern while the force of the draft created in the tower makes it possible to place conventional power generating windmills in the air passages to provide power as a by-product.

  4. No Chemical, Zero Bleed Cooling Tower Water Treatment Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coke, A. L.

    1992-01-01

    BLEED COOLING TOWER WATER TREATMENT PROCESS ALDEN L. COKE, CWS IV, PRESIDENT, AQUA-FLO, INC., BALTIMORE, MARYLAND ABSTRACT This paper describes a process to treat cooling tower water by means of a fully automated and chemical free mechanical water... treatment process. This is an alternative to conventional chemical treatment. Beginning with a suction pump to draw water out of the tower sump, water goes through a permanent magnetic descaler to increase the water solubility and begin the scale...

  5. Technical Evaluation of Side Stream Filtration for Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-10-01

    Cooling towers are an integral component of many refrigeration systems, providing comfort or process cooling across a broad range of applications. Cooling towers represent the point in a cooling system where heat is dissipated to the atmosphere through evaporation. Cooling towers are commonly used in industrial applications and in large commercial buildings to release waste heat extracted from a process or building system through evaporation of water.

  6. Armor Tower Inc. Notification of Intent to Investigate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and circumstances associated with the meteorological tower electrical shock event at Brookhaven National Laboratory on November 12, 2014. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)...

  7. Project Profile: CSP Tower Air Brayton Combustor | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This project addresses key technical hurdles for an optimized CSP central tower hybrid gas turbine system to increase energy conversion efficiency to greater than 50%, greatly...

  8. Comparative evaluation of cooling tower drift eliminator performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Joseph Kwok-Kwong

    The performance of standard industrial evaporative cooling tower drift eliminators is analyzed using experiments and numerical simulations. The experiments measure the

  9. A' Brief. History of the Tower Shielding Facility and Tower Shielding Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Equipment and Material Used for Experiments Waste Generation and Disposal Future #12;TOK?ZR SHIELDING Nuclear Propulsion Project 0 Requirements: Research in region free from ground and structure scattering COPPER RIDGE #12;#12;SERMT LINES - TOWER 4lWANGE4lENT SEE FIG. 6 GUY trerts Two-`4-h.&.TYf? 6+1.-41 w

  10. Tower, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)OpenEnergy Facilities Biomass Facility Jump to:TowTower,

  11. GreenTower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon:Corp JumpGreen2VGreenTech Jump to:GreenTower

  12. Composite Tower Solutions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump to:Technology Corporation Jump to:Tower

  13. Sandia Energy - Power Towers for Utilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &WaterNewPhotoionizationPower Towers for Utilities

  14. PS10 Solar Power Tower Xi Jing, Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prevedouros, Panos D.

    area equivalent of 17 American Football Tower Solar receiver 4 vertical panels 18ft*39ft Steam turbine the solar energy to the grid in 2007 Operating cash flow 1.4 millions in 2007.Operating cash flow 1PS10 Solar Power Tower Xi Jing, Fang #12;Overview Magnitudes , Cost & TechnologiesMagnitudes , Cost

  15. Purification of water from cooling towers and other heat exchange systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan; Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM), Carlson; Bryan J. (Ojo Caliente, NM), Wingo; Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM), Robison; Thomas W. (Stilwell, KS)

    2012-08-07

    The amount of silica in cooling tower water is reduced by passing cooling tower water through a column of silica gel.

  16. Conversion Tower for Dispatchable Solar Power: High-Efficiency Solar-Electric Conversion Power Tower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-11

    HEATS Project: Abengoa Solar is developing a high-efficiency solar-electric conversion tower to enable low-cost, fully dispatchable solar energy generation. Abengoa’s conversion tower utilizes new system architecture and a two-phase thermal energy storage media with an efficient supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) power cycle. The company is using a high-temperature heat-transfer fluid with a phase change in between its hot and cold operating temperature. The fluid serves as a heat storage material and is cheaper and more efficient than conventional heat-storage materials, like molten salt. It also allows the use of a high heat flux solar receiver, advanced high thermal energy density storage, and more efficient power cycles.

  17. Imaging the Radio Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    not "listen" to Radio Data #12;· Radio waves are electromatic radiation, exactly like light (and x of this membrane into "sound". MediumEar Sound Radio Waves are not Sound Waves #12;You do not listen to radio waves with a radio Sound wave 5 Hz ­ 20 kHz Microphone membrane Electronically encoded sound wave (5 Hz ­ 20 k

  18. Telecommunications Radio Lease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Radio Lease 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you do not receive. Note: There is an air time charge for the use of the radios. Radio lease rates depend on the radio type to any of the radios, chargers and accessories until signed back over to the Telecommunications office

  19. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1998-03-31

    An apparatus is disclosed for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material. The apparatus consists of a tower bioreactor which has mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  20. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Q.A.

    1999-03-30

    An apparatus is described for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets. 5 figs.

  1. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards of downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  2. Tower reactors for bioconversion of lignocellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Quang A. (16458 W. 1st Ave., Golden, CO 80401)

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of pretreated lignocellulosic material, in the form of a tower bioreactor, having mixers to achieve intermittent mixing of the material. Precise mixing of the material is important for effective heat and mass transfer requirements without damaging or denaturing the enzymes or fermenting microorganisms. The pretreated material, generally in the form of a slurry, is pumped through the bioreactor, either upwards or downwards, and is mixed periodically as it passes through the mixing zones where the mixers are located. For a thin slurry, alternate mixing can be achieved by a pumping loop which also serves as a heat transfer device. Additional heat transfer takes place through the reactor heat transfer jackets.

  3. Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A.; Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2011-04-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

  4. Introducing an Online Cooling Tower Performance Analysis Tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muller, M.R.; Muller, M.B.; Rao, P.

    2012-01-01

    and variable nature of all of the factors that can influence performance; fan speed, wind speed, sump temperature, heat load, ambient temperature, relative humidity, etc. This can be overwhelming for a regular operator resulting in many cooling towers being set...

  5. Multi-objective optimization of solar tower heliostat fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ábrahám, Erika

    on a tower-mounted receiver, see Fig. 1. The collector system uses hundreds or thousands of sun into account topography, tracking errors, and the position and intensity of the sun. An approach is introduced

  6. Cooling Tower Energy Conservation Through Hydraulic Fan Drives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, J.

    1991-01-01

    Many companies offer gearboxes, shafts, and couplings for cooling tower fan drives, with little or no innovation. These companies have traditionally been purchased with an emphasis on cost and not "Return on Investment!" In the past, when energy...

  7. How did the WTC towers collapse: a new theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Usmani, Asif; Chung, Y. C.; Torero, Jose L

    This paper uses a finite element model to investigate the stability of the Twin-Towers of the World Trade Center, New York for a number of different fire scenarios. This investigation does not take into account the ...

  8. A Microcomputer Model of Crossflow Cooling Tower Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichelt, G. E; Jones, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    to evaluate its response; moreover, a subprogram can evaluate pressure drop and motor/fan characteristics. Determination of the energy required to operate the tower enables its performance to be compared against energy-saving operations such as variable speed...

  9. Environmental Impacts from the Operation of Cooling Towers at SRP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.G. III

    2001-06-26

    An assessment has been made of the environmental effects that would occur from the operation of cooling towers at the SRP reactors. A more realistic numerical model of the cooling tower plume has been used to reassess the environmental impacts. The following effects were considered: (1) the occurrence of fog and ice and their impact on nearby structures, (2) drift and salt deposition from the plume, (3) the length and height of the visible plume, and (4) the possible dose from tritium.

  10. The Tower Shielding Facility: Its glorious past

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muckenthaler, F.J.

    1997-05-07

    The Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) is the only reactor facility in the US that was designed and built for radiation-shielding studies in which both the reactor source and shield samples could be raised into the air to allow measurements to be made without interference from ground scattering or other spurious effects. The TSF proved its usefulness as many different programs were successfully completed. It became active in work for the Defense Atomic Support Agency (DASA) Space Nuclear Auxiliary Power, Defense Nuclear Agency, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, the Gas-Cooled and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor programs, and the Japanese-American Shielding Program of Experimental Research, just to mention a few of the more extensive ones. The history of the TSF as presented in this report describes the various experiments that were performed using the different reactors. The experiments are categorized as to the programs which they supported and placed in corresponding chapters. The experiments are described in modest detail, along with their purpose when appropriate. Discussion of the results is minimal, but references are given to more extensive topical reports.

  11. Modulate Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 Modulate Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio By: Elie Salameh Outline. · Fm in gnu radio · Audio Streams in Internet Radio · Gnu & Audio Files · Sox command · Playlist ".pls" · Recording internet radio #12;2 Project description · Using gnu radio to modulate internet radio into fm. · Using usrp

  12. Telecommunications Radio Rental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Radio Rental 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you do not receive://telecom.tamu.edu/Accounts/Rate_Information.php). There is an air time charge for the use of the radios. Rental radios will be pro-rated per radio per daily usage of the radios, chargers and accessories until signed back over to the Telecommunications office. Amount

  13. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt Warren (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  14. A study of a cooling tower with variable packing heights 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, A. M. M. Farid

    1957-01-01

    and Electronic Relay 17 6. 7 ~ 8. View of the Instrument Panel Racking Arrangement Spacer and Packing Types 23 23 10. Effect of Tower Height on Range/Approach Ratio for Rectangular Packing 35 Effect of Tower Height on Range/Approach Rptio for Circular... - round type packing 33 VI. Average results ? triangular packing with vertex up 34 SYMBOLS ALUB ABB?', 'VIATIO&IS mass air flow rate, pounds per (hour)(unit ground area) h" ent'halpy of saturated ai- at water temperature, Btu per pound of dry air. ha...

  15. Cooling of hot gases by use of a spray tower 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pendleton, Elmer Lee

    1958-01-01

    , These included a sprayhead, number 5B Sprayco, which was located either at the top of the tower (A) or at a position four feet lower in the tower (B), a hot air inlet duct (C), an air outlet duct (D), a multiport gas burner (E), a ceramic checkerwork (F.... ?ne corresnonding m?ss w?s dote?- rrnrei) n-; use ? f su ~ table scales, . ni balances. Thc spec? f? cat iona I' or :j i'- ei' 'one. ? !'. )nws: ? ncp, a! i ' sty . ? i at?i. 'Fl. ? t"nr v: . , c ie. , " F. nu=rc. ured cy Can, " c? 0?ubdzv...

  16. Software Defined Radio Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranakis, Evangelos

    ) [14]. The USRP2 bridges the analog world of electromagnetic radio waves and digital world of computersChapter 2 Software Defined Radio Architecture A SDR is a real-time system. The inputs to the system are actions performed by the radio operator and data produced by active elements present in the SDR

  17. Introduction Big Radio Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prodiæ, Aleksandar

    Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary Big Radio Data Ue-Li Pen CITA, UofT, CIFAR July 3, 2014U. Pen Big Radio Data #12;Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary Overview History VLBI Processing Future U. Pen Big signal processing U. Pen Big Radio Data #12;Introduction VLBI Pulsars Summary VLBI Current experiments

  18. Energy Efficient Radio Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Energy Efficient Radio Resource Management in a Coordinated Multi-Cell Distributed Antenna System Hacettepe University 5 September 2014 Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource mobility , 1 Gb/s at high mobility). Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource

  19. Ilchmann, Achim; Pahl, M. : Adaptive Multivariable pH Regulation of a Biogas Tower Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilchmann, Achim

    Ilchmann, Achim; Pahl, M. : Adaptive Multivariable pH Regulation of a Biogas Tower Reactor Zuerst. The adaptive controller was successlullytesteclover il pcriod of tu'o nonths at a biogas tower reuetoriu pilot are not applicable to the biogas tower reüctor.since a dontinatingf-eatureof the new reactol' prir-rciplc-is its

  20. Water Poster Competition Place: Rudder Tower Exhibit Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Water Poster Competition Place: Rudder Tower Exhibit Hall Time: 9:00am to 4:00pm (judging from 2pm to 4pm) Click here to register. "Let's Talk About Water" and Movie Event Movie: "Last Call at the Oasis WMHS Program News C. Prakash Khedun Water is vital for life. Life form, as we know, would not have

  1. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

    2001-07-01

    This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

  2. Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-6660E Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a Dual Heat Exchanger heat exchangers was demonstrated to illustrate an energy efficient cooling capability. This unique. A model of the heat exchangers' performance was developed and used with an industry standard energy

  3. User's manual: cooling-tower-plume prediction code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Coke, L.; Wastag, M.

    1984-04-01

    This report presents the theory and user's guide to a mathematical model for the prediction of the seasonal/annual physical impacts of cooling tower plumes, drift, fogging, icing, and shadowing. The model is aimed at providing predictions that may be used in the licensing of power plants with cooling towers. The submodels for these physical impacts provide improvements in theory and performance compared to existing methods. Validation with field and laboratory data has been done in all situations where good quality data exist. The seasonal/annual methodology employs a new technique which reduces the available meteorological record at a site to approximately 30 to 100 categories. The plume submodels are then run once for a representative of each category and results are summed up to provide predictions for a season or the year. The model allows the treatment of any number of identical natural- or mechanical-draft cooling towers in any geometrical orientation. The model is easy to use and requires a minimal amount of user input. It is set up to run with a TDF-14 or CD-144 ground level meteorological tape or standard NRC meteorological tape. The model encompasses four computer codes in which the output of one is the input to the next. In this way, intermediate output that may be informative is saved and may be examined. The use of a sequence of four codes permits more flexibility to the user allowing him the opportunity to better define the type and scale of printed output he wishes. The model is applied in two case studies, one for a site with three nearly colinear natural-draft cooling towers, and the other for a site with two linear mechanical-draft cooling towers oriented parallel to each other. Input and output to the codes are presented and described.

  4. presents... CJSF Radio, SFU's Campus and Community radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presents... CJSF Radio, SFU's Campus and Community radio station is offering their Radio Kids Camp once again this year, for kids aged 8-12! CJSF 90.1fm is a radio station which promotes local around Storytelling. With radio as a way to express their voice, campers will learn innovative skills

  5. OPENENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. Why configurations of radioOPEN­ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: A GEOMETRICAL ANALYSIS Vladik Kreinovich, Scott A. The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio telescopes. During

  6. OPENENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. #12; Why configurations of radioOPEN­ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: TOWARDS OPTIMAL DESIGN VLADIK KREINOVICH, SCOTT A, Russia ABSTRACT The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio

  7. CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Luis F.

    CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy EUROPEAN SCIENCE FOUNDATION Committee on Radio Astronomy Handbook for Radio Astronomy, 3rd edition". #12;CRAF Handbook for Radio Astronomy Edited by Jim Cohen. This Handbook reviews the needs of the Radio Astronomy Service and the measures required for its continued

  8. Energy Efficiency Evaluation of Guangzhou West Tower Façade System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01

    /m 2·K? 2.35 1.5 Aluminium connect structure Aluminium connect structure Aluminium connect structure U-value of Roof?W/m 2·K? 1.55 0.9 0.88 0.88 0.88 Indoor useable area (m2) 252,000 252,000 252,000 252,000 247,000 West Tower model...

  9. Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: An introduction to freshman composition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Karen

    1978-01-01

    Rebuilding the Tower of Babel: An Introduction to Freshman Composition. (May 1978) Karen Davis, B. A. , Southwest Texas State University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Forrest Dean Burt New teachers of composition need a handbook to supplement... are doing even less to help students learn how to write. A 1974 survey of five hundred colleges and universities conducted by the ADE revealed the five most often used textbooks in freshman English: The Harbrace ~Guile e Handbook, ~Writin with a ~pur ose...

  10. TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 6-02.53 TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS August 2009 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public August 2009 TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS Contents Page PREFACE ...........................................................................................................viii Chapter 1 APPLICATIONS FOR TACTICAL RADIO DEPLOYMENT.............................. 1-1 Modularity

  11. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Henry D. (Orinda, CA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Berkeley, CA); Howard, Donald R. (Danville, CA)

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  12. Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio Impacts the duration of transmitter attachment and minimizing the impacts of radios on the behavior and demography of the study animal. We tested 4 methods of radio attachment for a breeding population of upland sandpipers

  13. Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms: Cooling tower and condenser water optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang

    2005-01-01

    LBNL-58634 Best Practices for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms:05CH11231. Best Practice for Energy Efficient Cleanrooms:The cooling tower best practice efficiency based upon energy

  14. Stellar radio astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Josep M. Paredes

    2004-02-27

    Radio emission has been detected from all the stages of stellar evolution across the HR Diagram. Its presence reveals both astrophysical phenomena and stellar activity which, otherwise, would not be detectable by other means. The development of large, sensitive interferometers has allowed us to resolve the radio structure of several stellar systems, providing insights into the mass transfer process in close binary systems. I review the main characteristics of the radio emission from several kinds of stars, paying special attention to those cases where such an emission originates in relativistic jets.

  15. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  16. Power Towers of String Instantons for N=1 Vacua

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Blumenhagen; Maximilian Schmidt-Sommerfeld

    2008-03-11

    We provide arguments for the existence of novel hereinafter called poly-instanton corrections to holomorphic couplings in four-dimensional N=1 supersymmetric string compactifications. After refining quantitatively the D-brane instanton calculus for corrections to the gauge kinetic function, we explicitly apply it to the Type I toroidal orbifold defined in arXiv:0710.3080 and compare the results to the proposed heterotic S-dual model. This leads us to the intriguing conclusion that N=1 string vacua feature a power tower like proliferation of instanton corrections.

  17. Parametric study and dynamic analysis of compliant piled towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moog, Karl Heinz

    1990-01-01

    the Tower. . . . . . . . . . Vl. g Shear Force and Overturning Moment 65 GG 69 75 79 83 84 90 VII CONC'LUSIONS . F(EFERENC'ES . l 02 APPENDIX A 5IODE SHAPES 104 P a. ge APPENDIX A MODE SHAPES 104 APPENDIX B DYNAMIC RESPONSE FOR A SINGLE WAVE..., 3q, " Kgss = Gl, 5 CW, Kgss? 10 4C'W, l, p, " lr ? CIV, I, qr" ls 30 60 6C'W; 33i" Kgss = + 5l, 5 ? CW, It g 5 s 10 ? CW; pr" l, 10 10 4CW;I, 30 10 (15) (16) (17) (18) (19) (20) (21) (22) (23) (24) In order to represent...

  18. Cooling tower plume and drift model: description and user's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, E.A.

    1984-04-01

    This report documents the computer model of cooling tower plume and drift behavior developed and used at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory. The work was sponsored primarily by the Maryland Power Plant Siting Program. The model has been used to make estimates of environmental impact of salt deposition and vapor plumes (visibility, fogging and icing). The report briefly discusses the physical basis of the model. It provides details of the modeling concepts, model structure, and its use including a complete model listing and examples of its execution.

  19. Microsoft Word - PowerTower_work_2009.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on77 PAGE OFDetection of Hydrates on Gas51PB-12330No. 1 ContractTower

  20. Alpine SunTower Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All HomeAlphakat GmbH Jump to:County,Alpine SunTower

  1. Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment ofCommercialEnergy Computers,dish/enginepower tower

  2. FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

    2010-07-22

    The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

  3. ON THE STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MAGNETIC TOWER JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huarte-Espinosa, M.; Frank, A.; Blackman, E. G.; Ciardi, A.; Hartigan, P.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2012-09-20

    Modern theoretical models of astrophysical jets combine accretion, rotation, and magnetic fields to launch and collimate supersonic flows from a central source. Near the source, magnetic field strengths must be large enough to collimate the jet requiring that the Poynting flux exceeds the kinetic energy flux. The extent to which the Poynting flux dominates kinetic energy flux at large distances from the engine distinguishes two classes of models. In magneto-centrifugal launch models, magnetic fields dominate only at scales {approx}< 100 engine radii, after which the jets become hydrodynamically dominated (HD). By contrast, in Poynting flux dominated (PFD) magnetic tower models, the field dominates even out to much larger scales. To compare the large distance propagation differences of these two paradigms, we perform three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic adaptive mesh refinement simulations of both HD and PFD stellar jets formed via the same energy flux. We also compare how thermal energy losses and rotation of the jet base affects the stability in these jets. For the conditions described, we show that PFD and HD exhibit observationally distinguishable features: PFD jets are lighter, slower, and less stable than HD jets. Unlike HD jets, PFD jets develop current-driven instabilities that are exacerbated as cooling and rotation increase, resulting in jets that are clumpier than those in the HD limit. Our PFD jet simulations also resemble the magnetic towers that have been recently created in laboratory astrophysical jet experiments.

  4. The potential of carbonyl sulfide as a proxy for gross primary production at flux tower sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The potential of carbonyl sulfide as a proxy for gross primary production at flux tower sites J. M August 2011; published 15 November 2011. [1] Seasonal dynamics of atmospheric carbonyl sulfide (OCS of carbonyl sulfide as a proxy for gross primary production at flux tower sites, J. Geophys. Res., 116, G04019

  5. Method and system for simulating heat and mass transfer in cooling towers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan (Lakewood, CO); Hassani, A. Vahab (Golden, CO)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for simulating the performance of a cooling tower. More precisely, the simulator of the present invention predicts values related to the heat and mass transfer from a liquid (e.g., water) to a gas (e.g., air) when provided with input data related to a cooling tower design. In particular, the simulator accepts input data regarding: (a) cooling tower site environmental characteristics; (b) cooling tower operational characteristics; and (c) geometric characteristics of the packing used to increase the surface area within the cooling tower upon which the heat and mass transfer interactions occur. In providing such performance predictions, the simulator performs computations related to the physics of heat and mass transfer within the packing. Thus, instead of relying solely on trial and error wherein various packing geometries are tested during construction of the cooling tower, the packing geometries for a proposed cooling tower can be simulated for use in selecting a desired packing geometry for the cooling tower.

  6. LQG control of horizontal wind turbines for blades and tower loads alleviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    LQG control of horizontal wind turbines for blades and tower loads alleviation A. Pintea*, N of power produced by two bladed horizontal variable speed wind turbines. The proposed controller ensures oscillations and with the tower bending tendency. Keywords: LQG control, Wind turbines, Multi-objective control

  7. System and method for aligning heliostats of a solar power tower

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Convery, Mark R.

    2013-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar power tower heliostat alignment system and method that includes a solar power tower with a focal area, a plurality of heliostats that each reflect sunlight towards the focal area of the solar power tower, an off-focal area location substantially close to the focal area of the solar power tower, a communication link between the off-focal area location and a misaligned heliostat, and a processor that interprets the communication between the off-focal area location and the misaligned heliostat to identify the misaligned heliostat from the plurality of heliostats and that determines a correction for the identified misaligned heliostat to realign the misaligned heliostat to reflect sunlight towards the focal area of the solar power tower.

  8. Cognitive Radio Networks as Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandari, Dorna; Yang, Seung R.; Zhao, Yue; Pottie, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    assuming the cognitive radios know their own coordinates.Networked Sensing Cognitive Radio Networks As SensorIntroduction: Cognitive Radio (CR) Networks The Need For

  9. Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of the Cooling Tower Complex for the North Experimental Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1976-01-01

    Adjudication of a Contract for the Construction of the Cooling Tower Complex for the North Experimental Area

  10. September/October 2006 Out of the Ivory Tower Safety of HFCS GM plants: GM-less Pollen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    _____________________________________________________________________________ Out of the Ivory Tower Safety of HFCS GM plants: GM-less Pollen Colony Condition ­ CA/US CSBA

  11. eRadio : empowerment through community Web radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Monroy, Carla, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The eRadio project proposes to be an effective aid to increase interaction and reduce alienation among the members of dispersed communities by using a holistic approach to participatory and interactive web radio-production, ...

  12. The radio structure of radio-quiet quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Leipski; Heino Falcke; Nicola Bennert; Susanne Huettemeister; ;

    2006-06-21

    We investigate the radio emitting structures of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with an emphasis on radio-quiet quasars to study their connection to Seyfert galaxies. We present and analyse high-sensitivity VLA radio continuum images of 14 radio-quiet quasars and six Seyfert galaxies. Many of the low redshift radio-quiet quasars show radio structures that can be interpreted as jet-like outflows. However, the detection rate of extended radio structures on arcsecond scales among our sample decreases with increasing redshift and luminosity, most likely due to a lack of resolution. The morphologies of the detected radio emission indicate strong interactions of the jets with the surrounding medium. We also compare the radio data of seven quasars with corresponding HST images of the [OIII] emitting narrow-line region (NLR). We find that the scenario of interaction between the radio jet and the NLR gas is confirmed in two sources by structures in the NLR gas distribution as previously known for Seyfert galaxies. The extended radio structures of radio-quiet quasars at sub-arcsecond resolution are by no means different from that of Seyferts. Among the luminosities studied here, the morphological features found are similar in both types of objects while the overall size of the radio structures increases with luminosity. This supports the picture where radio-quiet quasars are the scaled-up versions of Seyfert galaxies. In addition to known luminosity relations we find a correlation of the NLR size and the radio size shared by quasars and Seyferts.

  13. The evolution of magnetic tower jets in the laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ciardi; S. V. Lebedev; A. Frank; E. G. Blackman; J. P. Chittenden; C. J. Jennings; D. J. Ampleford; S. N. Bland; S. C. Bott; J. Rapley; G. N. Hall; F. A. Suzuki-Vidal; A. Marocchino; T. Lery; C. Stehle

    2006-11-14

    The evolution of laboratory produced magnetic jets is followed numerically through three-dimensional, non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The experiments are designed to study the interaction of a purely toroidal field with an extended plasma background medium. The system is observed to evolve into a structure consisting of an approximately cylindrical magnetic cavity with an embedded magnetically confined jet on its axis. The supersonic expansion produces a shell of swept-up shocked plasma which surrounds and partially confines the magnetic tower. Currents initially flow along the walls of the cavity and in the jet but the development of current-driven instabilities leads to the disruption of the jet and a re-arrangement of the field and currents. The top of the cavity breaks-up and a well collimated, radiatively cooled, 'clumpy' jet emerges from the system.

  14. Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    ' & $ % Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio Anant Sahai Wireless Foundations, UCB EECS program November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Outline 1. Why cognitive radios? 2 November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Apparent spectrum allocations · Traditional

  15. Radio Interferometric Geolocation Miklos Maroti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    Radio Interferometric Geolocation Mikl´os Mar´oti P´eter V¨olgyesi Sebesty´en D´ora Branislav.kusy, akos.ledeczi}@vanderbilt.edu ABSTRACT We present a novel radio interference based sensor local- ization method for wireless sensor networks. The technique relies on a pair of nodes emitting radio waves

  16. Cognitive Radio: Fundamentals and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morelos-Zaragoza, Robert H.

    Cognitive Radio: Fundamentals and Opportunities Robert H. Morelos-Zaragoza Department of Electrical Engineering San Jose State University October 12, 2007 #12;Cognitive Radio - RHMZ - 2007 Slide 2 of 18 Outline 1. Software-defined radio (SDR) a) Black-box approach b) Components and attributes (Mitola) 2

  17. Language Issues for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokar, Mieczyslaw M.

    INVITED P A P E R Language Issues for Cognitive Radio Computer languages that may be useful for expressing cognitive radio concepts are identified and evaluated in this tutorial paper. By Mieczyslaw M aspects of formal languages in the context of cognitive radio. A bottom up approach is taken in which

  18. Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    Continuum Radio Emission and Diagnostics The Sun is a strong radio source (one of the first objects discusses incoher­ ent emission from thermal plasma in the non­flaring so­ lar atmosphere; other relevant material may be found in Coherent Plasma Emission and in Solar Flares: Radio Bursts. Emission mechanisms

  19. Width of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; H. Xie

    2007-10-24

    In the present paper we report on the difference in angular sizes between radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs. For this purpose we compiled these two samples of events using Wind/WAVES and SOHO/LASCO observations obtained during 1996-2005. It is shown that the radio-loud CMEs are almost two times wider than the radio-quiet CMEs (considering expanding parts of CMEs). Furthermore we show that the radio-quiet CMEs have a narrow expanding bright part with a large extended diffusive structure. These results were obtained by measuring the CME widths in three different ways.

  20. Improvement of risk estimate on wind turbine tower buckled by hurricane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingwei

    2013-01-01

    Wind is one of the important reasonable resources. However, wind turbine towers are sure to be threatened by hurricanes. In this paper, method to estimate the number of wind turbine towers that would be buckled by hurricanes is discussed. Monte Carlo simulations show that our method is much better than the previous one. Since in our method, the probability density function of the buckling probability of a single turbine tower in a single hurricane is obtained accurately but not from one approximated expression. The result in this paper may be useful to the design and maintenance of wind farms.

  1. Optimal Cell Towers Distribution by using Spatial Mining and Geographic Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AL-Hamami, Alaa H

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of wireless communication is dramatically changing our life. Mobile telecommunications emerged as a technological marvel allowing for access to personal and other services, devices, computation and communication, in any place and at any time through effortless plug and play. Setting up wireless mobile networks often requires: Frequency Assignment, Communication Protocol selection, Routing schemes selection, and cells towers distributions. This research aims to optimize the cells towers distribution by using spatial mining with Geographic Information System (GIS) as a tool. The distribution optimization could be done by applying the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) on the image of the area which must be covered with two levels of hierarchy. The research will apply the spatial association rules technique on the second level to select the best square in the cell for placing the antenna. From that the proposal will try to minimize the number of installed towers, makes tower's location feasible, and pr...

