National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for wm turpin ballard

  1. Turpin Hills, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:Turpin Hills, Ohio:

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_John_Ballard_NMMSS_2013_Presentation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reconciliation John Ballard PSI DOE Lead DOENNSA Reconciliation Reconciliation - Facility reported physical inventory balance matches NMMSS generated balances by Reporting...

  3. Flight Dynamics and Simulation of Laser Propelled Christopher G. Ballard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Kurt S.

    Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California 91109 Kurt S. Anderson Leik Myrabo Department of Mechanical of lift, drag, and aerodynamic pitching moment were derived from Fluent computational fluid dynamics. e-mail:Christopher.G.Ballard@jpl.nasa.gov Corresponding author: Department of Mechanical, Aerospace

  4. WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions WM2014 Conference -...

  5. WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions - 14575. Explores and...

  6. Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ Remedial activities and subsequent ecological restoration have converted the site...

  7. Wind Turbine Test \\^ind Matic WM 15S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    00 ·2 V. v/ RisoM-2481 Wind Turbine Test \\^ind Matic WM 15S Troels Friis Pedersent The Test Station for Windmills Riso National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark July 1986 #12;#12;RIS0-M-2481 WIND TURBINE describes standard measurements performed on a Wind-Matic WM 15S, 55 kW wind turbine. The measurements

  8. Improving Mathematics Retrieval Shahab Kamali and Frank Wm. Tompa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompa, Frank

    Improving Mathematics Retrieval Shahab Kamali and Frank Wm. Tompa David R. Cheriton School. Despite the popularity of storing mathematical objects on the web, searching for mathematical expressions is extremely limited. Conventional retrieval systems are inadequate for mathematical expres- sions, because

  9. Waste Management Fault Tree Data Bank (WM): 1992 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baughman, D.F.; Hang, P.; Townsend, C.S.

    1993-08-30

    The Risk Assessment Methodology Group (RAM) of the Nuclear Process Safety Research Section (NPSR) maintains a compilation of incidents that have occurred in the Waste Management facilities. The Waste Management Fault Tree Data Bank (WM) contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM data bank including: availability, training, source of data, search options, and usage, to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  10. Dr. Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEP 2Dr.Wm. E.

  11. WM'02 Conference, February 24-28, 2002, Tucson, AZ

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b W r .WM'02 Conference,

  12. Characterization of Tank WM-189 Sodium-bearing Waste at INTEC, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2003-07-01

    Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center 300,000-gallon vessel WM-189 was filled in late 2001 with concentrated sodium bearing waste (SBW). Three airlifted liquid samples and a steam jetted slurry sample were obtained for quantitative analysis and characterization of WM-189 liquid phase SBW and tank heel sludge. Estimates were provided for most of the reported data values, based on the greater of (a) analytical uncertainty, and (b) variation of analytical results between nominally similar samples. A consistency check on the data was performed by comparing the total mass of dissolved solids in the liquid, as measured gravimetrically from a dried sample, with the corresponding value obtained by summing the masses of cations and anions in the liquid, based on the reported analytical data. After reasonable adjustments to the nitrate and oxygen concentrations, satisfactory consistency between the two results was obtained. A similar consistency check was performed on the reported compositional data for sludge solids from the steam jetted sample. In addition to the compositional data, various other analyses were performed: particle size distribution was measured for the sludge solids, sludge settling tests were performed, and viscosity measurements were made. WM-189 characterization results were compared with those for WM-180, and other Tank Farm Facility tank characterization data. A 2-liter batch of WM-189 simulant was prepared and a clear, stable solution was obtained, based on a general procedure for mixing SBW simulant that was develop by Dr. Jerry Christian. This WM-189 SBW simulant is considered suitable for laboratory testing for process development.

  13. our tools (toys) PhD program http://as.wm.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    new synthetic materials. Dur nanomaterials are engineered from atomic dimensions to macroscopic lengthour tools (toys) PhD program · I http://as.wm.edu http://nano-materials.org · The College a honeycomb laffice Mission. We develop and synthesize new nanomaterials, and we investigate nanomater- ials

  14. Regarding the possible generation of a lunar nightside exo-ionosphere W.M. Farrell a,d,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Note Regarding the possible generation of a lunar nightside exo-ionosphere W.M. Farrell a,d, , J of Maryland/Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250, United States d NASA's Lunar Science 2011 Keywords: Moon Ionospheres a b s t r a c t The non-condensing neutral helium exosphere is at its

  15. ACCESSING MCLEOD BUSINESS LIBRARY DATABASES 2/11/13 McLeod Business Library 757-221-2916 http://mason.wm.edu/about/library/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    ACCESSING MCLEOD BUSINESS LIBRARY DATABASES 2/11/13 McLeod Business Library 757-221-2916 http://mason.wm.edu/about/library to use the databases OUTSIDE the library, you'll need to set up Remote Desktop Access on your computer majors.) You will need your Mason School of Business email address and password. http://masonweb.wm.edu/it/docs/bus-library

  16. Hydrogen Donors in ZnO M.D. McCluskey, S.J. Jokela, and W.M. Hlaing Oo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Matthew

    Hydrogen Donors in ZnO M.D. McCluskey, S.J. Jokela, and W.M. Hlaing Oo Department of Physics first-principles calculations and experimental studies have shown that hydrogen acts as a shallow donor in ZnO, in contrast to hydrogen's usual role as a passivating impurity. Given the omnipresence

  17. ASCEM WM 2013 Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation DataStreamsTotal OzoneStudyAdministration March1

  18. Jonah L. Larrick Student Center 900 Turpin St

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, Christopher M.

    at dining locations on campus. Used cooking oil from VCU Dining is processed and converted into clean. The garden is mixed use and garden beds can be rented for a low cost by the month or by the year. Faculty, staff, and students can rent beds and grow their own organic flowers, herbs, and vegetables

  19. OF EXCELLENCE: The Turpin USB project remodeled 12,177

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feschotte, Cedric

    and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USGBC's Mission 32 of 59 credits from the following six green building credit categories: 5/7 SUSTAINABLE SITES N/A WATER EFFICIENCY 5/14 ENERGY & ATMOSPHERE 8/14 MATERIALS & RESOURCES 9/17 INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY 5

  20. TEMPORAL CYANOBACTERIA FLUCTUATIONS IN LAKE BALLARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Through photosynthesis, phytoplankton transform solar energy and nutrients from, they are part of plant communities found in lakes all over the world (Marshall 2009 a physical water component to a usable energy source (Marshall 2009). Phytoplankton

  1. Ballard Power Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:Bajo en Carbono, Mexico Jump to:

  2. Logistic-exponential distribution (from http://www.math.wm.edu/~leemis/chart/UDR/UDR.html) The shorthand X logistic-exponential(,) is used to indicate that the random variable X has the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    Logistic-exponential distribution (from http://www.math.wm.edu/~leemis/chart/UDR/UDR.html) The shorthand X logistic-exponential(,) is used to indicate that the random variable X has the logistic-exponential distribution with positive scale parameter and positive shape parameter . A logistic-exponential random

  3. Logistic distribution (from http://www.math.wm.edu/~leemis/chart/UDR/UDR.html) The shorthand X logistic(,) is used to indicate that the random variable X has the logistic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    Logistic distribution (from http://www.math.wm.edu/~leemis/chart/UDR/UDR.html) The shorthand X logistic(,) is used to indicate that the random variable X has the logistic distribution with parameters and . A logistic random variable X with positive scale parameter and positive shape parameter has probability

  4. Predictors of student success in the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Licensed Practical Nurse training program (91WM6) as identified by expert nurse educators, instructors, and administrators at Fort Sam Houston Post, San Antonio, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scialdo, Antonia

    2006-04-12

    must possess skills and competency of an LPN, which is a result of successful completion of a 52-week 91WM6 training program. The purpose of this two-part descriptive study includes evaluation of quantitative and qualitative data. The Delphi technique...

  5. MCLEOD BUSINESS LIBRARY--ACCESSING A JOURNAL ONLINE 11/13/12 McLeod Business Library 757-221-2916 http://mason.wm.edu/about/library/ Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    MCLEOD BUSINESS LIBRARY--ACCESSING A JOURNAL ONLINE 11/13/12 McLeod Business Library 757-221-2916 http://mason.wm.edu/about/library/ Page 1 1. Click the ProQuest ABI-INFORM Global icon on the McLeod Business Library Database page. If you don't know how to find the database page, see the ACCESSING BUSINESS

  6. Ballard County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuels BrasilMaine: Energy

  7. ALSTOM Ballard GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformation ALLETE, Inc.Energy

  8. OSTIblog Posts by Michelle Turpin | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access to scienceSpeeding accessScientificScientific andScientific

  9. Microsoft Word - WM10 ORP - 10241.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a high-efficiency mist eliminator (HEME), a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter; a thermal catalytic oxidation unit (TCO); a NO x removal system (SCR); a caustic...

  10. TC&WM EIS Scoping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With LivermoreSustainable Landmimic keySystemssystemso TABLES OFcall

  11. WM Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillageVitex SystemsE.T.WINDPLAN Bosse

  12. Microsoft Word - S07050_WM.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M PGroundwater Levels5-1 5.06-1

  13. Cost and Benefit Analysis of Mediated Enterprise Search Mingfang Wu James A. Thom Andrew Turpin Ross Wilkinson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingfang

    evaluation method in a case study and conduct user experiments to demonstrate it. Our study shows that: 1 mechanism to ask users to provide relevance assessment explicitly, or have "expert users" manually select) by making use of domain experts' relevance assessments in search result ranking, the precision

  14. Colliding plane waves with W=M=0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-05-13

    It is shown that there are three vacuum and one electrovacuum solutions of diagonal plane waves with M=0 and constant Maxwell scalars. Namely, these are the single wave, Stoyanov, Babala and Bell-Szekeres solutions. A comparison is made with the planar solutions of Taub.

  15. Globalstrahlung[Wm-2 NutzbarenTeildesSpektrums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    IPE Stuttgart, for the spectral measurement data, and Fernando Fabero of CIEMAT Madrid for the solar

  16. Microsoft Word - LL-WM08 Paper 8351.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tests on Geosynthetic Clay Liners Subjected to Differential Settlement," MS Thesis, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (1992). 25. W.J. WAUGH, G.M. SMITH, D.BERGMAN-TABBERT, and...

  17. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the APS and the scientific community at large and to enhance the ability of APS to meet the needs of graduate students. It also offers support services and encourages...

  18. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyThe U.S.Lacledeutilities. TheEnergyEnergyMedia1, inReports and Records of

  19. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚—34 Revision 0 Approved for69 Revision71748884045.

  20. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚—34 Revision 0 Approved for69

  1. WM'05 Conference, February 27 March 3, 2005, Tucson, AZ WM-5278 IDENTIFYING RADIOACTIVE SOURCES AT THE DEMOLITION SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    products. Industries that routinely use these devices include the automotive, paper manufacturing, sewage), in a cooperative partnership with the scrap metal industry, developed a CD ROM based training program to provide the demolition industry secure radioactive gauges and devices at their point of installation. Figure 1 Radiation

  2. WM '04 Conference, February 29 March 4, 2004, Tucson, AZ WM-4010 VITRIFICATION OF LOW AND INTERMEDIATE LEVEL WASTE: TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    radioactive waste (LILW), may result in significant reduction of transport and disposal costs. Development and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) is becoming increasingly important and large programmes waste from nuclear power plants (NPP) and institutional radioactive waste in borosilicate glass matrices

  3. Attentional Object Spotting by Integrating Multimodal Input Chen Yu, Dana H. Ballard, and Shenghuo Zhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chen

    on eye and head movements. Then the image at an attentional point in time is analyzed to extract Zhu Department of Computer Science University of Rochester Rochester, NY 14627,USA yu,dana,zsh¡ @cs.rochester.edu Abstract An intelligent human-computer interface is expected to allow computers to work with users

  4. 1999 by Glenn Ballard and Iris Tommelein, All Rights Reserved Aiming for Continuous Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    AND OBJECTIVES A continuous flow process (CFP) is a type of production line through which work is advanced from, specifically about continuous flow processes (CFPs)-- construction's 'assembly lines'. TERMINOLOGY can be planned. EXAMPLES OF CONTINUOUS FLOW PROCESSES Consider the following examples of CFPs

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_JOHN_BALLARD_MARY_MCCDONNELL_NRC DOE...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Len Myers Special Requests (301) 903-2180 Len.Myers@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith NRC Reconciliation (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Reasons to Call NMMSS -...

  6. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_MARY_MCCDONNELL_JOHN_BALLARD_Tips for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Len Myers Special Requests (301) 903-2180 Len.Myers@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith NRC Reconciliation (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Tips for Success ...

  7. Communication Bounds for Heterogeneous Architectures Grey Ballard, James Demmel, and Andrew Gearhart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Gearhart University of California, Berkeley Abstract. As the gap between the cost of communication (i become a critical research objective. Toward this end, we seek asymptotic communication lower bounds for general memory models and classes of algorithms. Recent work has established lower bounds for a wide set

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_JIM_CRABTREE_JOHN_BALLARD_UPDATED_NMMSSTraini...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in Albuquerque , NM at the National Training Center - 12 students from Bechtel Marine, LANL, New Brunswick Laboratory, NNSA, Pantex, and SNL NMMSS Training 2014 Schedule...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_CARL_BURGER-JOHN_BALLARD_Preview of...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), New Brunswick Laboratory, SNL, Bechtel Marine, Pantex, and NNSA - DOE NMMSS II * Hosted June 2013 by Idaho National Laboratory (INL)...

  10. NuCellSys GmbH formerly Ballard AG formerly XCellsis | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishiCleanAlincaUK Ltd JumpNstar Jump

  11. Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex AAustriaBiofuels BrasilMaine: Energy ResourcesInformation

  12. WBU-14-0007 - In the Matter of Earl M. Ballard | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutoryinEnableVisualizationcoloring bookWBA-15-0009 - In3-001407

  13. WBU-13-0014 - In the Matter of Earl M. Ballard | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuel Efficiency &Report- AprilEnergy WBH-13-0017 -34

  14. Justinian P. Rosca and Dana H. Ballard A fundamentalproblem in learning from observationand interaction with anenvironmentis defining a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Hierarchical Genetic Programming (HGP) extensions discover, modify, and exploit sub- routines to accelerate for good programs and offers the possibility to reuse code. While HGP approaches improve the efficiency. The scala- bility of HGP techniques could be further improved by solving two such issues. One

  15. Justinian P. Rosca and Dana H. Ballard A fundamentalproblem in learning from observation and interaction with anenvironment is defining a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Hierarchical Genetic Programming (HGP) extensions discover, modify, and exploit sub­ routines to accelerate for good programs and offers the possibility to reuse code. While HGP approaches improve the efficiency. The scala­ bility of HGP techniques could be further improved by solving two such issues. One

  16. Ballard Library and Neighborhood Service Center - Seattle, WA by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects [EDRA/Places Awards 2008 -- Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Kathryn Rogers

    2008-01-01

    utilize green-roof technology, local design professionalsDesign AIA Northwest and Pacific Region; 2006 Top Ten GreenGreen Roofs for Healthy Cities; 2005 Honor Award for Civic Design,

  17. Ballard Library and Neighborhood Service Center - Seattle, WA by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects [EDRA/Places Awards 2008 -- Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merlino, Kathryn Rogers

    2008-01-01

    from inside by means of a periscope. that plan is to createpatterns of rainfall. A periscope inside the library allowswill be built. 2 The periscope also allows library patrons

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_John_Ballard_NMMSS_2013_Presentation_DOE Reconciliation.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview of DOE and NRC Reporting

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_JIM_CRABTREE_JOHN_BALLARD_UPDATED_NMMSSTraining_2014_Powerpoint crabtree rev 2.ppt [Compatibility Mode

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview ofAgreements forUpdate:Tips

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - Effective Use of the Safeguards Management Software (SAMS)_John Ballard [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3OverviewAustralianEffective Use of the

  1. WM '04 Conference, February 29 March 4, 2004, Tucson, AZ WM-4085 METAL MATRIX IMMOBILISATION OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES FOR SAFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheffield, University of

    OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES FOR SAFE STORAGE, TRANSPORTATION AND DISPOSAL M. I. Ojovan, W. E. Lee of radiation fields and concentrations of radionuclides from SRS may far exceed high-level radioactive waste OF SRS The classification of radioactive wastes in the Russian Federation is based on the nature

  2. Not Just Another Database Project: Developments at UW Frank Wm. Tompa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tompa, Frank

    was directed towards the development of a database system that is capable of supporting the needs of text through 1989 the project was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Systems''; this effort has been recognized by NSERC in its 1991 publication entitled Great Canadian

  3. WM00 Conference, February 27-March 2, 2000 DEMONSTRATING DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TFTR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    task for dismantling. Plasma arc cutting is the current baseline technology for the dismantlement plasma arc cutting. This paper will provide detailed results of the diamond wire cutting demonstration: The baseline planning for dismantling the vacuum vessel utilizes plasma arc torch cutting. This involves

  4. WM00 Conference, February 27 March 2, 2000 DEMONSTRATING DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TFTR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Plasma arc cutting is the current baseline, and reduced overall costs as compared to using plasma arc cutting. This paper will provide detailed results plasma arc torch cutting. This involves personnel entry into the vessel using air supplied bubble suits

  5. WM'05 Conference, February 27 -March 3, 2005, Tucson, AZ TRACKING RADIOACTIVE SOURCES IN COMMERCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Integrated Safety and Security Enforcement and Interdiction System (ISSEIS). The Nuclear Regulatory of Nuclear Facilities Management/NE/DOE 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Germantown, MD 20585, 301 radiological and nuclear material tracking and monitoring in commerce and is part of a larger program entitled

  6. Geoarchaeological Investigation of the Coats-Hines Site (40WM31), Williamson County, Tennessee 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalle, Kayla Anne

    2013-07-24

    reveal the site was deposited during the late Pleistocene epoch at roughly 12,000^(14)C yr BP. During the summer of 2012, the site was excavated with the goal of determining the depositional setting of the site and geographic region, as well...