  2. Cooling Water Systems - Energy Savings/Lower Costs By Reusing Cooling Tower Blowdown 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puckorius, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    down for reuse into the cooling tower system. Several plants have been built and operated with considerable difficulty regarding effective operation of the softener due to improper chemical selection. However, other plants have utilized the proper...

  3. Exquisite corpse: a tower for the public in the era of exhausted modernity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Sungwoo

    2012-01-01

    Towers in Manhattan, especially in business areas, have historically used a single overarching system in order to visualize images of their corporate identity and immerse the public in the image of development. While using ...

  4. Plume configuration and plume recirculation/interference of the Vienna cooling towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, S.C.; Kennedy, J.F.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the laboratory model investigation reported herein was to study the behavior of the effluent plumes from the existing and proposed mechanical draft wet cooling towers at the Vienna power plant. Included in the study are plume recirculation and interference of the existing rectangular tower and the proposed round tower as well as effects on plume behavior of the power plant buildings and the coal pile. The study results can be utilized to determine the visible plume boundaries and cooling tower stack effluent concentration distributions for various meteorological and power plant operating conditions. The results can then be used to determine whether or not the plumes will cause fogging or icing on the proposed Route 50 bypass. Tests were conducted for several wind speeds and for the prevailing winter and summer wind directions.

  5. BREN Tower: A Monument to the Material Culture of Radiation Dosimetry Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Edwards

    2008-05-30

    With a height of more than 1,500 feet, the BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower dominates the surrounding desert landscape of the Nevada Test Site. Associated with the nuclear research and atmospheric testing programs carried out during the 1950s and 1960s, the tower was a vital component in a series of experiments aimed at characterizing radiation fields from nuclear detonations. Research programs conducted at the tower provided the data for the baseline dosimetry studies crucial to determining the radiation dose rates received by the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Today, BREN Tower stands as a monument to early dosimetry research and one of the legacies of the Cold War.

  6. Beyond the ivory tower : in search of a new form for campus-community relationships

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowman, Anne (Anne Renee)

    2011-01-01

    The terms "ivory tower" and "town-gown" have long been used to characterize the relationship between institutions of higher education and the communities in which they reside. While these adversarial phrases reflect the ...

  7. Economic and design analysis of daylighting a commercial tower in a hot and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roscow, Robert F

    1981-01-01

    A forty story commercial office tower in Tampa, Florida was redesigned for daylighting. The methods are outlined and results illustrated, A cooling load comparison is done to determine the economic feasibility of such a ...

  8. In the Shadow of No Towers: Symphony Number Four, A Conductor's Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapp, Michael Wayne

    2013-08-31

    This document serves as an examination of Mohammed Fairouz's (b. 1986) piece, In the Shadow of No Towers: Symphony Number Four (2012). Included within this paper are sections covering: biographical information of the ...

  9. "BECAUSE SOME STORIES DO LIVE FOREVER": STEPHEN KING'S THE DARK TOWER SERIES AS MODERN ROMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMurray, Rachel Elizabeth

    2012-05-31

    Stephen King's Dark Tower series is a seven-volume work that contains elements from myths, fairy tales, American westerns, legends, popular culture, Gothic literature, and medieval romance. Few scholars have engaged with this series, most likely due...

  10. Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water; Demonstration of a Dual Heat Exchanger Rack Cooling Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Steve

    2014-01-01

    LBNL-XXXXX Data Center Economizer Cooling with Tower Water;included a water- side economizer. This model estimated theand without a water-side economizer and including or not

  11. Computer Simulation of Cooling Effect of Wind Tower on Passively Ventilated Building 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seryak, J.; Kissock, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    equipment. A simple computer program was developed to simulate airflow through a wind tower based on tower dimensions and air temperature. The program was compared to experimental results with reasonable agreement. Parametric analysis indicates... of an occupied auditorium on an hour- by-hour basis using TMY2 data for Dayton, Ohio. SIMPLIFIED MODEL OF BUILDING INTERIOR AIR TEMPERATURE Assuming steady state conditions, an energy balance of major sensible heat flows into and out of a building yields...

  12. Heat Transfer Performance of a Dry and Wet / Dry Advanced Cooling Tower Condenser 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fricke, H. D.; Webster, D. J.; McIlroy, K.; Bartz, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    PERFORMANCE OF A DRY AND WET/DRY ADVANCED COOLING TOWER CONDENSER Hans D. Fricke, David J. Webster, Kenneth McIlroy Union carbide Corporation - Linde Division, Tonawanda, New York John A. Bartz Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, california... cooling in creases siting flexibility, particularly for locations in arid Western coal fields. However, dry cooling requires considerable capital investment for the cooling towers. Hence, the development of effitient (low cost) heat transfer surfaces...

  13. Dynamic Resource Allocation with the arcControlTower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Nilsen, Jon Kerr

    2015-01-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers’ workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job management system (PanDA) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experienc...

  14. CHEP2015: Dynamic Resource Allocation with arcControlTower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filipcic, Andrej; The ATLAS collaboration; Nilsen, Jon Kerr

    2015-01-01

    Distributed computing resources available for high-energy physics research are becoming less dedicated to one type of workflow and researchers’ workloads are increasingly exploiting modern computing technologies such as parallelism. The current pilot job management model used by many experiments relies on static dedicated resources and cannot easily adapt to these changes. The model used for ATLAS in Nordic countries and some other places enables a flexible job management system based on dynamic resources allocation. Rather than a fixed set of resources managed centrally, the model allows resources to be requested on the fly. The ARC Computing Element (ARC-CE) and ARC Control Tower (aCT) are the key components of the model. The aCT requests jobs from the ATLAS job mangement system (Panda) and submits a fully-formed job description to ARC-CEs. ARC-CE can then dynamically request the required resources from the underlying batch system. In this paper we describe the architecture of the model and the experience...

  15. Cooling tower and plume modeling for satellite remote sensing applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, B.J.

    1995-05-01

    It is often useful in nonproliferation studies to be able to remotely estimate the power generated by a power plant. Such information is indirectly available through an examination of the power dissipated by the plant. Power dissipation is generally accomplished either by transferring the excess heat generated into the atmosphere or into bodies of water. It is the former method with which we are exclusively concerned in this report. We discuss in this report the difficulties associated with such a task. In particular, we primarily address the remote detection of the temperature associated with the condensed water plume emitted from the cooling tower. We find that the effective emissivity of the plume is of fundamental importance for this task. Having examined the dependence of the plume emissivity in several IR bands and with varying liquid water content and droplet size distributions, we conclude that the plume emissivity, and consequently the plume brightness temperature, is dependent upon not only the liquid water content and band, but also upon the droplet size distribution. Finally, we discuss models dependent upon a detailed point-by-point description of the hydrodynamics and thermodynamics of the plume dynamics and those based upon spatially integrated models. We describe in detail a new integral model, the LANL Plume Model, which accounts for the evolution of the droplet size distribution. Some typical results obtained from this model are discussed.

  16. Radio and Collective Identity in the 2006 Oaxacan Uprising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01

    4): Buckley, Steve. 2000. “Radio’s New Horizons: DemocracyDiego. 2007. “Community Radio Stations Under Fire. ” InterWhat is Community Radio? A Resource Guide. Johannesburg:

  17. OPEN-ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    radio telescopes, devices that use the second observability window of radio waves. Why configurationsOPEN-ENDED CONFIGURATIONS OF RADIO TELESCOPES: A GEOMETRICAL ANALYSIS Vladik Kreinovich, Scott A. The quality of radio astronomical images drastically depends on where we place the radio telescopes. During

  18. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 3 Implementation Status of the SCA Based FM Radio P. Balister Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061 #12;Implementation Status of the SCA Based FM Radio Philip description of the FM Radio architecture planned for the SCA radio and provides information about the current

  19. Elements of Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank G. Borg; Ismo Hakala; Jukka Määttälä

    2007-12-24

    We present a summary of the basic properties of the radio wave generation, propagation and reception, with a special attention to the gigahertz bandwidth region which is of interest for wireless sensor networks. We also present some measurement results which use the so-called RSSI indicator in order to track how the field strength varies with position and distance of the transceivers. We hope the paper may be useful to anyone who looks for a quick review of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory with application to antennas.

  20. GNU Radio & USRPGNU Radio & USRP File transfer through WirelessFile transfer through Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 GNU Radio & USRPGNU Radio & USRP File transfer through WirelessFile transfer through WirelessSachin Hirve April 30, 2008April 30, 2008 Contents:Contents: What is Software Radio?What is Software Radio? USRPUSRP ­­ MultiMulti--functional hardwarefunctional hardware GNU RadioGNU Radio Previous Work

  1. 24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, D.; Bowen, J.; Egami, R.; Coulombe, W.; Crow, D.; Cristani, B.; Schmidt, S.

    1997-12-01

    This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.

  2. Brayton-Cycle Baseload Power Tower CSP System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Bruce

    2013-12-31

    The primary objectives of Phase 2 of this Project were: 1. Engineer, fabricate, and conduct preliminary testing on a low-pressure, air-heating solar receiver capable of powering a microturbine system to produce 300kWe while the sun is shining while simultaneously storing enough energy thermally to power the system for up to 13 hours thereafter. 2. Cycle-test a high-temperature super alloy, Haynes HR214, to determine its efficacy for the system’s high-temperature heat exchanger. 3. Engineer the thermal energy storage system This Phase 2 followed Wilson’s Phase 1, which primarily was an engineering feasibility study to determine a practical and innovative approach to a full Brayton-cycle system configuration that could meet DOE’s targets. Below is a summary table of the DOE targets with Wilson’s Phase 1 Project results. The results showed that a Brayton system with an innovative (low pressure) solar receiver with ~13 hours of dry (i.e., not phase change materials or molten salts but rather firebrick, stone, or ceramics) has the potential to meet or exceed DOE targets. Such systems would consist of pre-engineered, standardized, factory-produced modules to minimize on-site costs while driving down costs through mass production. System sizes most carefully analyzed were in the range of 300 kWe to 2 MWe. Such systems would also use off-the-shelf towers, blowers, piping, microturbine packages, and heliostats. Per DOE’s instructions, LCOEs are based on the elevation and DNI levels of Daggett, CA, for a 100 MWe power plant following 2 GWe of factory production of the various system components. Success criteria DOE targets Wilson system LCOE DOE’s gas price $6.75/MBtu 9 cents/kWh 7.7 cents/kWh LCOE Current gas price $4.71/MBtu NA 6.9 cents/kWh Capacity factor 75% (6500hr) 75-100% Solar fraction 85% (5585hr) >5585hr Receiver cost $170/kWe $50/kWe Thermal storage cost $20/kWhth $13/kWhth Heliostat cost $120/m2 $89.8/m2

  3. Radio frequency coaxial feedthrough

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Owens, Thomas L. (Kingston, TN)

    1989-01-17

    An improved radio frequency coaxial transmission line vacuum feed-through provided based on the use of a half-wavelength annular dielectric pressure barrier disk, or multiple disks comprising an effective half wavelength structure to eliminate reflections from the barrier surfaces. Gas-tight seals are formed about the outer and inner diameter surfaces of the barrier disk using a sealing technique which generates radial forces sufficient to form seals by forcing the conductor walls against the surfaces of the barrier disks in a manner which does not deform the radii of the inner and outer conductors, thereby preventing enhancement of the electric field at the barrier faces which limits voltage and power handling capabilities of a feedthrough.

  4. Data products: what do we want? The Radio Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data products: what do we want? #12;The Radio Sun #12;The Radio Sun #12;Radio Emission Mechanisms) is produced by nonthermal electrons in flares. #12;The Radio Sun in Frequency #12;What do we see in a radio

  5. Strategy for the Operation of Cooling Towers with variable Speed Fans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iñigo-Golfín, J

    2001-01-01

    Within the SPS Cooling Water Project at CERN aimed at the reduction of water consumption, this primary open cooling loop will be closed and all the primary cooling circuit components will be upgraded to the new required duty and brought to the necessary safety and operability standards. In particular the tower fans will be fitted with variable frequency drives to replace the existing two speed motors. This paper presents a study to optimize the operation of SPS cooling towers taking into account outdoor conditions (wet and dry bulb temperatures) and the entirety of the primary circuit in which they will operate.

  6. Concept study and validation of Antarctic telescope tower SPIE vol. 6268, Advances in Stellar Interferometry, paper 41, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    project surveyed relevant tower design approaches, then generated and evaluated six concept designs for telescope towers. Using data for typical and extreme wind at Dome C to generate wind loads, finite element analysis yielded lateral deflections at the top of 0.3 mm for typical winds and 12.1 mm for extreme gusts

  7. Cold weather operating guidelines and experience for natural draft cooling towers on the American Electric Power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michell, F.L.; Drew, D.H. [American Electric Power Service, Corp., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-10-01

    American Electric Power`s more than 30 years of experience in operating natural draft cooling towers during freezing winter weather conditions is discussed in the paper. Design features incorporated into the specifications for major rebuild/repack projects for crossflow and counterflow towers to facilitate cold weather operation are also reviewed.

  8. J. Adv. Model. Earth Syst., Vol. 2, Art. #8, 19 pp. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubert, Wayne H.

    J. Adv. Model. Earth Syst., Vol. 2, Art. #8, 19 pp. Adiabatic Rearrangement of Hollow PV Towers potential vorticity (PV). is structure has been referred to as a hollow PV tower. e sign reversal of the radial gradient of PV satis es the Charney-Stern necessary condition for combined barotropic

  9. Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants All Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!! 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1991-01-01

    Cooling towers, because of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration...

  10. Radio bursts from superconducting strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-01-30

    We show that radio bursts from cusps on superconducting strings are linearly polarized, thus, providing a signature that can be used to distinguish them from astrophysical sources. We write the event rate of string-generated radio transients in terms of observational variables, namely, the event duration and flux. Assuming a canonical set of observational parameters, we find that the burst event rate can be quite reasonable, e.g., order ten a year for Grand Unified strings with 100 TeV currents, and a lack of observed radio bursts can potentially place strong constraints on particle physics models.

  11. Radio Broadcasts from Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Daniele A. Steer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-05-14

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  12. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 4 A Comparison of Some Existing Radios with Implications 1 2 Methodology 1 3 Findings 2 4 Concluding Remarks 3 A Summary of Radio Specifications 5 B.S. consists of a dis- parate collection of radio technologies operating over a wide range of frequencies

  13. Royal Institute of Technology Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    Royal Institute of Technology Cognitive Radio Model-Based Competence for Software Radios Joseph Communication Systems Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden Cognitive Radio Model-Based Competence for Software Radios Joseph Mitola III August 1999 A thesis submitted to the Royal Institute

  14. Cognitive Radio Technology [from THE GUEST EDITORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    Cognitive Radio Technology [from THE GUEST EDITORS] Maria Gabriella di Benedetto, Yingbo Hua, Thomas Kaiser, and Xiaodong Wang C ognitive radio is an exciting and new way of thinking and researching of cognitive radio. Perhaps the most pressing of them is improved utilization of the electromagnetic radio

  15. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 17 The Rise of All-Band All- Mode Radio S.W. Ellingson and S Institute & State University #12;The Rise of All-Band All-Mode Radio Steve Ellingson and S.M. Shajedul Hasan is based on network infrastructure. In this approach, disparate radio networks are integrated through

  16. Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti Spring 2012 Radio astronomy provides a very different view of the universe than optical astronomy. Radio astronomers and optical astronomers use different terminology to describe their work. Here I present some basic concepts and terms of radio

  17. LOWFREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF XRAY GHOST BUBBLES A2597: A HISTORY RADIO ACTIVITY THE CORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarazin, Craig

    LOW­FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF X­RAY GHOST BUBBLES A2597: A HISTORY RADIO ACTIVITY THE CORE T showed ``ghost holes'' X­ray emission west northeast central radio galaxy PKS 2322#123. Previous radio observations detect radio emission coming from interior X­ray holes. present low­frequency observations A2597

  18. Radio: Borderless and selective On the use codes in radio broadcast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radio: Borderless and selective On the use codes in radio broadcast Jacob Thøgersen The universal radio In the beginning of the 21st century, the Internet may be heralded as the great bringer of free invention, the radio. In Denmark, the earliest experiments with radio broadcasting started as private

  19. TheGoldenGateBridgeWeatherJuly2010,Vol.65,No.7 fog, but the north tower had a story to tell. It

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    176 TheGoldenGateBridgeWeather­July2010,Vol.65,No.7 fog, but the north tower had a story to tell. It worked as a chimney. The fog entered and escaped through the openings of the tower, displaying iridescent colors and creating ever-changing and fast-moving fog shad- ows of the tower and the cables (Figure 2). I

  20. Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop (held in Long Beach, CA, on July 25, 2012), academic and industry experts discussed the existing and emerging electrotechnologies – such as microwave ...

  1. Security Policy: Radio Network Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Security Policy: Radio Network Controller Encryption Module Controller (RNC EMC) Cryptographic, 2007 Security Policy: RNC EMC Page 1 of 22 #12;Security Policy: RNC EMC Page 2 of 22 #12;Table...........................................................14 7. IDENTIFICATION AND AUTHENTICATION POLICY

  2. WATTS TOWERS: THE EFFECTS OF THERMAL CYCLES ON THE FORMATION AND BEHAVIOR OF CRACKS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer, Matthew T

    2013-02-06

    of cracks located at different sections on the Towers was outfitted with strain gauges, force transducers, and thermocouples to collect data on the crack width as a function of the ambient temperature. Using the Finite Element Analysis program LS-DYNA, a...

  3. Aalborg Universitet Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    @et.aau.dk, csu@et.aau.dk, zch@et.aau.dk Abstract ­ Grid connected wind turbines are fluctuating power sources due and the power flow situation of the original power system especially when the integration of wind powerAalborg Universitet Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale

  4. 1 Problem Solving: How do you do it? Classic example is the Tower of Hanoi problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Randall C.

    1 Problem Solving: How do you do it? Classic example is the Tower of Hanoi problem: Initial State state. 3 Problem Solving Heuristics Brute force search: explore entire problem space. Hill climbing away from the goal for a bit, it will eventually solve the problem. This is a problem for people too

  5. Conceptual Design of a 100 MWe Modular Molten Salt Power Tower Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Pacheco; Carter Moursund, Dale Rogers, David Wasyluk

    2011-09-20

    A conceptual design of a 100 MWe modular molten salt solar power tower plant has been developed which can provide capacity factors in the range of 35 to 75%. Compared to single tower plants, the modular design provides a higher degree of flexibility in achieving the desired customer's capacity factor and is obtained simply by adjusting the number of standard modules. Each module consists of a standard size heliostat field and receiver system, hence reengineering and associated unacceptable performance uncertainties due to scaling are eliminated. The modular approach with multiple towers also improves plant availability. Heliostat field components, receivers and towers are shop assembled allowing for high quality and minimal field assembly. A centralized thermal-storage system stores hot salt from the receivers, allowing nearly continuous power production, independent of solar energy collection, and improved parity with the grid. A molten salt steam generator converts the stored thermal energy into steam, which powers a steam turbine generator to produce electricity. This paper describes the conceptual design of the plant, the advantages of modularity, expected performance, pathways to cost reductions, and environmental impact.

  6. ECON 162B -A0, A1 Kenny Christianson Fall 2010 office: Library Tower 1013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    ECON 162B - A0, A1 Kenny Christianson Fall 2010 office: Library Tower 1013 lecture A0: MWF 9, the stock market, and the role of the Federal Reserve in changing interest rates; the potential for double-dip recession and the rate of growth of GDP; inflation and deflation; the national debt and growing budget

  7. Impact of environmental concerns on cooling-tower design and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensley, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    New and sometimes unexpected environmental concerns surface from time to time, and each has its special effect on the selection, pricing, and operation of cooling towers. This paper discusses the following concerns, which are either current or are becoming significant: water conservation, energy conservation, noise, drift, blowdown, visual impact, and construction materials that are environmentally sensitive. 3 refs.

  8. Experimental optimization of cooling-tower-fan control based on field data. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, D.L.

    1991-04-01

    Energy costs continue to play an important role in the decision-making process for building design and operation. Since the chiller, cooling tower fans, and associated pumps consume the largest fraction of energy in a heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, the control of these components is of major importance in determining building energy use. A significant control parameter for the chilled water system is the minimum entering condenser water set point temperature at which the cooling tower fans are cycled on and off, several studies have attempted to determine the optimum value for this minimum set point temperature, but direct measurements are not available to validate these studies. The purpose of this study was to experimentally determine the optimum minimum entering condenser water set point temperature from field data based on minimum energy consumption and to validate a chilled water system analytical model previously developed in earlier work. The total chiller system electrical consumption (chiller and cooling tower fan energy) was measured for four entering condensor water set point temperatures (70, 75, 80, and 85 deg F). The field results were compared to results obtained using an analytical model previously developed in a thesis entitled Optimized Design of a Commercial Building Chiller/Cooling Tower System, written by Joyce.

  9. Cooling Tower Operation in the Hot and Humid Climates of Arid Zones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Bassam, E.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Sebzali, M.

    2000-01-01

    Air-conditioning (A/C) in Kuwait is a necessity for comfortable living as the summer is extremely hot. Dry weather for most of the summer months reflects the effectiveness of using water-cooled (WC) systems. Cooling towers (C/Ts) at a Ministry...

  10. A STUDY ON LEGIONELLA PNEUMOPHILA, WATER CHEMISTRY, AND ATMOSPHERIC CONDITIONS IN COOLING TOWERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.; Brigmon, R.

    2009-10-20

    Legionnaires disease is a pneumonia caused by the inhalation of the bacterium Legionella pneumophila. The majority of illnesses have been associated with cooling towers since these devices can harbor and disseminate the bacterium in the aerosolized mist generated by these systems. Historically, Savannah River Site (SRS) cooling towers have had occurrences of elevated levels of Legionella in all seasons of the year and in patterns that are difficult to predict. Since elevated Legionella in cooling tower water are a potential health concern a question has been raised as to the best control methodology. In this work we analyze available chemical, biological, and atmospheric data to determine the best method or key parameter for control. The SRS 4Q Industrial Hygiene Manual, 4Q-1203, 1 - G Cooling Tower Operation and the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program, states that 'Participation in the SRNL Legionella Sampling Program is MANDATORY for all operating cooling towers'. The resulting reports include L. pneumophila concentration information in cells/L. L. pneumophila concentrations >10{sup 7} cells/L are considered elevated and unsafe so action must be taken to reduce these densities. These remedial actions typically include increase biocide addition or 'shocking'. Sometimes additional actions are required if the problem persists including increase tower maintenance (e.g. cleaning). Evaluation of 14 SRS cooling towers, seven water quality parameters, and five Legionella serogroups over a three-plus year time frame demonstrated that cooling tower water Legionella densities varied widely though out this time period. In fact there was no one common consistent significant variable across all towers. The significant factors that did show up most frequently were related to suspended particulates, conductivity, pH, and dissolved oxygen, not chlorine or bromine as might be expected. Analyses of atmospheric data showed that there were more frequent significant elevated Legionella concentrations when the dew point temperature was high--a summertime occurrence. However, analysis of the three years of Legionella monitoring data of the 14 different SRS Cooling Towers demonstrated that elevated concentrations are observed at all temperatures and seasons. The objective of this study is to evaluate the ecology of L. pneumophila including serogroups and population densities, chemical, and atmospheric data, on cooling towers at SRS to determine whether relationships exist among water chemistry, and atmospheric conditions. The goal is to more fully understand the conditions which inhibit or encourage L. pneumophila growth and supply this data and associated recommendations to SRS Cooling Tower personnel for improved management of operation. Hopefully this information could then be used to help control L. pneumophila growth more effectively in SRS cooling tower water.

  11. Tradeoff between spoofing and jamming a cognitive radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Q; Cosman, P C; Milstein, L B

    2009-01-01

    tradeoff for cognitive radio networks,” IEEE Transactions onemulation attacks in cognitive radio networks,” IEEE Journaldeception for cognitive radio networks,” IEEE Globecom 2009,

  12. RADIO OBSERVATRIO DO ITAPETINGA, ATIBAIA, SP ZONA DE SILNCIO ELTRICO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIO OBSERVATÓRIO DO ITAPETINGA, ATIBAIA, SP ZONA DE SILÊNCIO ELÉTRICO. PROTEÇÃO DO RÁDIO uma Radio Conferência Mundial (World Adminstrative Radio Conference, WARC) patrocinada pela União

  13. A Method for Broadband Full-Duplex MIMO Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo; Liang, Ping; Ma, Yiming; Cirik, Ali C; Gao, Qian

    2012-01-01

    canceller for collocated radios,” IEEE Trans. Microwaveusing off-the shelf radios: Feasibility and first results,”Broadband Full-Duplex MIMO Radio Yingbo Hua, Fellow, IEEE,

  14. Energy Savings Accomplished by Replacing Steam Ejectors with Electric Driven Vacuum Pumps in Crude Distillation Vacuum Towers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The low cost of steam combined with the maintenance free operation of steam ejectors has assured their unquestioned use in providing the necessary vacuum for crude distillation vacuum towers. However, the cost of steam production has risen...

  15. Effects of adding wash tower effluent to Ano Liossia landfill to enhance bioreaction c by Olympia Galenianou.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galenianou, Olympia

    2006-01-01

    A theoretical study was performed on the effects of adding sulfate-rich wash tower effluent from the Athens hospital waste incinerator to the Ano Liossia landfill of Athens. The method of mass balance was used to examine ...

  16. Evidence of a Threshold Wind Speed in Tower-mounted Scatterometer Data David W. Draper and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    . Evidence of the threshold wind speed and a hysteresis effect have been observed in airship and wave tank in airship data [2]. YSCAT, an ultra-wideband (2-14 GHz) tower-mounted scat- terometer, provides significant

  17. Reliability Analysis of Cooling Towers: Influence of Rebars Corrosion on Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudret, Bruno [Electricite de France - EDF, Research and Development Division, Dpt of Materials and Mechanics of Components, Site des Renardieres, 77818 Moret-sur-Loing Cedex (France); Pendola, Maurice [PHI-MECA Engineering, 1 Allee Alan Turing, 63170 - Aubiere (France)

    2002-07-01

    Natural-draught cooling towers are used in nuclear power plants as heat exchangers. These structures are submitted to environmental loads such as wind and thermal gradients that are stochastic in nature. A probabilistic framework has been developed by EDF (Electricite de France) for assessing the durability of such structures. In this paper, the corrosion of the rebars due to concrete carbonation and the corresponding weakening of the reinforced concrete sections is considered. Due to the presence of time in the definition of the limit state function associated with the loss of serviceability of the cooling tower, time-variant reliability analysis has to be used. A novel approach is proposed to take into account the random 'initiation time', which corresponds to the time necessary for the carbonation to attain the rebars. Results are given in terms of the probability of failure of the structure over its life time. (authors)

  18. Design considerations for concentrating solar power tower systems employing molten salt.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Kolb, Gregory J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

    2010-09-01

    The Solar Two Project was a United States Department of Energy sponsored project operated from 1996 to 1999 to demonstrate the coupling of a solar power tower with a molten nitrate salt as a heat transfer media and for thermal storage. Over all, the Solar Two Project was very successful; however many operational challenges were encountered. In this work, the major problems encountered in operation of the Solar Two facility were evaluated and alternative technologies identified for use in a future solar power tower operating with a steam Rankine power cycle. Many of the major problems encountered can be addressed with new technologies that were not available a decade ago. These new technologies include better thermal insulation, analytical equipment, pumps and values specifically designed for molten nitrate salts, and gaskets resistant to thermal cycling and advanced equipment designs.

  19. The trigger and data acquisition for the NEMO-Phase 2 tower

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrino, C.; Biagi, S.; Fusco, L. A.; Margiotta, A.; Spurio, M.; Chiarusi, T.; and others

    2014-11-18

    In the framework of the Phase 2 of the NEMO neutrino telescope project, a tower with 32 optical modules is being operated since march 2013. A new scalable Trigger and Data Acquisition System (TriDAS) has been developed and extensively tested with the data from this tower. Adopting the all-data-to-shore concept, the NEMO TriDAS is optimized to deal with a continuous data-stream from off-shore to on-shore with a large bandwidth. The TriDAS consists of four computing layers: (i) data aggregation of isochronal hits from all optical modules; (ii) data filtering by means of concurrent trigger algorithms; (iii) composition of the filtered events into post-trigger files; (iv) persistent data storage. The TriDAS implementation is reported together with a review of dedicated on-line monitoring tools.

  20. Proposal for the award of a contract for the construction of cooling-tower structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the construction of reinforced-concrete cooling-tower structures at LHC Point 1. Following a market survey carried out among 79 firms in 17 Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2710/ST/LHC) was sent on 13 August 1999 to eight firms and two consortia, both consisting of three firms, in eight Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract for the construction of reinforced-concrete cooling towers at LHC Point 1 with the consortium PAT (AT), BARESEL (DE) and ZSCHOKKE LOCHER (CH), the lowest bidder complying with the specification, for an amount of 3 393 493 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The consortium has indicated the following distribution by country of the supply covered by this adjudication proposal: BE-60%, AT-18%, CH-11% and DE-11%.

  1. Proposal for the award of a contract for the upgrade of the SPS cooling towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the upgrade of the SPS cooling towers. Following a market survey carried out among 56 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2740/ST/SPS) was sent on 14 February 2000 to 10 firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received seven tenders from seven firms. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with SPIG (IT), the lowest bidder, for the upgrade of the SPS cooling towers, for an amount of 1 073 757 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. SPIG has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: IT-73%; FI-24%; DE-3%.

  2. Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 131, Radio tomography of the ionosphere: Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raphaël

    Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1­31, Radio tomography of the ionosphere: Analysis AND CRESPON: 4D IONOSPHERE TOMOGRAPHY After analysing the forward and inverse problems of radio tomography, the development of Faraday rotation measurements on-board satellites opens the way to magnetospheric radio

  3. Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 15, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1­5, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection of Extended Sources with an Interferometer Geoffrey C. Bower Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a significant problem for current

  4. Final Project Report Modulate of Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    Final Project Report Modulate of Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio Department of Electrical-Introduction: Internet radio (also known as Webcasting) is becoming more and more popular. Especially that it covers for people traveling all the time or living away from there home country, internet radio helps them keep

  5. Thermodynamic modeling and optimization of a screw compressor chiller and cooling tower system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graves, Rhett David

    2004-09-30

    , absorption, thermoelectric, and thermoacoustic (Gordon and Ng 1995). Chiller models have been used to predict the performance of thermal storage 6 systems (Henze et al. 1997) and whole chiller plant systems (Lau et al. 1985). Chiller models have also been... used to aid in the development of control algorithms for chiller plants (Flake et al. 1997). There have been several attempts to generate an ?optimal? operating scheme using the Whillier cooling tower model, a chiller model, or a combination of both...

  6. Workers Safely Tear Down Towers at Manhattan Project Site | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'SEnergy Safely Tear Down Towers at Manhattan Project

  7. Economic evaluation of solar-only and hybrid power towers using molten salt technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Several hybrid and solar-only configurations for molten-salt power towers were evaluated with a simple economic model, appropriate for screening analysis. The solar specific aspects of these plants were highlighted. In general, hybrid power towers were shown to be economically superior to solar-only plants with the same field size. Furthermore, the power-booster hybrid approach was generally preferred over the fuel-saver hybrid approach. Using today`s power tower technology, economic viability for the solar power-boost occurs at fuel costs in the neighborhood of $2.60/MBtu to $4.40/ MBtu (low heating value) depending on whether coal-based or gas-turbine-based technology is being offset. The cost Of CO[sub 2] avoidance was also calculated for solar cases in which the fossil fuel cost was too low for solar to be economically viable. The avoidance costs are competitive with other proposed methods of removing CO[sub 2] from fossil-fired power plants.

  8. NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC): M2 Tower; Boulder, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jager, D.; Andreas, A.

    1996-09-24

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado, is a world-class research facility managed by NREL for the U.S. Department of Energy. NWTC researchers work with members of the wind energy industry to advance wind power technologies that lower the cost of wind energy through research and development of state-of-the-art wind turbine designs. NREL's Measurement and Instrument Data Center provides data from NWTC's M2 tower which are derived from instruments mounted on or near an 82 meter (270 foot) meteorological tower located at the western edge of the NWTC site and about 11 km (7 miles) west of Broomfield, and approximately 8 km (5 miles) south of Boulder, Colorado. The data represent the mean value of readings taken every two seconds and averaged over one minute. The wind speed and direction are measured at six heights on the tower and air temperature is measured at three heights. The dew point temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, totalized liquid precipitation, and global solar radiation are also available.

  9. Molten Salt Power Tower Cost Model for the System Advisor Model (SAM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, C. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a component-based cost model developed for molten-salt power tower solar power plants. The cost model was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), using data from several prior studies, including a contracted analysis from WorleyParsons Group, which is included herein as an Appendix. The WorleyParsons' analysis also estimated material composition and mass for the plant to facilitate a life cycle analysis of the molten salt power tower technology. Details of the life cycle assessment have been published elsewhere. The cost model provides a reference plant that interfaces with NREL's System Advisor Model or SAM. The reference plant assumes a nominal 100-MWe (net) power tower running with a nitrate salt heat transfer fluid (HTF). Thermal energy storage is provided by direct storage of the HTF in a two-tank system. The design assumes dry-cooling. The model includes a spreadsheet that interfaces with SAM via the Excel Exchange option in SAM. The spreadsheet allows users to estimate the costs of different-size plants and to take into account changes in commodity prices. This report and the accompanying Excel spreadsheet can be downloaded at https://sam.nrel.gov/cost.

  10. NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC): M2 Tower; Boulder, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Jager, D.; Andreas, A.

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado, is a world-class research facility managed by NREL for the U.S. Department of Energy. NWTC researchers work with members of the wind energy industry to advance wind power technologies that lower the cost of wind energy through research and development of state-of-the-art wind turbine designs. NREL's Measurement and Instrument Data Center provides data from NWTC's M2 tower which are derived from instruments mounted on or near an 82 meter (270 foot) meteorological tower located at the western edge of the NWTC site and about 11 km (7 miles) west of Broomfield, and approximately 8 km (5 miles) south of Boulder, Colorado. The data represent the mean value of readings taken every two seconds and averaged over one minute. The wind speed and direction are measured at six heights on the tower and air temperature is measured at three heights. The dew point temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, totalized liquid precipitation, and global solar radiation are also available.

  11. Philippe Zarka Recherche de transitoires radio associs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    LOFAR Search of radio transient counterparts for gravitational waves with LOFAR IVème Ecole de PhysiquePhilippe Zarka LESIA Recherche de transitoires radio associés à des ondes gravitationnelles avec des Astroparticules "Ondes gravitationnelles et Multi-Messagers", OHP, 2013 #12;· RADIO COUNTERPARTS

  12. Secure Location Verification Using Radio Broadcast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    , exploits the difference between propagation speeds of radio and sound waves to estimate the position1 Secure Location Verification Using Radio Broadcast Adnan Vora and Mikhail Nesterenko Abstract of the prover. In this paper, we propose a solution that leverages the broadcast nature of the radio signal

  13. Secure Location Verification Using Radio Broadcast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterenko, Mikhail

    the difference between propagation speeds of radio and sound waves to estimate the position of the proverSecure Location Verification Using Radio Broadcast Adnan Vora and Mikhail Nesterenko Computer. In this paper, we propose a solution that leverages the broadcast nature of the radio signal emitted

  14. METHODS OF RADIO-FREQUENCY CURRENT DRIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -670 Radio-frequency waves can penetrate thermonuclear plasmas, depositing momentum and energy with great. INTRODUCTION Using radio-frequency (rf) waves to drive the toroidal current in tokamak reactors is attractiveMETHODS OF RADIO-FREQUENCY CURRENT DRIVE N. J. FISCH* Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

  15. Radio Wave Emission from the Outer Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole

    Radio Wave Emission from the Outer Planets P. Zarka LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, Meudon #12;All outer planets) produce intense nonthermal radio emissions potentially interesting remote sensing tool of magnetospheric plasma(s) we can "see" magnetospheres directly, but do we understand what we see ? #12;"Radio

  16. Telecommunications Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio 1. Send completed form to Mail Stop of submitting this form, call 979.845.1020. In the event the radio is lost or broken, the department will be charged for a replacement. If the radio malfunctions, please contact Telecommunications. Texas A

  17. FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waddington, Ian

    FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY Deborah B. Haarsma 1 , R. Bruce Partridge 1 , Ian 85287­1504 USA Abstract. Faint extragalactic radio sources provide important information about the global history of star formation. Sensitive radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and other fields

  18. Analysis of modulation scheme using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 Analysis of modulation scheme using GNU Radio By: Zeyu long Outline Introduce Project Goal QPSK CPFSK Resolute Project conclusion Project challenges Reference #12;2 Introduce (1) GNU radio: One of the most popular applications of Software Defined Radios Use C++ to write blocks Use python to connect

  19. Radio Network Planning with Combinatorial Optimisation Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Radio Network Planning with Combinatorial Optimisation Algorithms P. Calégari, F. Guidec, P. Kuonen@c2r.tdf.fr Group: Software tools Abstract: Future UMTS radio planning engineers will face difficult, a software for the optimisation of the radio network is under development. Two mathematical models

  20. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  1. Physics 343 Observational Radio Astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Andrew J.

    is spending this week in Cape Town, South Africa, where he is helping lead the first facetoface meeting is fair game. Previous years: "Current and Future Radio Astronomy Projects" "The Search: measuring a telecope's beam #2: calibrating a telescope's response; measuring solar variability #3

  2. Cognitive Radio and Smart Grid Dr. Robert C. Qiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Cognitive Radio and Smart Grid Dr. Robert C. Qiu Professor Wireless Networking Systems Laboratory RadioCognitive Radio 2 2/23/2010 #12;Outline Cognitive Radio Cognitive Radio @ Tennessee Tech University Spectrum Sensing and Wideband Spectrum Sensing Cognitive Radio Networks and Testbeds Cognitive

  3. Relic Radio Bubbles and Cluster Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David S. De Young

    2003-05-09

    Recent suggestions that buoyant radio emitting cavities in the intracluster medium can cause significant reheating of cooling flows are re-examined when the effects of the intracluster magnetic field are included. Expansion of the cavity creates a tangential magnetic field in the ICM around the radio source, and this field can suppress instabilities that mix the ICM and the radio source. The onset of instability can be delayed for ~100 million years, and calculation of the actual reheating time shows that this may not occur until about 1Gy after creation of the cavity. These results may explain why the relic radio bubbles are still intact at such late times, and it may imply that the role of radio sources in reheating the ICM should be re-examined. In addition, the existence of relic radio cavities may also imply that the particle content of radio source lobes is primarily electrons and protons rather than electrons and positrons.

  4. Fast Radio Bursts and Radio Transients from Black Hole Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiara M. F. Mingarelli; Janna Levin; T. Joseph W. Lazio

    2015-11-09

    Most black holes (BHs) will absorb a neutron star (NS) companion fully intact, without tidal disruption, suggesting the pair will remain dark to telescopes. Even without tidal disruption, electromagnetic luminosity is generated from the battery phase of the binary when the BH interacts with the NS magnetic field. Originally the luminosity was expected in high-energy X-rays or gamma-rays, however we conjecture that some of the battery power is emitted in the radio bandwidth. While the luminosity and timescale are suggestive of fast radio bursts (FRBs; millisecond-scale radio transients) NS--BH coalescence rates are too low to make these a primary FRB source. Instead, we propose the transients form a FRB sub-population, distinguishable by a double peak with a precursor. The rapid ramp-up in luminosity manifests as a precursor to the burst which is $20\\%-80\\%$ as luminous, given 0.5~ms timing resolution. The main burst is from the peak luminosity before merger. The post-merger burst follows from the NS magnetic field migration to the BH, causing a shock. NS--BH pairs are especially desirable for ground-based gravitational wave (GW) observatories since the pair might not otherwise be detected, with electromagnetic counterparts greatly augmenting the scientific leverage beyond the GW signal. Valuably, the electromagnetic signal can break degeneracies in the parameters encoded in the GW as well as probe the NS magnetic field strength, yielding insights into open problems in NS magnetic field decay.

  5. Fast Radio Bursts and Radio Transients from Black Hole Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mingarelli, Chiara M F; Lazio, T Joseph W

    2015-01-01

    Most black holes (BHs) will absorb a neutron star (NS) companion fully intact, without tidal disruption, suggesting the pair will remain dark to telescopes. Even without tidal disruption, electromagnetic luminosity is generated from the battery phase of the binary when the BH interacts with the NS magnetic field. Originally the luminosity was expected in high-energy X-rays or gamma-rays, however we conjecture that some of the battery power is emitted in the radio bandwidth. While the luminosity and timescale are suggestive of fast radio bursts (FRBs; millisecond-scale radio transients) NS--BH coalescence rates are too low to make these a primary FRB source. Instead, we propose the transients form a FRB sub-population, distinguishable by a double peak with a precursor. The rapid ramp-up in luminosity manifests as a precursor to the burst which is $20\\%-80\\%$ as luminous, given 0.5~ms timing resolution. The main burst is from the peak luminosity before merger. The post-merger burst follows from the NS magnetic ...

  6. Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance- Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants all Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!! 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1990-01-01

    TOWER PERFORMANCE REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS, CHEMICAL PLANTS, AND POWER PLANTS ALL HAVE A RESOURCE QUIETLY AWAITING EXPLOITATION - COLD WATER!! ROBERT BURGER President Burger and Associates, Inc. Dallas, Texas Cooling towers, because... of their seeming simplicity, are usually orphans of the facilities operation. We are all aware that cooling towers are the step-children of the chemical process plant, electric power generating station, and refrigeration system. While engineers are pretty...

  7. Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Civil Engineering Work on the Extensions to the Cooling Towers at LEP Points 2, 4, 6 and 8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1991-01-01

    Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Civil Engineering Work on the Extensions to the Cooling Towers at LEP Points 2, 4, 6 and 8

  8. Imaging algorithms in radio interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Sault; T. A. Oosterloo

    2007-01-08

    The paper reviews progress in imaging in radio interferometry for the period 1993-1996. Unlike an optical telescope, the basic measurements of a radio interferometer (correlations between antennas) are indirectly related to a sky brightness image. In a real sense, algorithms and computers are the lenses of a radio interferometer. In the last 20 years, whereas interferometer hardware advances have resulted in improvements of a factor of a few, algorithm and computer advances have resulted in orders of magnitude improvement in image quality. Developing these algorithms has been a fruitful and comparatively inexpensive method of improving the performance of existing telescopes, and has made some newer telescopes possible. In this paper, we review recent developments in the algorithms used in the imaging part of the reduction process. What constitutes an `imaging algorithm'? Whereas once there was a steady `forward' progression in the reduction process of editing, calibrating, transforming and, finally, deconvolving, this is no longer true. The introduction of techniques such as self-calibration, and algorithms that go directly from visibilities to final images, have made the dividing lines less clear. Although we briefly consider self-calibration, for the purposes of this paper calibration issues are generally excluded. Most attention will be directed to the steps which form final images from the calibrated visibilities.

  9. The Host Galaxies of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2001-03-15

    I review our knowledge of the properties of the host galaxies of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, both in comparison to each other and in the context of the general galaxy population. It is now clear that the hosts of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars with M_V 10^9 solar masses appears to be a necessary (although perhaps not sufficient) condition for the production of radio jets of sufficient power to produce an FRII radio source within a massive galaxy halo.

  10. Conceptual Design Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Tower Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Chad

    2002-07-18

    The main objective of this work was to develop a conceptual design and engineering prototype for the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) tower structure. This thesis describes the conceptual design of a GLAST tower and the fabrication and testing of a prototype tower tray. The requirements were that the structure had to support GLAST's delicate silicon strip detector array through ground handling, launch and in orbit operations as well as provide for thermal and electrical pathways. From the desired function and the given launch vehicle for the spacecraft that carries the GLAST detector, an efficient structure was designed which met the requirements. This thesis developed in three stages: design, fabrication, and testing. During the first stage, a general set of specifications was used to develop the initial design, which was then analyzed and shown to meet or exceed the requirements. The second stage called for the fabrication of prototypes to prove manufacturability and gauge cost and time estimates for the total project. The last step called for testing the prototypes to show that they performed as the analysis had shown and prove that the design met the requirements. As a spacecraft engineering exercise, this project required formulating a solution based on engineering judgment, analyzing the solution using advanced engineering techniques, then proving the validity of the design and analysis by the manufacturing and testing of prototypes. The design described here met all the requirements set out by the needs of the experiment and operating concerns. This strawman design is not intended to be the complete or final design for the GLAST instrument structure, but instead examines some of the main challenges involved and demonstrates that there are solutions to them. The purpose of these tests was to prove that there are solutions to the basic mechanical, electrical and thermal problems presented with the GLAST project.

  11. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from themore »receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (?sel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ?sel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.« less

  12. A Single Tower Configuration of the Modular Gamma Box Counter System - 13392

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, K.; Nakazawa, D.; Francalangia, J.; Gonzalez, H.

    2013-07-01

    Canberra's Standard Gamma Box Counter System is designed to perform accurate quantitative assays of gamma emitting nuclides for a wide range of large containers including B-25 crates and ISO shipping containers. Using a modular building-block approach, the system offers tremendous flexibility for a variety of measurement situations with wide ranges of sample activities and throughput requirements, as well as the opportunity to modify the configuration for other applications at a later date. The typical configuration consists of two opposing towers each equipped with two high purity germanium detectors, and an automated container trolley. This paper presents a modified configuration, consisting of a single tower placed inside a measurement trailer with three detector assemblies, allowing for additional vertical segmentation as well as a viewing a container outside the trailer through the trailer wall. An automatic liquid nitrogen fill system is supplied for each of the detectors. The use of a forklift to move the container for horizontal segmentation is accommodated by creating an additional operational and calibration set-up in the NDA 2000 software to allow for the operator to rotate the container and assay the opposite side, achieving the same sensitivity as a comparable two-tower system. This Segmented Gamma Box Counter System retains the core technologies and design features of the standard configuration. The detector assemblies are shielded to minimize interference from environmental and plant background, and are collimated to provide segmentation of the container. The assembly positions can also be modified in height and distance from the container. The ISOCS calibration software provides for a flexible approach to providing the calibrations for a variety of measurement geometries. The NDA 2000 software provides seamless operation with the current configuration, handling the data acquisition and analysis. In this paper, an overview of this system is discussed, along with the measured performance results, calibration methodology and verification, and minimum detectable activity levels. (authors)

  13. High temperature performance of high-efficiency, multi-layer solar selective coatings for tower applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, M. H.; Tirawat, R.; Kessinger, K. A.; Ndione, P. F.

    2015-05-01

    The roadmap to next-generation concentrating solar power plants anticipates a progression to central towers with operating temperatures in excess of 650°C. These higher temperatures are required to drive higher power-cycle efficiencies, resulting in lower cost energy. However, these conditions also place a greater burden on the materials making up the receiver. Any novel absorber material developed for next-generation receivers must be stable in air, cost effective, and survive thousands of heating and cooling cycles. The collection efficiency of a power tower plant can be increased if the energy absorbed by the receiver is maximized while the heat loss from the receiver to the environment is minimized. Thermal radiation losses can be significant (>7% annual energy loss) with receivers at temperatures above 650°C. We present progress toward highly efficient and durable solar selective absorbers (SSAs) intended for operating temperatures from 650°C to 1000°C. Selective efficiency (?sel) is defined as the energy retained by the absorber, accounting for both absorptance and emittance, relative to the energy incident on the surface. The low emittance layers of multilayer SSAs are binary compounds of refractory metals whose material properties indicate that coatings formed of these materials should be oxidation resistant in air to 800-1200°C. On this basis, we initially developed a solar selective coating for parabolic troughs. This development has been successfully extended to meet the absorptance and emittance objectives for the more demanding, high temperature regime. We show advancement in coating materials, processing and designs resulting in the initial attainment of target efficiencies ?sel > 0.91 for proposed tower conditions. Additionally, spectral measurements show that these coatings continue to perform at targeted levels after cycling to temperatures of 1000°C in environments of nitrogen and forming gas.

  14. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumber JumpConferenceCoolingTowerWaterUseSummerGross

  15. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGross | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceIIInformationEnergyReportNumberCoolingTowerWaterUseWinterGross Jump to:

  16. From: No Towers To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: No NIETC"s

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDan O"Hagan To:JMulveny,No Towers To: Congestion

  17. High-interactivity radio : using the Internet to enhance community among radio listeners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easton, Joellen

    2005-01-01

    (cont.) This thesis examines the evidence of community among listeners to three radio programs, who gather online to discuss radio programming in blogs, message boards and discussion forums provided by those programs. The ...

  18. Secure Software-Defined Radio Project

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project results will include the following: * Radio platform that secures "last mile" wireless communications to remote utility sites and provides superior versatility and...

  19. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  20. Radio-frequency power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Richard G

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the main types of radio-frequency power amplifiers which are, or may be, used for high-power hadron accelerators. It covers tetrodes, inductive output tubes, klystrons and magnetrons with power outputs greater than 10 kW continuous wave or 100 kW pulsed at frequencies from 50 MHz to 30 GHz. Factors affecting the satisfactory operation of amplifiers include cooling, matching and protection circuits are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the state of the art for the different technologies.

  1. An evaluation of possible next-generation high temperature molten-salt power towers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, Gregory J.

    2011-12-01

    Since completion of the Solar Two molten-salt power tower demonstration in 1999, the solar industry has been developing initial commercial-scale projects that are 3 to 14 times larger. Like Solar Two, these initial plants will power subcritical steam-Rankine cycles using molten salt with a temperature of 565 C. The main question explored in this study is whether there is significant economic benefit to develop future molten-salt plants that operate at a higher receiver outlet temperature. Higher temperatures would allow the use of supercritical steam cycles that achieve an improved efficiency relative to today's subcritical cycle ({approx}50% versus {approx}42%). The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of a 565 C subcritical baseline plant was compared with possible future-generation plants that operate at 600 or 650 C. The analysis suggests that {approx}8% reduction in LCOE can be expected by raising salt temperature to 650 C. However, most of that benefit can be achieved by raising the temperature to only 600 C. Several other important insights regarding possible next-generation power towers were also drawn: (1) the evaluation of receiver-tube materials that are capable of higher fluxes and temperatures, (2) suggested plant reliability improvements based on a detailed evaluation of the Solar Two experience, and (3) a thorough evaluation of analysis uncertainties.

  2. Comparison of Triton SODAR Data to Meteorological Tower Wind Measurement Data in Hebei Province, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuechun, Y.; Jixue, W.; Hongfang, W.; Guimin, L.; Bolin, Y.; Scott, G.; Elliott, D.; Kline, D.

    2012-01-01

    With the increased interest in remote sensing of wind information in recent years, it is important to determine the reliability and accuracy of new wind measurement technologies if they are to replace or supplement conventional tower-based measurements. In view of this, HydroChina Corporation and the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted a comparative test near a wind farm in Hebei Province, China. We present the results of an analysis characterizing the measurement performance of a state-of-the-art Sound Detection and Ranging (sodar) device when compared to a traditional tower measurement program. NREL performed the initial analysis of a three-month period and sent the results to HydroChina. When another month of data became available, HydroChina and their consultant Beijing Millenium Engineering Software (MLN) repeated NREL's analysis on the complete data set, also adding sensitivity analysis for temperature, humidity, and wind speed (Section 6). This report presents the results of HydroChina's final analysis of the four-month period.

  3. Cognitive Radio Network {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    2010 Cognitive Radio Network , , {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr Analysis of Average Opportunities in Cognitive Radio Networks Seowoo Jang, Saewoong Bahk INMC, EECS, Seoul National University Cognitive Radio Network . Primary user

  4. RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE IN THE FEL SECTION OF A TBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuenning, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    Amplitude Control of the Radio Frequency Wave in the Two-Madison, WI, August 21-27, 1986 RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE IN THEAC03-76SF00098 LBL- 223Pl RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE IN THE FEL

  5. Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    to explore and exploit the free spectrum. Spectrum analyzer is used to emulate cognitive radio to do spectrum should keep silent; otherwise, cognitive radio can access this spectrum. In this paper, spectrum analyzer- rithm of sensing spectrum and transmission schemes [6]. Pre- viously, spectrum analyzer was controlled

  6. Radio Tomographic Imaging for Ambient Assisted Living

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwari, Neal

    radio device. We describe a technique named radio tomographic imaging (RTI), which produces real of people. People's locations are inferred from the estimated RTI images. We show results from a long of the domestic environment, we introduce methods to make the RTI system self-calibrating. Experimental results

  7. COLLOQUIUM: Type II Solar Radio Bursts: From Fundamental Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coherent radio emission stimulated by shocks. Type II bursts are widely accepted to be radio emission produced at the electron plasma frequency andor twice that frequency...

  8. Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Simulations Run at NERSC Support Fusion Experiments at MIT, General Atomics...

  9. Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced...

  10. Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel Consumption, Wins R&D 100 Award Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel Consumption, Wins R&D...

  11. A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forest Service, 271 Mast Road, Durham, NH 03824 USA.25 #12;RANDOM ERRORS IN ENERGY AND CO2 FLUX1 A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3 4 Forest Service, 271 Mast Road, Durham, NH 03824, USA.11 3 LI-COR Biosciences, Inc., 4421 Superior Street

  12. Constraints on Carbon Monoxide Emissions Based on Tall Tower Measurements in the U.S. Upper Midwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Constraints on Carbon Monoxide Emissions Based on Tall Tower Measurements in the U.S. Upper Midwest-up emission estimates in response to top-down constraints. 1. INTRODUCTION Carbon monoxide (CO) is a precursor is emitted during the combustion of biomass and fossil fuel and produced photochemically from the oxidation

  13. Long term monitoring of the optical background in the Capo Passero deep-sea site with the NEMO tower prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Ameli, F; Anghinolfi, M; Ardid, M; Barbarino, G; Barbarito, E; Barbato, F C T; Beverini, N; Biagi, S; Biagioni, A; Bouhadef, B; Bozza, C; Cacopardo, G; Calamai, M; Calí, C; Calvo, D; Capone, A; Caruso, F; Ceres, A; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Cocimano, R; Coniglione, R; Costa, M; Cuttone, G; D'Amato, C; D'Amico, A; De Bonis, G; De Luca, V; Deniskina, N; De Rosa, G; di Capua, F; Distefano, C; Enzenhöfer, A; Fermani, P; Ferrara, G; Flaminio, V; Fusco, L A; Garufi, F; Giordano, V; Gmerk, A; Grasso, R; Grella, G; Hugon, C; Imbesi, M; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Leismüller, K P; Leonora, E; Litrico, P; Alvarez, C D Llorens; Lonardo, A; Longhitano, F; Presti, D Lo; Maccioni, E; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martini, A; Masullo, R; Migliozzi, P; Migneco, E; Miraglia, A; Mollo, C M; Mongelli, M; Morganti, M; Musico, P; Musumeci, M; Nicolau, C A; Orlando, A; Orzelli, A; Papaleo, R; Pellegrino, C; Pellegriti, M G; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Pugliatti, C; Pulvirenti, S; Raffaelli, F; Randazzo, N; Real, D; Riccobene, G; Rovelli, A; Saldaña, M; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Sciacca, V; Sgura, I; Simeone, F; Sipala, V; Speziale, F; Spitaleri, A; Spurio, M; Stellacci, S M; Taiuti, M; Terreni, G; Trasatti, L; Trovato, A; Ventura, C; Vicini, P; Viola, S; Vivolo, D

    2015-01-01

    The NEMO Phase-2 tower is the first detector which was operated underwater for more than one year at the "record" depth of 3500 m. It was designed and built within the framework of the NEMO (NEutrino Mediterranean Observatory) project. The 380 m high tower was successfully installed in March 2013 80 km offshore Capo Passero (Italy). This is the first prototype operated on the site where the italian node of the KM3NeT neutrino telescope will be built. The installation and operation of the NEMO Phase-2 tower has proven the functionality of the infrastructure and the operability at 3500 m depth. A more than one year long monitoring of the deep water characteristics of the site has been also provided. In this paper the infrastructure and the tower structure and instrumentation are described. The results of long term optical background measurements are presented. The rates show stable and low baseline values, compatible with the contribution of 40K light emission, with a small percentage of light bursts due to bio...

  14. Environmental assessment of air quality, noise and cooling tower drift from the Jersey City Total Energy Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.T.; Kolb, J.O.

    1980-06-01

    This assessment covers three specific effects from the operation of the Total Energy (TE) demonstration: (1) air quality from combustion emissions of 600 kW diesel engines and auxiliary boilers fueled with No. 2 distillate oil, (2) noise levels from TE equipment operation, (3) cooling tower drift from two, 2220 gpm, forced-draft cooling towers. For the air quality study, measurements were performed to determine both the combustion emission rates and ground-level air quality at the Demonstration site. Stack analysis of NO/sub x/, SO/sub 2/, CO, particulates, and total hydrocarbons characterized emission rates over a range of operating conditions. Ground-level air quality was monitored during two six-week periods during the summer and winter of 1977. The noise study was performed by measuring sound levels in db(A) in the area within approximately 60 m of the CEB. The noise survey investigated the effects on noise distribution of different wind conditions, time of day or night, and condition of doors - open or closed - near the diesel engines in the CEB. In the cooling tower study, drift emission characteristics were measured to quantify the drift emission before and after cleaning of the tower internals to reduce fallout of large drift droplets in the vicinity of the CEB.

  15. APS Forum on Education Fall 2008 Newsletter Page 22 Away from the ivory tower: Real challenges teaching high

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinberg, Richard N.