  7. WM'02 Conference, February 24-28, 2002, Tucson, AZ ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION PROTECTION STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA CAPT Raymond L. Clark, U.S. Public Health Service Team Leader for the Yucca disposal system in Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These standards are found in Part 197 of Title 40 of the Code for the potential spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste disposal system in Yucca Mountain, Nevada

  8. Memorandum WM 0001 Evaluation of WAQUA/CSM8 A concise evaluation of water level

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vries, Hans de

    developments, facilitates maintenance, and removes some problems which exist in the software which was used. The new dcsm­98 is envisaged to replace dcsm­96 as the operational model later in the year 2000. 2 Method 2.1 Statistics The comparison of waqua/csm­16 and waqua/csm­8 has been carried out along the lines

  9. l ! w r -7 6 l i C i . -^ I; Wm Report No. 33?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix IV 60 Appendix V 65. #12;- 5 - 1. INTRODUCTION The rare earth metals are perhaps the roost Electrical Fields in Dilute Rare Earths Studied by Neutron Scattering by O. Rathmann March 1976 Salei Crystalline Electrical Fields in Dilute Rare Earths Studied by Neutron Scattering by 0. Rathmann Danish Atomic

  10. Microsoft Word - doe_nv--1164-WM07-7416FINALpaper.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA.MOX Adventure614583 GENII5, 2007The C C

  11. https://sweis.nv.doe.gov/References/RE%20WM%20activities%20at%2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers andMEDA Station WindSelect aNCDCIDFrom:

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - WM2014_MZ_14575_2014-03-03.ppt

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof Methane HydrateUpdateBudgeting RebeccaSCADAwethat

  13. WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE. regulators consumer advocates WIPP Update FrankDepartmentRisk

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_JOHN_BALLARD_MARY_MCCDONNELL_NRC DOE REporting requirements_presentations_4-29-14.ppt [Compatibility M

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview of DOE and NRC Reporting to

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_CARL_BURGER-JOHN_BALLARD_Preview of DOE and NMMSS NMMSS Training Courses_rev2.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview of DOE and

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_MARY_MCCDONNELL_JOHN_BALLARD_Tips for REporting requirements_presentations_4-29-14.ppt [Compatibility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71-3Overview ofAgreements forUpdate:Tips for

  17. Open Senate Minutes December 7, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    of Dr. Turpin who sent his regrets. Dr. Turpin was in India, where he would be part of a provincial Environmental Fellowship award for her fuel cell research and Dr. Anita Molzahn had been awarded the annual to park. She suggested that an additional ticket dispensary machine was needed for "community

  18. Page 1 wm (l) The domain of the function f = \\/ (a: + 5) is: (a) [0'00) ? ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13. (23) On what intervals is the graph of f (œ) = :04 +4933 l?lœz »~ 6a: concave downward? >\\ 2l l /i? c liga-ci «alle. @di “o” @if wat “il. (a) on («3,l) and (2,3).

  19. Results: Both tasks activated largely overlapping cortical networks typically engaged by verbal WM (i.e., bilateral dorsolateral PFC, Broca's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Val, Val/Met, or Met/Met). At the group map level, there was an apparent allelic load effect wherein

  20. %"%9%Z%/%H;X8~%W%m%0%i%%s%0$H Dependency Injection $NM;9g

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiba, Shigeru

    $?$a$N¡jK!$N1 $D$G$" $k!%%3%s%]!¡%M%s%H$H$O4XO"$9$k5!G=$r1 $D$K$^$H$a $?ItIJ$N$3$H$G!$%3%s%]!¡%M%s%H$rMQ$$$?3+H/$H$O

  1. Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

    2008-11-30

    U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

  2. OO84O4c6sP HNF-SD-WM-II-740, Rev. OB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer under pressureNavyNumericalO K30 SeeOO84O4c6sP

  3. Robert M. Goodman Executive Dean, Agriculture & Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Robert M.

    Robert M. Goodman Executive Dean, Agriculture & Natural Resources Executive Dean, School. Thomas Leustek Assoc. Dean Academic Administration Robert Hills Assoc. Dean Academic Programs Rebecca and Business Administration Barbara Turpin Campus Dean G. H. Cook Campus School of Environmental and Biological

  4. Procurement Services Announcements January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    and Contracting. Lora Turpin will start as Section Coordinator ­ Systems Support (Cathy's previous position Toshiba XR0032 37-40% *begins February 1, 2012, ends May 31, 2012 8. Tonya Bolt and Kathy Fanning have

  5. F.M. Brouwer R.L.M. Vissers W.M. Lamb Structure and metamorphism of the Gran Paradiso massif,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brouwer, Fraukje M.

    during initial decompression, while undergoing top-to-the-west shear on chlorite-bearing shear bands and larger scale shear zones. Biotite-bearing shear bands and larger shear zones related to top Paradiso (Meffan-Main, personal communication), Dora Maira (Tilton et al. 1989; Gebauer et al. 1993

  6. WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International P.O. Box 3090, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88221 ABSTRACT The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal-lined containers, shipped to WIPP in existing certified transportation packages for CH waste, and emplaced in WIPP to meet the requirements that apply to WIPP and its associated transportation system. This paper describes

  7. Bailey, M.E., Clube, S.V.M. & Napier, W.M. 1990, The Origin of Comets (Oxford: Pergamon Press)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    of a gamma ray burst from the collision of a free comet with a neutron star low typical high comet mass (g for neutron stars anywhere in the disk or halo. Comet collisions can produce only short gamma ray bursts less'ath's figure that 1/4 of the gamma ray bursts are in the class of short bursts and that the count

  8. A self-consistent MoD-WM/MM structural refinement method: characterization of hydrogen bonding in the orytricha nova G-1uar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newcomer, Micharel B [YALE UNIV; Raggin, Christina M [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Loria, J Patrick [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

    2008-01-01

    This paper generalizes the MoD-QM/MM hybrid method, developed for ab initio computations of protein electrostatic potentials [Gasc6n, l.A.; Leung, S.S.F.; Batista, E.R.; Batista, V.S. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2006,2, 175-186], as a practical algorithm for structural refinement of extended systems. The computational protocol involves a space-domain decomposition scheme for the formal fragmentation of extended systems into smaller, partially overlapping, molecular domains and the iterative self-consistent energy minimization of the constituent domains by relaxation of their geometry and electronic structure. The method accounts for mutual polarization of the molecular domains, modeled as Quantum-Mechanical (QM) layers embedded in the otherwise classical Molecular-Mechanics (MM) environment according to QM/MM hybrid methods. The method is applied to the description of benchmark models systems that allow for direct comparisons with full QM calculations, and subsequently applied to the structural characterization of the DNA Oxytricha nova Guanine quadruplex (G4). The resulting MoD-QM/MM structural model of the DNA G4 is compared to recently reported highresolution X-ray diffraction and NMR models, and partially validated by direct comparisons between {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts that are highly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions and the corresponding theoretical values obtained at the density functional theory DFT QM/MM (BH&H/6-31 G*:Amber) level in conjunction with the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method for the ab initio self consistent-field (SCF) calculation of NMR chemical shifts.

  9. Code-on-demand and code adaptation for mobile computing Francis C.M. Lau, Nalini Belaramani, Vivien W.M. Kwan, Pauline P.L. Siu,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Francis C.M.

    , and mobile devices have insufficient resources to cope. We introduce Sparkle, a proof-of-concept, mobile as possible to run on a mobile device, we propose changing the software development paradigm from monolithic chunks to small functionalities which can be dynamically downloaded on demand to the mobile device

  10. Improving Construction Workflow- The Role of Production Planning and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamzeh, Farook

    2009-01-01

    Intl. Group for Lean Construction, Taipei, Taiwan. Ballard,2 nd Edition, Lean Construction Institute, San Francisco,Implementing Lean Construction: Stabilizing Workflow”,

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - Effective Use of the Safeguards Management...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Effective Use of the Safeguards Management Software (SAMS) John Ballard - NMMSS SAMS 2 What is SAMS? 3 Facility based version of the NMMSS software Functionality and look of...

  12. Process-Based Cost Modeling to Support Target Value Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Hung Viet

    2010-01-01

    work planning to manage production unit control ( BallardProduction Control uses master scheduling, phase scheduling, and look-ahead planning

  13. ORNL, Da Vinci Sign Licensing Agreement | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Director Tom Ballard and Da Vinci CEO Kent Froelund. Standing are (l to r) Johney Green, ORNL Energy and Transportation Science Division; David Sims, Partnerships; and...

  14. Modeling the comfort effects of short-wave solar radiation indoors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arens, Edward; Hoyt, Tyler; Zhou, Xin; Huang, Li; Zhang, Hui; Schiavon, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    7]); h r is the radiation heat transfer coefficient (W/m 2Unit °C W/m 2 h r Radiation heat transfer coefficient W/m

  15. Avoiding Communication in Dense Linear Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Theoretical Lower Bounds Algorithmic Innovation Optimized Implementation Improved Applications Grey Ballard 9) + · (# words) as measured in time and energy, and the relative cost of communication is increasing Grey Bandwidth 59% per year 23% per year 26% per year Energy cost comparisons Grey Ballard 6 Source: John

  16. of Victoria UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Kennedy, Ms. Lindsay LeBlanc, Dr. Erich Mohr, Mr. Tribesty Nguyen, Mr. Ray Pretti, Dr. David Turpin, Ms to their first open board meeting. 5. Correspondence - Nil CONSENT 6. Operations and Facilities (M. Kennedy) a (M. Kennedy) a. Academic Staffing, Recruitment and Vacancies Report BOG-Sep25/12-01 Mr. Kennedy

  17. of Victoria UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Kennedy, Dr. Erich Mohr, Dr. David Turpin, Ms. Beverly Van Ruyven, Prof. Barbara Whittington, Ms. Carrie (M. Kennedy) a. Status Report on Capital Projects BOG-Jun25/13-14 b. Due Diligence Reports 2012 BOG by consent. CARRIED REGULAR 8. Operations and Facilities Committee (M. Kennedy) Mr. Kennedy reminded Board

  18. see music prof p.2 PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    President DavidTurpin (R). PhOTO: UVIC PhOTO SErVICES By Dianne GeorGe The Michele Pujol Room was the site it with the people who are critical to the devel- opment of our future leaders," said Dr. Ali Dastmalchian, dean

  19. The Nearby Supernova FactoryThe Nearby Supernova Factory W.M. Wood-Vasey, G. Aldering, B. C. Lee, S. Loken, P. Nugent, S. Perlmutter, R. Quimby, J. Siegrist, L. Wang Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .4 0.45 0.5 SupernovaeDiscovered/year/0.02 MagnitudeError Redshift Redshift distribution for Various

  20. Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusion Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunterman, Haluna Penelope Frances

    2011-01-01

    polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, 2009. C. Lim and C.be incorporated directly into full fuel-cell simulations toFCgen1020ACS, www.ballard.com/fuel-cell-products, Accessed

  1. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOIL MOISTURE MAPPING IN AFGHANISTAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    and Brian Borchers New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 Julie R. Kelley, Stacy Howington and Jerry Ballard and the partition of incoming solar and long-wave radiation between sensible and latent heat fluxes[18, 19

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_Jim Crabtree_NMMSS People, Resources...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Reporting Lead 301-903-6870 John Ballard* DOE Lead, Training Lead 301-903-0092 Pat Smith* NRC Lead 301- 903-6860 Len Myers * Special RequestsDIMSForeign Obligations...

  3. NMMSS_News_February_2014_FINAL__1_5_2014

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Team Lead DOE Special Requests (301) 903-0092 John.Ballard@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith Senior Analyst - NRC (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Len Myers Senior...

  4. EERE QC Workshop: Overview of Relevant Processes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ECS PRiME 2012, October, 2012. 4 Line Types * Continuous sheet o Roll-to-roll o Float o Belt Used with permission, Ballard Power Systems NREL Image Gallery 08527 Used with...

  5. 2006 NMMSS Users Training Meeting | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    KB SRS - Reconciliation (Fay G. Armstrong) 50.93 KB NMMSS Data Quality (Brian Horn) 35.6 KB Reconciliation (John Ballard) 23.53 KB The MOX Adventure (Tamara Reavis) 94.86 KB...

  6. Automated Continuous Commissioning of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    areas in BLDG26. The lighting power density (W/m2) used forthe Drill hall. The lighting power density (W/m2) used for

  7. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)...

  8. Serial longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging data indicate non-linear regional gray matter volume recovery in abstinent alcohol-dependent individuals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    parietal and occipital gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM), total cortical GM and total lobar WM, thalamus andVolume increases in regional GM were significantly greater

  9. 2D phase-sensitive inversion recovery imaging to measure in vivo spinal cord gray and white matter areas in clinically feasible acquisition times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    TCA) and gray matter (GM) areas based on phase-sensitiveassessment of spinal cord GM and white matter (WM) couldbecause of insufficient GM/WM contrast provided by

  10. Turtle, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:Turpin

  11. Supplemental Information Mechanisms Leading to Oligomers and SOA through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    : Insights from OH Radical Oxidation of Acetic Acid Y. Tan1* , Y. B. Lim1 , K. E. Altieri2 , S. P. Seitzinger-mail: turpin@envsci.rutgers.edu #12;2 0 2 4 6 20 M acetic acid + OH 0 5 10 15 20 100 M acetic acid + OH Concentration(M) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 0 30 60 90 120 1 mM acetic acid + OH Time (min) Fig. S1. Oxalic acid

  12. ON TEXT COHERENCE PARSING Albert-Ludwigs4hfiversit~t Fmiburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    lnacro propositions and superstnlc- turns [Kintsch & wm Dijk 1978, van Dijk 19801, tilt latter sharing

  13. June 2014 | Communications, SFU VP-Research Office www.sfu.ca/vpresearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavanagh, Karen L.

    and Fuel Cell Conference in Goa, organized by Hydrogen Association of India and Indian Oil. They also institutions, industrial partners incl. Indian Oil, Ballard and Schneider Electric, and government Indian medical knowledge, and health-technology-economy. #12;SFU enjoys mutually beneficial relationships

  14. MINIMIZING COMMUNICATION IN NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    MINIMIZING COMMUNICATION IN NUMERICAL LINEAR ALGEBRA* GREY BALLARD , JAMES DEMMEL , OLGA HOLTZ, i.e., essentially all direct methods of linear al- gebra. The proof works for dense or sparse our lower bound technique to compositions of linear algebra operations (like computing powers

  15. Last Planner and Its Role as Conceptual Kanban 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rybkowski, Zofia K.

    2010-07-14

    the impact of lean production strategies on project cost and schedule.” Proc., 7th Conf. of the Int. Group for Lean Construction, Univ. of California, Berkeley, 263-273. Ballard, G. (2000a). “Lean project delivery system.” Conf. of the Int. Group for Lean Construction, Gramado, Brazil. Cheng, T. C. E., and Podolsky, S. (1993). Just-in-time manufacturing...