    #12;APS Forum on Education Fall 2008 Newsletter Page 22 Away from the ivory tower: Real challenges teaching high school physics in an urban environment Richard Steinberg For the 2007-08 school year, I took a sabbatical and became a full time high school physics teacher in a public high

  16. The Torrioni di Rialba (Abbadia Lariana -LC, Italy) is a rock tower-like conglomerate divided by a system of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alippi, Cesare

    is a hybrid wireless-wired sensor network that inspects the insurgence of micro-cracks within the rock (mems is composed by a Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) that measures changes in the structure of the tower of the sensor networks hence reducing the need of in-situ maintenance. All modules composing the monitoring

  17. Restoration and repair of 30-year old cooling towers at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Phase I. Draft 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Early in 1980, a comprehensive reliability study was made to ascertain the ability of the present 30-year old recirculating water system to meet the anticipated load demand through the year 2000. The findings and recommendations of this study were used as a guide to schedule uprating and repairs. This paper deals with the underground distribution system and cooling tower repairs.

  18. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lochner, Michelle; Zwart, Jonathan T L; Smirnov, Oleg; Bassett, Bruce A; Oozeer, Nadeem; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) New telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will push into a new sensitivity regime and expose systematics, such as direction-dependent effects, that could previously be ignored. Current methods for handling such systematics rely on alternating best estimates of instrumental calibration and models of the underlying sky, which can lead to inaccurate uncertainty estimates and biased results because such methods ignore any correlations between parameters. These deconvolution algorithms produce a single image that is assumed to be a true representation of the sky, when in fact it is just one realisation of an infinite ensemble of images compatible with the noise in the data. In contrast, here we report a Bayesian formalism that simultaneously infers both systematics and science. Our technique, Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO), determines all parameters directly from the raw data, bypassing image-making entirely, by sampling from the joint posterior probability distribution. Thi...

  19. Fuzzy Logic Application for Optimization of the Cooling Towers Control System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanc, D

    2000-01-01

    The control system for the SPS-BA6 cooling towers station is considered in order to introduce the concept of a multivariable process. Multivariable control means the maintenace of several controlled variables at independent set points. In a single-variable system, to keep the single process variables within their critical values is considered a rather simple operation. In a complex multivariable system, the determination of the optimal operation point results in a combination of all set values of the variables. Control of a multivariable system requires therefore a more complex analysis. As the solution based on a mathematical model of the process is far beyond acceptable complexity, most mathematical models involve extensive simplifications and linearizations to optimize the resulting controllers. In this report the author will demonstrate how fuzzy logic might provide elegant and efficient solutions in the design of multivariable control based on experimental results rather than on mathematical models.

  20. Utility-Scale Power Tower Solar Systems: Performance Acceptance Test Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kearney, D.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of these Guidelines is to provide direction for conducting performance acceptance testing for large power tower solar systems that can yield results of a high level of accuracy consistent with good engineering knowledge and practice. The recommendations have been developed under a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract and reviewed by stakeholders representing concerned organizations and interests throughout the concentrating solar power (CSP) community. An earlier NREL report provided similar guidelines for parabolic trough systems. These Guidelines recommend certain methods, instrumentation, equipment operating requirements, and calculation methods. When tests are run in accordance with these Guidelines, we expect that the test results will yield a valid indication of the actual performance of the tested equipment. But these are only recommendations--to be carefully considered by the contractual parties involved in the Acceptance Tests--and we expect that modifications may be required to fit the particular characteristics of a specific project.

  1. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the Extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kale, Ruta; Cassano, Rossella; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, sandro; Dallacasa, Daniele; Zucca, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment on their radio properties. To decouple the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment in their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS). We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which was divided into two classes, depending on the dynamical state of the host cluster, i.e. merging (M) and relaxed (R). Among the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio-loud, and 31 are radio--quiet. The radio-loud sources are located favourably located in relaxed clusters (71\\%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, mostly located in merging systems (81\\%). The fraction...

  2. Gravitational Wave Emission from Galactic Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. de Freitas Pacheco; J. E. Horvath

    1997-04-15

    We consider in this work continuous gravitational wave (GW) emission from non-axisymmetric radio pulsars. We treat in some detail the observational issues related to the known radio pulsar sample with the aim of unveiling the actual number of sources contributing to GW, which are likely to be the main contributors of GWs. It is shown that the operation of spheroidal GW detectors and full-size interferometers could detect this component of the radiation or impose useful limits on the effective oblateness of young radio pulsars.

  3. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Ronald W. (Morgan Hill, CA); Carrender, Curtis Lee (Morgan Hill, CA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA); Steele, Kerry D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-02-13

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  4. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, Quentin A. (Bloomingdale, IL); Miller, Harold W. (Winfield, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  5. Exploiting Radio Irregularity in Wireless Networks for Automated People Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T, suffers from radio irregularity ­ a phenomenon referring to radio waves being selectively absorbedExploiting Radio Irregularity in Wireless Networks for Automated People Counting Wei-Chuan Lin. Radio irregularity is often regarded as a problem in wireless communications but, with the envisioned

  6. Historical Radio Astronomy Working Group IAU General Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    the observed radio waves and the stellar atmospheres research. The origin of the radio emission observed be present in the interstellar space to account for a free-free emission of the radio waves. In 1947 UnsöldProgram Historical Radio Astronomy Working Group IAU General Assembly Beijing, China Room 408

  7. A brief Overview of the GSM Radio Interface Thierry Turletti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turletti, Thierry

    Networking. Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Radio Transmission Aspects 2 3 From Speech to Radio Waves 4 3A brief Overview of the GSM Radio Interface Thierry Turletti Telemedia Networks and Systems Group to the GSM­900 radio interface. It is not exhaustive and it is restricted to the TraOEc Channel

  8. RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES The secret are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need until it is second nature. Practicing proper day-to-day radio procedures will make emergency radio

  9. Energy Efficient Transmissions In MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Energy Efficient Transmissions In MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks Liqun Fu The Institute of Network@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract-In this paper, we consider energy efficient transmis sions for MIMO cognitive radio networks. Index Terms-Cognitive radio networks, MIMO, Energy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive radio, which

  10. Power plant site evaluation, Brandon Shores Site. Volume 3: fogging potential for revised cooling tower structures - addendum to PPSE 1-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshioka, G.A.; Davis, E.A.

    1982-08-01

    Brandon Shores Units 1 and 2, currently under construction by Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG and E), were originally to have had multi-cell rectangular banks of wet/dry cooling towers. BG and E recently proposed that the Unit 2 cooling tower design be changed to a circular configuration. The Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory has undertaken to analyze the potential for the Brandon Shores Unit 1 tower (with dry section eliminated) to produce fog at Fort Smallwood Road. Pessimistic assumptions have been made, and a low frequency of expected fogging on the road has been demonstrated in spite of these assumptions.

  11. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  12. Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

  13. Observations of Radio Giant Pulses with GAVRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Radio giant pulses provide a unique opportunity to study the pulsar radio emission mechanism in exquisite detail. Previous studies have revealed a wide range of properties and phenomena, including extraordinarily high brightness temperatures, sub-nanosecond emission features, and banded dynamic spectra. New measurements of giant pulse characteristics can help guide and test theoretical emission models. To this end, an extensive observation campaign has begun which will provide more than 500 hours on the Crab with a 34-meter antenna located in California, USA. The observations are being done as part of an educational outreach program called the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT). This antenna has a novel wide bandwidth receiver which provides up to 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the range of 2.5 to 14 GHz. These observations will provide detailed information about the variability, amplitude distribution, and detailed frequency structure of radio giant pulses. In addition, a database of pulses ...

  14. Antenna design for ultra wideband radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Johnna, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    The recent allocation of the 3.1-10.6 GHz spectrum by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) for Ultra Wideband (UWB) radio applications has presented a myriad of exciting opportunities and challenges for design in ...

  15. Polarimetric observations at low radio frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farnes, Jamie S.

    2012-10-09

    . An interferometric polarisation mode has recently become available at the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). A detailed analysis of the GMRT’s instrumental response is presented. The findings are used to create a polarisation pipeline, which in combination...

  16. Low Luminosity Radio Loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Giovannini; M. Giroletti

    2007-08-30

    I review observational properties of low power radio loud AGN. High resolution VLBI observations allow the estimate of the jet velocity and orientation with respect to the line of sight and the determination of the Doppler factor. These data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. New results on 1144+35, a giant radio source with superluminal motion are shown in detail.

  17. Radio signals of particle dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Regis

    2011-12-08

    In most of particle dark matter (DM) models, the DM candidate injects sizable fluxes of high-energy electrons and positrons through its annihilations or decays. Emitted in regions with magnetic field, they in turn give raise to a synchrotron radiation, which typically covers radio and infrared bands. We discuss the possibility of detecting signatures of Galactic and extra-galactic DM in the total intensity and small-scale anisotropies of the radio background.

  18. Historic American engineering record. Nevada national security site, Bren Tower Complex. Written historical and descriptive data and field records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Susan R.; Goldenberg, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    The BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower Complex is significant for its role in the history of nuclear testing, radiation dosimetry studies, and early field testing of the Strategic Missile Defense System designs. At the time it was built in 1962, the 1,527 ft (465 m) BREN Tower was the tallest structure west of the Mississippi River and exceeded the height of the Empire State Building by 55 ft (17 m). It remains the tallest ever erected specifically for scientific purposes and was designed and built to facilitate the experimental dosimetry studies necessary for the development of accurate radiation dose rates for the survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The tower was a key component of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission’s (ABCC) mission to predict the health effects of radiation exposure. Moved to its current location in 1966, the crucial dosimetry studies continued with Operation HENRE (High Energy Neutron Reactions Experiment). These experiments and the data they generated became the basis for a dosimetry system called the Tentative 1965 Dose or more commonly the T65D model. Used to estimate radiation doses received by individuals, the T65D model was applied until the mid-1980s when it was replaced by a new dosimetry system known as DS86 based on the Monte Carlo method of dose rate calculation. However, the BREN Tower data are still used for verification of the validity of the DS86 model. In addition to its importance in radiation heath effects research, the BREN Tower Complex is also significant for its role in the Brilliant Pebbles research project, a major component of the Strategic Defense Initiative popularly known as the “Star Wars” Initiative. Instigated under the Reagan Administration, the program’s purpose was to develop a system to shield the United States and allies from a ballistic missile attack. The centerpiece of the Strategic Defense System was space-based, kinetic-kill vehicles. In 1991, BREN Tower was used for the tether tests of the Brilliant Pebbles prototype vehicle at the earth’s surface prior to the more costly space testing program. The success of these tests established the Brilliant Pebbles program as an essential component of America’s space-based missile defense system even after the dismantling of the Soviet Union. Data from the Brilliant Pebbles research program continues to inspire current missile defense system research (Independent Working Group 2009).

  19. Integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Steven R.

    1989-01-01

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole (10) is provided having an elongate housing (11) with an elongate central axis (12) and top, bottom and two side walls (13a-d) symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes (14a-d) formed integrally with the walls (13a-d), the vanes (14a-d) each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis (12) which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips (15a-d) spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls (13a-d), and the vanes (14a-d) integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane (16) passing through the tip of the vane, the walls (13a-d) having flat mounting surfaces (17, 18) at right angles to and parallel to the control plane (16), respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other.

  20. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-12-31

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information. 5 figs.

  1. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  2. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  3. Abell 1033: birth of a radio phoenix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gasperin, F; van Weeren, R J; Dawson, W A; Brüggen, M; Bonafede, A; Simionescu, A

    2015-01-01

    Extended steep-spectrum radio emission in a galaxy cluster is usually associated with a recent merger. However, given the complex scenario of galaxy cluster mergers, many of the discovered sources hardly fit into the strict boundaries of a precise taxonomy. This is especially true for radio phoenixes that do not have very well defined observational criteria. Radio phoenixes are aged radio galaxy lobes whose emission is reactivated by compression or other mechanisms. Here, we present the detection of a radio phoenix close to the moment of its formation. The source is located in Abell 1033, a peculiar galaxy cluster which underwent a recent merger. To support our claim, we present unpublished Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and Chandra observations together with archival data from the Very Large Array and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We discover the presence of two sub-clusters displaced along the N-S direction. The two sub-clusters probably underwent a recent merger which is the cause of a moderately per...

  4. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    23.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

  5. Session: What have studies of communications towers suggested regarding the impact of guy wires and lights on birds and bats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerlinger, Paul

    2004-09-01

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The paper ''Wind turbines and Avian Risk: Lessons from Communications Towers'' was given by Paul Kerlinger. The presenter outlined lessons that have been learned from research on communications (not cell) towers and about the impacts of guy wires and lights on birds and bats and how they could be useful to wind energy developers. The paper also provided specific information about a large 'fatality' event that occurred at the Mountaineer, WC wind energy site in May 2003, and a table of Night Migrant Carcass search findings for various wind sites in the US.

  6. Radio Galaxy Zoo: host galaxies and radio morphologies derived from visual inspection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banfield, J K; Willett, K W; Norris, R P; Rudnick, L; Shabala, S S; Simmons, B D; Snyder, C; Garon, A; Seymour, N; Middelberg, E; Andernach, H; Lintott, C J; Jacob, K; Kapinska, A D; Mao, M Y; Masters, K L; Jarvis, M J; Schawinski, K; Paget, E; Simpson, R; Klockner, H R; Bamford, S; Burchell, T; Chow, K E; Cotter, G; Fortson, L; Heywood, I; Jones, T W; Kaviraj, S; Lopez-Sanchez, A R; Maksym, W P; Polsterer, K; Borden, K; Hollow, R P; Whyte, L

    2015-01-01

    We present results from the first twelve months of operation of Radio Galaxy Zoo, which upon completion will enable visual inspection of over 170,000 radio sources to determine the host galaxy of the radio emission and the radio morphology. Radio Galaxy Zoo uses $1.4\\,$GHz radio images from both the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST) and the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) in combination with mid-infrared images at $3.4\\,\\mu$m from the {\\it Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer} (WISE) and at $3.6\\,\\mu$m from the {\\it Spitzer Space Telescope}. We present the early analysis of the WISE mid-infrared colours of the host galaxies. For images in which there is $>\\,75\\%$ consensus among the Radio Galaxy Zoo cross-identifications, the project participants are as effective as the science experts at identifying the host galaxies. The majority of the identified host galaxies reside in the mid-infrared colour space dominated by elliptical galaxies, quasi-stellar objects (QSOs), and l...

  7. ARRA FEMP Technical Assistance -- Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 -- Control Tower and Support Building, Palm Springs, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 100% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Palm Springs, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  8. Fossil Radio Plasma in Cluster Merger Shock Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten A. Ensslin; Marcus Brueggen

    2001-04-06

    In several merging clusters of galaxies so-called cluster radio relics have been observed. These are extended radio sources which do not seem to be associated with any radio galaxy. Two competing physical mechanisms to accelerate the radio emitting electrons have been proposed: (i) diffusive shock acceleration and (ii) adiabatic compression of fossil radio plasma by merger shock waves. Here the second scenario is investigated. We present detailed 3-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the passage of a radio plasma cocoon through a shock wave. Taking into account synchrotron, inverse Compton and adiabatic energy losses and gains we evolved the relativistic electron population to produce synthetic radio maps in Stokes I-, Q-, and U-polarisation. In the synthetic radio maps the electric polarisation vectors are mostly perpendicular to the filamentary radio structures.

  9. Radio broadcasting and the politics of mass culture in transwar Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Ji Hee

    2010-01-01

    Press, Cox, Jim. The Great Radio Audience ParticipationSusan. Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination. NewCalling: Japanese Overseas Radio Broadcasting 1937- 1945.

  10. Radio-frequency identification could help reduce the spread of plant pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luvisi, Andrea; Panattoni, Alessandra; Triolo, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    ReVIEW Article Radio-frequency identification could helpcertified nursery stock. Radio- frequency identification (Panattoni and Enrico Triolo Radio-frequency identification (

  11. Structural Design Considerations for Tubular Power Tower Receivers Operating at 650 Degrees C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neises, T. W.; Wagner, M. J.; Gray, A. K.

    2014-04-01

    Research of advanced power cycles has shown supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles may have thermal efficiency benefits relative to steam cycles at temperatures around 500 - 700 degrees C. To realize these benefits for CSP, it is necessary to increase the maximum outlet temperature of current tower designs. Research at NREL is investigating a concept that uses high-pressure supercritical carbon dioxide as the heat transfer fluid to achieve a 650 degrees C receiver outlet temperature. At these operating conditions, creep becomes an important factor in the design of a tubular receiver and contemporary design assumptions for both solar and traditional boiler applications must be revisited and revised. This paper discusses lessons learned for high-pressure, high-temperature tubular receiver design. An analysis of a simplified receiver tube is discussed, and the results show the limiting stress mechanisms in the tube and the impact on the maximum allowable flux as design parameters vary. Results of this preliminary analysis indicate an underlying trade-off between tube thickness and the maximum allowable flux on the tube. Future work will expand the scope of design variables considered and attempt to optimize the design based on cost and performance metrics.

  12. Results From The Two-tower Run Of The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisetter, A J

    2005-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search has completed two runs at the Soudan Underground Laboratory In the second, two towers of detectors were operated from March to August 2004. CDMS used Ge and Si ZIP (Z-sensitive, Ionization, and Phonon) detectors, operated at 50mK, to look for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPS) which may make up most of the dark matter in our universe. These detectors are surrounded by lead and polyethylene shielding as well as an active muon veto. These shields, as well as the overburden of Soudan rock, provide a low background environment for the detectors. The ZIP detectors record the ratio of ionization signal to phonon signal to discriminate between nuclear recoils, characteristic of WIMPS and neutrons, and electron recoils, characteristic of gamma and beta backgrounds. They also provide timing information from the four phonon channels that is used to reject surface events, for which ionization collection is poor. A blind analysis, defined using calibration data taken in situ thr...

  13. Radio-Excess IRAS Galaxies: IV. Optical Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catherine L. Buchanan; Peter J. McGregor; Geoffrey V. Bicknell; Michael A. Dopita

    2006-04-21

    This is the fourth in our series of papers investigating radio-excess galaxies, which have radio emission associated with an active nucleus but which do not fit into the traditional categories of either radio-loud or radio-quiet active galaxies. In this paper, we present optical spectra of our sample of FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies. Optical emission line diagnostics are used to determine the dominant source of the ionizing radiation. We find that radio excess is an excellent indicator of the presence of an active nucleus: the radio-excess sample contains a much higher fraction of AGN than samples selected on FIR luminosity alone, or using other criteria such as warm FIR colors. Several objects have ambiguous classifications and are likely to be composite objects with mixed excitation. The type of optical spectrum appears to be associated with the radio-loudness: radio-loud objects may be more `pure' AGN than radio-intermediate objects. We find strong evidence for interaction between the radio plasma and the surrounding gas. The jet energy fluxes of the radio-excess objects, inferred from the [O III] luminosities, are lower than in powerful radio sources, consistent with our previous results. We conclude that the jets of radio-intermediate sources are intrinsically weaker than those in sources with more powerful radio emission. A significant fraction of the sample spectra show post-starburst stellar continuum, with A-star absorption lines, consistent with the large fraction of merging or disturbed host galaxies in the sample. The ages of the radio sources are significantly less than those of A stars indicating that, if the radio sources are associated with merging activity, there is a delay between the interaction and the initiation of the radio activity. (Abridged.)

  14. Extended emission around GPS radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Stanghellini; C. P. O'Dea; D. Dallacasa; P. Cassaro; S. A. Baum; R. Fanti; C. Fanti

    2005-07-21

    Extended radio emission detected around a sample of GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources is discussed. Evidence for extended emission which is related to the GPS source is found in 6 objects out of 33. Three objects are associated with quasars with core-jet pc-scale morphology, and three are identified with galaxies with symmetric (CSO) radio morphology. We conclude that the core-jet GPS quasars are likely to be beamed objects with a continuous supply of energy from the core to the kpc scale. It is also possible that low surface brightness extended radio emission is present in other GPS quasars but the emission is below our detection limit due to the high redshifts of the objects. On the other hand, the CSO/galaxies with extended large scale emission may be rejuvenated sources where the extended emission is the relic of previous activity. In general, the presence of large scale emission associated with GPS galaxies is uncommon, suggesting that in the context of the recurrent activity model, the time scale between subsequent bursts is in general longer than the radiative lifetime of the radio emission from the earlier activity.

  15. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-06

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  16. Optical and Radio Variability of BL Lacertae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaur, Haritma; Bachev, R; Strigachev, A; Semkov, E; Wiita, Paul J; Volvach, A E; Gu, Minfeng; Agarwal, A; Agudo, I; Aller, M F; Aller, H D; Kurtanidze, O M; Kurtanidze, S O; Lahteenmaki, A; Peneva, S; Nikolashvili, M G; Sigua, L A; Tornikoski, M; Volvach, L N

    2015-01-01

    We observed the prototype blazar, BL Lacertae, extensively in optical and radio bands during an active phase in the period 2010--2013 when the source showed several prominent outbursts. We searched for possible correlations and time lags between the optical and radio band flux variations using multifrequency data to learn about the mechanisms producing variability. During an active phase of BL Lacertae, we searched for possible correlations and time lags between multifrequency light curves of several optical and radio bands. We tried to estimate any possible variability timescales and inter-band lags in these bands. We performed optical observations in B, V, R and I bands from seven telescopes in Bulgaria, Georgia, Greece and India and obtained radio data at 36.8, 22.2, 14.5, 8 and 4.8 GHz frequencies from three telescopes in Ukraine, Finland and USA. Significant cross-correlations between optical and radio bands are found in our observations with a delay of cm-fluxes with respect to optical ones of ~250 days...

  17. Stormy Weather and Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. O. Burns; C. Loken; K. Roettiger; E. Rizza; G. Bryan; M. L. Norman; P. Gomez; F. N. Owen

    1999-08-31

    New adaptive mesh refinement N-body + hydrodynamics numerical simulations are used to illustrate the complex and changing cluster environments in which many radio galaxies live and evolve. Groups and clusters of galaxies form at the intersections of filaments where they continue to accrete gas and dark matter to the present day. The accretion process produces shocks, turbulence, and transonic bulk flows forming a kind of stormy weather within the intracluster medium (ICM). Radio sources embedded within the stormy ICM form distorted, complex morphologies as observed in recent VLA cluster surveys. We show that the bending of wide-angle tailed radio sources can be understood as the result of recent cluster-subcluster mergers. We use new MHD simulations to illustrate how cluster radio halos can be formed by the shocks and turbulence produced during cluster mergers. Finally, we discuss new observations of distant Abell clusters that reveal a class of weak radio sources, probably starbursts, likely produced during the formation of the clusters as they accrete material from the supercluster environment.

  18. Are there Radio-quiet Solar Flares?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold O. Benz; Roman Brajsa; Jasmina Magdalenic

    2007-01-19

    Some 15% of solar flares having a soft X-ray flux above GOES class C5 are reported to lack coherent radio emission in the 100 - 4000 MHz range (type I - V and decimetric emissions). A detailed study of 29 such events reveals that 22 (76%) of them occurred at a radial distance of more than 800'' from the disk center, indicating that radio waves from the limb may be completely absorbed in some flares. The remaining seven events have statistically significant trends to be weak in GOES class and to have a softer non-thermal X-ray spectrum. All of the non-limb flares that were radio-quiet > 100 MHz were accompanied by metric type III emission below 100 MHz. Out of 201 hard X-ray flares, there was no flare except near the limb (R>800'') without coherent radio emission in the entire meter and decimeter range. We suggest that flares above GOES class C5 generally emit coherent radio waves when observed radially above the source.

  19. Radio galaxies in the 2SLAQ Luminous Red Galaxy survey: II. The stellar populations of radio-loud and radio-quiet LRGs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helen M. Johnston; Elaine M. Sadler; Russell Cannon; Scott M. Croom; Nicholas P. Ross; Donald P. Schneider

    2007-11-21

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra of a volume-limited sample of 375 radio galaxies at redshift 0.4radio-quiet sources from the same survey, we also investigate the effect on the galaxy of the presence of an active nucleus. The composite spectra, binned by redshift and radio luminosity, all require two components to describe them, which we interpret as an old and a younger population. We found no evolution with redshift of the age of the younger population in radio galaxies, nor were they different from the radio-quiet comparison sample. Similarly, there is no correlation with radio power, with the exception that the most powerful radio sources (P(1.4) > 10^26 W/Hz) have younger stars and stronger emission lines than the less powerful sources. This suggests that we have located the threshold in radio power where strong emission lines "switch on", at radio powers of around 10^26 W/Hz. Except for the very powerful radio galaxies, the presence of a currently-active radio AGN does not appear to be correlated with any change in the observed stellar population of a luminous red galaxy at z~0.5.

  20. Radio-tracking reveals that lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) forage in woodland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Radio-tracking reveals that lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) forage in woodland±8 g) precluded the use of radio-telemetry because commercially available radio-transmitters exceeded 10% of its body mass. In this study, radio- transmitters weighing

  1. GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt, Rolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt Positioning System) radio occultation experiment onboard the German CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload sensing of Earth's atmosphere, GPS radio occulta- tion 1 Introduction The CHAMP GPS radio occultation

  2. Incorporating supercritical steam turbines into molten-salt power tower plants : feasibility and performance.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, James Edward; Wolf, Thorsten; Muley, Nishant

    2013-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Siemens Energy, Inc., examined 14 different subcritical and supercritical steam cycles to determine if it is feasible to configure a molten-salt supercritical steam plant that has a capacity in the range of 150 to 200 MWe. The effects of main steam pressure and temperature, final feedwater temperature, and hot salt and cold salt return temperatures were determined on gross and half-net efficiencies. The main steam pressures ranged from 120 bar-a (subcritical) to 260 bar-a (supercritical). Hot salt temperatures of 566 and 600%C2%B0C were evaluated, which resulted in main steam temperatures of 553 and 580%C2%B0C, respectively. Also, the effects of final feedwater temperature (between 260 and 320%C2%B0C) were evaluated, which impacted the cold salt return temperature. The annual energy production and levelized cost of energy (LCOE) were calculated using the System Advisory Model on 165 MWe subcritical plants (baseline and advanced) and the most promising supercritical plants. It was concluded that the supercritical steam plants produced more annual energy than the baseline subcritical steam plant for the same-size heliostat field, receiver, and thermal storage system. Two supercritical steam plants had the highest annual performance and had nearly the same LCOE. Both operated at 230 bar-a main steam pressure. One was designed for a hot salt temperature of 600%C2%B0C and the other 565%C2%B0C. The LCOEs for these plants were about 10% lower than the baseline subcritical plant operating at 120 bar-a main steam pressure and a hot salt temperature of 565%C2%B0C. Based on the results of this study, it appears economically and technically feasible to incorporate supercritical steam turbines in molten-salt power tower plants.

  3. Technology to Facilitate the Use of Impaired Waters in Cooling Towers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colborn, Robert

    2012-04-30

    The project goal was to develop an effective silica removal technology and couple that with existing electro-dialysis reversal (EDR) technology to achieve a cost effective treatment for impaired waters to allow for their use in the cooling towers of coal fired power plants. A quantitative target of the program was a 50% reduction in the fresh water withdrawal at a levelized cost of water of $3.90/Kgal. Over the course of the program, a new molybdenum-modified alumina was developed that significantly outperforms existing alumina materials in silica removal both kinetically and thermodynamically. The Langmuir capacity is 0.11g silica/g adsorbent. Moreover, a low cost recycle/regeneration process was discovered to allow for multiple recycles with minimal loss in activity. On the lab scale, five runs were carried out with no drop in performance between the second and fifth run in ability to absorb the silica from water. The Mo-modified alumina was successfully prepared on a multiple kilogram scale and a bench scale model column was used to remove 100 ppm of silica from 400 liters of simulated impaired water. Significant water savings would result from such a process and the regeneration process could be further optimized to reduce water requirements. Current barriers to implementation are the base cost of the adsorbent material and the fine powder form that would lead to back pressure on a large column. If mesoporous materials become more commonly used in other areas and the price drops from volume and process improvements, then our material would also lower in price because the amount of molybdenum needed is low and no additional processing is required. There may well be engineering solutions to the fine powder issue; in a simple concept experiment, we were able to pelletize our material with Boehmite, but lost performance due to a dramatic decrease in surface area.

  4. Towering oak, the sun - porch house winner of the ''1982 German research award''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berndt, G.W.P.

    1983-12-01

    The design for this energy-efficient house was developed to suit a benign climate with much rain, wind, and fog. The building's basic construction guarantees the most limited energy-use possible. This is achieved through a unique houseform, which encloses and warms the living spaces with a thick thermal coat: walls = 6'' semi-rigid glass fiber boards, R-19; roof = 10'' foil faced fiber glass, R = 30. Windows are located only on the south side, to ensure optimal sun-ray capture. The housefront consists of a ''sun-porch'' (Sonnenhof), which is a further development of the well-known German ''Wintergarten'' (winter garden). In this climate region, one can only expect a yearly average of five days with a summer temperature of over 25/sup 0/C (77/sup 0/F); however, with a ''sun-porch'' the summer can make itself at home. In winter, the ''sun-porch'' protects against storms and always offers temperatures above the 7/sup 0/C (45/sup 0/F) minimum, a product of the compact roof and double glass with selective coating. On sunny winter days, one may even dine on the balconies. The estimation technique represented here is based on a procedure devised at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, New Mexico, (Passive Solar Handbook, Vol. 2, J.D. Balcomb). ''Towering Oak's'' solar savings fraction = 49.0%; heating load = 2.56 BTU/sq. ft. Better results have yet to be achieved in Germany. In the USA, this could be increased to a solar fraction of up to 90%. Some modifications would, however, be necessary to suit the local climate (sun control devices, etc.).

  5. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search: First 5-Tower Data and Improved Understanding of Ionization Collection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Catherine N.

    2010-01-01

    The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) is searching for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) with cryogenic particle detectors. These detectors have the ability to discriminate between nuclear recoil candidate and electron recoil background events by collecting both phonon and ionization energy from recoils in the detector crystals. The CDMS-II experiment has completed analysis of the first data runs with 30 semiconductor detectors at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, resulting in a world leading WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section limit for WIMP masses above 44 GeV/c{sup 2}. As CDMS aims to achieve greater WIMP sensitivity, it is necessary to increase the detector mass and discrimination between signal and background events. Incomplete ionization collection results in the largest background in the CDMS detectors as this causes electron recoil background interactions to appear as false candidate events. Two primary causes of incomplete ionization collection are surface and bulk trapping. Recent work has been focused on reducing surface trapping through the modification of fabrication methods for future detectors. Analyzing data taken with test devices has shown that hydrogen passivation of the amorphous silicon blocking layer worsens surface trapping. Additional data has shown that the iron-ion implantation used to lower the critical temperature of the tungsten transition-edge sensors causes a degradation of the ionization collection. Using selective implantation on future detectors may improve ionization collection for events near the phonon side detector surface. Bulk trapping is minimized by neutralizing ionized lattice impurities. Detector investigations at testing facilities and in situ at the experimental site have provided methods to optimize the neutralization process and monitor running conditions to maintain full ionization collection. This work details my contribution to the 5-tower data taking, monitoring, and analysis effort as well as the SuperCDMS detector development with the focus on monitoring and improving ionization collection in the detectors.

  6. Optimization Online - Radio Planning of Energy-Aware Cellular ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nov 3, 2010 ... Radio Planning of Energy-Aware Cellular Networks ... Keywords: green networking, wireless, network design, coverage, network management, ...

  7. Calculating the probability of detecting radio signals from alien civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvat, Marko

    2006-01-01

    Although it might not be self-evident, it is in fact entirely possible to calculate the probability of detecting alien radio signals by understanding what types of extraterrestrial radio emissions can be expected and what properties these emissions can have. Using the Drake equation as the obvious starting point, and logically identifying and enumerating constraints of interstellar radio communications can yield the probability of detecting a genuine alien radio signal.

  8. Calculating the probability of detecting radio signals from alien civilizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marko Horvat

    2007-07-14

    Although it might not be self-evident, it is in fact entirely possible to calculate the probability of detecting alien radio signals by understanding what types of extraterrestrial radio emissions can be expected and what properties these emissions can have. Using the Drake equation as the obvious starting point, and logically identifying and enumerating constraints of interstellar radio communications can yield the probability of detecting a genuine alien radio signal.

  9. Radio Properties of EROs in the Phoenix Deep Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Afonso; A. M. Hopkins; M. Sullivan; B. Mobasher; A. Georgakakis; L. E. Cram

    2003-12-04

    Insensitive to dust obscuration, radio wavelengths are ideal to study star-forming galaxies free of dust induced biases. Using data from the Phoenix Deep Survey, we have identified a sample of star-forming extremely red objects (EROs). Stacking of the radio images of the radio-undetected star-forming EROs revealed a significant radio detection. Using the expected median redshift, we estimate an average star-formation rate of 61 M_sun/yr for these galaxies.

  10. Solar Radio Bursts and Space Weather Stephen M. White

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Stephen

    advantage of exceptionally clean radio spectra of such bursts acquired with the Green Bank Solar Radio Burst­effective disturbances probably originate: the layers where energy is released in solar flares, where energetic particlesSolar Radio Bursts and Space Weather Stephen M. White Dept. of Astronomy, University of Maryland

  11. Radio Wave Propagation in Potato Fields John Thelen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Radio Wave Propagation in Potato Fields John Thelen Wageningen University Email: John has an important effect on the propagation of radio waves. The influence of the growth stage from 23 m to 10 m. Another important result is that radio waves propagate better in conditions

  12. IS TITAN A RADIO SOURCE? W. S. Kurth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    , 2004. Again, however, Saturn was actively emitting radio waves in a similar frequency range, henceIS TITAN A RADIO SOURCE? W. S. Kurth , B. Cecconi , D. A. Gurnett , M. L. Kaiser , P. Zarka , and A. Lecacheux Abstract Voyager 1 observations near Titan suggested that radio emissions near 60 kHz were

  13. The Symbiosis of Cognitive Radio and Wireless Mesh Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boutaba, Raouf

    a transmitter to encode information and generate radio waves. These electromagnetic waves occurring at lowChapter 18 The Symbiosis of Cognitive Radio and Wireless Mesh Networks Brent Ishibashi and Raouf, the dual usage of wireless communication makes them very resource dependent. Proposed cognitive radio (CR

  14. Technologies for DWDM Millimetre-Wave Fibre-Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakaul, Masuduzzaman

    Technologies for DWDM Millimetre- Wave Fibre-Radio Networks Masuduzzaman Bakaul BSc. Eng. (EE. The millimetre-wave (mm-wave) fibre-radio system with its inherent advantages of large bandwidth characteristics services and applications. At mm-wave frequencies, propagation effects through the air limit the radio cell

  15. SOME UNSOLVED CHALLENGES IN RADIO-FREQUENCY HEATING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the electronic version. I. INTRODUCTION There are many methods by which radio-frequency (rf) waves driveSOME UNSOLVED CHALLENGES IN RADIO-FREQUENCY HEATING AND CURRENT DRIVE N. J. FISCH* Princeton Plasma, 2013 doi:10.13182/FST13-682 Several unsolved challenges in radio-frequency heating and current drive

  16. FAILURE OF GPS FUNCTIONING CAUSED BY EXTREME SOLAR RADIO EVENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    solar radio emission followed the flare exceeded power solar radio bursts (SRB) in all flares known tillFAILURE OF GPS FUNCTIONING CAUSED BY EXTREME SOLAR RADIO EVENTS E. L. Afraimovich1 , V. V. Demyanov1 , D. E. Gary2 , A. B. Ishin1 , and G. Ya. Smolkov1 1) Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics

  17. Pop Up Radio Archive: A Solution for Independent Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Pop Up Radio Archive: A Solution for Independent Producers Anne Wootton, Bailey Smith, and Christen Penny UC Berkeley School of Information May 4, 2012 #12;Pop Up Radio Archive 2 Abstract Independent* solutions do not adequately serve independent radio producers, who "have all these hard drives at home

  18. INVITED PAPER, IEEE PIMRC'97 HELSINKI, FINLAND. 0 Impulse Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    INVITED PAPER, IEEE PIMRC'97 ­ HELSINKI, FINLAND. 0 Impulse Radio Robert A. Scholtz and Moe Z. Win, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2565 USA Abstract Impulse radio, a form of ultra-wide band signaling, has. This paper describes the characteristics of impulse radio, gives analytical estimates of its multiple access

  19. Radio Number for Trees Daphne Der-Fen Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Daphne Der-Fen

    Radio Number for Trees Daphne Der-Fen Liu Department of Mathematics California State University be a connected graph with diameter diam(G). The radio number for G, denoted by rn(G), is the smallest integer k bound for the radio number of trees, and characterize the trees achiev- ing this bound. Moreover, we

  20. Radio Emission from Ultracool Dwarfs and the Relevant Radiation Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radio Emission from Ultracool Dwarfs and the Relevant Radiation Mechanisms A thesis submitted have learnt a lot of knowledge which includes not only the radio instruments for observations, but also the science such as particle simulations for understanding the detected radio signal. Also, from this research

  1. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors Coskun Kocabas*, Hoon properties of individ- ual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demon- stration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios

  2. Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation -1 School of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation - 1 School of Physics and Astronomy An Introduction to Radio Interferometry and The Measurement Equation Formalism Pedagogical Seminar Louise M. Ker March 2010 Abstract The next generation of radio telescopes, such as LOFAR, e-Merlin, ASKAP, MeerKat and even- tually

  3. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1 , T. Ndukum3 , K. C. Schwab3 measurementsinmesoscopicelectronicsandmechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection tech- niques, and the radio

  4. Data Analysis in the Radio Astr 257: Modern Astronomical Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Data Analysis in the Radio Emma Storm Astr 257: Modern Astronomical Techniques May 28th, 2013 Storm (Astr257) Radio Data Analysis 05/28/13 1 / 36 #12;Radio Data Analysis interferometers measure antenna to raw, uncalibrated data need to manually calibrate image processing depends on science goals Storm

  5. Energy Efficient Transmissions in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Energy Efficient Transmissions in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks Liqun Fu The Institute of Network@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract--In this paper, we consider energy efficient transmis- sions for MIMO cognitive radio networks on the traffic load of the secondary system. Index Terms--Cognitive radio networks, MIMO, Energy- efficiency. I

  6. > RADIO TUDIANTE CISM 89,3 FM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    3 0 > RADIO ÉTUDIANTE ­ CISM 89,3 FM Pavillon J.-A.-DeSève 2332, boul. Édouard-Montpetit Local C-1509 Téléphone : 514 343-7511 Télécopieur : 514 343-2418 cism@cam.org www.cismfm.qc.ca Recherche

  7. DYNAMIC SPECTRUM ACCESS IN COGNITIVE RADIO NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Jonathan

    , the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has con- trolled the radio frequency energy spectrum. They license resources. The basic idea is to let people use licensed frequencies, pro- vided they can guarantee interference perceived by the primary license holders will be minimal. With advances in software and cognitive

  8. 3D tracking via body radio reflections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kabelac, Zachary (Zachary E.)

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents WiTrack, a system that tracks the 3D motion of a user from the radio signals reflected off her body. It works even if the person is occluded from the WiTrack device or in a different room. WiTrack does ...

  9. Angular clustering in the SUMSS radio survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Tom Mauch; Elaine M. Sadler

    2003-10-05

    We measure the angular correlation function of radio galaxies selected by the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). We find that the characteristic imprint of large-scale structure is clearly detectable, and that the survey is very uniform. Through comparison with similar analyses for other wide-area radio surveys - the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the 325 MHz Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) - we are able to derive consistent angular clustering parameters, including a steep slope for the clustering function, $w(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-1.1}$. We revise upwards previous estimates of the NVSS clustering amplitude, and find no evidence for dependence of clustering properties on radio frequency. It is important to incorporate the full covariance matrix when fitting parameters to the measured correlation function. Once the redshift distribution for mJy radio galaxies has been determined, these projected clustering measurements will permit a robust description of large-scale structure at $z \\sim 0.8$, the median redshift of the sources.

  10. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

  11. Environmental Assessment for Leasing Land for the Siting, Construction and Operation of a Commercial AM Radio Antenna at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-02-16

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to lease approximately 3 acres of land at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on the southeast tip of Technical Area (TA) 54 for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna. This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been developed in order to assess the environmental effects of the Proposed Action and No Action alternative. The Proposed Action includes the lease of land for the siting, construction and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna in TA-54, just north of Pajarito Road and State Highway 4. The No Action Alternative was also considered. Under the No Action Alternative, DOE would not lease land on LANL property for the siting and operation of an AM radio broadcasting antenna; the DOE would not have a local station for emergency response use; and the land would continue to be covered in native vegetation and serve as a health and safety buffer zone for TA-54 waste management activities. Other potential sites on LANL property were evaluated but dismissed for reasons such as interference with sensitive laboratory experiments. Potential visual, health, and environmental effects are anticipated to be minimal for the Proposed Action. The radio broadcasting antenna would be visible against the skyline from some public areas, but would be consistent with other man-made objects in the vicinity that partially obstruct viewsheds (e.g. meteorological tower, power lines). Therefore, the net result would be a modest change of the existing view. Electromagnetic field (EMF) emissions from the antenna would be orders or magnitude less than permissible limits. The proposed antenna construction would not affect known cultural sites, but is located in close proximity to two archaeological sites. Construction would be monitored to ensure that the associated road and utility corridor would avoid cultural sites.

  12. 2010 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis Radio FrequencyRadio Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    . Louis RFID ReadersRFID Readers Sends a pulse of radio energy and listens for tags response Readers may24-1 ©2010 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis Radio FrequencyRadio Frequency;24-3 ©2010 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis What is RFID?What is RFID? Radio Frequency

  13. Opacity in compact extragalactic radio sources and its effect on radio-optical reference frame alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Y. Kovalev; A. P. Lobanov; A. B. Pushkarev; J. A. Zensus

    2007-10-22

    Accurate alignment of the radio and optical celestial reference frames requires detailed understanding of physical factors that may cause offsets between the positions of the same object measured in different spectral bands. Opacity in compact extragalactic jets (due to synchrotron self-absorption and external free-free absorption) is one of the key physical phenomena producing such an offset, and this effect is well-known in radio astronomy ("core shift"). We have measured the core shifts in a sample of 29 bright compact extragalactic radio sources observed using very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at 2.3 and 8.6 GHz. We report the results of these measurements and estimate that the average shift between radio and optical positions of distant quasars would be of the order of 0.1-0.2 mas. This shift exceeds positional accuracy of GAIA and SIM. We suggest two possible approaches to carefully investigate and correct for this effect in order to align accurately the radio and optical positions. Both approaches involve determining a Primary Reference Sample of objects to be used for tying the radio and optical reference frames together.

  14. 2006 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis Radio FrequencyRadio Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    18-1 ©2006 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis Radio FrequencyRadio Frequency;18-3 ©2006 Raj JainCSE574sWashington University in St. Louis What is RFID?What is RFID? ! Radio Frequency #. 96-bit block of read- only storage (ROM). " Read-write memory. " Tags may have embedded sensors (tire

  15. Distant FR I radio galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: implications for the cosmological evolution of radio-loud AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    that number counts of radio sources contain important information about the distribution of radio sources by Jackson & Wall (1999), who use the source counts at several frequencies and redshift information of the 3C of radio-loud AGN I. A. G. SnellenP and P. N. Best Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory, Blackford

  16. A review of "Murder in the Tower and Other Tales from the State Trials." by Alan Wharam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellen J. Jenkins

    2003-01-01

    stream_source_info V61-I1-23-Jenkins.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 8562 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name V61-I1-23-Jenkins.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 REVIEWS 87 a... fuller understanding of the trial and execution of ?that man of blood.? Alan Wharam. Murder in the Tower and Other Tales from the State Trials. Aldershot, U.K.: Ashgate, 2001. x + 286 pp. + 12 b&w illus. $84.95. Review by ELLEN J. JENKINS, ARKANSAS...

  17. Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce MacA Thomas and John M. Sarkissian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkissian, John M.

    of the radio-frequency background levels as they use the most sensitive radio-wave receivers in the world to study the sky at radio wavelengths. Radio waves can give us information about astronomical phenomena astronomy telescopes are the most sensitive radio-wave receivers in the world. For example, a mobile phone

  18. Emergency Alert System Radio Quick Guide The Emergency Alert System (EAS) radio is one component of Texas A&M University's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to KAMU 90.9 FM. Power: Green light that shows the radio has power. Ready-Reset Switch: Toggle switch a test. Signal Indicator: Green light that shows radio signal reception. The EAS radio should be tuned the radio to AM or FM. Set to FM. Power Input: Plug for the AC adapter, which provides power to the radio

  19. Radio-loud Narrow-Line Type 1 Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Komossa; W. Voges; D. Xu; S. Mathur; H. -M. Adorf; G. Lemson; W. Duschl; D. Grupe

    2006-03-24

    We present the first systematic study of (non-radio-selected) radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies. Cross-correlation of the `Catalogue of Quasars and Active Nuclei' with several radio and optical catalogues led to the identification of 11 radio-loud NLS1 candidates including 4 previously known ones. Most of the radio-loud NLS1s are compact, steep spectrum sources accreting close to, or above, the Eddington limit. The radio-loud NLS1s of our sample are remarkable in that they occupy a previously rarely populated regime in NLS1 multi-wavelength parameter space. While their [OIII]/H_beta and FeII/H_beta intensity ratios almost cover the whole range observed in NLS1 galaxies, their radio properties extend the range of radio-loud objects to those with small widths of the broad Balmer lines. Among the radio-detected NLS1 galaxies, the radio index R distributes quite smoothly up to the critical value of R ~ 10 and covers about 4 orders of magnitude in total. Statistics show that ~7% of the NLS1 galaxies are formally radio-loud while only 2.5% exceed a radio index R > 100. Several mechanisms are considered as explanations for the radio loudness of the NLS1 galaxies and for the lower frequency of radio-louds among NLS1s than quasars. While properties of most sources (with 2-3 exceptions) generally do not favor relativistic beaming, the combination of accretion mode and spin may explain the observations. (abbreviated)

  20. Tracking the CME-driven shock wave on 2012 March 5 and radio triangulation of associated radio emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdaleni?, J.; Marqué, C.; Mierla, M.; Zhukov, A. N.; Rodriguez, L.; Krupar, V.; Maksimovi?, M.; Cecconi, B.

    2014-08-20

    We present a multiwavelength study of the 2012 March 5 solar eruptive event, with an emphasis on the radio triangulation of the associated radio bursts. The main points of the study are reconstruction of the propagation of shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) using radio observations and finding the relative positions of the CME, the CME-driven shock wave, and its radio signatures. For the first time, radio triangulation is applied to different types of radio bursts in the same event and performed in a detailed way using goniopolarimetric observations from STEREO/Waves and WIND/Waves spacecraft. The event on 2012 March 5 was associated with a X1.1 flare from the NOAA AR 1429 situated near the northeast limb, accompanied by a full halo CME and a radio event comprising long-lasting interplanetary type II radio bursts. The results of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the CME (using SOHO/LASCO, STEREO COR, and HI observations), and modeling with the ENLIL cone model suggest that the CME-driven shock wave arrived at 1 AU at about 12:00 UT on March 7 (as observed by SOHO/CELIAS). The results of radio triangulation show that the source of the type II radio burst was situated on the southern flank of the CME. We suggest that the interaction of the shock wave and a nearby coronal streamer resulted in the interplanetary type II radio emission.

  1. Pulsar radiation belts and transient radio emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q. Luo; D. B. Melrose

    2007-04-22

    It is proposed that radiation belts similar to the ones in the planetary magnetosphere can exist for a pulsar with a relatively long period and a strong magnetic field. In the belts located in the closed field line region near the light cylinder relativistic pairs are trapped and maintained at a density substantially higher than the local Goldreich-Julian corotation density. The trapped plasma can be supplied and replenished by either direct injection of relativistic pairs from acceleration of externally-supplied particles in a dormant outer gap or in situ ionization of the accreted neutral material in the trapping region. The radiation belts can be disrupted by waves that are excited in the region as the result of plasma instabilities or emitted from the surface due to starquakes or stellar oscillations. The disruption can cause an intermittent particle precipitation toward the star producing radio bursts. It is suggested that such bursts may be seen as rotating radio transients (RRATs).

  2. CALLISTO - A new concept for solar radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold O. Benz; Christian Monstein; HAnsueli Meyer

    2004-10-19

    A new radio spectrometer, CALLISTO, is presented. It is a dual-channel frequency-agile receiver based on commercially available consumer electronics. Its major characteristic is the low price for hardware and software, and the short assembly time, both two or more orders of magnitude below existing spectrometers. The instrument is sensitive at the physical limit and extremely stable. The total bandwidth is 825 MHz, and the width of individual channels is 300 kHz. A total of 1000 measurements can be made per second. The spectrometer is well suited for solar low-frequency radio observations pertinent to space weather research. Five instruments of the type were constructed until now and put into operation at several sites, including Bleien (Zurich) and NRAO (USA). First results in the 45 - 870 MHz range are presented. Some of them were recorded in a preliminary setup during the time of high solar activity in October and November 2003.

  3. Energy range of hadronic calorimeter towers and cells for high-pT jets at a 100 TeV collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Chekanov; J. Dull

    2015-12-28

    This paper discusses a study of tower and cell energy ranges of a hadronic calorimeter for a 100 TeV pp collider. The dynamic energy ranges were estimated using Standard Model jets with transverse momenta above 20 TeV. The simulations were performed using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo model after a fast detector simulation tuned to the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. We estimate the maximum energy range of towers and cells as a function of lateral cell sizes for several extreme cases of jet transverse energy.

  4. Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-08-29

    A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

  5. Energy range of hadronic calorimeter towers and cells for high-pT jets at a 100 TeV collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Chekanov; J. Dull

    2015-11-04

    This paper discusses a study of tower and cell energy ranges of a hadronic calorimeter for a 100 TeV pp collider. The dynamic energy ranges were estimated using Standard Model jets with transverse momenta above 20 TeV. The simulations were performed using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo model after a fast detector simulation tuned to the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. We estimate the maximum energy range of towers and cells as a function of lateral cell sizes for several extreme cases of jet transverse energy.

  6. Chautauqua notebook: appropriate technology on radio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renz, B.

    1981-01-01

    Experiences in establishing and maintaining a regional call-in information-exchange radio show (Chautauqua) on energy conservation, appropriate technology, renewable energy sources, and self-reliance are discussed. Information is presented on: appropriate technology; the Chautauquaa concept; topics discussed; research performed; guests; interviewing tips; types of listeners; program features; where to find help; promotion and publicity; the technical and engineering aspects; the budget and funding; and station policies. (MCW)

  7. Preparing a public database of radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Andernach; S. A. Trushkin; A. G. Gubanov; O. V. Verkhodanov; V. B. Titov; A. Micol

    1996-07-22

    We have collected the largest existing set of radio source lists in machine-readable form: 320 tables with 1.75 million records. Only a minor fraction of these is accessible via public databases. We describe our plans to make this huge amount of heterogeneous data accessible in a homogeneous way via the World Wide Web, with reliable cross-identifications, and searchable by various observables.

  8. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF HOTSPOTS IN RADIO LOBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, Michael W.; Murphy, David W.; Livingston, John H.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Lawrence, Charles R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We have carried out a systematic search with Spitzer Warm Mission and archival data for infrared emission from the hotspots in radio lobes that have been described by Hardcastle et al. These hotspots have been detected with both radio and X-ray observations, but an observation at an intermediate frequency in the infrared can be critical to distinguish between competing models for particle acceleration and radiation processes in these objects. Between the archival and warm mission data, we report detections of 18 hotspots; the archival data generally include detections at all four IRAC bands, the Warm Mission data only at 3.6 {mu}m. Using a theoretical formalism adopted from Godfrey et al., we fit both archival and warm mission spectral energy distributions (SEDs)-including radio, X-ray, and optical data from Hardcastle as well as the Spitzer data-with a synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the X-rays are produced by Compton scattering of the radio frequency photons by the energetic electrons which radiate them. With one exception, an SSC model requires that the magnetic field be less or much less than the equipartition value which minimizes total energy and has comparable amounts of energy in the magnetic field and in the energetic particles. This conclusion agrees with those of comparable recent studies of hotspots, and with the analysis presented by Hardcastle et al. We also show that the infrared data rule out the simplest synchrotron-only models for the SEDs. We briefly discuss the implications of these results and of alternate interpretations of the data.

  9. SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATING RADIO TRANSIENT J1819-1458

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J. J.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rea, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) Campus UAB, Fac. de Ciències, Torre C5, parell, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lazaridis, K.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-20

    We present the results of simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR J1819–1458. Our 94 ks XMM-Newton observation of the high magnetic field (?5 × 10{sup 13} G) pulsar reveals a blackbody spectrum (kT ? 130 eV) with a broad absorption feature, possibly composed of two lines at ?1.0 and ?1.3 keV. We performed a correlation analysis of the X-ray photons with radio pulses detected in 16.2 hr of simultaneous observations at 1-2 GHz with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Parkes telescopes, respectively. Both the detected X-ray photons and radio pulses appear to be randomly distributed in time. We find tentative evidence for a correlation between the detected radio pulses and X-ray photons on timescales of less than 10 pulsar spin periods, with the probability of this occurring by chance being 0.46%. This suggests that the physical process producing the radio pulses may also heat the polar-cap.

  10. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luan, Jing; Goldreich, Peter

    2014-04-20

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 10{sup 3} pc cm{sup –3}. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ?5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period.

  11. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, J.; Petrosian, V.; Lawrence, A.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio loud quasars, but rather a smooth transition. Also, this efficiency seems higher for the high-redshift and more luminous sources in the considered sample.

  12. A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvin, David

    A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which takes in crude oil, up to a maximum of 650,000 barrels per day (bbl/day) and produces **" means "**% octane".) Once crude oil enters the system, it goes fully through the process. The refinery

  13. Economic evaluation of a novel fuel-saver hybrid combining a solar receiver with a combustor for a solar power tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    achieves the same combus- tion efficiency as the boiler for twice the capital cost of a solar receiverEconomic evaluation of a novel fuel-saver hybrid combining a solar receiver with a combustor for a solar power tower G.J. Nathan a, , D.L. Battye b , P.J. Ashman b a Centre for Energy Technology, Schools

  14. Simultaneous observations of Jovian quasi-periodic radio emissions by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    of many Jovian plasma wave and radio emissions. One of these emissions is Jovian type III radio emissions); 2784 Magnetospheric Physics: Solar wind/magnetosphere interactions; 6984 Radio Science: Waves in plasma rich in radio and plasma wave emissions. One interesting radio emission component is the quasi

  15. GNU Radio Group Final Research Report Thomas Bell Kevin Gajewski Anthony Hsu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    GNU Radio Group Final Research Report Thomas Bell Kevin Gajewski Anthony Hsu Advisors: Yu-Dong Yao, the once only theoretical concept of Software-Defined Radio is now a practical reality. Using an open source software-defined radio package called GNU Radio and a basic radio hardware component called

  16. Radio Planning of Energy-Aware Cellular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvia Boiardi

    2010-11-03

    Nov 3, 2010 ... Radio Planning of Energy-Aware Cellular Networks. Silvia Boiardi(Silvia.Boiardi ***at*** gerad.ca) Capone Antonio(antonio.capone ***at*** ...

  17. TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T., E-mail: Paul.Hancock@Sydney.edu.au [Also at Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. (Australia)

    2013-10-20

    The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ?30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (?95%) or optical (?70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

  18. Advanced Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Filter Sensor and Controls for Advanced Low-Pressure Drop Systems to Reduce Engine Fuel Consumption Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Radio Frequency...

  19. Multiple Objective Fitness Functions for Cognitive Radio Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Timothy Ray

    2008-04-30

    needs into commands to the underlying radio functions. In March of 2005, Vanu, Inc. introduced the first (and presently only), FCC-certified software radio product [23]. The AnyWaveTM Base Station is the first base station system that fully implements... needs into commands to the underlying radio functions. In March of 2005, Vanu, Inc. introduced the first (and presently only), FCC-certified software radio product [23]. The AnyWaveTM Base Station is the first base station system that fully implements...

  20. CONTRIBUTION OF GAMMA-RAY-LOUD RADIO GALAXIES' CORE EMISSIONS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Fermi gamma-ray satellite has recently detected gamma-ray emissions from radio galaxy cores. From these samples, we first examine the correlation between the luminosities...

  1. Observations of the Pulsar PSR B1951+32 with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Kildea; J. Zweerink; J. Ball; J. E. Carson; C. E. Covault; D. D. Driscoll; P. Fortin; D. M. Gingrich; D. S. Hanna; A. Jarvis; T. Lindner; C. Mueller; R. Mukherjee; R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; D. A. Williams

    2007-10-25

    We present the analysis and results of 12.5 hours of high-energy gamma-ray observations of the EGRET-detected pulsar PSR B1951+32 using the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE). STACEE is an atmospheric Cherenkov detector, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, that detects cosmic gamma rays using the shower-front-sampling technique. STACEE's sensitivity to astrophysical sources at energies around 100 GeV allows it to investigate emission from gamma-ray pulsars with expected pulsed emission cutoffs below 100 GeV. We discuss the observations and analysis of STACEE's PSR 1951+32 data, accumulated during the 2005 and 2006 observing seasons.

  2. Statistics of solar microwave radio burst spectra with implications for operations of microwave radio systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .6 GHz to employ an adaptable mode wherein, if the prediction of solar activity suggested the possible [Hey, 1946], the understanding and prediction of solar events that might produce interfering noiseStatistics of solar microwave radio burst spectra with implications for operations of microwave

  3. RADIO CONTROL CRICKET V2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 D D C C B B A A PCLK PDATA PALE RADIO DATA SPI_SCK SPI_MOSI SPI_MISO CHP_SCK PCLK PDATA PALE ADC0 SPI_MISO CHP_OUT RF_DETECT AVCC AVCC VCC VCC AVCC VCC AVCC VCC VCC VCC J9 HDR 2 X AVCC AVCC AVCC AVCC RF_IN RF_OUT L1 L2 CHP_OUT R_BIAS XOSC1 XOSC2 DIO DCLK PCLK PDATA PALE RSSI C18 R13

  4. Revealing Cosmic Magnetism with Radio Polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Gaensler

    2007-12-18

    While gravitation sustains the on-going evolution of the cosmos, it is magnetism that breaks gravity's symmetry and that provides the pathway to the non-thermal Universe. By enabling processes such as anisotropic pressure support, particle acceleration, and jet collimation, magnetism has for billions of years regulated the feedback vital for returning matter to the interstellar and intergalactic medium. After reviewing recent results that demonstrate the unique view of magnetic fields provided by radio astronomy, I explain how the Square Kilometre Array will provide data that will reveal what cosmic magnets look like, how they formed, and what role they have played in the evolving Universe.