  16. Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application). The experiments and simulations focused on the air-cooled Ballard Nexa fuel cell. The experimental

  17. What Kind of Production is Construction? Proceedings IGLC '98

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    . This is the strategy employed by those who advocate making construction more like the manufacturing from which lean that learning how to make construction lean will help show the way to the manufacturing of the future IS CONSTRUCTION? Glenn Ballard1 and Greg Howell2 ABSTRACT Applicability of lean principles to construction might

  18. CSRI Summer Proceedings 2010 1 EFFICIENTLY COMPUTING TENSOR EIGENVALUES ON A GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    to high performance computations with symmetric tensors. UC Berkeley, ballard@cs.berkeley.edu Sandia parallel performance for computing eigenpairs of tensors of general order and dimension, we focus the GPU in the main computational kernels of SS-HOPM. Instead of attempting to write an algorithm that offers high

  19. MFR PAPER 1323 Estimating the Structure of Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 1323 Estimating the Structure of Capacity Utilization in the Fishing Industry KENNETH and to look at certain types of industry behavior that have been relatively ne- glected. This paper discusses BALLARD and VITO BLOMO INTRODUCTION Research in industrial market struc- ture has usually included

  20. Department of Energy Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buses used in revenue service since 2000 No engine issues, fuel consumption equivalent to CNG Improved cost represents a 20% premium over CNG (CNG at $1.50 per gge and hydrogen at $3 per gge) #12;10 Ballard consumption of 8.9 miles per gge is 2.5 times better than conventional CNG bus Lessons learned applied to P-5

  1. 184 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 1, MARCH 2011 PEM Fuel Cell Stack Modeling for Real-Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    184 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 26, NO. 1, MARCH 2011 PEM Fuel Cell Stack Modeling, IEEE Abstract--In this paper, a multiphysical proton exchange mem- brane fuel cell stack model, which, fluidic, and thermal. A Ballard 1.2 kW 47 cells fuel cell stack model is introduced. The corresponding

  2. The Strategic Retention of Task-Relevant Objects in Visual Working Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollingworth, Andrew

    : visual working memory, visual short-term memory, scene perception, attention, eye movements Supplemental are fairly well understood, considerable re- search has turned to the function of VWM (Ballard, Hayhoe entering into a comparison cannot be perceived simultaneously, requiring a saccade from one object

  3. System design and dynamic signature identification for intelligent energy management in residential buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Jaehwi

    2008-01-01

    overall coecient of heat transmission ( W/m s : density ofm ) U : overall coecient of heat transmission ( W/m F : K )transmission and conduction through window glazing; Inltration of outdoor air; Heat

  4. Using Building Simulation and Optimization to Calculate Lookup Tables for Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Brian

    2011-01-01

    solar (W/m2) Table 13: Base case annual energy consumptionsolar gain on window (W/m2) Figure 25: Total energy consumptionlighting energy consumption. Figure 11: Solar shading and

  5. Integration and Segregation of Information in Language and Math 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsiao, Yi-ting

    2012-11-28

    The model of Working Memory (WM) which was brought up by Baddeley and Hitch (1974) has been explored for decades. Moreover, to investigate the operational character of WM, the manipulation of complex information has been ...

  6. J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wm.eduresearchideationscience-and-technologyj-lab-scientist-wins-award-for-graphene-invention6812.php Submitted: Thursday, June 1...

  7. Using Building Simulation and Optimization to Calculate Lookup Tables for Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coffey, Brian

    2012-01-01

    solar (W/m2) Table 13: Base case annual energy consumptionlighting energy consumption. Figure 11: Solar shading and

  8. Turtle Airships | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:Turpin Hills,

  9. Turtle Creek, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:Turpin Hills,Creek,

  10. TurtleEnergy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York: Energy Resources Jump to:Georgia:TurpinTurtleEnergy

  11. A Review of Electrochromic Window Performance Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selkowitz Ed, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    controls and a lighting power density of 16.1 W/m2 (1.5controls and a lighting power density of 16.1 W/m2 (1.5ft) office spaces. Lighting power density was 16.1 W/m2 (1.5

  12. Second Set of EPA Completeness Comments 1 Second Set of EPA Completeness Comments For CRA 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in international approaches to PICs. These are referenced in INIS-US-13-WM-13145 which states "The DOE/CBFO WIPP this feasibility concern. Please also provide the complete INIS-US-WM-13145 report (the Web link only provides: INIS-US-13-WM-13145, "The Revised WIPP Passive International Controls Program ­ A Conceptual Plan

  13. Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    . · Next 2-3 years will see concerted efforts to introduce 100s of H2 stations capable of supporting 10://www.fleetsandfuels.com/fuels /hydrogen/2013/07/gm-and-honda- team-on-fcvs/ March 7, 2013 Volkswagen, Ballard Power Systems http://www.netinform.net/H2/H2Stations/H2Stations.aspx?Continent=NA&StationID=-1 11 #12;HySUT Japan KETEP Korea 8 STATE MOU 12

  14. Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal toDepartment ofEnergy Michigan3 BALLARD POWER

  15. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

  16. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

  17. Supplementary Material The Open Atmospheric Science Journal, 2008, Volume 2 i Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, Dana

    the sun, which is ~240 W/m2 . A blackbody temperature of ~255°K yields a heat flux of 240 W/m2 . Indeed in the calculated 3.5 W/m2 forcing due to surface changes (ice sheet area, vegetation distribution, shoreline with that approach is that, unlike long-lived GHGs, aerosols are distributed heterogeneously, so it is difficult

  18. DATA META FILE 2012 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 Year 2 Day 3 Hour 4 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 5 Reflected Solar Radiation W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Incoming longwave radiation W/m2 Eppley Pyrgeometer 7 of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates above for recent updates concerning

  19. DATA META FILE 2011 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 Year 2 Day 3 Hour 4 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 5 Reflected Solar Radiation W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Incoming longwave radiation W/m2 Eppley Pyrgeometer 7 of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates above for recent updates concerning

  20. A BRIGHTER FUTURE A Response to Don Wuebbles (Climatic Change, vol. 52, no. 4, 2002)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    anthropogenic global climate forcing due to BC (1 W/m2 ) and O3 (0.4 W/m2 ) is comparable to the CO2 forcing (1.7 W/m2 , fully half as large as the forcing by CO2. Observed growth of CH4 is not accelerating caused by air pollution. Most of the pollution in this latter case arises from indoor combustion

  1. Individual Differences in Animal Intelligence: Learning, Reasoning, Selective Attentionand Inter-Species Conservation of a Cognitive Trait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matzel, Louis D.; Wass, Christopher; Kolata, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    battery were rudimentary in nature (associative fear conditioning,battery (LM = Lashley maze, PA = passive avoidance, WM = spatial water maze, OD = odor discrimination, FC = fear conditioning).

  2. Comfort standards and variation in exceedance for mixed-mode buildings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Borgeson, Sam

    2010-01-01

    comfort exceedance: lighting power density (W/m 2 ): low ¼example, both lighting and equipment power density defaultand low lighting and equipment power density values were

  3. Assessment of China's Energy-Saving and Emission-Reduction Accomplishments and Opportunities During the 11th Five Year Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    coefficient LPD = lighting power density COP = coefficientGB50034-2004 LPD = lighting power density W/m 2 = watts/

  4. Analysis of Assembly Bill 310: Prescription Drugs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Health Benefits Review Program (CHBRP)

    2011-01-01

    Ma and the National Multiple Sclerosis Society- CaliforniaTherapeutics, LLC. Multiple Sclerosis Medication Out-of-Carroll WM. Clinical trials of multiple sclerosis therapies:

  5. Discovery and Characterization of Radiation Mitigator Yel002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivina, Yelena Olegovna

    2013-01-01

    20. Bonner WM. Low-dose radiation: thresholds, bystanderR. ; Haran-Ghera, N. Low doses of radiation induce systemicattributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: assessing

  6. This

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan to Support Waste Feed Delivery, HNF-SD-WM-SP-012, Numatec Hanford Corporation, Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, and Cogema Engineering, vol. 1, Richland, Washington,...

  7. bo Akademi University 424101 Processteknikens Grunder Introduction to Process Engineering by/av: Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    värmeöverföringshastigheten Q (W) genom en tvärsnittsarea A (m2 ), resulterar i ett värmeflöde "Q (W/m2 ). Om den så kallade

  8. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  9. The College of William & Mary AFRICANA STUDIES PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    ://www.wm.edu/news/pressreleases/2009/bov-resolution- on-the-lemon-project.php). Furthermore, the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

  10. Kinetic coefficient of steps at the Si(111) crystal-melt interface from molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buta, Dorel; Asta, Mark; Hoyt, Jeffrey J.

    2007-01-01

    W. D. Luedtke, R. N. Barnett, C. L. Cleveland, M. W.M. W. Ribarsky, R. N. Barnett, and C. L. Cleveland, Phys.

  11. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jones report-id SAND2012-0007C year 2012 event WM2012 Conference location Phoenix, Arizona The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Performance Assessment (PA) methodology...

  12. Biochar: A Solution to Oakland's Green Waste?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Villar, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    as an alternative waste management solution. Biochar is asequestration and alternative green waste management. For5 years, Alameda County Waste Management’s (WM) residential

  13. Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waste Management Group

    2006-01-01

    LBNL/PUB-5352, Revision 6 Waste Management QualityAssurance Plan Waste Management Group Environment, HealthRev. 6 WM QA Plan Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan

  14. The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    III I II QUALITY ASSURANCE IMPLEMENTING MANAGEMENT PLAN I III SECTION 1 - MANAGEMENT Criterion 1 - Program II II WM-AND SAFETY DIVISION Waste Management Quality Assurance

  15. Impacts of Delayed Drawdown on Aquatic Biota and Water Quality in Seasonally Managed Wetlands of the Grasslands Ecological Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2009-01-01

    L) Turbidity (NTU) Solar Radiation (W/m 2 ) Label Date Ave.mg/L-P) Date Phosphate (mg/L-P) Solar Radiation (Ly/day)

  16. Calibration of stormwater management model using flood extent data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Kunyeun; Kim, Youngjoo; Kim, Byunhyun; Famiglietti, James S; Sanders, Brett F

    2014-01-01

    publishing Calibration of stormwater management model usingin urbanised areas. the stormwater management model (SWMM)Issue WM1 Calibration of stormwater management model using ?

  17. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 85, NO. A5, PAGES 2353-2356,MAY 1, 1980 TheVolumeEmissivityof TypeIII RadioBursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    80A0197. 0148-0227/80/080A-0197501.00 Ap J- AVA·Wm-3sr-' (1) where AP is the power radiated in volume

  18. The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    AND SAFETY DIVISION Waste Management Quality AssuranceII I RECORD I WM-QAIMP Waste Management Quality Assurancefor hazardous waste management that have leadership

  19. Design of a Natural Ventilation System in the Dunhuang Museum 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Y.; Guan, W.

    2006-01-01

    preservation layer, interior side is clay air brick, heat transfer coefficient is 0.43W/m2. ?. Window: alloy aluminium window interior shading device with low-e properties, heat transfer coefficient is 2.0 W/m2. ?. Roof: 120mm concrete slab, outside...

  20. The 3D Vector Potential, Magnetic Field and Stored Energy in a Thin cos2 theta Coil Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caspi, S.

    2011-01-01

    quadrupole magnets with thin Cos(20) current sheet placed at= canst. const. I:: JO. ,m cos WmZ m=l and the flow linesl I:: JOz,m m=l sin 2()0 JOz,m cos WmZ where ()o denotes the

  1. Minimal RED Cell Pairs Markedly Improve Electrode Kinetics and Power Production in Microbial Reverse Electrodialysis Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    improved compared to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by using ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) solutions in multiple electrodes used in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) are placed on each side of a reverse electrodialysis (RED increasing power production (Acetate: 4.2 W/m2 ; WW: 1.9 W/m2 ). By maintaining near optimal electrode power

  2. The Role of Episodic Memory and Emotion in a Cognitive Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sound localization Head Key IMA Agents Hand Arm WMS SM CEA STM-WM LTM-WM Voice recognition EM Human ...Behavior N ... Behaviors STM SES SES Manager Perception Encoding Simulator Sound localization Head Key IMA Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Vanderbilt University Nashville, TN 37205-0131, USA {will

  3. Supplement 24, Part 1, Authors: A To Z 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

    1982-01-01

    ????-??^^??^?*,' ?fidl??????????? y ?fTisd!sisifi ???.???? ???????,??^?-^ bwilor-id? J... Portug-- Acta Medica Portugesa. Wm(Wl AC85ID) Lisboa. Acta Neurol Scand-- Acta Neurologica Scandina- via. Copenhagen. Wm(Wl AC872I) Acta-Oto-Rhino-Laryngol Belg-- Acta Oto-Rhino- Laryngologica Belgica. Soci?t? Belge d'Oto- Rhino-Laryngologie et de...

  4. WEATHER MODIFICATION BY CARBON DUST ABSORPTION OF SOLAR ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    WEATHER MODIFICATION BY CARBON DUST ABSORPTION OF SOLAR ENERGY by WM. M. GRAY, WM. M. FRANK, M OF SOLAR ENERGY by w. M. Gray, W. M. Frank, M. L. Corrin and C. A. Stokes Department of Atmospheric Science interception of solar energy. Growing population pressures and predicted future global food shortages dictate

  5. Riso-M-2546 g Wind Turbine Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riso-M-2546 g Wind Turbine Test Wind Matic WM 17S Troels Friis Pedersen The Test Station for Windmills Riso National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde Denmark April 1986 #12;#12;RIS0-M-2546 WIND TURBINE describes standard measurements performed on a Wind-Matic WM 17S, 75 kW wind turbine. The measurements

  6. Heat Transfer -1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 A satellite in space orbits the sun. The satellite can be approximated as a flat plate with dimensions and properties given below. (a) Calculate the solar heat flux (W/m2 is at a distance where the solar heat flux (as defined above) is 500 W/m2 , and the flat plate is oriented

  7. Supplement 21, Part 1, Authors: A To Z 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hood, Martha W.; Tolson, Deborah A.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Shaw, Judith H.

    1976-01-01

    of Electrocardiology. Dayton, Ohio. [Wm. (W1.J0628R)] J. Fish Biol.? Journal of Fish Biology. The Fisheries Society of the British Isles. London, England. [Wa. (QL614J68)] J. Gujarat Research Soc.? Journal of the Gujarat Research Society. Bombay, India. [Wm. (Wl...

  8. Supplement 22, Part 1, Authors: A To Z 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

    1978-01-01

    Federai do Parana. Curitiba. [Wa. (QH301.A29)] [Continuation of: Bol. Univ. Fed. Parana, s. Biol., Botan e Zool.] Acta Bioquim. Clin. Latinoam.-- Acta Bioqu?mica Clinica Latinoamericana. Confederaci?n Bio- qu?mica Clinica de la Rep?blica Argentina y....-- Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni. Ankara, Turkey. [Wm.(W1 MI 409K)] Minerva Med. Argentina.-- Minerva Medica Argen- tina. Buenos Aires. [Wm.(W1 MI646K)] Minerva Oftal.-- Minerva Oftalmologica. Torino. [Wm.(W1 MI6489)] ABBREVIATIONS Nematol. Mediterran.-- Nematologia...

  9. The biology and control of the three-cornered alfalfa hopper Spissistilus festinus (Say) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Cedric Roy

    1952-01-01

    . Rabat, Maroc. Wa(Q91.M8U5) Bull et Mem Acad Roy Med Belg-- Bulletin et Memoires de l'Academie Royale de Medecine de Belgique. Bruxelles. Continuation of Bull Acad Roy Med Belg and Mem Acad Roy Med Belg. Wm(W1 BU652P) 3 COPRAQ Sess See^ Fish Dis 3..., New Jersey. Continuation of J Pediat Ophth Wm(Wl J0828FD) J Rheumatol-- The Journal of Rheumatology. Toronto. W1(Wm J087H) J Roy Soc Med-- Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine. London. Continuation of Proc Roy Soc Med. Wa(448 .9 R814) J...

  10. Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan Topics: TA-21 TA-54 RiskBenefit Principles Consent Order WM-FY12-WP - September...

  11. Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington...

  12. 99-32053.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    located across the United States; the WM PEIS also is available on the internet at www.osti.govbridge (select Advanced Search; under Select Field, choose Identifying Number, then...

  13. Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Takanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Odette, G.R. [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

  14. Assessment of Energy Use and Comfort in Buildings Utilizing Mixed-Mode Controls with Radiant Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Samuel Dalton

    2010-01-01

    Internal Gains Lighting power density in W/m2: low=7.53, example, both lighting and equipment power density defaultand low lighting and equipment power density values were

  15. Vrme-och strmningsteknik Thermal and Flow Engineering Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ). a. Beräkna det luftfyllda avståndet D (i cm) så att värmeledningen (i W/m2 ) genom dubbel-glasfönstret är 1/(z+5) av den genom enkelglasfönstret. b. För både enkelglasfönstret och dubbelglasfönstret under

  16. Building 911 P.O. Box 5000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Shield): K = 393 W/m-K Polyimide Insulation (Magnet Wire Insulation): Thickness = .005 inches (.127 mm in series. See Appendix B for the methodology. Thermal Contact Coefficient, hc (W/m2 -K) Polyimide

  17. The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    flAIMP REVISION 1 i i Software Testing WM groups must testinstallation testing of item, software, or other product.and testing activities. Security Access to computer software

  18. Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    such as global PSP (Wm2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion...

  19. Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

    2011-01-01

    performance of  photovoltaic roofs, ASHRAE Trans 107 (absorption of solar radiation.   roof cooling load [Wm ] a) exposed roof PV covered roof b) GHI [W m ] Time [PST

  20. Technical Journal The Bendix Technical Journal publishes noteworthy results of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    and Jim Irwin prior to lift-off from the lunar surface. Published three times a year by The Bendix. McNaughton The ALSEP Central Station Data Subsystem W.M. Tosh The Passive Seismic Experiment D. K

  1. CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  2. NSTX Program Overview andNSTX Program Overview and NSTX Upgrade Physics Design ProgressNSTX Upgrade Physics Design Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    -B318, PPPL NSTXNSTX Supported by College W&M Colorado Sch Mines Columbia U CompX General Atomics INL in Upgrade 6. Develop normally-conducting radiation-tolerant magnets for ST applications · Desig

  3. Microsoft Word - Summary.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TNT 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene TTR Tonopah Test Range U.S. United States USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service WM Waste Management Draft Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement...

  4. 2000 - 12 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12302000 - 1:00am Inventors Win Patent: W&M Group Still Working on Lamp (Daily Press) Thu, 12142000 - 1:00am Huge Magnet Arrives at UI, Only To Wait in the Snow (News-Gazette)...

  5. Counting Guns in Early America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, James

    2002-01-01

    Bang! Historian Explodes American Gun Myths, M INN . S TAR Tat 339-40 (1994). Counting Guns in Early America, Wm. & Maryto estimate levels of gun ownership in early America. This

  6. Proceedings of IMECE 2004 2004 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and RD&D Expo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Xiulin

    ) s volumetric energy conversion (W/m3) T temperature (K) Greek symbols decay rate (1/s) permittivity (F the incident pump intensity. Noginov et al. [?] observed similar results in Cr-doped lasers and laser mate

  7. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND...

  8. GCAM Bioenergy and Land Use Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leon Clarke. 2013. "Can radiative forcing be limited to 2.6 Wm-2 without negative emissions from bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage?" Climatic Change. Special Issue on...

  9. Current-enhanced SASE using an optical laser and its application to the LCLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Reiche, Sven; Stupakov, Gennady

    2004-01-01

    AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE LCLS £ A.A. Zholents, W.M. Fawleymore fully the potential of ESASE tech- niques at the LCLS.REFERENCES [1] LCLS Conceptual Design Report, SLAC-R-593 (

  10. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron transport. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 107:326-331 8. Nealson, K.H. 2010. Sediment reactions defy dogma. Nature 463:1033-1034. 9. Salas, E.C., W.M. Berelson, D.E....

  11. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY NEALSON...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron transport. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 107:326-331 8. Nealson, K.H. 2010. Sediment reactions defy dogma. Nature 463:1033-1034. 9. Salas, E.C., W.M. Berelson, D.E....

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chao, A.W. ; Fawley, W.M. ; Frisch, J. ; Huang, Z. ; Nuhn, H.D. ; SLAC ; et al March 2013 Efficiency Enhancement in a Tapered Free Electron Laser by Varying the Electron Beam...

  13. Hepatitis B Sero-Prevalence and Risk Behaviors Among Immigrant Men in a Population-Based Household Survey in Low-Income Neighborhoods of Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    control of infections with hepatitis virus in correctionalL, Schmid G, et al. Hepatitis B vaccination in sexuallyReferences 1. Lee WM. Hepatitis B virus infection. The New

  14. Design studies of the DAHRT Phase II injector with the GYMNOS PIC code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, W.M.; Henestroza, E.; Chen, Y.-J.; Hewett, D.W.

    1998-01-01

    INJECTOR WITH THE GYMNOS PIC CODE W.M. Fawley, E. Henestrozaelectro-/magneto- static PIC simulation code to help designW. Hewett and Y. -J. Chen, “PIC Space-Charge Emission with

  15. Illuminating Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Ocean Mixing as Inferred from Argo Profiling Floats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whalen, Caitlin

    2015-01-01

    W/m 2 ] (b) Tide Power Wind Power natre bbtre97 home ladderSOFine has above-average wind power input. Environments thata range of wind and tidal power input and topographic

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga at the February 2013 Waste Management Conference in Phoenix presented by WM Symposia.

  17. Local Company Purchases William & Mary Land Near Jefferson Lab...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    articles.dailypress.com2010-06-14newsdp-nws-wm-land-20100614-11jefferson-lab-mary-real-estate-foundation-new... Submitted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 12...

  18. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    author Joon H. Lee, Daniel Clayton, Carlos Jove-Colon, Yifeng Wang location Phoenix, Arizona report-id SAND2012-1400C event WM Symposia 2012 Outline - Introduction - Conceptual...

  19. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wang report-id SAND2012-0158C year 2012 event WM2012 Conference location Phoenix, Arizona A salt repository is one of the four geologic media currently under study by the U.S....

  20. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jove-Colon, Malcolm Siegel, Yifeng Wang event WM2012 Conference location Phoenix, Arizona, USA report-id SAND2102-0158C A salt repository is one of the four geologic...

  1. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentation, Workshop author Joon H. Lee, Daniel Clayton, Carlos Jove-Colon, Yifeng Wang year 2012 report-id SAND2012-1400C event WM Symposia 2012 location Phoenix, Arizona...

  2. A Decision Methodology for Prioritizing R&D Supporting Geologic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WM2014 Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 2-6 Mar 2014 Research Org: Sandia...

  3. A Decision Methodology for Prioritizing R&D Supporting Geologic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WM2014 Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 2-6 Mar 2014; Related Information:...

  4. CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant IICX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/21/2010Location(s): Milam Landfill, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  5. FY95 software project management plan: TMACS, CASS computer systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spurling, D.G.

    1994-11-11

    The FY95 Work Plan for TMACS and CASS Software Projects describes the activities planned for the current fiscal year. This plan replaces WHC-SD-WM-SDP-008. The TMACS project schedule is included in the TWRS Integrated Schedule.

  6. A concept for Z-dependent microbunching measurements with coherent X-ray transition radiation in a sase FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumpkin, A.H.; Fawley, W.M.; Rule, D.W.

    2004-01-01

    Model to Data from a SASE FEL at 540, 265, and 157 nm,”simulation of the x-ray SASE FEL showing the SASE radiationTRANSITION RADIATION IN A SASE FEL* A.H. Lumpkin # , W.M.

  7. 10 Questions for a Quantitative Geneticist: Wellington Muchero...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    why does it matter for biofuels production? WM: Cellulose is one of the most abundant polymers on earth -- most of which occurs as a structural component of plant cell walls. Since...

  8. Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-B-111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benar, C.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-06

    This tank characterization report for Tank 241-B-111 was initially released as PNL-10099. This document is now being released as WHC-SD- WM-ER-549 in order to accommodate internet publishing.

  9. Rotary mode core sampling service trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-056. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-111 Rev.1.

  10. Supplement 24, Part 3, Parasite-Subject Catalogue, Parasites: Trematoda and Cestoda 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.; Shaw, Judith H.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Kirby, Margie D.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Zidar, Judith A.

    1982-01-01

    and salmonella? dogs (faeces)? fecal survey from public parks? grounds? and children's playing grounds, public health significance: Grossstadt in Bundesrepublik Deutschland Ankylostoma Volkheimer G 1981 Leber Magen Darm 11 (2) Apr 94-96 Wm functional...

  11. Reduced impact logging minimally alters tropical rainforest carbon and energy exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    Brazil | Amazon | land use | micrometeorology D eforestation in the tropics affects the land–atmosphere ex- change of trace gases and energyand energy (W·m ?2 ) ?uxes, calculated as (? = logged ? unlogged), in Tapajos National Forest, Para, Brazil.

  12. Beverage habits and mortality in Chinese adults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odegaard, AO; Koh, WP; Koh, WP; Yuan, JM; Pereira, MA

    2015-01-01

    42. 42. Higdon JV, Frei B. Tea catechins and polyphenols:O’Keefe JH, Lavie CJ. Coffee and tea: perks for health andVerschuren WM, Beulens JW. Tea and coffee consumption and

  13. Incorporating Uncertainty into Probabilistic Performance Models...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    irradiance for a subtended angle of 9.3 mrad is 0.16 Wcm 2 or 1600 Wm 2 . 3.3.2 ANSI 2000 Standard More recently, Delori et al. 15 provide a concise formulation and...

  14. Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Beaini, S.

    2010-01-01

    of  houses built to current standards.   Passive House: Passive houses typically require a maximum of 10 W/m2 of were provided with passive house frames and have triple 

  15. Aerosol absorp+on from space M. de Graaf IMAU, 19 April 2013 Frasca+ 20111020T18:15:41

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    IMAU, 19 April 2013 Global annual mean Earth's energy budget for March 2000 ­ May 2004 (Wm2(radio)metry Cloud modelling Results Outlook #12; Aerosol absorp+on from

  16. Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Ontology of Earthquake Probability: Metaphor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Philip B.

    Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Ontology of Earthquake Probability: Metaphor be abandoned in favor of common sense. #12;Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Earthquake not random. ­Wm. ShakesEarth #12;Intro Probability Rabbits Description Predictions Earthquake Poker

  17. Applications of nanotechnology to the central nervous system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumling, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Cambridge, MA M. S. in Bioengineering, University ofDiego, La Jolla, CA Ph. D. in Bioengineering, University ofBiotechnology and Bioengineering, 96(2):381391, 2007. 84. WM

  18. Window performance for human thermal comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huizenga, C; Zhang, H.; Mattelaer, P.; Yu, T.; Arens, Edward A; Lyons, P.

    2006-01-01

    of Effects of Solar Radiation and Raradiation from Windowsoutdoor air temperature and solar radiation. Both WINDOW andindoor temperature = 24ºC and solar radiation = 783 W/m 2 ).

  19. Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

    2012-01-01

    solar radiation. The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , wereexceed those of the solar radiation data. Figure 2-3. Lightbased on local solar radiation data, measurements made with

  20. Solving the fluctuation problems in a land with 100% of renewable energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Damien

    expected Danish offshore wind farms in 2030 (3.8 GW) and (iii) all ex- pected wind farms (onshore that people won't say NO to: wind farms because they are ugly, noisy and kill bats; solar panels on roofs from renew- ables. Power per unit land or water area Wind 2 W/m2 Offshore wind 3 W/m2 Tidal pools 3 W

  1. Double shell tank waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulkey, C.H.; Jones, J.M.

    1994-12-15

    Waste analysis plan for the double shell tanks. SD-WM-EV-053 is Superseding SD-WM-EV-057.This document provides the plan for obtaining information needed for the safe waste handling and storage of waste in the Double Shell Tank Systems. In Particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage waste according to Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and Title 40, parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

  2. PRIMME SVDS: A PRECONDITIONED SVD SOLVER FOR COMPUTING ACCURATELY SINGULAR TRIPLETS OF LARGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stathopoulos, Andreas

    focus on the problem of finding the smallest singular triplets. Assume A m×n is a large sparse matrix.1) A = UV T where U = [u1, . . . , un] m×n is an orthonormal set of the left singular vectors and V = [v1, Virginia 23187- 8795, U.S.A.(lfwu@cs.wm.edu, andreas@cs.wm.edu) 1 #12;compute the smallest singular values

  3. DATA META FILE 2009 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    measure/quality control of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates above for field sites G21 and G19: Column Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 DDOY, decimal day of year 2 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 3 Net radiation (Rn) W/m2 Kipp&Zonen Components 3.7 m 4 Ground heat flux

  4. DATA META FILE 2008 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    measure/quality control of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates above for field sites G21 and G19: Column Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 DDOY, decimal day of year 2 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 3 Net radiation (Rn) W/m2 Kipp&Zonen Components 3.7 m 4 Ground heat flux

  5. DATA META FILE 2010 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    measure/quality control of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates above for field sites G21 and G19: Column Variable Units Instrument *Notes 1 DDOY, decimal day of year 2 Solar radiation (K) W/m2 Eppley PSP 3.7 m 3 Net radiation (Rn) W/m2 Kipp&Zonen Components 3.7 m 4 Ground heat flux

  6. The Fix Issue17 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Multiple Contributors

    1997-01-01

    Argentina de Gastroenterologia. Buenos Aires. Wm (W1 AC804H) Acta Ichthyol et Piscat-- Acta Ichthyologica et Piscatoria. Academy of Agriculture in Szczecin. Faculty of Marine Fisheries and Food Technology. Szczecin, Polska. Wa (QL614.A28 ) Acta Med...) Adhesion and Microorganism Pathogenicity See Ciba Found Symp (80) 1981 Advances Int Med-- Advances in Internal Medicine. Chicago. Wm(W1 AD653) African J Clin and Exper Immunol-- African Journal of Clinical and Experimental Immunology. Bloemfontein...

  7. Use of Carbon Mesh Anodes and the Effect of Different Pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mesh in a muffle furnace (450 °C for 30 min) resulted in a maximum power density of 922 mW/m2 (46 W/m3 (893 mW/ m2 ; 45 W/m3 ). This power density with heating was only 7% less than that achieved of MFCs for wastewater treatment or bioenergy production requires the use of inexpensive electrode

  8. One size fits all? An assessment tool for solid waste management at local and national levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broitman, Dani; Ayalon, Ofira; Kan, Iddo

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste management schemes are generally implemented at national or regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local conditions characteristics and constraints are often neglected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an economic model able to compare multi-level waste management options. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A detailed test case with real economic data and a best-fit scenario is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most efficient schemes combine clear National directives with local level flexibility. - Abstract: As environmental awareness rises, integrated solid waste management (WM) schemes are increasingly being implemented all over the world. The different WM schemes usually address issues such as landfilling restrictions (mainly due to methane emissions and competing land use), packaging directives and compulsory recycling goals. These schemes are, in general, designed at a national or regional level, whereas local conditions and constraints are sometimes neglected. When national WM top-down policies, in addition to setting goals, also dictate the methods by which they are to be achieved, local authorities lose their freedom to optimize their operational WM schemes according to their specific characteristics. There are a myriad of implementation options at the local level, and by carrying out a bottom-up approach the overall national WM system will be optimal on economic and environmental scales. This paper presents a model for optimizing waste strategies at a local level and evaluates this effect at a national level. This is achieved by using a waste assessment model which enables us to compare both the economic viability of several WM options at the local (single municipal authority) level, and aggregated results for regional or national levels. A test case based on various WM approaches in Israel (several implementations of mixed and separated waste) shows that local characteristics significantly influence WM costs, and therefore the optimal scheme is one under which each local authority is able to implement its best-fitting mechanism, given that national guidelines are kept. The main result is that strict national/regional WM policies may be less efficient, unless some type of local flexibility is implemented. Our model is designed both for top-down and bottom-up assessment, and can be easily adapted for a wide range of WM option comparisons at different levels.

  9. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ? 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  10. PEMFC MEA and System Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knights, Shanna [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Bashyam, Rajesh [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; He, Ping [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Lauritzen, Michael [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Startek, Cara [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Colbow, Vesna [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Cheng, Tommy [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Kolodziej, Joanna [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Wessel, Silvia [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.

    2011-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are being developed and sold commercially for multiple near term markets. Ballard Power Systems is focused on the near term markets of backup power, distributed generation, materials handling, and buses. Significant advances have been made in cost and durability of fuel cell products. Improved tolerance to a wide range of system operation and environmental noises will enable increased viability across a broad range of applications. In order to apply the most effective membrane electrode assembly (MEA) design for each market, the system requirements and associated MEA failures must be well understood. The failure modes associated with the electrodes and membrane degradation are discussed with respect to associated system operation and mitigating approaches. A few key system considerations that influence MEA design include expected fuel quality, balance-of-plant materials, time under idle or open circuit operation, and start-up and shut-down conditions.

  11. Accelerated Testing Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary; James, Greg; Davey, John; Langlois, David; Torraco, Dennis; Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z; Borup, Rodney L.

    2011-07-01

    The DOE Fuel Cell technical team recommended ASTs were performed on 2 different MEAs (designated P5 and HD6) from Ballard Power Systems. These MEAs were also incorporated into stacks and operated in fuel cell bus modules that were either operated in the field (three P5 buses) in Hamburg, or on an Orange county transit authority drive cycle in the laboratory (HD6 bus module). Qualitative agreement was found in the degradation mechanisms and rates observed in the AST and in the field. The HD6 based MEAs exhibited lower voltage degradation rates (due to catalyst corrosion) and slower membrane degradation rates in the field as reflected by their superior performance in the high potential hold and open-circuit potential AST tests. The quantitative correlation of the degradation rates will have to take into account the various stressors in the field including temperature, relative humidity, start/stops and voltage cycles.