  5. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  6. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South Region IV: Optical Properties of the Faint Radio Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Huynh; C. A. Jackson; R. P. Norris; A. Fernandez-Soto

    2008-03-31

    The Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field-South (ATHDFS) survey of the Hubble Deep Field South reaches sensitivities of ~10 miceoJyJy at 1.4, 2.5, 5.2 and 8.7 GHz, making the ATHDFS one of the deepest surveys ever performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Here we present the optical identifications of the ATHDFS radio sources using data from the literature. We find that ~66% of the radio sources have optical counterparts to I = 23.5 mag. Deep HST imaging of the area identifies a further 12% of radio sources. We present new spectroscopic observations for 98 of the radio sources, and supplement these spectroscopic redshifts with photometric ones calculated from 5-band optical imaging. The host galaxy colors and radio-to-optical ratios indicate that low luminosity (or "radio quiet") AGN make up a significant proportion of the sub-mJy radio population, a result which is in accordance with a number of other deep radio studies. The radio-to-optical ratios of the bright (S_1.4GHz > 1 mJy) sources is consistent with a bimodal distribution.

  7. Cognitive Radio: A path in the Evolution of Public Wireless Networks The concept of cognitive radio has arisen as a generalization of the principle of multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed A.

    Cognitive Radio: A path in the Evolution of Public Wireless Networks The concept of cognitive radio has arisen as a generalization of the principle of multiple access in radio channels initially layer including fixed modulation and error control coding algorithms. The cognitive radio is supposed

  8. Simulation of radio emission from air showers in atmospheric electric fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buitink, S.

    2010-01-01

    the propagation of the radio waves. In this work we use theof propagation of the radio wave. The three-dimensionalof propagation of the radio wave cannot be unambiguously de?

  9. PHASE AND AMPLITUDE CONTROL OF THE RADIO FREQUENCY WAVE IN THE TWO-BEAM ACCELERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuenning, R.W.

    2008-01-01

    CONTROL OF THE RADIO FREQUENCY WAVE IN THE TWO-BEAMCONTROL OF THE RADIO FREQUENCY WAVE IN THE TWO-BEAMsensitivity of the radio frequency (rf) wave generated by

  10. Radio-Frequency Beam Conditioner for Fast-Wave Free-Electron Generators of Coherent Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    to Physical Review Letters Radio-Frequency Beam ConditionerDE-AC03-76SF00098 LBL-31006 RADIO-FREQUENCY BEAM CONDITIONERIbaraki, 305, Japan. RADIO-FREQUENCY BEAM CONDITIONER FOR

  11. Canonical Particle Acceleration in FRI Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Young; Lawrence Rudnick; Debora Katz; Tracey DeLaney; Namir E. Kassim; Kazuo Makishima

    2005-02-26

    Matched resolution multi-frequency VLA observations of four radio galaxies are used to derive the asymptotic low energy slope of the relativistic electron distribution. Where available, low energy slopes are also determined for other sources in the literature. They provide information on the acceleration physics independent of radiative and other losses, which confuse measurements of the synchrotron spectra in most radio, optical and X-ray studies. We find a narrow range of inferred low energy electron energy slopes, n(E)=const*E^-2.1 for the currently small sample of lower luminosity sources classified as FRI (not classical doubles). This distribution is close to, but apparently inconsistent with, the test particle limit of n(E)=const*E^-2.0 expected from strong diffusive shock acceleration in the non-relativistic limit. Relativistic shocks or those modified by the back-pressure of efficiently accelerated cosmic rays are two alternatives to produce somewhat steeper spectra. We note for further study the possiblity of acceleration through shocks, turbulence or shear in the flaring/brightening regions in FRI jets as they move away from the nucleus. Jets on pc scales and the collimated jets and hot spots of FRII (classical double) sources would be governed by different acceleration sites and mechanisms; they appear to show a much wider range of spectra than for FRI sources.

  12. Quark Nova Model for Fast Radio Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachary Shand; Amir Ouyed; Nico Koning; Rachid Ouyed

    2015-05-29

    FRBs are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via $\\beta$-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm$^{-3}$ pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of $\\beta$-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies ($\\sim$ 10$^{41}$ ergs), spectra shapes and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  13. On the Nature of Pulsar Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyutikov, M; Machabeli, G Z; Lyutikov, Maxim; Blandford, Roger D.; Machabeli, George

    1998-01-01

    A theory of pulsar radio emission generation, in which the observed waves are produced directly by maser-type plasma instabilities operating at the anomalous cyclotron-Cherenkov resonance $\\omega- k_{\\parallel} v_{\\parallel} + \\omega_B/ v_{\\parallel} - k_{\\perp} u_d =0$, is capable of explaining the main observational characteristics of pulsar radio emission. The instabilities are due to the interaction of the fast particles from the primary beam and the tail of the distribution with the normal modes of a strongly magnetized one-dimensional electron-positron plasma. The waves emitted at these resonances are vacuum-like, electromagnetic waves that may leave the magnetosphere directly. In this model, the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability is responsible for core emission pattern and the Cherenkov-drift instability produces conal emission. The conditions for the development of the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability are satisfied for both typical and millisecond pulsars provided that the streaming energy of the bulk pl...

  14. Beam calibration of radio telescopes with drones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Chihway; Refregier, Alexandre; Amara, Adam; Glauser, Adrian; Casura, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    We present a multi-frequency far-field beam map for the 5m dish telescope at the Bleien Observatory measured using a commercially available drone. We describe the hexacopter drone used in this experiment, the design of the flight pattern, and the data analysis scheme. This is the first application of this calibration method to a single dish radio telescope in the far-field. The high signal-to-noise data allows us to characterise the beam pattern with high accuracy out to at least the 4th side-lobe. The resulting 2D beam pattern is compared with that derived from a more traditional calibration approach using an astronomical calibration source. We discuss the advantages of this method compared to other beam calibration methods. Our results show that this drone-based technique is very promising for ongoing and future radio experiments, where the knowledge of the beam pattern is key to obtaining high-accuracy cosmological and astronomical measurements.

  15. Negotiating Multichannel Sensing and Access In Cognitive Radio Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Negotiating Multichannel Sensing and Access In Cognitive Radio Wireless Networks Hua Liu§, Bhaskar the coordination among secondary users on channel sensing strategy in cognitive wireless networks. In this problem and potentially access in a cognitive radio network? If users may have a potentially different valuation of each

  16. Software Defined Radio Architecture Survey for Cognitive Testbeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risset, Tanguy

    ]. While implementing the whole radio node in software is still an utopia, many architectures now hittingSoftware Defined Radio Architecture Survey for Cognitive Testbeds Micka¨el Dardaillon, Kevin propose a classification related to the architectural organization of the pro- totypes and provide some

  17. Near-Optimal Radio Use For Wireless Network Synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohler, Eddie

    of energy. We distill a clean theoretical formulation of minimizing radio use and present near either switch their radios off to save energy (and hence, can neither send nor receive messages-hungry. As the power costs of process- ing, memory, and other computing components drop, the lifetime of a battery

  18. NearOptimal Radio Use For Wireless Network Synchronization #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovsky, Rafail

    of energy. We distill a clean theoretical formulation of minimizing radio use and present near either switch their radios o# to save energy (and hence, can neither send nor receive messages­hungry. As the power costs of process­ ing, memory, and other computing components drop, the lifetime of a battery

  19. Energy-Constrained Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    Energy-Constrained Cooperative Spectrum Sensing in Cognitive Radio Networks Xinxin Feng 1 duration to strike a balance between energy consumption and system throughput. We focus on a cooperative is an impor- tant issue in Cognitive Radio (CR) networks, which could greatly affect energy efficiency

  20. Radio-Frequency Rectification on Membrane Bound Pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujatha Ramachandran; Robert H. Blick; Daniel W. van der Weide

    2007-09-12

    We present measurements on direct radio-frequency pumping of ion channels and pores bound in bilipid membranes. We make use of newly developed microcoaxes, which allow delivering the high frequency signal in close proximity to the membrane bound proteins and ion channels. We find rectification of the radio-frequency signal, which is used to pump ions through the channels and pores.

  1. Ultra-Low Power Time Synchronization Using Passive Radio Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Ultra-Low Power Time Synchronization Using Passive Radio Receivers Yin Chen Qiang Wang Marcus Chang. In this pa- per, we present an inexpensive and ultra-low power ( of elapsed seconds. The universal time sig- nal receiver combines an off-the-shelf radio chip with an ultra-low

  2. Coronal Magnetography with FASR Magnetic Sensitivity of Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coronal Magnetography with FASR - 1 - Magnetic Sensitivity of Radio Emission There are three main radio emission mechanisms that operate in the Sun. In order of their usefulness for direct measurement of coronal magnetic fields, the broad families are gyroemission, free-free emission, and plasma emission

  3. Coronal Magnetography with FASR Magnetic Sensitivity of Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coronal Magnetography with FASR ­ 1 ­ Magnetic Sensitivity of Radio Emission There are three main radio emission mechanisms that operate in the Sun. In order of their usefulness for direct measurement of coronal magnetic fields, the broad families are gyroemission, free­free emission, and plasma emission

  4. Google's Auction for Radio and TV Ads Preliminary version

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Google's Auction for Radio and TV Ads Preliminary version Noam Nisan Jason Bayer Deepak Chandra Tal. Abstract This document describes the auction system used by Google for allocation and pricing of TV ads and Radio ads. It is based on a simultaneous ascending auction, and has been in use since September 2008. 0

  5. Energy Efficient Resource Allocation for Cognitive Radios: A Generalized Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    1 Energy Efficient Resource Allocation for Cognitive Radios: A Generalized Sensing Analysis Abdul In this paper, we propose two resource allocation schemes for energy efficient cognitive radio systems. Our-sensing information, adaptive sensing thresholds, and adaptive power to achieve an energy efficient system. We

  6. Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR COGNITIVE RADIOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering SIGNAL PROCESSING FOR COGNITIVE RADIOS (A Fall 2015 of signal processing and machine learning in achieving self-awareness, subsequent intelligent decision-making and radio reconfiguration cannot be over-emphasized. In fact, one may argue that it is signal processing

  7. ARQ PROTOCOL FEATURES FOR HF RADIO LINKS Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    ARQ PROTOCOL FEATURES FOR HF RADIO LINKS Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State University ABSTRACT The explosion of interest in using Internet-style applica- tions over wireless links prompts investigation links with Internet-style workloads. The investigation is focused on high-frequency radio links

  8. Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio Tracking of Mars Pathfinder. Analysis of radio tracking measurements from the Vi- king landers has determined the normal- ized polar. The precession is driven by the gravita- tional torque of the sun acting on Mars' oblate figure

  9. Radio tracking of Phoenix during its landing on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    Radio tracking of Phoenix during its landing on Mars Paul Withers Center for Space Physics, Boston University (withers@bu.edu) MEX/VEX Radio Science Meeting 2010.03.18-19 Bonn, Germany #12;Phoenix atmospheric for a-aero using known quantities Re-arrange: #12;Next steps · Find f(t) for Phoenix direct

  10. CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS Vancouver, B.C. V7M 3H7 #12;S-1 CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS FINAL REPORT SUMMARY The City of Prince George recently proposed to investigate the possibility

  11. MOS: A critical tool for current and future radio surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01

    Since radio continuum observations are not affected by dust obscuration, they are of immense potential diagnostic power as cosmological probes and for studying galaxy formation and evolution out to high redshifts. However, the power-law nature of radio frequency spectra ensures that ancillary spectroscopic information remains critical for studying the properties of the faint radio sources being detected in rapidly-increasing numbers on the pathway to the Square Kilometre Array. In this contribution, I present some of the key scientific motivations for exploiting the immense synergies between radio continuum observations and multi-object spectroscopic surveys. I review some of the ongoing efforts to obtain the spectra necessary to harness the huge numbers of star-forming galaxies and AGN that current and future radio surveys will detect. I also touch on the WEAVE-LOFAR survey, which will use the WEAVE spectrograph currently being built for the William Herschel Telescope to target hundreds of thousands of low f...

  12. Fossil shell emission in dying radio loud AGNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kino, M; Kawakatu, N; Orienti, M; Nagai, H; Wajima, K; Itoh, R

    2015-01-01

    We investigate shell emission associated with dying radio loud AGNs. First, based on our recent work by Ito et al. (2015), we describe the dynamical and spectral evolutions of shells after stopping the jet energy injection. We find that the shell emission overwhelms that of the radio lobes soon after stopping the jet energy injection because fresh electrons are continuously supplied into the shell via the forward shock while the radio lobes rapidly fade out without jet energy injection. We find that such fossil shells can be a new class of target sources for SKA telescope. Next, we apply the model to the nearby radio source 3C84. Then, we find that the fossil shell emission in 3C84 is less luminous in radio band while it is bright in TeV gamma-ray band and it can be detectable by CTA.

  13. The Phoenix survey: the pairing fraction of faint radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Georgakakis; B. Mobasher; L. Cram; A. Hopkins

    1999-10-07

    The significance of tidal interactions in the evolution of the faint radio population (sub-mJy) is studied using a deep and homogeneous radio survey (1.4 GHz), covering an area of 3.14 deg$^2$ and complete to a flux density of 0.4 mJy. Optical photometric and spectroscopic data are also available for this sample. A statistical approach is employed to identify candidate physical associations between radio sources and optically selected `field' galaxies. We find an excess of close pairs around optically identified faint radio sources, albeit at a low significance level, implying that the pairing fraction of the sub-mJy radio sources is similar to that of `field' galaxies (at the same magnitude limit) but higher than that of local galaxies.

  14. The Phoenix Deep Survey: A Deep Microjansky Radio Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Afonso; B. Mobasher; A. Hopkins; L. Cram

    1999-09-05

    The study of the nature of faint radio sources is of great importance since a significant fraction of these objects is thought to be composed of actively star-forming galaxies. Due to the increased sensitivity of radio telescopes, we are now not only able to catalogue large numbers of these sources in the sub-millijansky regime, but also to start the study of the nature of increasingly fainter microjansky sources. This paper presents a new very deep 1.4 GHz radio survey made as a part of the Phoenix Deep Survey, a project aimed to study the nature of the faintest radio sources. With a limiting sensitivity of 45 microJy, this new survey has allowed us to assemble a large number of sources with 1.4 GHz flux densities below 100 microJy. The resulting source counts and the analysis of the optical properties of the faintest radio sources are presented.

  15. Radio detection of high-energy cosmic rays with the Auger Engineering Radio Array (PISA 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schröder, Frank G

    2016-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is an enhancement of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina. Covering about View the $17\\,$km$^2$, AERA is the world-largest antenna array for cosmic-ray observation. It consists of more than 150 antenna stations detecting the radio signal emitted by air showers, i.e., cascades of secondary particles caused by primary cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. At the beginning, technical goals had been in focus: first of all, the successful demonstration that a large-scale antenna array consisting of autonomous stations is feasible. Moreover, techniques for calibration of the antennas and time calibration of the array have been developed, as well as special software for the data analysis. Meanwhile physics goals come into focus. At the Pierre Auger Observatory air showers are simultaneously detected by several detector systems, in particular water-Cherenkov detectors at the surface, underground muon detectors, and fluorescence telescopes, which enables cross-calibration of...

  16. Study of Calibration of Solar Radio Spectrometers and the quiet-Sun Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chengming; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying; Xu, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0-2.0 GHz, 2.6-3.8 GHz, and 5.2-7.6 GHz) during 1997-2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about $10\\%-20\\%$ at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet-Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  17. Non-thermal emission from extragalactic radio sources: a high resolution broad band (radio to X-rays) approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Brunetti

    2002-07-31

    In the framework of the study of extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on the importance of the spatial resolution at different wavelengths, and of the combination of observations at different frequency bands. In particular, a substantial step forward in this field is now provided by the new generation X-ray telescopes which are able to image radio sources in between 0.1--10 keV with a spatial resolution comparable with that of the radio telescopes (VLA) and of the optical telescopes. After a brief description of some basic aspects of acceleration mechanisms and of the radiative processes at work in the extragalactic radio sources, we will focus on a number of recent radio, optical and X-ray observations with arcsec resolution, and discuss the deriving constraints on the physics of these sources.

  18. The Radio Luminosity Function of the NEP Distant Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Branchesi; I. M. Gioia; C. Fanti; R. Fanti; R. Perley

    2005-09-06

    A complete sample of 18 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies belonging to the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey has been observed with the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz. These are the most distant clusters in the X-ray survey with redshift in the range 0.3 =0.17 mJy/beam, except for three sources, belonging to the same cluster, which have a higher peak brightness limit of 0.26 mJy/beam. The NEP field source counts are in good agreement with the source counts of a comparison survey, the VLA-VIRMOS deep field survey, indicating that the NEP sample is statistically complete. Thirty-two out of the 79 sources are within 0.2 Abell radii, twenty-two of them are considered cluster members based on spectroscopic redshifts or their optical magnitude and morphological classification. The cluster radio galaxies are used to construct the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) of distant X-ray selected clusters. A comparison with two nearby cluster RLFs shows that the NEP RLF lies above the local ones, has a steeper slope at low radio powers (<= 10^(24) W/Hz) and shows no evidence for a break at about 6 X 10^(24) W/Hz which is observed in the nearby cluster RLFs. We discuss briefly the origin and possible explanations of the differences observed in the radio properties of nearby and distant clusters of galaxies. The main result of this study is that the RLF of the distant X-ray clusters is very different from that of the local rich Abell clusters.

  19. Drift Wave Model of Rotating Radio Transients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Lomiashvili; G. Machabeli; I. Malov

    2007-09-13

    During the last few years there were discovered and deeply examined several transient neutron stars (Rotating Radio Transients). It is already well accepted that these objects are rotating neutron stars. But their extraordinary features (burst-like behavior) made necessary revision of well accepted models of pulsar interior structure. Nowadays most popular model for RRATs is precessing pulsar model, which is the subject of big discussion. We assume that these objects are pulsars with specific spin parameters. An important feature of our model, naturally explaining most of the properties of these neutron stars, is presence of very low frequency, nearly transverse drift waves propagating across the magnetic field and encircling the open field lines region of the pulsar magnetosphere.

  20. Gravitation Wave Emission from Radio Pulsars Revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Regimbau; J. A. de Freitas Pacheco

    2000-05-02

    We report a new pulsar population synthesis based on Monte Carlo techniques, aiming to estimate the contribution of galactic radio pulsars to the continuous gravitational wave emission. Assuming that the rotation periods of pulsars at birth have a Gaussian distribution, we find that the average initial period is 290 ms. The number of objects with periods equal to or less than 0.4 s, and therefore capable of being detected by an interferometric gravitational antenna like VIRGO, is of the order of 5100-7800. With integration times lasting between 2 and 3 yr, our simulations suggest that about two detections should be possible, if the mean equatorial ellipticity of the pulsars is $\\epsilon$ =10$^{-6}$. A mean ellipticity an order of magnitude higher increases the expected number of detections to 12-18, whereas for $\\epsilon < 10^{-6}$, no detections are expected

  1. Neutral hydrogen absorption towards Fast Radio Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fender, Rob

    2015-01-01

    If Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) are truly at astronomical, in particular cosmological, distances, they represent one of the most exciting discoveries in astrophysics of the past decade. However, the distance to FRBs has, to date, been estimated purely from their excess dispersion, and has not been corroborated by any independent means. In this paper we discuss the possibility of detecting neutral hydrogen absorption against FRBs both from spiral arms within our own galaxy, or from intervening extragalactic HI clouds. In either case a firm lower limit on the distance to the FRB would be established. Absorption against galactic spiral arms may already be detectable for bright low-latitude bursts with existing facilities, and should certainly be so by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). Absorption against extragalactic HI clouds, which would confirm the cosmological distances of FRBs, should also be detectable with the SKA, and maybe also Arecibo. Quantitatively, we estimate that SKA1-MID should be able to detect extr...

  2. MicrobeWorld Radio and Communications Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara Hyde

    2006-11-22

    MicrobeWorld is a 90-second feature broadcast daily on more than 90 public radio stations and available from several sources as a podcast, including www.microbeworld.org. The feature has a strong focus on the use and adapatbility of microbes as alternative sources of energy, in bioremediation, their role in climate, and especially the many benefits and scientific advances that have resulting from decoding microbial genomes. These audio features are permanantly archived on an educational outreach site, microbeworld.org, where they are linked to the National Science Education Standards. They are also being used by instructors at all levels to introduce students to the multiple roles and potential of microbes, including a pilot curriculum program for middle-school students in New York.

  3. Axion Stars and Fast Radio Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iwazaki

    2014-10-23

    We show that fast radio bursts arise from collisions between axion stars and neutron stars. The bursts are emitted in the atmosphere of the neutron stars. The observed frequencies of the bursts are given by the axion mass $m_a$ such as $m_a/2\\pi\\simeq 1.4\\,\\mbox{GHz}\\,\\big(m_a/(6\\times 10^{-6}\\mbox{eV})\\big)$. From the event rate $\\sim 10^{-3}$ per year in a galaxy, we can determine the mass $\\sim 10^{-11}M_{\\odot}$ of the axion stars. Using these values we can explain short durations ( $\\sim $ms ) and amount of radiation energies ( $\\sim 10^{43}$GeV ) of the bursts.

  4. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  5. An improved integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbott, S.R.

    1987-10-05

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole is provided having an elongate housing with an elongate central axis and top, bottom and two side walls symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes formed integrally with the walls, the vanes each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls, and the vanes integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane passing through the tip of the vane, the walls having flat mounting surfaces at right angles to and parallel to the control plane, respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other. 4 figs.

  6. On the Nature of Pulsar Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Lyutikov; Roger D. Blandford; George Machabeli

    1998-06-27

    A theory of pulsar radio emission generation, in which the observed waves are produced directly by maser-type plasma instabilities operating at the anomalous cyclotron-Cherenkov resonance $\\omega- k_{\\parallel} v_{\\parallel} + \\omega_B/ \\gamma_{res}=0$ and the Cherenkov-drift resonance $\\omega- k_{\\parallel} v_{\\parallel} - k_{\\perp} u_d =0$, is capable of explaining the main observational characteristics of pulsar radio emission. The instabilities are due to the interaction of the fast particles from the primary beam and the tail of the distribution with the normal modes of a strongly magnetized one-dimensional electron-positron plasma. The waves emitted at these resonances are vacuum-like, electromagnetic waves that may leave the magnetosphere directly. In this model, the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability is responsible for core emission pattern and the Cherenkov-drift instability produces conal emission. The conditions for the development of the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability are satisfied for both typical and millisecond pulsars provided that the streaming energy of the bulk plasma is not very high $\\gamma_p \\approx 10$. In a typical pulsar the cyclotron-Cherenkov and Cherenkov-drift resonances occur in the outer parts of magnetosphere at $r_{res} \\approx 10^9 cm$. This theory can account for various aspects of pulsar phenomenology including the morphology of the pulses, their polarization properties and their spectral behavior. We propose several observational tests for the theory. The most prominent prediction are the high altitudes of the emission region and the linear polarization of conal emission in the plane orthogonal to the local osculating plane of the magnetic field.

  7. Old stellar populations in distant radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Dunlop

    1998-01-13

    I describe the current status of our attempts to determine the age of the oldest known stellar populations at high redshift, in the red mJy radio galaxies 53W091 ($z = 1.55$) and 53W069 ($z = 1.43$). During the past year the original conclusion of Dunlop et al. (1996) - that 53W091 is $>3$ Gyr old - has been questioned from two, basically orthogonal directions. First, reports that the near-infrared light from 53W091 is highly polarized have cast some doubt on whether its red colour is genuinely due to an old population of stars. Second, assuming that all the light is indeed due to stars, it has been claimed that 53W091 is in fact only 1-2 Gyr old. Here I present a preliminary analysis of new infrared polarimetric observations of 53W091 which show that the first of these criticisms can be rejected with very high confidence. I then explore why different modellers have derived different ages for 53W091, and present new model fits to the spectrum of 53W069 which demonstrate that different spectral synthesis codes are certainly in good agreement that this galaxy is 3-4 Gyr old. Finally I present a preliminary analysis of the morphologies and scale-lengths of 53W091 and 53W069 as derived from new I-band WFPC2 HST images, and compare the results with those for 3CR galaxies at comparable redshifts. I conclude that the scalelengths and luminosities of radio galaxies at $z \\simeq 1.5$ appear to scale together as would be predicted from the Kormendy relation for low-redshift elliptical galaxies.

  8. The Tunka Radio Extension (Tunka-Rex): Radio Measurements of Cosmic Rays in Siberia (PISA 2015)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schröder, F G; Budnev, N M; Gress, O A; Haungs, A; Hiller, R; Huege, T; Kazarina, Y; Kleifges, M; Konstantinov, E N; Korosteleva, E E; Kostunin, D; Krömer, O; Kuzmichev, L A; Lubsandorzhiev, N; Mirgazov, R R; Monkhoev, R; Pakhorukov, A; Pankov, L; Prosin, V V; Rubtsov, G I; Wischnewski, R; Zagorodnikov, A

    2015-01-01

    The Tunka observatory is located close to Lake Baikal in Siberia, Russia. Its main detector, Tunka-133, is an array of photomultipliers measuring Cherenkov light of air showers initiated by cosmic rays in the energy range of approximately $10^{16}-10^{18}\\,$eV. In the last years, several extensions have been built at the Tunka site, e.g., a scintillator array named Tunka-Grande, a sophisticated air-Cherenkov-detector prototype named HiSCORE, and the radio extension Tunka-Rex. Tunka-Rex started operation in October 2012 and currently features 44 antennas distributed over an area of about $3\\,$km$^2$, which measure the radio emission of the same air showers detected by Tunka-133 and Tunka-Grande. Tunka-Rex is a technological demonstrator that the radio technique can provide an economic extension of existing air-shower arrays. The main scientific goal is the cross-calibration with the air-Cherenkov measurements. By this cross-calibration, the precision for the reconstruction of the energy and mass of the primary...

  9. Unusual Solar Radio Burst Observed at Decameter Wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melnik, V N; Konovalenko, A A; Rucker, H O; Frantsuzenko, A V; Dorovskyy, V V; Panchenko, M; Stanislavskyy, A A

    2015-01-01

    An unusual solar burst was observed simultaneously by two decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine) and URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) on 3 June 2011 in the frequency range 16-28 MHz. The observed radio burst has some unusual properties, which are not typical for the other types of solar radio bursts. The frequency drift rate of it was positive (about 500 kHz s$^{-1}$) at frequencies higher than 22 MHz and negative (100 kHz s$^{-1}$) at lower frequencies. The full duration of this event varies from 50 s up to 80 s, depending on the frequency. The maximum radio flux of the unusual burst reaches $\\approx 10^3$ s.f.u and its polarization does not exceed 10%. This burst has a fine frequency-time structure of unusual appearance. It consists of stripes with the frequency bandwidth 300-400 kHz. We consider that several accompanied radio and optical events observed by SOHO and STEREO spacecraft are possibly associated with the reported radio burst. A model that may interpret the observed unusual solar radio burs...

  10. Dominant Nuclear Outflow Driving Mechanisms in Powerful Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Batcheldor; Clive Tadhunter; Joanna Holt; Raffaella Morganti; Christopher P. O'Dea; David J. Axon; Anton Koekemoer

    2007-02-20

    In order to identify the dominant nuclear outflow mechanisms in Active Galactic Nuclei, we have undertaken deep, high resolution observations of two compact radio sources (PKS 1549-79 and PKS 1345+12) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Not only are these targets known to have powerful emission line outflows, but they also contain all the potential drivers for the outflows: relativistic jets, quasar nuclei and starbursts. ACS allows the compact nature (<0.15") of these radio sources to be optically resolved for the first time. Through comparison with existing radio maps we have seen consistency in the nuclear position angles of both the optical emission line and radio data. There is no evidence for bi-conical emission line features on the large-scale and there is a divergance in the relative position angles of the optical and radio structure. This enables us to exclude starburst driven outflows. However, we are unable to clearly distinguish between radiative AGN wind driven outflows and outflows powered by relativistic radio jets. The small scale bi-conical features, indicative of such mechanisms could be below the resolution limit of ACS, especially if aligned close to the line of sight. In addition, there may be offsets between the radio and optical nuclei induced by heavy dust obscuration, nebular continuum or scattered light from the AGN.

  11. The Complex North Transition Region of Centaurus A: Radio Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Susan G; Owen, Frazer N

    2015-01-01

    We present deep radio images of the inner 50 kpc of Centaurus A, taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 90cm. We focus on the Transition Regions between the inner galaxy - including the active nucleus, inner radio lobes, and star-forming disk - and the outer radio lobes. We detect previously unknown extended emission around the Inner Lobes, including radio emission from the star-forming disk. We find that the radio-loud part of the North Transition Region, known as the North Middle Lobe, is significantly overpressured relative to the surrounding ISM. We see no evidence for a collimated flow from the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) through this region. Our images show that the structure identified by Morganti et al. (1999) as a possible large-scale jet appears to be part of a narrow ridge of emission within the broader, diffuse, radio-loud region. This knotty radio ridge is coincident with other striking phenomena: compact X-ray knots, ionized gas filaments, and streams of young stars. Several s...