  12. Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Morgan; Donald Connors; Michael Hickner

    2012-07-10

    Ballard Material Products (BMP) performed a pre-design technical and cost analysis of state of the art production technologies feasible for high volume GDL manufacturing. Based upon criteria that also included environmental health and safety, customer quality requirements, and future needs, BMP selected technologies that can be integrated into its current manufacturing process. These selections included Many-At-A-Time (MAAT) coating and continuous mixing technologies, as well as various on-line process control tools. These processes have allowed BMP to produce high performance GDLs at lower cost for near-term markets, as well as to define the inputs needed to develop a conceptual Greenfield facility to meet the cost targets for automotive volumes of 500,000 vehicles per year.

  13. Waste Management facilities fault tree databank 1995 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnick, W.V.; Wellmaker, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    The Safety Information Management and Analysis Group (SIMA) of the Safety Engineering Department (SED) maintains compilations of incidents that have occurred in the Separations and Process Control, Waste Management, Fuel Fabrication, Tritium and SRTC facilities. This report records the status of the Waste Management (WM) Databank at the end of CY-1994. The WM Databank contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM Databank including the availability, training, sources of data, search options, Quality Assurance, and usage to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  14. In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-08-01

    The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

  15. A Study of Home Life as Seen in Goethe's Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moser, Minnie T.

    1914-01-01

    and wine, both of which Herman takes to the travelers. Punch1^nd chocolate^re used more rarely for lighter lunches 1. A.m.L. 161:33 27 Wm. M. 151:36 3. H.u. D. 5:5 4. H.u.D. 15:15 5. A.m.L. 7:3 6. Werther 28:36 7. H.u.D. 16:188 8. Werther 9:10 9.... WertherL. 9:9;12 10. A.m.L. 354:19 11. H.u.D. 8:3 12. Wm. M.I. 69:18 13. Wm. m. I. 155:27 5. and entertainment drinks. Soups1 and stews are made by the poor woman whose husband had gone to Switzerland and bad not returned. o The meals were three...

  16. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  17. Solid Waste Integrated Forecast Technical (SWIFT) Report FY2001 to FY2046 Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARCOT, R.A.

    2000-08-31

    This report provides up-to-date life cycle information about the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; program-level and waste class-specific estimates; background information on waste sources; and comparisons to previous forecasts and other national data sources. This report does not include: waste to be managed by the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) contractor (i.e., waste that will be disposed of at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF)); waste that has been received by the WM Project to date (i.e., inventory waste); mixed low-level waste that will be processed and disposed by the River Protection Program; and liquid waste (current or future generation). Although this report currently does not include liquid wastes, they may be added as information becomes available.

  18. Helper's Network Gazette June - July 1994 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1994-01-01

    coyote feces Abortion Dubey JP et al 1980 Am J Vet Research 41 (7) July 1072-1076 Wa Toxoplasma gondii, goats (exper.)? abortion, clinical signs, and distribution in host tissues Abortion Dubey JP; Schmitz JA 1981 J Am Vet Med Ass 178 (7) Apr 1... Venez Puericult y Pediat 40 (2) July- Sept 265-288 Wm Ascaris lumbricoides, children, hepa ic ab- cesses, clinical aspects, treatment, 14 cases: Caracas Abscess, Amebic Abul-Khair ?? et al 1981 Ann Surg 193 (2) Feb 221-226 Wm Entamoeba histolytica...

  19. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  20. Sustainable Energy - without the hot air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacKay, David

    2008-12-02

    breakdown of power consump- tion in my house, “after” the austerity mea- sures were introduced, is 6.2W/m2 of gas and 7.1W/m2 total.) Page 299 Another niggle with figure E.12 is that the PassivHaus standards use a different convention for defining power... : they define power in terms of “primary energy consumption,” which re- quires knowledge of the primary sources of elec- tricity and fuel, and of conversion efficiencies. This means that the PassivHaus standards are actually more stringent than the figure shows...

  1. Supplement 3, Authors: A To I 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith H.

    1955-01-01

    - cific expedition 1914-16. LXXIV. On some freeliving marine nematodes from Tobago ALLG?N, CARL ?.?Continued. (Br. W. I.) CVidensk. Medd. Dansk Naturh. F?rening K0benhavn, v. 110, pp. 45-63, illus., pL [Issued Aug. 21] [WM 1947 i.?Papers from Dr. Th.... Diger., v. 8, pp. 145-148. [WM ANGSTBOM, CLEMENT I. I960 a.?Report of the Poultry disease labora- tory (Kingston) July 1, 194S to June 30, 1949

  2. EC-Earth = IFS + NEMO + LIM "CMIP5 version" (v2.3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    EC-Earth = IFS + NEMO + LIM "CMIP5 version" (v2.3) IFS T159L62 (cycle 31r1 + enhancements) OASIS ORCA1/L46 (or ORCA025) #12;20.03.2013 A. Sterl - NL EC-Earth day #12;20.03.2013 A. Sterl - NL EC-Earth day Imbalance: 0.135 W/m2 GHG forcing: 0.5-1 W/m2 #12;20.03.2013 A. Sterl - NL EC-Earth day T

  3. Machine Learning ! ! ! ! !Srihari Bayesian Linear Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    handled using Bayesian approach 3 ED (w) = 1 2 t n -wT (xn ){ } n=1 N 2 E(w) = ED (w)+ EW (w) ww 2 1 )w prior for w (which has components w0,..,wM-1) p(w) = N (w|m0 , S0) with mean m0 and covariance matrix S0) with Gaussian noise has an exponential form p(t | X,w,) = N tn | wT (xn ),-1 ( ) n=1 N

  4. Christiaan J.J. Paredis and Pradeep K. Khosla, ``Designing Fault Tolerant Manipulators: How Many Degreesoffreedom?''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and is immobilized. The number of degrees­of­freedom needed for fault tolerance strongly depends on the knowledge Management (ER&WM) program of the Department of Energy. Consider, for instance, the use of a manipulator in a nuclear environment where equipment has to be repaired or space has to be searched for radioactive

  5. HARMONIC CASCADE FEL DESIGNS FOR LUX G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J. Wurtele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    HARMONIC CASCADE FEL DESIGNS FOR LUX G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J. Wurtele , J.N. Corlett, W.M. Fawley, A stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200­250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser mod then produces ra- diation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differ- ently tuned undulator. Repeated

  6. William and Mary Athletics Camp Employee Disclosure and Background Release Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Camp employee candidates may be required to disclose requested criminal records, job history and other information and must undergo a background check, including a criminal history or criminal conviction check and consented for the College of William and Mary (W&M) to conduct a criminal background check on you within

  7. LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL# 40102 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings 1 of 26 Field Investigation of Duct System Performance in California Light Commercial Buildings Wm National Laboratory Berkeley, California Synopsis This paper discusses field measurements of duct system

  8. MARKET-BASED APPROACHES TO SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    MARKET-BASED APPROACHES TO SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT by DAVID PEARCE and R. KERRY TURNER CSERGE Working Paper WM 92-02 #12;MARKET-BASED APPROACHES TO SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT by DAVID PEARCE and R. KERRY permits. #12;1 1. INTRODUCTION: WASTE MANAGEMENT FAILURES Rational decision making about solid waste

  9. Scholarly Paper for Master Degree of Meteorology Tianle Yuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    of both effects in GCMs may significantly lower the estimation of global aerosol cooling effect and thus) is systematically higher than that from POLDER (Breon et al., 2002). On the other hand, certain physical truth may of uncertainties in model simulations of the global AIE (-1.1 to -4.4 Wm-2 ) (Rotstayn 1999, Ghan et al. 2001

  10. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Stewart L. Udall, Secretary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginsburg. April 1946, 8 p. Superseded by FL 418. 9. Available leaflets on fisheries (subject index, a potential source of attractive low-cost sea food from the Atlantic Coast. By Wm. C. Herrington and Leslie W and L. N. Kolloen. March 1943, 16 p., 5 tables. 17. Construction of farm ponds. By Branch of Game

  11. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Stewart L. Udall, Secretary FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, Clarence F. Pautzke, Commissioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . April 1946, 8 p. Superseded by FL 418. Available publications on fisheries (subject index). By Office of attractive low~cost sea food from the Atlantic cQast. By Wm. C. Herrington and Leslie W. Scattergood. Construction of farm ponds. By Branch of Game-fish and Hatcheries. February 1951, 13 p., 6 figs. Home

  12. 1 February 2012 CPV firm Semprius sets record 33.9% solar module efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    was tested indoors under Standard Test Conditions (850W/m2 , 25°C cell temperature, and a spectrum matched of 32.0%. "For the first time, we have been able to convert more than one-third of the sun's energy production distribution that will be commercially available later this year," he adds. Depending

  13. Annual Report for the Year 2001-2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge University Library

    2002-01-01

    …???? #2; A survey of the entrance of Sierra Leona River, by Capt’n Thompson, of His Majesty’s Ship Nautilas (London ????) #2; A new map of Ireland. Drawn from the survey made by Sr Wm Petty… [????] Music #2; Mendelssohn, An anthem… to Charles Bayles...

  14. Information Engineering -Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Constance Kompetenznetzwerk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhlen, Rainer

    Information Engineering - Department of Computer and Information Science at the University;2 Information Engineering - Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Constance Skizze;3 Information Engineering - Department of Computer and Information Science at the University of Constance WM

  15. Thermal Analysis of Novel Underfill Materials with Optimum Processing Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Julie P.

    - date the morphology of these composites. © 2005 Wiley Peri- odicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci 98: 1300 chip. Polymers are thermally insulating mate- rials; the thermal conductivity of a typical polymer the compos- ite thermal conductivity up to 32.5 W/m K at the maximum filler loading of 78 vol %. Polymer

  16. Candidate genes affecting Drosophila life span identified by integrating microarray gene expression analysis and QTL mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackay, Trudy F.C.

    University, Boston, MA 02111, United States b Department of Genetics and W.M. Keck Center for Behavioral Biology, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7614, United States Received 4 April 2006, short-lived animal models are essential to identifying the mechanisms and genes that affect the rate

  17. High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Eleanor

    2011-01-01

    with an installed lighting power density of 10.76 W/m 2 (1.069%, or an average lighting power density (LPD) of 0.31-0.38kWh/ft -yr Average lighting power density (W/ft ) Percent

  18. Professor Akos Vertes The George Washington University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    for Proteomics Technology and Applications (IPTA) announced today it has received a three-year, $1.5 million technology and in using that technology for proteomics research. The IPTA is an interdisciplinary research to seed its growth. Based in Los Angeles, the W.M. Keck Foundation was established in 1954 by the late W

  19. High Efficiency Spectrum Splitting Prototype Submodule Using Commercial CPV Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keevers, M.; Lau, J.; Green, M.; Thomas, I.; Lasich, J.; King, R.; Emery, K.

    2014-11-01

    This presentation summarizes progress on the design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept, prototype spectrum splitting CPV submodule using commercial CPV cells, aimed at demonstrating an independently confirmed efficiency above 40% at STC (1000 W/m2, AM1.5D ASTM G173-03, 25 degrees C).

  20. D A R G A N M . W . F R I E R S O N D E P A R T M E N T O F A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    to the particular climate forcing ¡ Measured in Watts per meter squared (W/m2) ¡ An increase in shortwave radiation need a way to put these on equal footing in terms of how much warming they cause ¡ Let's recall how: Shortwave Forcings For shortwave forcings, this is just the change in solar energy absorbed by the planet

  1. Motorization, Vehicle Purchase and Use Behavior in China: A Shanghai Survey????????????????????????????

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ni, Jason

    2008-01-01

    WTC WTPS (WM)BPT (WP)BT (WP)BTC (WP)T N (4+ stages) = 431BPM BPT BPW BSC BST BSW BT BTC BTM BTP BTS BW BWC BWM BWPBPW BPWM BPWT BSC BST BSW BT BTC BTM BTMC BTP BTPC BTS BTSC

  2. Paulina Jaramillo, Ph.D. Executive Director, RenewElec Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -chair), Chris T. Hendrickson, M. Granger Morgan. Dissertation Title: Life Cycle Comparison of Coal and Naturalth International Conference. Toronto, Canada. June 20, 2007 PUBLICATIONS Peer-Reviewed Journal, W.M; Matthews; H. S. "Comparative Life Cycle Air Emissions of Coal, Domestic Natural Gas, LNG

  3. GIScience & Remote Sensing, 2012, 49, No. 3, p. 317345. http://dx.doi.org/10.2747/1548-1603.49.3.317 Copyright 2012 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    . INTRODUCTION Geothermal features are one of the main reasons that Yellowstone National Park (YNP of geothermal features. The GHF in the Yellowstone region is approximately 2 Wm­2 , which is roughly 40 times.2747/1548-1603.49.3.317 Copyright © 2012 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved. Analyzing Change in Yellowstone

  4. Micro Catalytic Combustor with Pd/Nano-porous Alumina for High-Temperature Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasagi, Nobuhide

    . A heat exchanger with a temperature efficiency of 0.78 is assumed for heat recirculation. Thus as high as 850 o C and extremely high heat generation density of 2-5x108 W/m3 has been achieved been made for radial-flow-type combustors using Fluent 6 (Fluent Inc.). Figure 1 shows a radial-flow-type

  5. Heat flux measurement from thermal infrared imagery in low-flux fumarolic zones: Example of the Ty fault (La Soufrire de Guadeloupe)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauducel, François

    the geothermal flux of a dormant volcano is necessary both for hazard assessment and for studying hydrothermal for the thermal infrared method, and 275 ± 50 W/m2 for the vertical temperature gradient method), if surface through connected porosity and fissures of rocks in which the thermal vertical gradient is nil. Near

  6. Michael Bell for the NSTX Research Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    NSTXNSTX Supported by College W&M Colorado Sch Mines Columbia U CompX General Atomics INL Johns Hopkins U accumulation increases radiated power and Zeff H. Kugel, B. LeBlanc, R.E. Bell #12;M.G. Bell / PPPL Theory Dept

  7. Divertor options for NSTX and NSTX-Upgrade Rajesh Maingi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Program Advisory Committee Meeting Princeton, NJ Feb. 3-5, 2010 College W&M Colorado Sch Mines Columbia U power exhaust sharing may be required ­ Gas puffing for radiative/detached divertor would be used techniques ­ High flux expansion divertors ­ Gas puffing for extra radiation and partial detachment

  8. William and Mary Athletics State Vehicle / Rental Vehicle / Personal Vehicle Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaddle, John

    William and Mary Athletics State Vehicle / Rental Vehicle / Personal Vehicle Policies Last Update: 2/14/14 W&M's vehicle use policy requires that a driver authorization form be completed and approved before driving any vehicle (including a personal vehicle) for university business or a university

  9. A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -years-old database for solar irradiance (W.m-2 ). So it is important to determine Luminous Efficacy in order to find illuminance from solar irradiance (or luminance from solar radiance). The measured data. Keywords Global and diffuse luminous efficacy, different sky conditions, solar irradiance, solar

  10. 410 IEEE/ASME TRANSACTIONS ON MECHATRONICS, VOL. 7, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2002 Using Role-Based Control to Produce Locomotion in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Wei-Min

    , and battle field reconnaissance. Robustness is needed because the system cannot rely on a human operator by the Danish Tech- nical Research Council under Contract 26-01-0088. Recommended by Guest Editors W.-M. Shen-like locomotion. (c) A gait similar to that of a sidewinder snake. The cables only supply power. the robot should

  11. VALUATION FOR LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    VALUATION FOR LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF WASTE MANAGEMENT OPTIONS by Jane C. Powell David Pearce and Inger Brisson CSERGE Working Paper WM 95-07 #12;VALUATION FOR LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF WASTE MANAGEMENT-use, recycling and source reduction. The context of the study is life cycle assessment (LCA), which seeks

  12. Neural Mechanisms of Interference Control Underlie the Relationship Between Fluid Intelligence and Working Memory Span

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neural Mechanisms of Interference Control Underlie the Relationship Between Fluid Intelligence Andrew R. A. Conway Princeton University Todd S. Braver Washington University in St. Louis Fluid studies show that much of the variance in gF and WM span is shared, suggesting common neural mechanisms

  13. MA 166 NAME 10-DIGIT PUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a .nlD. P X m. anI. _ O m r. e m mam 3_83_51_24_7.5_8 .w hm EN __ __ __. ) w. 5 Sm . _ E E f . 6 7 w 0 A C D E. 1T6 <__$ m @m. \\1/ Wm. /0\\ __ m y w .. m f w e ...

  14. Toward Large-Scale Energy Harvesting by a Nanoparticle-Enhanced Triboelectric Nanogenerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L.

    by commonly available ambient mechanical energy such as human footfalls, a NG with size smaller than a human palm can generate maximum short-circuit current of 2 mA, delivering instantaneous power output of 1.2 W to external load. The power output corresponds to an area power density of 313 W/m2 and a volume power density

  15. Fenestration of Today and Tomorrow: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and 0.30 W/(m2 K), which was from a suspended coating glazing product and an aerogel glazing product-cleaning glazing, low-emissivity coatings and spacers were also reviewed, thus also representing possibilities and solutions, electrochromic windows and aerogel glazing seem to have the largest potential for improving

  16. Towards an understanding of form drag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    form drag and wave drag } W/m N/m x 104 } } 1 cm of SSH N S Tidal conversion rate per unit width -250 body #12;Form drag and mixing U0 Form drag pressure Tidal energy conversion Form drag causes and understand the physical processes that play a role in energy conversion at Three Tree Point. Conclusions

  17. Vrme-och strmningsteknik Thermal and Flow Engineering Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    such that in 1 second the pressure is reduced to ambient 0.1 MPa, = 100 kPa. The volume of the tire is constant: värmegenomgångstal U (W/(m2 ·K)) beror inte på temperaturskillnaden T. 1104. In a simple, double-tube heat exchanger reversed, giving a parallel flow heat exchanger. Calculate the final temperature of the benzene. Note

  18. W.R. Peltier Curriculum Vitae January 2009 1. Personal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    W.R. Peltier Curriculum Vitae January 2009 1. Personal Name: Wm. Richard Peltier Citizenship-978-8905 Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 Canada E- mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Web: http://www.atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca/~peltier

  19. W.R. Peltier Curriculum Vitae April 2009 A. BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    W.R. Peltier Curriculum Vitae April 2009 A. BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION 1. Personal Name: Wm. Richard Peltier Citizenship: Canadian Office address: Department of Physics Office tel.: 416-978-2938 University of Toronto Fax : 416-978-8905 Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 Canada E- mail: peltier@atmosp.physics.utoronto.ca Web

  20. VertexBased Formulations of Irradiance from Polygonal Sources Technical Report UUCS00012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertex­Based Formulations of Irradiance from Polygonal Sources Technical Report UUCS­00­012 Michael M. Stark Department of Computer Science University of Utah May 29, 2000 Abstract Irradiance]. Radiance is measured in units of W/m 2 /sr. A related quantity is irradiance, the incident radiant flux

  1. Superconducting magnets and their radiation protections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Refrigerator& Power Supply Building Tank Yard Installation Shaft High Power Proton Beam Line 30 GeV 750 k (doublet optics) · Common Design with LHC ­ Vacuum Vessel ­ Shield Tray ­ Support Post ­ Cold Diode ­ 30 GeV 750 kW (possibly 50 GeV, 4MW) ­ Beam loss 1W/m (10W per point) by tunnel shield · Issues

  2. COMMUN. MATH. SCI. c 2010 International Press Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 295319

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauluis, Olivier M.

    of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012-1185, USA (pauluis with a conversion between latent energy and sensible (thermal) energy. The amount of energy involved of approximately 75W/m2 in the atmosphere. This energy is initially injected into the atmosphere through

  3. Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system {number_sign}3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary.

  4. Radiation Modeling In Fluid Flow Iain D. Boyd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    Collector #12;4 Fundamentals of Radiation (1) · All matter with non-zero temperature emits thermal radiation with energy flux given by the Stefan-Boltzmann Law: e.g., Sun: T=5800 K, total radiated power = 4 distribution (Planck spectrum) !q =T 4 W/m2 #12;5 Planck Radiation Spectrum #12;6 Solar Radiation Spectrum

  5. APEX-TASK IV (A W-alloy structure, vaporized Li blanket concept)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    /blanket configuration · Blanket lithium boiling analysis · First Wall/Blanket Li transpiration cooling analysis;Schematic of EVOLVE First Wall Tubes and Blanket Trays #12;A A B QF [W/m2 ] B Btoroidal Transpiration Cooled and Recommendatons · The transpiration cooled first wall seems to be a credible concept. This is a critical concept

  6. KU Public Safety Office Criminal Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KU Public Safety Office ! Criminal Damage The unidentified white male pictured below is a suspect in the damage of a Coca-Cola vending machine in the Parking Services lobby at 1501 Irving Hill Drive and damage to Coca-Cola vending machines across the campus. Suspect Description: W/M, 5 feet 10 inches, 150

  7. MAM-06, 28 MAY -1 JUNE, WASEDA, TOKYO, JAPAN MICRO-/NANOFLUIDIC COMPUTING AND ITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munakata, Toshinori

    APPLICATIONS TO BLOOD VESSEL THROMBUS FORMATION CONTROL Toshinori Munakata,1 David W.M. Marr2 and Michael and nanomedicine, and Micro-/nanofluidic computing. References [1] A. Terray, J. Oakey, and D.W.M. Marr, Microfluidic control using colloidal devices, Science, 296, 2002, 1841-1844. [2] T. Vestad, D.W.M. Marr and T

  8. Tank waste remediation system compensatory measure removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLIKEN, N.J.

    1999-05-18

    In support of Fiscal Year 1998 Performance Agreement TWR1.4.3, ''Replace Compensatory Measures,'' the Tank Waste Remediation System is documenting the completion of field modifications supporting the removal of the temporary exemptions from the approved Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006. These temporary exemptions or compensatory measures expire September 30, 1998.

  9. Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    at tissue temperature (kPa) mQ Metabolic rate of tissue (W/m3 ) R Ideal gas constant (J/molK) Re Reynolds1 Theoretical evaluation on burn injury of human respiratory tract due to inhalation of hot gas to predict the thermal impact of inhaled hot air during the early stage of fires. Influences of individual

  10. NSTX Program Governance, Research Support and Facility Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    -30, 2008 College W&M Colorado Sch Mines Columbia U Comp-X General Atomics INEL Johns Hopkins U LANL LLNL, Cadarache IPP, Jülich IPP, Garching ASCR, Czech Rep U Quebec Supported by #12;NSTX 2009-13 5 year Plan · Milestone performance history · Scheduling operation, maintenance & upgrades · Managing environment, safety

  11. CodeTopics: Which Topic am I Coding Now? Malcom Gethers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poshyvanyk, Denys

    information might be too coarse- grained: a source code artifact the developer is coding may by related and Mary Williamsburg, VA, USA mgethers@cs.wm.edu Trevor Savage HCI Institute Carnegie Mellon University@unisa.it ABSTRACT Recent studies indicated that showing the similarity between the source code being developed

  12. THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMMISSIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMMISSIONS FROM 21 INDUSTRIES BY JONATHAN FISHER CSERGE WORKING PAPER WM 97-03 #12;THE COST OF REDUCING VOC EMISSIONS FROM 21 INDUSTRIES by Jonathan Fisher ERM Economics 8 and Industry to estimate the costs of various levels of controls on emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds

  13. Laser Inertial Fusion-based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as thermal insulator to protect capsule during injection: --Radiation heating to capsule: ­ Polyimide transmits in the IR ­ Radiation shield (Al/polyimide/Al) gives 99% reflectivity --Convective heating of polyimide window dominates: ­ Heat transfer coefficient ~8 W/m2-K at window edge ­ Window heats to ~80

  14. MassverfringochSeparationsteknik februari 2015 bo Akademi -kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    " 111 )()( )( )( h d hh TThTTh TT d TTh Th total total totalh Heat flux h" (W/m2), local*-c1) 1212 1 1 2 1 2 1 1 11 ccmkccm kk m N m c ck m c c kmk N ox xy A oy xy

  15. X-ray and EUV Observations of GOES C8 Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Patrick J.

    X-ray and EUV Observations of GOES C8 Solar Flare Events Kathy Reeves1, Trevor Bowen1,2, Paola;Solar Flares Tuesday, February 19, 2013 #12;Solar Flares Tuesday, February 19, 2013 #12;Solar Dynamics Veronig et al, A&A, 2002 Tuesday, February 19, 2013 #12;Flare Timing GOESflux(Wm-2) Rise Decay Tuesday

  16. IST | VALCOURT NEW CAREER OPPORTUNITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    expertise and analytical abilities will be used in your project management based on the Argile method. 3 in computer science or information systems management (IMS) or equivalent, and at least 10 years of relevant would be an asset Use with ease the advanced functions of SAP MM/PP/WM/QM Apply frequently your

  17. From Measurements to Models: What Satellite and Sub-Orbital Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    uncertainty upper bounds for ~1 W/m2 TOA DARF accuracy: ~ 0.02 CCSP - SAP 2.3, 2009 #12;Aerosol-location time series Regional Context R. Kahn #12;The NASA Earth Observing System's Terra Satellite ASTER First Light: February 24, 2000 MODIS CERES MISR MOPITT Terra Project Office / NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

  18. CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drill One Exploratory Hole On Lease Tract C-WM-17 by Golden Eagle UraniumCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3Date: 06/02/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into the Applicability of the CIRS Solar Aquatic Wastewater Treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and maintenance costs for the system are approximately $1.00/m3 . The capital investment for the system has been energy requirements of approximately 200W/m3 with energy costs of $0.0177/m3 . The operating; however the pumps should be replaced after 15 years. In terms of the environmental indicators, the Eco

  20. FSICA MODERNA I -2o SEMESTRE 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribas, Roberto Vicençotto

    fotoelétrica é iluminada com luz de diferentes comprimentos de onda, os seguintes potenciais de corte são da luz incidente é reduzido de 4000Å para 3980Å? (Assuma que o decréscimo no comprimento de onda pode a intensidade da luz incidente é de 2 W/m2 , qual é o número médio de fótons por unidade de tempo e por unidade

  1. 6= SOUTH EST FOREST SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; stocking of lemon-wm eucalyptus was considered poor. All thee species made rapid height growth. If more.1 Eucalyptus citriodora + 176.1 Bithecellobiurn samn + 176.1 Swietenia mahogani]. RE TRIE VAL TERMS: Eucalyptus mhog-ani EL.] Jacq.), mon- key-pod (BtheceElobium stkpnan Jacq. Benth.), and lemongum eucalyptus

  2. Proceedings of FUELCELL2005 Third International Conference on Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    in load, coolant flow, and coolant temperature. A first-law control volume analysis is performed or signal value Stefan-Boltzmann constant [W/(m2K4)] 1 Copyright c 2005 by ASME #12; Relative humidity lost through leakage Liq, l Liquid mAir Moist air mH2 Moist hydrogen O2 Oxygen Ohm Ohmic Out Outlet

  3. Inverse Square Law Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    due to the independent sources A and B with powers WZ and WB, taking advantage of the symmetryq2 (q2 +m2 ) and collecting together like powers of q produces a quartic equation, 4IDq4 + [4m2 ID intensity (I Wm-2 ) on distance (r m) from a source. For a single source of sound power W watts

  4. Thomas Sommer gewinnt zweimal Gold bei der German Open Poomsae 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinnau, René

    Thomas Sommer gewinnt zweimal Gold bei der German Open Poomsae 2011 Mit der Poomsae-Union Rheinland-Pfalz (TURP) stellte sich auch der zweifache WM- Bronzemedaillengewinner Thomas Sommer der im Paarwettbewerb wollte Thomas Sommer mit Cyra De Rama nach einer Goldmedaille greifen und damit für

  5. GREEN TAXES, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    GREEN TAXES, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY by R. Kerry Turner J. Powell A. Craighill CSERGE Working Paper WM 96-03 #12;GREEN TAXES, WASTE MANAGEMENT AND POLITICAL ECONOMY by R. Kerry Turner and advocated. The application of such instruments in the current political economy settings will however serve

  6. Towards Stable Network Performance in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankovic, John A.

    Whitehouse, Yafeng Wu, John A. Stankovic, and Tian He Department of Computer Science, University of Virginia of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN {shanlin, whitehouse, yw5s, stankovic}@cs.virginia.edu {gzhou}@cs.wm.edu {tianhe}@cs.umn.edu Abstract--Many applications in wireless

  7. Poster Abstract: Achieving Stable Network Performance for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Gang

    , University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Department of Computer Science, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA Department of Computer Science and Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN {sl8yc,yw5s,whitehouse,stankovic}@cs.virginia.edu gzhou@cs.wm.edu tianhe@cs.umn.edu ABSTRACT Extensive

  8. Author List Mark Baker and Rajkumar Buyya 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melbourne, University of

    135 y Department of Computer Science University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 22903­2242 z: xd2a@cs.virginia.edu, zhang@cs.wm.edu Mark Baker and Geoffrey Fox 154 y Division of Computer Science: fnitin, mraghug@cdacb.ernet.in Alfred C. Weaver 301 Department of Computer Science University of Virginia

  9. Honor Roll of Donors University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Gail

    Honor Roll of Donors University of California San Francisco School of Pharmacy 2005/2006 UCSF. Long Chair in Chain Pharmacy Practice Honor Roll of Donors July 1, 2005­June 30, 2006 The Class of 2009 at the 2005 White Coat Ceremony #12;Highlights 2005­2006 Honoring Harry Wm. Hind '39 At a spring

  10. As the demand for power increases in populated areas, so will the demand for water. Current power plant technology relies heavily on the Rankine cycle in coal, nuclear and even solar thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plant technology relies heavily on the Rankine cycle in coal, nuclear and even solar thermal powerAs the demand for power increases in populated areas, so will the demand for water. Current power the cooling power from radiation were developed and run. The results showed a cooling power of 35 W/m2

  11. Soft X-ray microflares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirzoeva, I K

    2015-01-01

    Soft X-ray solar bursts are studied. Weak bursts with powers up to 10-8 W/m2 were detected. All the events were confirmed by GOES observations. Parameters of these microflares are determined. A physical mechanism for the low-intensity solar events is discussed.

  12. Rank in materials science Rank in chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Joan

    ,503 60.12 31 Paul W.M. Blom University of Groningen 37 2,176 58.81 32 Jenny Nelson Imperial College London 31 1,821 58.74 33 David J. Mooney Harvard University 43 2,512 58.42 34 Tsu-Wei Chou University

  13. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  14. Rendering Concepts Reflectance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lischinski, Dani

    solid angle [W/(m2 sr)] 9 Photometric quantities Luminous energy [talbot] Luminous power [lumen = talbot optics Quantum mechanics 4 Radiant Energy Light can be thought of as flow of photons. The energy of each photon depends on its wavelength: We are interested in the equilibrium of radiant energy in a 3D scene

  15. Coherence and Linewidth Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fawley, W.M.

    2008-01-01

    bandwidth for a single-pass FEL amplifier initiated by SASE.Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W.M. Fawley, A.M. Sessler,Studies of a 4-nm High Power FEL W. M. Fawley and A. M.

  16. 1999 Leak Detection and Monitoring and Mitigation Strategy Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHL, P.C.

    1999-09-23

    This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented.

  17. PIhS0952-1976(97)00026-2 Engng Applic. Artif Intell. Vol. 10, No. 4, pp. 321-334, 1997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yinlun

    State University,Detroit, MI, U.S.A. Y. L. HUANG Wayne State University,Detroit, MI, U.S.A. (ReceivedScience,WayneStateUniversity, Detroit.MI48202.U.S.A.[E-mail:yhuang@cheml.eng.wayne.edu]. ing to the EPA's WM hierarchy, source reduction

  18. FPA Meeting, 10/11-12/05 Status of World ST Research Status of World Spherical Torus Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Energy Policy October 11-12, 2005, Washington, DC Supported by Office of Science College W&M Colorado Sch Has a Tradition of Strong Collaboration · Active bilateral exchanges ­ UK-US on NSTX and MAST ­ START options for economical fusion reactor Phase III Target Strategy of the All-Japan ST Research Program (Prof

  19. DATA META FILE 2006 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    DDOY - - - 4 Time (hour/minute) - - - 5 Solar radiation (K) W/m² Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Net radiation (Rn best measure/quality control of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates

  20. DATA META FILE 2007 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    DDOY - - - 4 Time (hour/minute) - - - 5 Solar radiation (K) W/m² Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Net radiation (Rn best measure/quality control of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates

  1. DATA META FILE 2005 This file describes the instrumentation, field setup, and quality control procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    DDOY - - - 4 Time (hour/minute) - - - 5 Solar radiation (K) W/m² Eppley PSP 3.7 m 6 Net radiation (Rn best measure/quality control of the climate variables to date and is subject to revision. See dates

  2. Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

    2001-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

  3. Operational test procedure for SY tank farm replacement exhauster unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClees, J.

    1995-09-26

    This operational test procedure will verify that the remaining functions not tested per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-080, or components disturbed during final installation, as well as interfaces with other tank farm equipment and remote monitoring stations are operating correctly.