  12. The Phoenix radio survey: the angular correlation function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Georgakakis; B. Mobasher; L. Cram; A. Hopkins; M. Rowan-Robinson

    1999-10-18

    Using the Phoenix radio survey, a homogeneous survey selected at 1.4GHz and covering an area of ~3deg^2, we analyse the clustering of the sub-mJy radio population using angular correlation function analysis. Extensive simulations are carried out to investigate the significance of the estimated angular correlation amplitudes. Our analysis show that for the S_1.4>0.5mJy sub-samples the radio source distribution is anisotropic at the 2$\\sigma$ significance level. Additionally, we estimate upper limits for the angular correlation amplitudes that, despite the large uncertainties, are in good agreement with the amplitude estimates for sources brighter than 1mJy, detected in the FIRST radio survey (Cress {et al.} 1997). Adopting a radio luminosity function and assuming an evolving spatial correlation function of the form \\xi(r)=(r/r_{o})^{-\\gamma} (1+z)^{-(3+\\epsilon)}, with the evolution parametrised by \\epsilon, we find an upper limit for the angular correlation length r_{o}~9h^-1Mpc for S_1.4>0.5mJy and \\gamma=2.1. This agrees well with the value r_{o}~6-8h^-1Mpc estimated from the FIRST radio survey for sources brighter than 1mJy. Additionally, we quantify the characteristics, in terms of areal coverage and limiting flux density, of future deep radio surveys to yield a significant correlation amplitude detection and to explore possible changes of the correlation amplitude with flux density.

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration – Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building Oakland, CA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-01

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be build at Oakland, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  14. High-power radio-frequency attenuation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1981-12-30

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  15. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, D.J.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1993-11-30

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents. 6 figures.

  16. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Daniel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents.

  17. Radio emission from Colliding-Wind Binaries: Observations and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Dougherty; J. M. Pittard; E. P. O'Connor

    2005-10-18

    We have developed radiative transfer models of the radio emission from colliding-wind binaries (CWB) based on a hydrodynamical treatment of the wind-collision region (WCR). The archetype of CWB systems is the 7.9-yr period binary WR140, which exhibits dramatic variations at radio wavelengths. High-resolution radio observations of WR140 permit a determination of several system parameters, particularly orbit inclination and distance, that are essential for any models of this system. A model fit to data at orbital phase 0.9 is shown, and some short comings of our model described.

  18. A pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR0 radio-galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldi, Ranieri D; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys.We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources of the SDSS/NVSS sample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with only one exception of a FRI/FRII source extended over $\\sim$40 kpc. We isolate the radio core component in most of them. The sample splits into two groups. Four sources have small black hole (BH) masses (mostly $\\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\\odot}$) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission and associated with radio-quiet AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud AGN, which live in red massive ($\\sim10^{11}$ M$_{\\odot}$) early-type galaxies, with large BH masses ($\\gtrsim$10$^{8}$ M$_{\\odot}$), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteris...

  19. Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet Gamma-Ray Pulsars from the Galactic Plane and the Gould Belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonthier, P. L.

    2005-03-17

    We present recent results of a pulsar population synthesis study in the polar cap model that includes the Parkes Multibeam Pulsar Survey, realistic beam geometries for radio and {gamma}-ray emission from neutron stars born in the Galactic disc as well as the local Gould Belt. We include nine radio surveys to normalize the simulated results from the Galactic disc to the number of radio pulsars observed by the group of selected surveys. In normalizing the contribution of the Gould Belt, we use results from a recent study that indicates a supernova rate in the Gould Belt of 3 to 5 times that of the local region of the Galactic plane leading to {approx}100 neutron stars born in the Gould Belt during the last 5 Myr. Our simulations include the dynamical evolution of the Gould Belt where neutron stars are produced in the plane of the Gould Belt during the past 5 Myr. We discuss the simulated numbers of radio-quiet (those below flux threshold of radio surveys) and radio-loud, {gamma}-ray pulsars from the Galactic disc and the Gould belt observed by {gamma}-ray telescopes EGRET, AGILE and GLAST. They suggest that about 35 of the unidentified EGRET sources could be (mostly radio-loud) {gamma}-ray pulsars with 2/3 of them born in the Galactic disc and 1/3 in the Gould Belt.

  20. High Energy Gamma-Ray Observations of the Crab Nebula and Pulsar with the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oser, S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hanna, D S; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schuette, D R; Theoret, C G; Tumer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2015-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a new ground-based atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for gamma-ray astronomy. STACEE uses the large mirror area of a solar heliostat facility to achieve a low energy threshold. A prototype experiment which uses 32 heliostat mirrors with a total mirror area of ~ 1200\\unit{m^2} has been constructed. This prototype, called STACEE-32, was used to search for high energy gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula and Pulsar. Observations taken between November 1998 and February 1999 yield a strong statistical excess of gamma-like events from the Crab, with a significance of $+6.75\\sigma$ in 43 hours of on-source observing time. No evidence for pulsed emission from the Crab Pulsar was found, and the upper limit on the pulsed fraction of the observed excess was E_{th}) = (2.2 \\pm 0.6 \\pm 0.2) \\times 10^{-10}\\unit{photons cm^{-2} s^{-1}}. The observed flux is in agreement with a continuation to lower energies of the power law spectrum seen at TeV energies...

  1. Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, K M

    1957-01-01

    Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

  2. Radio Wave Propagation in Metal Train Compartments MSc thesis in Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    #12;#12;Radio Wave Propagation in Metal Train Compartments MSc thesis in Embedded Systems Faculty Yaowen Khee January 12, 2009 #12;#12;Author Yaowen Khee yb.khee@gmail.com Title Radio Wave Propagation of multiple nodes, each with the ability to communicate using radio waves. The characteristics of the radio

  3. On the antenna calibration of space radio instruments using the galactic background: General formulas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and application to STEREO/WAVES, Radio Sci., 46, RS2008, doi:10.1029/2010RS004464. 1. Introduction [2] Radio apply these rela- tions to the antenna calibration of the STEREO/WAVES (S/WAVES) radio instrumentOn the antenna calibration of space radio instruments using the galactic background: General

  4. Exploiting Radio Irregularity in the Internet of Things for Automated People Counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T, suffers from radio irregularity ­ a phenomenon referring to radio waves being selectively absorbedExploiting Radio Irregularity in the Internet of Things for Automated People Counting Wei-chuan Lin. Radio irregularity is often regarded as a problem in wireless communications but, with the envisioned

  5. Ulysses Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at High Southern Heliographic Latitudes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Ulysses Radio and Plasma Wave Observations at High Southern Heliographic Latitudes R. G. Stone, R-Frey, R. Manning, M. J. Reiner, J. L. Steinberg, G. Thejappa Ulysses spacecraft radio and plasma wave wind. Radio and plasma wave observations, such as those made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave

  6. 30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Radio Detection of UltraHigh Energy Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    offers a number of interesting advantages. Since radio waves suffer no attenuation, radio measurements30TH INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE Radio Detection of Ultra­High Energy Cosmic Rays HEINO: The radio technique for the detection of cosmic particles has seen a major revival in recent years. New

  7. Intrinsic advantages of the w component and spherical imaging for wide-field radio interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEwen, Jason

    . Next-generation radio interferometers, such as the Square Kilometre Array1 (SKA) [1], will inherently

  8. 4.1.2.8 Radio bursts of the nonthermal sun Arnold O. Benz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4.1.2.8 Radio bursts of the non­thermal sun Arnold O. Benz The time scale of the radio flux. The dis­ tinctions and classifications by radio astronomers should not be considered as se­ mantic described in the previous chap­ ter. 1 Solar radio bursts Enhancements shorter than about one hour form

  9. THE JETS IN FRII RADIO GALAXIES WITH Z ! 0:3 MARTIN HARDCASTLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardcastle, Martin

    THE JETS IN FRII RADIO GALAXIES WITH Z ! 0:3 MARTIN HARDCASTLE Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory, Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHE, UK 1. Introduction If we believe that jets trace radio galaxy with compact hot spots. Until recently the detection rate of jets in FRII radio galaxies

  10. EXAMINING THE RADIO-LOUD/RADIO-QUIET DICHOTOMY WITH NEW CHANDRA AND VLA OBSERVATIONS OF 13 UGC GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharb, P.; Axon, D. J.; Robinson, A.; Capetti, A.; Balmaverde, B.; Chiaberge, M.; Macchetto, D.; Grandi, P.; Giovannini, G.; Montez, R.

    2012-04-15

    We present the results from new {approx}15 ks Chandra-ACIS and 4.9 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) observations of 13 galaxies hosting low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This completes the multiwavelength study of a sample of 51 nearby early-type galaxies described in Capetti and Balmaverde and Balmaverde and Capetti. The aim of the three previous papers was to explore the connection between the host galaxies and AGN activity in a radio-selected sample. We detect nuclear X-ray emission in eight sources and radio emission in all but one (viz., UGC 6985). The new VLA observations improve the spatial resolution by a factor of 10: the presence of nuclear radio sources in 12 of the 13 galaxies confirms their AGN nature. As previously indicated, the behavior of the X-ray and radio emission in these sources depends strongly on the form of their optical surface brightness profiles derived from Hubble Space Telescope imaging, i.e., on their classification as 'core', 'power-law', or 'intermediate' galaxies. With more than twice the number of 'power-law' and 'intermediate' galaxies compared to previous work, we confirm with a much higher statistical significance that these galaxies lie well above the radio-X-ray correlation established in Fanaroff-Riley type I radio galaxies and the low-luminosity 'core' galaxies. This result highlights the fact that the 'radio-loud/radio-quiet' dichotomy is a function of the host galaxy's optical surface brightness profile. We present radio-optical-X-ray spectral indices for all 51 sample galaxies. Survival statistics point to significant differences in the radio-to-optical and radio-to-X-ray spectral indices between the 'core' and 'power-law galaxies (Gehan's Generalized Wilcoxon test probability p for the two classes being statistically similar is <10{sup -5}), but not in the optical-to-X-ray spectral indices (p = 0.25). Therefore, the primary difference between the 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies is in their ability to launch powerful radio outflows. This result is consistent with the hypothesis of different formation processes and evolution histories in 'core' and 'power-law' galaxies: major mergers are likely to have created 'core' galaxies, while minor mergers were instrumental in the creation of 'power-law' galaxies.

  11. ATLAS: Deep Radio Observations of Six Square Degrees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray P. Norris; Enno Middelberg; Brian J. Boyle

    2007-01-12

    We are using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to image about six square degrees surrounding the Chandra Deep Field South and European Large Area ISO Survey - South 1 regions, with the aim of producing the widest deep radio survey ever attempted, in fields with deep optical, infrared, and X-ray data. Our goal is to penetrate the heavy dust extinction which is found in active galaxies at all redshifts, and study the star formation activity and active galactic nuclei buried within. Although we are only about half-way through the survey, our data are proving remarkably fruitful. For example, we have discovered a new and unexpected class of object (the Infrared-Faint Radio Sources), we have found that the radio-FIR correlation extends to low flux densities, and we havefound powerful AGN-like radio objects in galaxies with a star-forming SED.

  12. Multiobjective optimization of a radio telescope array with site constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohanim, Babak, 1980-

    2004-01-01

    The next generation of radio telescope interferometric arrays requires careful design of the array configuration to optimize the performance and minimize the cost of the overall system while adhering to site constraints. ...

  13. Radio frequency identification (RFID) applications in semiconductor manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassett, David Ian, 1971-

    2004-01-01

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) has an enormous potential impact within the semiconductor supply chain, especially within semiconductor manufacturing. The end benefit of RFID will be in the mass serialization, and ...

  14. Enhancing the energy efficiency of radio base stations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtkamp, Hauke Andreas

    2014-06-30

    This thesis is concerned with the energy efficiency of cellular networks. It studies the dominant power consumer in future cellular networks, the Long Term Evolution (LTE) radio Base Station (BS), and proposes mechanisms ...

  15. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain ...

  16. Circuits and passive components for radio-frequency power conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Yehui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This thesis focuses on developing technology for high efficiency power converters operating at very high frequencies. The work in the thesis involves two aspects of such converters: rf (radio-frequency) power circuit design ...

  17. Operator and radio resource sharing in multi-carrier environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teeraparpwong, Pongsakorn

    2009-01-01

    a Radio Network System (RNS). RNSs are interconnected toBSC MS BTS CM SM RB UI PS-CN RNS Internet UE UI UE Node B CMavailable bandwidth at each RNS/BSS and donating available

  18. Cognitive Radio Network as Wireless Sensor Network (II): Security Consideration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Radio Institute, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Center for Manufacturing Research [2], in which a mali- cious CR node can inject false information on the spectrum en- vironment

  19. Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Adventures in Radio Astronomy Instrumentation and Signal Processing by Peter Leonard Mc Alan Langman, Karoo Array Telescope 1 Center for Astronomy Signal Processing and Electronics Research and implementation of several instruments for digi- tizing and processing analogue astronomical signals collected

  20. Performance Analysis of Dispersed Spectrum Cognitive Radio Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2011-02-22

    Dispersed spectrum cognitive radio systems represent a promising approach to exploit the utilization of spectral resources to full extent. Therefore, the performance analysis of such systems is conducted in this research. The Average symbol error...

  1. Radio Resource Management for Green Wireless Networks Cristina Comaniciu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandayam, Narayan

    energy sources (e.g. solar cells and wind turbines). Although research on the design of green radio battery power for mobile terminals and wireless sensors. Because of the focus on mobile terminals

  2. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schirotzek, Andre

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents experiments investigating the phase diagram of ultracold atomic Fermi gases using radio-frequency spectroscopy. The tunability of many experimental parameters including the temperature, the interparticle ...

  3. Search for Axion Radio Broadcasts from the Galaxy | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Search for Axion Radio Broadcasts from the Galaxy November 23, 2015 3:30PM to 4:30PM Presenter Aaron Chou, Fermilab Location Building 203, Room R150 Type Seminar Abstract:...

  4. Radio-frequency probes of Antarctic ice at South Pole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Besson, David Zeke; Kravchenko, I.

    2013-05-16

    consistent with measurements in East Antarctica. Combined with other radio echo sounding data, we conclude that observed birefringent asymmetries at South Pole are generated entirely in the lower half of the ice sheet. By contrast, birefringent asymmetries...

  5. Observational tests of hurricane intensity estimations using GPS radio occultations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergados, Panagiotis

    This study presents a novel approach to estimating the intensity of hurricanes using temperature profiles from Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPSRO) measurements. Previous research has shown that the temperature ...

  6. MEASURING THE JET POWER OF FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO QUASARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabala, S. S.; Santoso, J. S.; Godfrey, L. E. H.

    2012-09-10

    We use frequency-dependent position shifts of flat-spectrum radio cores to estimate the kinetic power of active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets. We find a correlation between the derived jet powers and AGN narrow-line luminosity, consistent with the well-known relation for radio galaxies and steep spectrum quasars. This technique can be applied to intrinsically weak jets even at high redshift.

  7. Intranight optical variability of radio-quiet and radio lobe dominated quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Stalin; Gopal-Krishna; Ram Sagar; Paul J. Wiita

    2003-06-19

    We present results of a programme of multi-epoch, intra-night optical monitoring of a sample of non-blazar type AGN, which includes seven radio-quiet QSOs (RQQs) and an equal number of radio-loud, lobe-dominated quasars (LDQs), covering a redshift range from about 0.2 to 2.0. These two sets of optically bright and intrinsically luminous QSOs are well matched in the redshift-optical luminosity ($z - M_B$) plane. Our CCD monitoring covered a total of 61 nights with an average of 6.1 hours of densely sampled monitoring of just a single QSO per night, thereby achieving a typical detection threshold of $\\sim 1$% variation over the night. Unambiguous detection of intra-night variability(INOV) amplitudes in the range 1$-$3% on day-like or shorter time scales were thus made for both RQQs and LDQs. Based on these clear detections of INOV, we estimate duty cycles of 17% and 9% for RQQs and LDQs, respectively; inclusion of the two cases of probable variations of LDQs would raise the duty cycle to 15% for LDQs. The similarity in the duty cycle and amplitude of INOV for the RQQs and LDQs suggests, firstly, that the radio loudness alone does not guarantee an enhanced INOV in QSOs and,secondly, that as in LDQs, relativistic jets may also be present in RQQs. We argue that, as compared to BL Lacs, the conspicuously milder, rarer and possibly slower INOV of RQQs and LDQs, can in fact be readily understood in terms of their having optical synchrotron jets which are modestly misaligned from us,but are otherwise intrinsically as relativistic and active as the jets in BL Lacs.

  8. Fourier phase analysis in radio-interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francois Levrier; Edith Falgarone; Francois Viallefond

    2006-06-09

    Most statistical tools used to characterize the complex structures of the interstellar medium can be related to the power spectrum, and therefore to the Fourier amplitudes of the observed fields. To tap into the vast amount of information contained in the Fourier phases, one may consider the probability distribution function (PDF) of phase increments, and the related concepts of phase entropy and phase structure quantity. We use these ideas here with the purpose of assessing the ability of radio-interferometers to detect and recover this information. By comparing current arrays such as the VLA and Plateau de Bure to the future ALMA instrument, we show that the latter is definitely needed to achieve significant detection of phase structure, and that it will do so even in the presence of a fair amount of atmospheric phase fluctuations. We also show that ALMA will be able to recover the actual "amount'' of phase structure in the noise-free case, if multiple configurations are used.

  9. Radio wave emissions due to gravitational radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattias Marklund; Gert Brodin; Peter Dunsby

    2000-02-29

    We consider the interaction of a weak gravitational wave with electromagnetic fields in a thin plasma on a Minkowski background spacetime using the 1+3 orthonormal frame formalism. Because gravitational and electromagnetic waves satisfy the same dispersion relation, electromagnetic waves can be effectively generated as a result of this interaction. In the case of the interaction with a static magnetic field, the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves depends on the size of the excitation region in which the magnetic field is contained. It is argued that due to the presence of a plasma this process can also lead to the generation of higher harmonics of the original mode. Estimates are given for this effect in the case of a binary pulsar and a cold electron plasma. It is found that the emmited radiation will lie in the radio frequency band. We also speculate on the possible relevance of this process on situations in cosmology, in particular whether this could be used to constrain primordial magnetic fields.

  10. Antenna unit and radio base station therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuwahara, Mikio; Doi, Nobukazu; Suzuki, Toshiro; Ishida, Yuji; Inoue, Takashi; Niida, Sumaru

    2007-04-10

    Phase and amplitude deviations, which are generated, for example, by cables connecting an array antenna of a CDMA base station and the base station, are calibrated in the baseband. The base station comprises: an antenna apparatus 1; couplers 2; an RF unit 3 that converts a receive signal to a baseband signal, converts a transmit signal to a radio frequency, and performs power control; an A/D converter 4 for converting a receive signal to a digital signal; a receive beam form unit 6 that multiplies the receive signal by semi-fixed weight; a despreader 7 for this signal input; a time-space demodulator 8 for demodulating user data; a despreader 9 for probe signal; a space modulator 14 for user data; a spreader 13 for user signal; a channel combiner 12; a Tx calibrater 11 for controlling calibration of a signal; a D/A converter 10; a unit 16 for calculation of correlation matrix for generating a probe signal used for controlling an Rx calibration system and a TX calibration system; a spreader 17 for probe signal; a power control unit 18; a D/A converter 19; an RF unit 20 for probe signal; an A/D converter 21 for signal from the couplers 2; and a despreader 22.

  11. Trirotron: triode rotating beam radio frequency amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lebacqz, Jean V. (Stanford, CA)

    1980-01-01

    High efficiency amplification of radio frequencies to very high power levels including: establishing a cylindrical cloud of electrons; establishing an electrical field surrounding and coaxial with the electron cloud to bias the electrons to remain in the cloud; establishing a rotating electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the steady field, the circular path of the rotating field being one wavelength long, whereby the peak of one phase of the rotating field is used to accelerate electrons in a beam through the bias field in synchronism with the peak of the rotating field so that there is a beam of electrons continuously extracted from the cloud and rotating with the peak; establishing a steady electrical field that surrounds and is coaxial with the rotating field for high-energy radial acceleration of the rotating beam of electrons; and resonating the rotating beam of electrons within a space surrounding the second field, the space being selected to have a phase velocity equal to that of the rotating field to thereby produce a high-power output at the frequency of the rotating field.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Salinity Evaluation and Minimization Plan for Cooling Towers and Mechanical Equipment Discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daily III, W D

    2010-02-24

    This document was created to comply with the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (CVRWQCB) Waste Discharge Requirement (Order No. 98-148). This order established new requirements to assess the effect of and effort required to reduce salts in process water discharged to the subsurface. This includes the review of technical, operational, and management options available to reduce total dissolved solids (TDS) concentrations in cooling tower and mechanical equipment water discharges at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Experimental Test Site (Site 300) facility. It was observed that for the six cooling towers currently in operation, the total volume of groundwater used as make up water is about 27 gallons per minute and the discharge to the subsurface via percolation pits is 13 gallons per minute. The extracted groundwater has a TDS concentration of 700 mg/L. The cooling tower discharge concentrations range from 700 to 1,400 mg/L. There is also a small volume of mechanical equipment effluent being discharged to percolation pits, with a TDS range from 400 to 3,300 mg/L. The cooling towers and mechanical equipment are maintained and operated in a satisfactory manner. No major leaks were identified. Currently, there are no re-use options being employed. Several approaches known to reduce the blow down flow rate and/or TDS concentration being discharged to the percolation pits and septic systems were reviewed for technical feasibility and cost efficiency. These options range from efforts as simple as eliminating leaks to implementing advanced and innovative treatment methods. The various options considered, and their anticipated effect on water consumption, discharge volumes, and reduced concentrations are listed and compared in this report. Based on the assessment, it was recommended that there is enough variability in equipment usage, chemistry, flow rate, and discharge configurations that each discharge location at Site 300 should be considered separately when deciding on an approach for reducing the salt discharge to the subsurface. The smaller units may justify moderate changes to equipment, and may benefit from increased cleaning frequencies, more accurate and suitable chemical treatment, and sources of make up water and discharge re-use. The larger cooling towers would be more suitable for automated systems where they don't already exist, re-circulation and treatment of blow down water, and enhanced chemical dosing strategies. It may be more technically feasible and cost efficient for the smaller cooling towers to be replaced by closed loop dry coolers or hybrid towers. There are several potential steps that could be taken at each location to reduce the TDS concentration and/or water use. These include: sump water filtration, minimization of drift, accurate chemical dosing, and use of scale and corrosion coupons for chemical calibration. The implementation of some of these options could be achieved by a step-wise approach taken at two representative facilities. Once viable prototype systems have been proven in the field, systematic implementation should proceed for the remaining systems, with cost, desired reduction, and general feasibility taken into consideration for such systems.

  13. Radio Afterglows and Host Galaxies of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Long-Biao; Huang, Yong-Feng; Wu, Xue-Feng; Kong, Si-Wei; Li, Di; Chang, Heon-Young; Choi, Chul-Sung

    2015-01-01

    Considering the contribution of the emission from the host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) to the radio afterglows, we investigate the effect of host galaxies on observations statistically. For the three types of events, e.g. low-luminosity, standard and high-luminosity GRBs, it is found that a tight correlation exists between the ratio of the radio flux (RRF) of host galaxy to the total radio peak emission and the observational frequency. Especially, toward lower frequencies, the contribution from the host increases significantly. The correlation can be used to get a useful estimate for the radio brightness of those host galaxies which only have very limited radio afterglow data. Using this prediction, we re-considered the theoretical radio afterglow light curves for four kinds of events, i.e. high-luminosity, low-luminosity, standard and failed GRBs, taking into account the contribution from the host galaxies and aiming at exploring the detectability of these events by the Five-hundred-meter Aperture Sp...

  14. Exploring the magnetized cosmic web through low frequency radio emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Battaglia; C. Pfrommer; J. L. Sievers; J. R. Bond; T. A. Ensslin

    2009-08-07

    Recent improvements in the capabilities of low frequency radio telescopes provide a unique opportunity to study thermal and non-thermal properties of the cosmic web. We argue that the diffuse, polarized emission from giant radio relics traces structure formation shock waves and illuminates the large-scale magnetic field. To show this, we model the population of shock-accelerated relativistic electrons in high-resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy clusters and calculate the resulting radio synchrotron emission. We find that individual shock waves correspond to localized peaks in the radio surface brightness map which enables us to measure Mach numbers for these shocks. We show that the luminosities and number counts of the relics strongly depend on the magnetic field properties, the cluster mass and dynamical state. By suitably combining different cluster data, including Faraday rotation measures, we are able to constrain some macroscopic parameters of the plasma at the structure formation shocks, such as models of turbulence. We also predict upper limits for the properties of the warm-hot intergalactic medium, such as its temperature and density. We predict that the current generation of radio telescopes (LOFAR, GMRT, MWA, LWA) have the potential to discover a substantially larger sample of radio relics, with multiple relics expected for each violently merging cluster. Future experiments (SKA) should enable us to further probe the macroscopic parameters of plasma physics in clusters.

  15. Radio faint AGN: a tale of two populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padovani, P; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Mainieri, V; Tozzi, P

    2015-01-01

    We study the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) Very Large Array sample, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 32.5 microJy at the field centre and redshift ~ 4, and covers ~ 0.3 deg^2. Number counts are presented for the whole sample while the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions are derived for active galactic nuclei (AGN). The faint radio sky contains two totally distinct AGN populations, characterised by very different evolutions, luminosity functions, and Eddington ratios: radio-quiet (RQ)/radiative-mode, and radio-loud/jet-mode AGN. The radio power of RQ AGN evolves ~ (1+z)^2.5, similarly to star-forming galaxies, while the number density of radio-loud ones has a peak at ~ 0.5 and then declines at higher redshifts. The number density of radio-selected RQ AGN is consistent with that of X-ray selected AGN, which shows that we are sampling the same population. The unbiased fraction of radiative-mode RL AGN, derived from our own and previously published data, is a strong funct...

  16. The 18th Annual IEEE International Symposium on Personal, Indoor and Mobile Radio Communications (PIMRC'07) IMPLEMENTING BACKSCATTER RADIO FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PIMRC'07) IMPLEMENTING BACKSCATTER RADIO FOR WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Giovanni Vannucci Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Cambridge USA Aggelos Bletsas RadioCommunications Lab (RCL) Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece Darren Leigh Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories, Cambridge USA

  17. DEEP SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES: HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Ray P.; Mao, Minnie; Afonso, Jose; Cava, Antonio; Farrah, Duncan; Oliver, Seb; Huynh, Minh T.; Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Surace, Jason; Ivison, R. J.; Jarvis, Matt; Lacy, Mark; Maraston, Claudia; Middelberg, Enno; Seymour, Nick

    2011-07-20

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRSs) are a rare class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelengths but very faint at infrared and optical wavelengths. Here we present sensitive near-infrared observations of a sample of these sources taken as part of the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey. Nearly all the IFRSs are undetected at a level of {approx}1 {mu}Jy in these new deep observations, and even the detections are consistent with confusion with unrelated galaxies. A stacked image implies that the median flux density is S{sub 3.6{mu}m} {approx} 0.2 {mu}Jy or less, giving extreme values of the radio-infrared flux density ratio. Comparison of these objects with known classes of object suggests that the majority are probably high-redshift radio-loud galaxies, possibly suffering from significant dust extinction.

  18. Presented at "RFI2004: Workshop on Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy"; Penticton, Canada, 16-18 July 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    of the large financial investment foreseen in the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio telescope, it will need

  19. Restarting radio activity and dust emission in radio-loud broad absorption line quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruni, G; Montenegro-Montes, F M; Brienza, M; González-Serrano, J I

    2015-01-01

    Broad absorption line quasars (BAL QSOs) are objects showing absorption from relativistic outflows, with velocities up to 0.2c. These manifest, in about 15% of quasars, as absorption troughs on the blue side of UV emission lines, such as C iv and Mg ii. In this work, we complement the information collected in the cm band for our previously presented sample of radio loud BAL QSOs with new observations at m and mm bands. Our aim is to verify the presence of old, extended radio components in the MHz range, and probe the emission of dust (linked to star formation) in the mm domain. We observed 5 sources from our sample, already presenting hints of low-frequency emission, with the GMRT at 235 and 610 MHz. Other 17 sources (more than half the sample) were observed with bolometer cameras at IRAM-30m and APEX. All sources observed with the GMRT present extended emission at a scale of tens of kpc. In some cases these measurements allow us to identify a second component in the SED, at frequencies below 1.4 GHz, beyond ...