  4. Sediment mixing and basin-wide cosmogenic nuclide analysis in rapidly-eroding mountainous environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sediment mixing and basin-wide cosmogenic nuclide analysis in rapidly-eroding mountainous, W.M., Summerfield, M.A., and Fifield, L.K., 2006, Sediment mixing and basin-wide cosmogenic nuclide nuclide concentrations in alluvial sediments have been widely used to estimate basin-wide denudation rates

  5. 1. Introduction The aerosol DRE at the top-of-atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    is the incident solar irradiance spectrum. The anisotropy factor , a measure for the angular distribution observed aerosol DRE in a case of smoke over clouds off the west coast of Africa was 69±7 Wm-2 (ESA) within the Support to Science Element, project number 22403. µ0E0 Figure 2. CALIOP 1064 nm

  6. GISS 2007 Temperature Analysis The year 2007 tied for second warmest in the period of instrumental data, behind the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    cycle. Another analysis of the satellite data (not illustrated here), by Judith Lean, has the 2007 solar irradiance of an area perpendicular to the solar beam is about 1366 W/m2 , the absorption of solar energy data, behind the record warmth of 2005, in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) analysis

  7. Observational determination of albedo decrease caused by vanishing Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    ) The decline of Arctic sea ice has been documented in over 30 y of satellite passive microwave observations- ments along with satellite microwave sea ice data to document the Arctic-wide decrease in planetary to an additional 6.4 ± 0.9 W/m2 of solar energy input into the Arctic Ocean region since 1979. Averaged over

  8. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-13

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented.

  9. Research on Thermal Properties in a Phase Change Wallboard Room Based on Air Conditioning Cold Storage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, G.; Li, W.; Chen, X.

    2006-01-01

    is lower than that of ordinary wall room by 1 to 2?, and PCW can lower the heat flow by 4.6W/m2. Combining phase change material with the building envelope can lower the indoor temperature, make the room thermally comfortable, and cut down the turn...

  10. BRIEF REPORT Choke or Thrive? The Relation Between Salivary Cortisol and Math

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateo, Jill M.

    BRIEF REPORT Choke or Thrive? The Relation Between Salivary Cortisol and Math Performance Depends on Individual Differences in Working Memory and Math-Anxiety Andrew Mattarella-Micke and Jill Mateo to their performance in a challenging math situation as a function of individual differences in working memory (WM

  11. Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salzman, Daniel

    Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. ISSN 0077-8923 ANNALS OF THE NEW YORK ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Issue: Critical of Neuroscience, 2 Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York. 3 W.M. Keck Center on Brain Plasticity and Cognition, Columbia University, New York, New York. 4 Kavli Institute for Brain Sciences, 5

  12. REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    : IS THE ENERGY FROM THE SUN THAT ACTUALLY REACHES THE EARTH'S SURFACE. The atmosphere gets its heat energy from the Sun. The flux of energy coming from the Sun is 1370 W/m2. This is the energy flux that would. · Ozone absorbs ultraviolet radiation coming from the Sun. · This absorption converts the energy of the UV

  13. THE BLIND PATTERN MATCHING ATTACK ON WATERMARK SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petitcolas, Fabien A.P.

    complex- ity to reverse the permutations as a preprocessing step for watermark detection. In this paper, we describe the logistics of the attack and a recipe for its implementation against an audio be shown that any WM detector is facing a task of exponential complexity to reverse the permutations

  14. US008265354B2 (12) Ulllted States Patent (10) Patent N0.: US 8,265,354 B2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Or Wm Ona asc urg 24, 2°04 (57) ABSTRACT (51) Int CL Multiple volumes that are to be aligned to form. ....................................................... 382/128 iZatiOn step' a edge detection Step and a Correlation Step to (58) Fi61d of Classi

  15. BRAIN IMAGING NEUROREPORT 0959-4965 & Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Vol 11 No 11 3 August 2000 2581

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Jochen

    of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA CA Corresponding Author Received 26 neuroimaging stud- ies of WM were conducted using PET. Since the advent of fMRI, a technique that can non reported with other tasks (e.g. word processing [2]), we evaluated a group of healthy volunteers with f

  16. Magnetic/metallic thin films and nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    examples. During the past decade applications of nano-scale magnetic devices to data storage have hadMagnetic/metallic thin films and nanostructures The College of William and MarY;'l Virginia http://www.as.wm.cdu/Faculty/Lukaszcw.html It is widely believed that revolutionary progress can be made as materials and devices are developed to operate

  17. Global energy and global precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global energy and global precipitation or Why doesn't precipitation increase as Clausias expect precipitation to increase at the same rate. · Rest of this brief talk is to show you why Heat Flux (S) 20 W/m2 Atmospheric heating from precipitation LP Atmosphere has small heat capacity. So

  18. Solar Thermoelectric Generators (STEG) Dr. HoSung Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Sung

    Solar Thermoelectric Generators (STEG) Dr. HoSung Lee Western Michigan University Mechanical;#12;· Kraemer et al. (2011) · 1 sun · t = 0.94, a = 0.95, e = 0.05 · q" = 1000 W/m^2, Cth = 299 · Thermoelectric;Baranowski, Snyder, Tober (2012) #12;Baranowski, Snyder, Tober (2012) Reduced current density Thermoelectric

  19. HIGH EFFICIENCY Cu(ln,Ga)SepBASED SOLAR CELLS: PROCESSING OF NOVEL ABSORBER STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    HIGH EFFICIENCY Cu(ln,Ga)SepBASED SOLAR CELLS: PROCESSING OF NOVEL ABSORBER STRUCTURES Miguel A conditions (ASTM E892-87, Global 1000 W/m'). The first attempts to translate this development to larger areas a device performance point of view. In terms of lightweight flexible substrate-for potential space

  20. Student #_______________ Department of Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    The intensity of solar radiation that strikes the earth is I = 1370 W/m2 . The earth's surface absorptivity for solar radiation is = 0.7. At the same time the earth loses heat by radiation to the universe to the block and radiation heat transfer to the surrounding, how long will it take for the block of ice

  1. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  2. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  3. Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

    2007-11-26

    We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present-day emissions suggest that future climate projections warrant particular scrutiny.

  4. Fuelcell Prototype Locomotive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David L. Barnes

    2007-09-28

    An international industry-government consortium is developing a fuelcell hybrid switcher locomotive for commercial railway applications and power-to-grid generation applications. The current phase of this on-going project addresses the practicalities of on-board hydrogen storage, fuelcell technology, and hybridity, all with an emphasis on commercially available products. Through practical evaluation using designs from Vehicle Projects’ Fuelcell-Powered Underground Mine Loader Project, the configuration of the fuelcell switcher locomotive changed from using metal-hydride hydrogen storage and a pure fuelcell power plant to using compressed hydrogen storage, a fuelcell-battery hybrid power plant, and fuelcell stack modules from Ballard Power Systems that have been extensively used in the Citaro bus program in Europe. The new overall design will now use a RailPower battery hybrid Green Goat™ as the locomotive platform. Keeping the existing lead-acid batteries, we will replace the 205 kW diesel gen-set with 225 kW of net fuelcell power, remove the diesel fuel tank, and place 14 compressed hydrogen cylinders, capable of storing 70 kg of hydrogen at 350 bar, on the roof. A detailed design with associated CAD models will allow a complete build of the fuelcell-battery hybrid switcher locomotive in the next funded phase.

  5. ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-11-15

    This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

  6. Saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically-enhanced effective gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Corcovilos; M. E. Turk; D. M. Strayer; N. N. Asplund; N. -C. Yeh

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen for effective gravities of 1g, 6.0g, and 16g (g=9.8 m/s^2) at a saturation pressure of 760 torr and for heat fluxes of 10 ~ 3000 W/m^2. The effective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force generated by a superconducting solenoid. We measure the heater temperature (expressed as a reduced superheat) as a function of heat flux and fit this data to a piecewise power-law/linear boiling curve. At low heat flux (<400 W/m^2) the superheat is proportional to the cube root of the heat flux. At higher heat fluxes, the superheat is a linear function of the heat flux. To within statistical uncertainties, which are limited by variations among experimental runs, we find no variation of the boiling curve over our applied gravity range.

  7. Penetrative turbulence associated with mesoscale surface heat flux variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alam, Jahrul M

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates penetrative turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer. Using a large eddy simulation approach, we study characteristics of the mixed layer with respect to surface heat flux variations in the range from 231.48 W/m$^2$ to 925.92 W/m$^2$, and observe that the surface heterogeneity on a spatial scale of $20$ km leads to downscale turbulent kinetic energy cascade. Coherent fluctuations of mesoscale horizontal wind is observed at 100m above the ground. Such a surface induced temporal oscillations in the horizontal wind suggest a rapid jump in mesocale wind forecasts, which is difficult to parameterize using traditional one-dimensional ensemble-mean models. Although the present work is idealized at a typical scale (20km) of surface heterogeneity, the results help develop effective subgrid scale parameterization schemes for classical weather forecasting mesoscale models.

  8. Thermal interface conductance across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterojunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chun-Chung; Li, Zhen; Cronin, Stephen B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    We measure thermal transport across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) interface by electrically heating the graphene and measuring the temperature difference between the graphene and BN using Raman spectroscopy. Because the temperature of the graphene and BN are measured optically, this approach enables nanometer resolution in the cross-plane direction. A temperature drop of 60?K can be achieved across this junction at high electrical powers (14 mW). Based on the temperature difference and the applied power data, we determine the thermal interface conductance of this junction to be 7.4?×?10{sup 6}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1}, which is below the 10{sup 7}–10{sup 8}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1} values previously reported for graphene/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  9. GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-10-26

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029).

  10. Investigations of low-temperature geothermal potential in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible potential for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient anomalies: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira anomalies, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these anomalies are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the anomalies and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity anomalies and the temperature gradient map suggests that the geothermal anomalies may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.

  11. Molecular Science Research Center, 1991 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1992-03-01

    During 1991, the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) experienced solid growth and accomplishment and the Environmental, and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) construction project moved forward. We began with strong programs in chemical structure and dynamics and theory, modeling, and simulation, and both these programs continued to thrive. We also made significant advances in the development of programs in materials and interfaces and macromolecular structure and dynamics, largely as a result of the key staff recruited to lead these efforts. If there was one pervasive activity for the past year, however, it was to strengthen the role of the EMSL in the overall environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) mission at Hanford. These extended activities involved not only MSRC and EMSL staff but all PNL scientific and technical staff engaged in ER/WM programs.

  12. Application of Infrared Thermography in Building Energy Efficiency 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Y.; Chen, H.; Xu, Q.; I, D.; Wang, Z.; Fang, X.

    2006-01-01

    of infrared detector according to infrared radiation law. 4TE ??= ?? (1) Where E ? radiometric force, W/m2 ? ? emissivity ? ? the constant of radiation =5.67×10-8 , W/ ? m2?K4? T ? the absolute temperature of the surface , K... OF INFRARED THERMOGRAPHY According to the Planck?s radiation law (equation 1), radiometric force of common object has the biquadratic direct proportion with the absolute temperature of its surface. Infrared ray belongs to the electromagnetic wave, which...

  13. Plasmonic photovoltaics K.R. Catchpole1,2, S. Pillai2, M.A. Green2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    of the worlds energy using 8% efficient photovoltaics. The Solar Resource Average solar irradiance, W/m2. #12 of photovoltaics 50% of the cost of solar modules is the cost of the silicon wafers (300m thick). This canUNSW Plasmonic photovoltaics K.R. Catchpole1,2, S. Pillai2, M.A. Green2, E. Verhagen1, L. Kuipers1

  14. Supplement 23, Part 1, Authors: A-Z 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zidar, Judith A.; Shaw, Judith H.; Hanfman, Deborah T.; Kirby, Margie D.; Rayburn, Jane D.; Edwards, Shirley J.; Hood, Martha W.

    1982-01-01

    .-- Biochemical Medicine. New York. [Wa.(QP501.B474) ] Biochimie.-- Biochimie. Soci?t? de Chimie Biolo- gique avec le concours du Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique. Paris. [Wa.(383 SOI); Wm.(W1 BI 6257)] Biol. Bull. Acad. Sc. USSR.-- Biology.... et Phys. Maroc.-- Bulletin de la Soci?t? des Sciences Naturelles et Physiques du Maroc. Rabat. [Wa.(515 Sol)] [Continuation of: Bull. Soc. Sc. Nat. Maroc] Bull. Tohoku National Agrie. Exper. Station (Tohoku Nogyo Shikenjo Kenkyu Hokoku...

  15. Ranunculus sardous (Introduced) 2 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amanda B. Cemper

    2011-08-02

    .35 0.17 0.11 0.14 U-value of External wall ?W/m 2?K? 2.35 1.5 Aluminium connect structure Aluminium connect structure Aluminium connect structure U-value of Roof?W/m 2?K? 1.55 0.9 0.88 0.88 0.88 Indoor useable area (m2) 252,000 252,000 252...

  16. Part 10, Authors: M To Mysh 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Ray, Doris H.; Hewlett, Ruth V.; Hassall, Albert; Doss, Mildred A.

    1948-01-01

    Rem?des. Paris. 3. Nutrition Conf. Vet. (Decatur, Indiana, July 7).?Third Nutrition Conference for Vet- erinarians Held at Decatur, Indiana, July 7, 1943. Fort Wayne, Indiana. Oesterr. Botan. Ztschr.?Oesterreichische Bo-tanische Zeitschrift. Wien....?Prophylaxie et th?rapeutique sp?-cifique du paludisme par les d?riv?e de la dihydroquinamine. Th?se. (Paris). 144 pp. Paris. [Wm.] MAARTENS, D. J. 1906 a.?Heart water and dropsy [Letter to editor] July, p. 131. [Reply...

  17. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  18. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline · Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3://www.atm.ncu.edu.tw/93/wind/ MM5 simulation (1996~2000 database) Wind speed (m/s) at 50mWind power (100W/m2) at 50m http://wind.itri.org.tw/wind

  19. Vrme-och strmningsteknik Thermal and Flow Engineering Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ,1·(a·z) m3 contains CO2 gas at temperature T1 = (15+5·c) °C and pressure 101 kPa. A propeller mixes temperature ti = 21°C to to = 43°C, in a so-called "shell and plate" heat exchanger. See the enclosed Figure that gives the heat exchanger's correction factor F for the overall heat transfer coefficient U (W/(m2 ·K

  20. PROPRIETARY MATERIAL. 2011 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers and educators for course preparation. If you are a student using this Manual, you are using it without permission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    from the steam turbine and the binary cycle, and the thermal efficiencies for the binary cycle from the steam turbine and the binary cycle are kW15,410 kJ/kg)7.23448.1kJ/kg)(27438.19()( 433steamT,binarynet, 98isoT, inp iso wmWW hhmW steam turbine production well reinjection well isobutane turbine heat

  1. REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    : Is the process by which hot, less dense materials rise upward and are replaced by cold, more dense materials = (2.8 x1023 m2)(1370 W/m2) = 3.8 x 1026 watts 1 watt (W) = J/s #12;The fusion process: Nuclear produces its energy by two fusion reactions: 1. Proton-Proton (PP) ­ 88% 2. Carbon-Nitrogen-Oxygen (CNO

  2. Pat Hubert 1951- All American 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    ??QUEZ, ROMAN [Dr.] ; RODR?GUEZ BAR- RIOS, R. ; and SAN JULIAN, J. 1951 a.?Nueva t?cnica para la extirpaci?n del quiste hid?tico cerebral [English summary] 1951)? PP. 312-314. [W.] ' ? Vioiminth parasites of Alaskan Teavb;iWM HABI?, Ivo; DELAK, MARCEL; and MIKACI?, DA- ?1953* a 1 ?Nametnici...

  3. TANK CHARACTERIATION REPORT FOR SINGLE-SHELL TANK 241-T-111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1996-04-06

    This document was initially released as WHC-EP-0806. This document is now being released as WHC-SD-WM-ER-540 in order to accommodate internet publishing. This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-T-111. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05.

  4. Heat Transfer -1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 1 Consider a composite pipe of inner diameter 10 cm and outer diameter 10.6 cm subjected to an external constant uniform heat flux of 100,000 W/m2 . The composite material of the pipe has/mK in the axial direction. Both ends of the pipe are insulated from any heat loss. The pipe is cooled by water

  5. Auslegung: a journal of philosophy, Volume 15, Number 2 (Summer, 1989): Front Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelle Rotert, University of Iowa Frank Schalow, Loyola University-New Orleans Leslie Thielen-Wilson, University of Western Ontario Jim Tuedio, California State University-Stanislaus Danney Ursery, St. Edwards University Robert D. Walsh, Marquette... and Equality and justice reviewed by D.T. Asselin 185 Essays, Comments and Reviews reviewed by C.S. Schreiner 187 A Cognitive Theory of Metaphor reviewed by Anthonie W.M. Meijers 190 The Evidence of the Senses reviewed by Stephen Hicks 193 Lyotard...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories California Waste Management Program Annual Report February 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2008-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  7. The Brighton declaration: the value of non-communicable disease modelling in population health sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, Laura; Mytton, Oliver T.; Briggs, Adam D. M.; Woodcock, James; Scarborough, Peter

    2014-12-01

    Marsh, Marco Mesa-Frias, Lise Retat; Imperial College London: Anthony Laverty; The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine: Zaid Chalabi; University College London: Luz Sanchez Romero; University of Oxford: Anja Mizdrak, Mike Rayner, Marco... , Sayre EC, Flanagan WM, Fines P, Cibere J, Rahman MM, Bansback NJ, Anis AH, Jordan JM, Sobolev B, Aghajanian J, Kang W, Greidanus NV, Garbuz DS, Hawker GA, Badley EM. Development of a population-based microsimulation model of osteoarthritis in Canada...