  20. The Radio Luminosity Function of the NEP Distant Cluster Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branchesi, M; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Perley, R

    2005-01-01

    A complete sample of 18 X-ray selected clusters of galaxies belonging to the ROSAT North Ecliptic Pole (NEP) survey has been observed with the Very Large Array at 1.4 GHz. These are the most distant clusters in the X-ray survey with redshift in the range 0.3 =0.17 mJy/beam, except for three sources, belonging to the same cluster, which have a higher peak brightness limit of 0.26 mJy/beam. The NEP field source counts are in good agreement with the source counts of a comparison survey, the VLA-VIRMOS deep field survey, indicating that the NEP sample is statistically complete. Thirty-two out of the 79 sources are within 0.2 Abell radii, twenty-two of them are considered cluster members based on spectroscopic redshifts or their optical magnitude and morphological classification. The cluster radio galaxies are used to construct the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) of distant X-ray selected clusters. A comparison with two nearby cluster RLFs shows that the NEP RLF lies above the local ones, has a steeper slope at lo...

  1. Commissioning of helium injector for coupled radio frequency quadrupole and separated function radio frequency quadrupole accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, Shixiang Chen, Jia; Ren, Haitao; Zhao, Jie; Xu, Yuan; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Wenlong; Gao, Shuli; Wang, Zhi; Luo, Yuting; Guo, Zhiyu; Zhang, Ailing; Chen, Jia'er; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049

    2014-02-15

    A project to study a new type of acceleration structure has been launched at Peking University, in which a traditional radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a separated function radio frequency quadrupole are coupled in one cavity to accelerate the He+ beam. A helium injector for this project is developed. The injector consists of a 2.45 GHz permanent magnet electron cyclotron resonance ion source and a 1.16 m long low energy beam transport (LEBT). The commissioning of this injector was carried out and an onsite test was held in June 2013. A 14 mA He+ beam with the energy of 30 keV has been delivered to the end of the LEBT, where a diaphragm with the diameter of 7 mm is located. The position of the diaphragm corresponds to the entrance of the RFQ electrodes. The beam emittance and fraction were measured after the 7 mm diaphragm. Its rms emittance is about 0.14 ??mm?mrad and the fraction of He+ is about 99%.

  2. Monitoring temporal opacity fluctuations of large structures with muon tomography : a calibration experiment using a water tower tank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevin Jourde; Dominique Gibert; Jacques Marteau; Jean de Bremond d'Ars; Serge Gardien; Claude Girerd; Jean-Christophe Ianigro

    2015-04-09

    The idea of using secondary cosmic muons to scan the internal structure of a given body has known significant developments since the first archaeological application by Alvarez and collaborators on the Gizah pyramids. Recent applications cover the fields of volcanology, hydrology, civil engineering, mining, archaeology etc. Muon radiography features are essentially identical to those of medical X-ray imaging techniques. It is a contrast densitometry method using the screening effect of the body under study on the natural flux of cosmic muons. This technique is non-invasive and complements the standard geophysical techniques, e.g. electrical tomography or gravimetry. It may be applied to a large variety of geological targets, among which the domes of active volcanoes. In this context muon tomography presents the noticeable advantage to perform measurements of large volumes, with a large aperture, from a distant point, far from the potentially dangerous zones. The same conclusions apply regarding the monitoring of the volcano's activity since muon tomography provides continuous data taking, provided the muon detectors are sufficiently well designed and autonomous. Recent measurements on La Soufri\\`ere of Guadeloupe (Lesser Antilles, France) show, over a one year period, large modulations of the crossing muon flux, correlated with an increase of the activity in the dome. In order to firmly establish the sensitivity of the method and of our detectors and to disentangle the effects on the muon flux modulations induced by the volcano's hydrothermal system from those induced by other sources, e.g. atmospheric temperature and pressure, we perform a dedicated calibration experiment inside a water tower tank. We show how the method is fully capable of dynamically following fast variations in the density.

  3. Acoustic Imaging Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Behavior in the Immediate Forebay of the Water Temperature Control Tower at Cougar Dam, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Fenton; Johnson, Gary E.; Royer, Ida M.; Phillips, Nathan RJ; Hughes, James S.; Fischer, Eric S.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-10-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of juvenile Chinook salmonid (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) behavior in the immediate forebay of the Water Temperature Control (WTC) tower at Cougar Dam in 2010. The study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The overall goal of the study was to characterize juvenile salmonid behavior and movement patterns in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower for fisheries resource managers to use to make decisions on bioengineering designs for long-term structures and/or operations to facilitate safe downstream passage for juvenile salmonids. We collected acoustic imaging (Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar; DIDSON) data from February 1, 2010 through January 31, 2011 to evaluate juvenile salmonid behavior year-round in the immediate forebay surface layer of the WTC tower (within 20 m, depth 0-5 m). From October 28, 2010 through January 31, 2011 a BlueView acoustic camera was also deployed in an attempt to determine its usefulness for future studies as well as augment the DIDSON data. For the DIDSON data, we processed a total of 35 separate 24-h periods systematically covering every other week in the 12-month study. Two different 24-hour periods were processed for the BlueView data for the feasibility study. Juvenile salmonids were present in the immediate forebay of the WTC tower throughout 2010. The juvenile salmonid abundance index was low in the spring (<200 fish per sample-day), began increasing in late April and peaked in mid-May. Fish abundance index began decreasing in early June and remained low in the summer months. Fish abundance increased again in the fall, starting in October, and peaked on November 8-9. A second peak occurred on December 22. Afterwards, abundance was low for the rest of the study (through January 2011). Average fish length for juvenile salmonids during early spring 2010 was 214 {+-} 86 mm (standard deviation). From May through early November, average fish length remained relatively consistent (132 {+-} 39 mm), after which average lengths increased to 294 {+-} 145 mm for mid-November though early December. Fish behavior analysis indicates milling in front of the intake tower was the most common behavior observed throughout the study period (>50% of total fish events). The next most common movement patterns were fish traversing along the front of the tower, east-to-west and west-to-east. The proportion of fish events seen moving into (forebay to tower) or out of (tower to forebay) the tower was generally low throughout the spring, summer, and early fall for both directions combined. From mid-December 2010 through the end of the study, the combined proportions of fish moving into and out of the tower were higher than previous months of this study. Schooling behavior was most distinct in the spring from late April through mid-June. Schooling events were present in 30 - 96% of the fish events during that period, with a peak in mid-May. Schooling events were also present in the summer, but at lower numbers. Diel distributions for schooling fish during spring, fall, and winter months indicate schooling was concentrated during daylight hours. No schooling was observed at night. Predator activity was observed during late spring, when fish abundance and schooling were highest for the year, and again in the fall months when fish events increased from a summer low. No predator activity was observed in the summer, and little activity occurred during the winter months. For the two days of BlueView data analyzed for vertical distribution in the forebay, a majority of fish (>50%) were present in the middle of the water column (10 - 20 m deep). Between 20 and 41 % of total fish abundance were found in the bottom of the water column (20 - 30 m deep). Few fish were observed in the top 10 m of the water column.

  4. The Radio/Xray Connection in Abell 2029 T.E. Clarke, E.L. Blanton, & C.L. Sarazin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarazin, Craig

    The Radio/X­ray Connection in Abell 2029 T.E. Clarke, E.L. Blanton, & C.L. Sarazin Recent advances in galaxy clusters. One of the most spectacular results is the profound effect that the cluster­center radio are often host to powerful radio galaxies. Comparison of the radio and X­ray emission shows that the radio

  5. THE SPITZER HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO GALAXY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Breuck, Carlos; Galametz, Audrey; Vernet, Joel; Seymour, Nick; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, P. R. M.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.; Lacy, Mark; Rettura, Alessandro; Rocca-Volmerange, Brigitte

    2010-12-10

    We present results from a comprehensive imaging survey of 70 radio galaxies at redshifts 1 < z < 5.2 using all three cameras on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. The resulting spectral energy distributions unambiguously show a stellar population in 46 sources and hot dust emission associated with the active nucleus in 59. Using a new rest-frame S{sub 3{sub {mu}m}}/S{sub 1.6{sub {mu}m}} versus S{sub 5{sub {mu}m}}/S{sub 3{sub {mu}m}} criterion, we identify 42 sources where the rest-frame 1.6 {mu}m emission from the stellar population can be measured. For these radio galaxies, the median stellar mass is high, 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}, and remarkably constant within the range 1 < z < 3. At z>3, there is tentative evidence for a factor of two decrease in stellar mass. This suggests that radio galaxies have assembled the bulk of their stellar mass by z {approx} 3, but confirmation by more detailed decomposition of stellar and active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission is needed. The rest-frame 500 MHz radio luminosities are only marginally correlated with stellar mass but are strongly correlated with the rest-frame 5 {mu}m hot dust luminosity. This suggests that the radio galaxies have a large range of Eddington ratios. We also present new Very Large Array 4.86 and 8.46 GHz imaging of 14 radio galaxies and find that radio core dominance-an indicator of jet orientation-is strongly correlated with hot dust luminosity. While all of our targets were selected as narrow-lined, type 2 AGNs, this result can be understood in the context of orientation-dependent models if there is a continuous distribution of orientations from obscured type 2 to unobscured type 1 AGNs rather than a clear dichotomy. Finally, four radio galaxies have nearby (<6'') companions whose mid-IR colors are suggestive of their being AGNs. This may indicate an association between radio galaxy activity and major mergers.

  6. Air Shower Measurements with the LOPES Radio Antenna Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Haungs; for the LOPES collaboration

    2008-11-12

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. Since radio waves suffer very little attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers. These waves can be recorded day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. LOPES is designed as a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. The LOPES antennas are absolutely amplitude calibrated allowing to reconstruct the electric field strength which can be compared with predictions from detailed Monte Carlo simulations. We report about the analysis of correlations present in the radio signals measured by the LOPES 30 antenna array. Additionally, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPES-STAR) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory. Status, recent results of the data analysis and further perspectives of LOPES and the possible large scale application of this new detection technique are discussed.

  7. A RADIO-LOUD MAGNETAR IN X-RAY QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, Lina; Bailes, Matthew; Bhat, N. D. Ramesh; Burke-Spolaor, Sarah; Van Straten, Willem [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Mail H39, P.O. Box 218, VIC 3122 (Australia); Bates, Samuel; Kramer, Michael; Stappers, Ben [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Burgay, Marta; D'Amico, Nichi; Milia, Sabrina; Possenti, Andrea [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, localita Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, 09012 Capoterra (Italy); Johnston, Simon; Keith, Michael [Australia Telescope National Facility-CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Rea, Nanda [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Facultat de Ciencies, Torre C5-parell, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-09-20

    As part of a survey for radio pulsars with the Parkes 64 m telescope, we have discovered PSR J1622-4950, a pulsar with a 4.3 s rotation period. Follow-up observations show that the pulsar has the highest inferred surface magnetic field of the known radio pulsars (B {approx}3 x 10{sup 14} G), and it exhibits significant timing noise and appears to have an inverted spectrum. Unlike the vast majority of the known pulsar population, PSR J1622-4950 appears to switch off for many hundreds of days and even in its on-state exhibits extreme variability in its flux density. Furthermore, the integrated pulse profile changes shape with epoch. All of these properties are remarkably similar to the only two magnetars previously known to emit radio pulsations. The position of PSR J1622-4950 is coincident with an X-ray source that, unlike the other radio pulsating magnetars, was found to be in quiescence. We conclude that our newly discovered pulsar is a magnetar-the first to be discovered via its radio emission.

  8. A Search for X-ray Counterparts of Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    We describe a systematic search for X-ray counterparts of radio pulsars. The search was accomplished by cross-correlating the radio timing positions of all radio pulsars from the ATNF pulsar database (version 1.54) with archival XMM-Newton and Chandra observations publicly released by August 1st 2015. In total, 171 of the archival XMM-Newton observations and 215 of the archival Chandra datasets where found to have a radio pulsar serendipitously in the field of view. From the 283 radio pulsars covered by these datasets we identified 19 previously undetected X-ray counterparts. For 6 of them the statistics was sufficient to model the energy spectrum with one- or two-component models. For the remaining new detections and for those pulsars for which we determined an upper limit to their counting rate we computed the energy flux by assuming a Crab-like spectrum. Additionally, we derived upper limits on the neutron stars' surface temperature and on the non-thermal X-ray efficiency for those pulsars for which the sp...

  9. Dominant Nuclear Outflow Driving Mechanisms in Powerful Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batcheldor, D; Holt, J; Morganti, R; O'Dea, C P; Koekemoer, D J A A; Batcheldor, Dan; Tadhunter, Clive; Holt, Joanna; Morganti, Raffaella; Dea, Christopher P. O'; Koekemoer, David J. Axon & Anton

    2007-01-01

    In order to identify the dominant nuclear outflow mechanisms in Active Galactic Nuclei, we have undertaken deep, high resolution observations of two compact radio sources (PKS 1549-79 and PKS 1345+12) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Not only are these targets known to have powerful emission line outflows, but they also contain all the potential drivers for the outflows: relativistic jets, quasar nuclei and starbursts. ACS allows the compact nature (<0.15") of these radio sources to be optically resolved for the first time. Through comparison with existing radio maps we have seen consistency in the nuclear position angles of both the optical emission line and radio data. There is no evidence for bi-conical emission line features on the large-scale and there is a divergance in the relative position angles of the optical and radio structure. This enables us to exclude starburst driven outflows. However, we are unable to clearly distinguish between radiative AGN wi...

  10. Plasma phenomenology in astrophysical systems: Radio-sources and jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montani, Giovanni; Petitta, Jacopo

    2014-06-15

    We review the plasma phenomenology in the astrophysical sources which show appreciable radio emissions, namely Radio-Jets from Pulsars, Microquasars, Quasars, and Radio-Active Galaxies. A description of their basic features is presented, then we discuss in some details the links between their morphology and the mechanisms that lead to the different radio-emissions, investigating especially the role played by the plasma configurations surrounding compact objects (Neutron Stars, Black Holes). For the sake of completeness, we briefly mention observational techniques and detectors, whose structure set them apart from other astrophysical instruments. The fundamental ideas concerning angular momentum transport across plasma accretion disks—together with the disk-source-jet coupling problem—are discussed, by stressing their successes and their shortcomings. An alternative scenario is then inferred, based on a parallelism between astrophysical and laboratory plasma configurations, where small-scale structures can be found. We will focus our attention on the morphology of the radio-jets, on their coupling with the accretion disks and on the possible triggering phenomena, viewed as profiles of plasma instabilities.

  11. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - FEMP Technical Assistance - Federal Aviation Administration - Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-06-28

    This report documents an energy audit performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Boise, Idaho. This report presents findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) followed by a site visit of the facility under construction. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  12. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration – Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building, Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted an energy audit on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Reno, Nevada. This report presents the findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) and completed a site visit. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  13. Separating weak lensing and intrinsic alignments using radio observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittaker, Lee; Battye, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    We discuss methods for performing weak lensing using radio observations to recover information about the intrinsic structural properties of the source galaxies. Radio surveys provide unique information that can benefit weak lensing studies, such as HI emission, which may be used to construct galaxy velocity maps, and polarized synchrotron radiation; both of which provide information about the unlensed galaxy and can be used to reduce galaxy shape noise and the contribution of intrinsic alignments. Using a proxy for the intrinsic position angle of an observed galaxy, we develop techniques for cleanly separating weak gravitational lensing signals from intrinsic alignment contamination in forthcoming radio surveys. Random errors on the intrinsic orientation estimates introduce biases into the shear and intrinsic alignment estimates. However, we show that these biases can be corrected for if the error distribution is accurately known. We demonstrate our methods using simulations, where we reconstruct the shear an...

  14. Radio Jets in Galaxies with Actively Accreting Black Holes: new insights from the SDSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinevere Kauffmann; Timothy M. Heckman; Philip N. Best

    2007-09-19

    The majority of nearby radio-loud AGN are found in massive, old elliptical galaxies with weak emission lines. At high redshifts,however, most known radio AGN have strong emission lines. In this paper, we examine a subset of radio AGN with emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The probability for a nearby radio AGN to have emission lines is a strongly decreasing function of galaxy mass and an increasing function of radio luminosity above 10^25 W/Hz. Emission line and radio luminosities are correlated, but with large dispersion. At a given radio power, AGN with small black holes have higher [OIII] luminosities (which we interpret as higher accretion rates) than AGN with big black holes. However, if we scale both radio and emission line luminosities by the black hole mass, we find a correlation between normalized radio power and accretion rate in Eddington units that is independent of black hole mass. There is also a clear correlation between normalized radio power and the age of the stellar population in the galaxy. Present-day AGN with the highest normalized radio powers are confined to galaxies with small black holes. High-redshift, high radio-luminosity AGN could be explained if big black holes were similarly active at earlier cosmic epochs. To investigate why only a small fraction of emission line AGN become radio loud, we create matched samples of radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN and compare their host galaxy properties and environments. The main difference lies in their environments; our local density estimates are a factor 2 larger around the radio-loud AGN. We propose a scenario in which radio-loud AGN with emission lines are located in galaxies where accretion of both cold and hot gas can occur simultaneously. (Abridged)

  15. Fourier Modeling of the Radio Torus Surrounding Supernova 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -Y. Ng; B. M. Gaensler; L. Staveley-Smith; R. N. Manchester; M. J. Kesteven; L. Ball; A. K. Tzioumis

    2008-05-27

    We present detailed Fourier modeling of the radio remnant of Supernova 1987A, using high-resolution 9 GHz and 18 GHz data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array over the period 1992 to 2008. We develop a parameterized three-dimensional torus model for the expanding radio shell, in which the emission is confined to an inclined equatorial belt; our model also incorporates both a correction for light travel-time effects and an overall east-west gradient in the radio emissivity. By deriving an analytic expression for the two-dimensional Fourier transform of the projected three-dimensional brightness distribution, we can fit our spatial model directly to the interferometric visibility data. This provides robust estimates to the radio morphology at each epoch. The best-fit results suggest a constant remnant expansion at 4000 +/- 400 km/s over the 16-year period covered by the observations. The model fits also indicate substantial mid-latitude emission, extending to 40 degree on either side of the equatorial plane. This likely corresponds to the extra-planar structure seen in H$\\alpha$ and Ly$\\alpha$ emission from the supernova reverse shock, and broadly supports hydrodynamic models in which the complex circumstellar environment was produced by a progression of interacting winds from the progenitor. Our model quantifies the clear asymmetry seen in the radio images: we find that the eastern half of the radio remnant is consistently ~40 brighter than the western half at all epochs, which may result from an asymmetry in the ejecta distribution between these two hemispheres.

  16. Radio Remote Sensing of the Corona and the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven R. Spangler; Catherine A. Whiting

    2008-09-26

    Modern radio telescopes are extremely sensitive to plasma on the line of sight from a radio source to the antenna. Plasmas in the corona and solar wind produce measurable changes in the radio wave amplitude and phase, and the phase difference between wave fields of opposite circular polarization. Such measurements can be made of radio waves from spacecraft transmitters and extragalactic radio sources, using radio telescopes and spacecraft tracking antennas. Data have been taken at frequencies from about 80 MHz to 8000 MHz. Lower frequencies probe plasma at greater heliocentric distances. Analysis of these data yields information on the plasma density, density fluctuations, and plasma flow speeds in the corona and solar wind, and on the magnetic field in the solar corona. This paper will concentrate on the information that can be obtained from measurements of Faraday rotation through the corona and inner solar wind. The magnitude of Faraday rotation is proportional to the line of sight integral of the plasma density and the line-of-sight component of the magnetic field. Faraday rotation provides an almost unique means of estimating the magnetic field in this part of space. This technique has contributed to measurement of the large scale coronal magnetic field, the properties of electromagnetic turbulence in the corona, possible detection of electrical currents in the corona, and probing of the internal structure of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). This paper concentrates on the search for small-scale coronal turbulence and remote sensing of the structure of CMEs. Future investigations with the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) or Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) could provide unique observational input on the astrophysics of CMEs.

  17. Mid Infrared Spectra of Radio Galaxies and Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Ogle; R. R. J. Antonucci; D. Whysong

    2006-12-15

    Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of 3C radio galaxies and quasars shed new light on the nature of the central engines of AGN. Emission from silicate dust obscuring the central engine can be used to estimate the bolometric luminosity of an AGN. Emission lines from ions such as O IV and Ne V give another indication of the presence or lack of a hidden source of far-UV photons in the nucleus. Radio-loud AGN with relative-to-Eddington luminosity ratios of L/L_Edd jet shocks in the interstellar medium.

  18. Control of radio-activity found in normal waste during 1963 and disposal of radio-activity waste from the CERN site an approach to"sky-shine" measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baarli, J

    1964-01-01

    Control of radio-activity found in normal waste during 1963 and disposal of radio-activity waste from the CERN site

  19. Devils Tower folio, Wyoming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darton, Nelson Horatio, 1865-1948.; O'Harra, Cleophas C. (Cleophas Cisney), 1866-1935.

    1907-01-01

    Previous hydrologic models of flow in Bear Creek Valley have presented lateral flow as occurring through the Nolichucky Shale in parallel to strike fractures within thin carbonate beds; the effects of faults were not considered. This study presents...

  20. Davis Field Water Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erway, Jennifer

    Reynolds Library Starbucks 7A. Wilson Wing 8. Olin Physical Laboratory 9. Salem Hall 10. Winston Hall 11

  1. Albritton Bell Tower - 4 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Derrick Grubbs

    2006-03-24

    We present a preliminary design for a red-sensitive spectrograph. The spectrograph is optimized to operate over the 600-1000nm spectral range at a resolution of ~2000 and is designed specifically for the 2.7-m Harlan J. Smith Telescope at Mc...

  2. Phase Change Material Tower

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  3. Water Tower - 14 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    Previous studies using tertiary amines to extract water from reagent-grade carboxylate salts (calcium acetate, propionate, and butyrate) have shown selectivity for water and not for the carboxylate salts. These results ...

  4. Albritton Bell Tower - 15 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-03-24

    High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) can provide clean electricity,as well as process heat that can be used to produce hydrogen for transportation and other sectors. A prototypic HTGR, the Next Generation Nuclear ...

  5. Phase Change Material Tower

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transfer of pulverized coal Assortment of available fabrication methods (shrink fit, adhesive, casting) & liner materials (i.e. alumina, SiC, etc.) Pyrotek molten metal transfer...

  6. Albritton Bell Tower - 39 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2006-01-01

    The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitric oxide (NO) with ammonia over vanadia-based (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) and pillared interlayer clay-based (V2O5/Ti-PILC) monolithic honeycomb catalysts using a laboratory laminar-flow reactor was investigated...

  7. Armor Tower, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLC | Department ofApps forLynn talked about Mr. Edward

  8. PREDICTION OF TYPE II SOLAR RADIO BURSTS BY THREE-DIMENSIONAL MHD CORONAL MASS EJECTION AND KINETIC RADIO EMISSION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, J. M.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hillan, D. S., E-mail: jschmidt@physics.usyd.edu.au [CSIRO Earth Science and Resource Engineering, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia)

    2013-08-20

    Type II solar radio bursts are the primary radio emissions generated by shocks and they are linked with impending space weather events at Earth. We simulate type II bursts by combining elaborate three-dimensional MHD simulations of realistic coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at the Sun with an analytic kinetic radiation theory developed recently. The modeling includes initialization with solar magnetic and active region fields reconstructed from magnetograms of the Sun, a flux rope of the initial CME dimensioned with STEREO spacecraft observations, and a solar wind driven with averaged empirical data. We demonstrate impressive accuracy in time, frequency, and intensity for the CME and type II burst observed on 2011 February 15. This implies real understanding of the physical processes involved regarding the radio emission excitation by shocks and supports the near-term development of a capability to predict and track these events for space weather prediction.

  9. Comparison of Pulsed Sinusoid Radio Frequency Interference Detection Algorithms Using Time and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    Comparison of Pulsed Sinusoid Radio Frequency Interference Detection Algorithms Using Time of two major Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection algorithms is compared. The peak detection algorithm and the kurtosis detection algorithm are characterized using the receiver operating characteristic

  10. Discovery of Correlated Behavior Between the HXR and the Radio Bands in Cygnus X-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. L. McCollough; C. R. Robinson; S. N. Zhang; B. A. Harmon; R. M. Hjellming; E. B. Waltman; R. S. Foster; F. D. Ghigo; M. S. Briggs; G. N. Pendleton; K. J. Johnston

    1998-10-14

    Using CGRO/BATSE hard X-ray (HXR) data and GHz radio monitoring data from the Green Bank Interferometer (GBI), we have performed a long term study ($\\sim$ 1800 days) of the unusual X-ray binary Cyg X-3 resulting in the discovery of a remarkable relationship between these two wavelength bands. We find that, during quiescent radio states, the radio flux is strongly anticorrelated with the intensity of the HXR emission. The relationship switches to a correlation with the onset of major radio flaring activity. During major radio flaring activity the HXR drops to a very low intensity during quenching in the radio and recovers during the radio flare. Injection of plasma into the radio jets of Cyg X-3 occurs during changes in the HXR emission and suggests that disk-related and jet-related components are responsible for the high energy emission.

  11. Upfront Radio on WMUA 91.1FM Wednesday's @ 4:30-5:30PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullin, William J.

    Upfront Radio on WMUA 91.1FM Wednesday's @ 4:30-5:30PM Show Announcement as the "God Particle" in the popular press. Upfront Radio will speak with UMass

  12. Antenna and rectifier designs for miniaturized radio frequency energy scavenging systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yi

    2015-11-26

    With ample radio transmitters scattered throughout urban landscape, RF energy scavenging emerges as a promising approach to extract energy from propagating radio waves in the ambient environment to continuously charge ...

  13. The Walnut Street Model of Ionospheric HF Radio Propagation Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    1 The Walnut Street Model of Ionospheric HF Radio Propagation Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State on radio frequency, latitude, time of day, season, the solar weather, and so on. Signals reach the receiver

  14. Robotic localization of hostile networked radio sources with a directional antenna 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qiang

    2007-04-25

    propose a scheme to localize hostile networked radio sources based on the radio signal strength and communication protocol pattern analysis using a mobile robot with a directional antenna. We integrate a Particle Filter algorithm with a new sensing model...

  15. Cultured men, uncultured women : an exploration of the gendered hierarchy of taste governing Afghan radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamal, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    After years of strict bans on the media, local radio in post-Taliban Afghanistan is undergoing an intense period of reconstruction. This thesis uses a multi-sited ethnographic investigation to examine local Afghan radio's ...

  16. Wireless Distributed Sensing and Computing in SDR based Radio Network -Implementation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Wireless Distributed Sensing and Computing in SDR based Radio Network - Implementation building the large scale cognitive radio network in TTU(Tennessee Technological University), a wireless). This network demonstrates the combination of the wireless distributed sensing applications with corresponding

  17. Design and Analysis of Opportunistic MAC Protocols for Cognitive Radio Wireless Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Hang

    2012-02-14

    As more and more wireless applications/services emerge in the market, the already heavily crowded radio spectrum becomes much scarcer. Meanwhile, however,as it is reported in the recent literature, there is a large amount of radio spectrum...

  18. Energy efficient ultra-wideband radio transceiver architectures and receiver circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Fred S. (Fred Shung-Neng), 1979-

    2007-01-01

    Energy efficient short-range radios have become an active research area with proliferation of portable electronics. A critical specification for radio efficiency is energy/bit. The FCC has allocated the 3.1-10.6 GHz band ...

  19. Design of RF/IF analog to digital converters for software radio communication receivers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thandri, Bharath Kumar

    2007-09-17

    Software radio architecture can support multiple standards by performing analogto- digital (A/D) conversion of the radio frequency (RF) signals and running reconfigurable software programs on the backend digital signal ...

  20. Diode pumped solid state kilohertz disk laser system for time-resolved combustion diagnostics under microgravity at the drop tower Bremen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Volker; Paa, Wolfgang; Triebel, Wolfgang [Institute of Photonic Technology, Laser Diagnostics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany)] [Institute of Photonic Technology, Laser Diagnostics, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 07745 Jena (Germany); Eigenbrod, Christian; Klinkov, Konstantin [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity, University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany)] [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity, University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Larionov, Mikhail; Giesen, Adolf; Stolzenburg, Christian [Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge (IFSW), Pfaffenwaldring 43, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Institut für Strahlwerkzeuge (IFSW), Pfaffenwaldring 43, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    We describe a specially designed diode pumped solid state laser system based on the disk laser architecture for combustion diagnostics under microgravity (?g) conditions at the drop tower in Bremen. The two-stage oscillator-amplifier-system provides an excellent beam profile (TEM{sub 00}) at narrowband operation (?? < 1 pm) and is tunable from 1018 nm to 1052 nm. The laser repetition rate of up to 4 kHz at pulse durations of 10 ns enables the tracking of processes on a millisecond time scale. Depending on the specific issue it is possible to convert the output radiation up to the fourth harmonic around 257 nm. The very compact laser system is integrated in a slightly modified drop capsule and withstands decelerations of up to 50 g (>11 ms). At first the concept of the two-stage disk laser is briefly explained, followed by a detailed description of the disk laser adaption to the drop tower requirements with special focus on the intended use under ?g conditions. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the capsule laser as a tool for ?g combustion diagnostics, we finally present an investigation of the precursor-reactions before the droplet ignition using 2D imaging of the Laser Induced Fluorescence of formaldehyde.