  8. Faculty of Technology Heat Engineering Laboratory course 424508 E Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    at the outside the temperature is 200°C. Assuming steady-state, with wall thermal conductivity = 1.0 W and 6, in °C (accuracy 0.1 °C); and b. the heat flow per unit length, Q/L (W/m) from the inside on the boundary value for x=L) that µ must be a multiple of , i.e. µn = n/L with n = 0, 1, 2, 3

  9. Matter and mattering: the metaphysics of Rowan Williams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickstock, C. J. C.

    2015-07-28

    to identify the supposed inner consistencies and protocols of a postulated third realm of abstract 16 The Edge, pp. 95-125. On the natural life of words, see Woolf, ‘Craftsmanship’: “Words [. . .] are full... and David Bentley Hart trs (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans, 2013). 14 Williams’s argument, which, as we have seen, builds from ontology to theology, is that language must be added to nature, expressed in a dilation or further excess of nature...

  10. Modeling and Experimental Study of Lithium-Ion Battery Thermal Behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Carlos F

    2015-04-28

    . (a) Temperature and heating rate, (b) amount of meta-stable SEI, (c) cathode degree of conversion, and (d) anode lithium content during oven tests at 150 and 170 °C with a convection coefficient of 7.17 W/m2K. ............... 32 Figure 6. Heat.... ........................................................................................................... 35 Figure 8. Temperature response and heating rate during simulated oven test for the cylindrical and prismatic spiral-wound cells. ....................................................... 37 Figure 9. (a) Amount of meta-stable SEI, (b), cathode...

  11. F589 -TERCEIRA LISTA DE EXCERCICIOS 1. Ilumina-se uma superficie de aluminio com luz de comprimento de onda 2000A. No

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    F589 - TERCEIRA LISTA DE EXCERC´ICIOS 1. Ilumina-se uma superf´icie de alum´inio com luz de^encia de corte para o alum´inio? (e) Se a intensidade da luz incidente for 2.0 W/m2 qual o n´umero m corta para foto-el´etrons emitidos por uma superf´icie iluminada por luz com = 4910 °A ´e 0.71V

  12. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

  13. Instituto Superior Tecnico Departamento de Matematica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nunes, João Pimentel

    painel solar P tem uma forma rectangular, P = {(x, y) R2 : 0 x 20, 0 y 15} (os comprimentos est~ao em metros). O painel P ´e composto por 4 sub-paineis: P1 = {(x, y) R2 : 0 x x 20, 10 y 15}. O sub-painel Pj, j = 1, 2, 3, 4, tem uma produ¸c~ao energ´etica de 5j W/m2

  14. Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 3, Cairo, Egypt, Dec 19-22nd 978-1-61284-266-0/10/$26.00 2010 IEEE ThETA3_056 283

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ]. There is a recent micropower demonstration by Amatya and Ram [8]. The incident solar energy flux is around 1000W/m2Thermal Issues in Emerging Technologies, ThETA 3, Cairo, Egypt, Dec 19-22nd 2010 978-1-61284-266-0/10/$26.00 ©2010 IEEE ThETA3_056 283 SYSTEM OPTIMIZTION OF HOT WATER CONCENTRATED SOLAR THERMOELECTRIC GENERATION

  15. Tank characterization report for double-shell tank 241-SY-103

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, S.L.

    1998-07-31

    The best-basis inventory provides waste inventory estimates that serve as standard characterization source terms for the various waste management activities. To establish a best-basis inventory for double-shell tank 241-SY-103, an evaluation of available information was performed. This work follows the methodology established in Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes, HNF-SO-WM-TI-740, Rev.OA. This tank has been listed on the Hydrogen Watch List.

  16. A stochastic Monte Carlo computer simulation of the drop-weight test for the determination of nil-ductility transition temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, Michael Andrew

    1990-01-01

    characterization of nuclear pressure boundary materials. Substituting typical values for upper shelf fracture toughness and yield suength, 200 ksi~in. (220 MPaWm) and 50 ksi (345 MPa), respectively, for nudear pressure vessel steels into Bquatton B3 results in a... Carlo Computer Simulation of the Drop-Weight Test for the Determination of Nil-Ductility Transition Temperature. (August 1990) Michael A. Lambert, B. S. , Texas AdcM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. ' Ted L. Anderson Material inhomogeneity...

  17. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  19. Spring 2014 Heat Transfer -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2014 Heat Transfer - 2 A thin electronic chip is in the shape of a square wafer, b = 1 cm surface of the chip with a heat transfer coefficient of h = 100 W/m2 -K. Assume the chip has a uniform per side with a mass of m = 0.3 grams and specific heat of C = 103 J/kg-K. The chip is mounted

  20. Heat Transfer -2 A long copper wire is used to carry an electric current and has an electrical resistance of 0.4 ohm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Heat Transfer - 2 A long copper wire is used to carry an electric current and has an electrical and the insulation reaching 90 0 C. You may neglect heat transfer to the air during this process, but justify conductivity k = 300 W/m-0 C Density = 8900 kg/m3 Specific heat capacity Cp = 380 J/kg-0 C a) (10 pts) Draw

  1. NSF REU Participant, Liliana Zepeda Compare evapotranspiration (ET) estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    191 #12;Results: Weather Data Quality 11 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 Solar radiation, W/m2 Day of the Year Solar Radiation Rso Rs #12;Results: Weather Data Quality 12 y = 0.8299x R² = 0.886 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Humidity Volumetric Water Content Soil Heat Flux Solar Radiation Net Radiation Infrared Radiation 5

  2. Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

    1996-12-01

    Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

  3. Engineering Basis Document Review Supporting the Double Shell Tank (DST) System Specification Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEONARD, M.W.

    2000-03-14

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System is required to transition from its current storage mission to a storage and retrieval mission supporting the River Protection Project Phase 1 privatization, defined in HNF-SD-WM-MAR-008, Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report. Requirements for the DST subsystems are being developed using the top-down systems engineering process outlined in HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. This top-down process considers existing designs to the extent that these designs impose unavoidable constraints on the Phase 1 mission. Existing engineering-basis documents were screened, and the unavoidable constraints were identified. The constraints identified herein will be added to the DST System specification (HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System). While the letter revisions of the DST System specification were constructed with a less rigorous review of the existing engineering-basis documents, the Revision 0 release of the specification must incorporate the results of the review documented herein. The purpose of this document is to describe the screening process and criteria used to determine which constraints are unavoidable and to document the screening results.

  4. A structural evaluation of the tungsten isotopes via thermal neutron capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurst, A M; Sleaford, B W; Summers, N C; Revay, Zs; Szentmiklosi, L; Basunia, M S; Belgya, T; Escher, J E; Krticka, M

    2014-01-01

    Total radiative thermal neutron-capture $\\gamma$-ray cross sections for the $^{182,183,184,186}$W isotopes were measured using guided neutron beams from the Budapest Research Reactor to induce prompt and delayed $\\gamma$ rays from elemental and isotopically-enriched tungsten targets. These cross sections were determined from the sum of measured $\\gamma$-ray cross sections feeding the ground state from low-lying levels below a cutoff energy, E$_{\\rm crit}$, where the level scheme is completely known, and continuum $\\gamma$ rays from levels above E$_{\\rm crit}$, calculated using the Monte Carlo statistical-decay code DICEBOX. The new cross sections determined in this work for the tungsten nuclides are: $\\sigma_{0}(^{182}{\\rm W}) = 20.5(14)$ b and $\\sigma_{11/2^{+}}(^{183}{\\rm W}^{m}, 5.2 {\\rm s}) = 0.177(18)$ b; $\\sigma_{0}(^{183}{\\rm W}) = 9.37(38)$ b and $\\sigma_{5^{-}}(^{184}{\\rm W}^{m}, 8.33 \\mu{\\rm s}) = 0.0247(55)$ b; $\\sigma_{0}(^{184}{\\rm W}) = 1.43(10)$ b and $\\sigma_{11/2^{+}}(^{185}{\\rm W}^{m}, 1.67 ...

  5. High power laser heating of low absorption materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, K.; Talghader, J.; Ogloza, A.; Thomas, J.

    2014-09-28

    A model is presented and confirmed experimentally that explains the anomalous behavior observed in continuous wave (CW) excitation of thermally isolated optics. Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) high reflective optical thin film coatings of HfO? and SiO?were prepared with a very low absorption, about 7 ppm, measured by photothermal common-path interferometry. When illuminated with a 17 kW CW laser for 30 s, the coatings survived peak irradiances of 13 MW/cm², on 500 ?m diameter spot cross sections. The temperature profile of the optical surfaces was measured using a calibrated thermal imaging camera for illuminated spot sizes ranging from 500 ?m to 5 mm; about the same peak temperatures were recorded regardless of spot size. This phenomenon is explained by solving the heat equation for an optic of finite dimensions and taking into account the non-idealities of the experiment. An analytical result is also derived showing the relationship between millisecond pulse to CW laser operation where (1) the heating is proportional to the laser irradiance (W/m²) for millisecond pulses, (2) the heating is proportional to the beam radius (W/m) for CW, and (3) the heating is proportional to W/m? tan?¹(?(t)/m) in the transition region between the two.

  6. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

    2012-08-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

  7. Optimal linear reconstruction of dark matter from halo catalogues

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-04-01

    The dark matter lumps (or "halos") that contain galaxies have locations in the Universe that are to some extent random with respect to the overall matter distributions. We investigate how best to estimate the total matter distribution from the locations of the halos. We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter haloes that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses of halos being used. While the standard biased-Poisson model of the halo distribution predicts that bias weighting is optimal, the simple factmore »that the mass is comprised of haloes implies that the optimal w(M) will be a mixture of mass-weighting and bias-weighting. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15× noisier than the optimal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost effective.« less

  8. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  9. Optimal linear reconstruction of dark matter from halo catalogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-04-01

    The dark matter lumps (or "halos") that contain galaxies have locations in the Universe that are to some extent random with respect to the overall matter distributions. We investigate how best to estimate the total matter distribution from the locations of the halos. We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter haloes that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses of halos being used. While the standard biased-Poisson model of the halo distribution predicts that bias weighting is optimal, the simple fact that the mass is comprised of haloes implies that the optimal w(M) will be a mixture of mass-weighting and bias-weighting. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15× noisier than the optimal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost effective.

  10. First limits on the 3-200 keV X-ray spectrum of the quiet Sun using RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iain G. Hannah; G. J Hurford; H. S. Hudson; R. P. Lin; K. van Bibber

    2007-02-27

    We present the first results using the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI, to observe solar X-ray emission not associated with active regions, sunspots or flares (the quiet Sun). Using a newly developed chopping technique (fan-beam modulation) during seven periods of offpointing between June 2005 to October 2006, we obtained upper limits over 3-200 keV for the quietest times when the GOES12 1-8A flux fell below $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$. These values are smaller than previous limits in the 17-120 keV range and extend them to both lower and higher energies. The limit in 3-6 keV is consistent with a coronal temperature $\\leq 6$ MK. For quiet Sun periods when the GOES12 1-8A background flux was between $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$ and $10^{-7}$ Wm$^{-2}$, the RHESSI 3-6 keV flux correlates to this as a power-law, with an index of $1.08 \\pm 0.13$. The power-law correlation for microflares has a steeper index of $1.29 \\pm 0.06$. We also discuss the possibility of observing quiet Sun X-rays due to solar axions and use the RHESSI quiet Sun limits to estimate the axion-to-photon coupling constant for two different axion emission scenarios.

  11. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  12. Solid waste integrated forecast technical (SWIFT) report: FY1997 to FY 2070, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Morgan, J.

    1997-01-07

    This web site provides an up-to-date report on the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; program-level and waste class-specific estimates; background information on waste sources; and comparisons with previous forecasts and with other national data sources. This web site does not include: liquid waste (current or future generation); waste to be managed by the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) contractor (i.e., waste that will be disposed of at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF)); or waste that has been received by the WM Project to date (i.e., inventory waste). The focus of this web site is on low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). Some details on low-level waste and hazardous waste are also provided. Currently, this web site is reporting data th at was requested on 10/14/96 and submitted on 10/25/96. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY97 through the end of each program's life cycle. Therefore, these data represent revisions from the previous FY97.0 Data Version, due primarily to revised estimates from PNNL. There is some useful information about the structure of this report in the SWIFT Report Web Site Overview.

  13. Radiative forcing in the ACCMIP historical and future climate simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shindell, Drew; Lamarque, J.-F.; Schulz, M.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Chin, Mian; Young, P. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Rotstayn, Leon; Mahowald, N. M.; Milly, G.; Faluvegi, G.; Balkanski, Y.; Collins, W. J.; Conley, Andrew; Dalsoren, S.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Horowitz, L.; Liu, Xiaohong; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, Vaishali; Rumbold, S.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Szopa, S.; Takemura, T.; Voulgarakis, A.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Lo, Fiona

    2013-03-15

    The Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) examined the short-lived drivers of climate change in current climate models. Here we evaluate the 10 ACCMIP models that included aerosols, 8 of which also participated in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). The models reproduce present-day total aerosol optical depth (AOD) relatively well, though many are biased low. Contributions from individual aerosol components are quite different, however, and most models underestimate east Asian AOD. The models capture most 1980-2000 AOD trends well, but underpredict increases over the Yellow/Eastern Sea. They strongly underestimate absorbing AOD in many regions. We examine both the direct radiative forcing (RF) and the forcing including rapid adjustments (effective radiative forcing; ERF, including direct and indirect effects). The models’ all-sky 1850 to 2000 global mean annual average total aerosol RF is (mean; range) ?0.26Wm?2; ?0.06 to ?0.49Wm?2. Screening based on model skill in capturing observed AOD yields a best estimate of ?0.42Wm?2; ?0.33 to ?0.50Wm?2, including adjustment for missing aerosol components in some models. Many ACCMIP and CMIP5 models appear to produce substantially smaller aerosol RF than this best estimate. Climate feedbacks contribute substantially (35 to ?58 %) to modeled historical aerosol RF. The 1850 to 2000 aerosol ERF is ?1.17Wm?2; ?0.71 to ?1.44Wm?2. Thus adjustments, including clouds, typically cause greater forcing than direct RF. Despite this, the multi-model spread relative to the mean is typically the same for ERF as it is for RF, or even smaller, over areas with substantial forcing. The largest 1850 to 2000 negative aerosol RF and ERF values are over and near Europe, south and east Asia and North America. ERF, however, is positive over the Sahara, the Karakoram, high Southern latitudes and especially the Arctic. Global aerosol RF peaks in most models around 1980, declining thereafter with only weak sensitivity to the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP). One model, however, projects approximately stable RF levels, while two show increasingly negative RF due to nitrate (not included in most models). Aerosol ERF, in contrast, becomes more negative during 1980 to 2000. During this period, increased Asian emissions appear to have a larger impact on aerosol ERF than European and North American decreases due to their being upwind of the large, relatively pristine Pacific Ocean. There is no clear relationship between historical aerosol ERF and climate sensitivity in the CMIP5 subset of ACCMIP models. In the ACCMIP/CMIP5 models, historical aerosol ERF of about ?0.8 to ?1.5Wm?2 is most consistent with observed historical warming. Aerosol ERF masks a large portion of greenhouse forcing during the late 20th and early 21st century at the global scale. Regionally, aerosol ERF is so large that net forcing is negative over most industrialized and biomass burning regions through 1980, but remains strongly negative only over east and southeast Asia by 2000. Net forcing is strongly positive by 1980 over most deserts, the Arctic, Australia, and most tropical oceans. Both the magnitude of and area covered by positive forcing expand steadily thereafter.

  14. Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wessel, Silvia; Harvey, David

    2013-06-28

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications that target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 40,000 hours by 2015, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different structural compositions and under different fuel cell conditions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project was to address catalyst durability by using a dual path approach that coupled an extensive range of experimental analysis and testing with a multi-scale modeling approach. With this, the major technical areas/issues of catalyst and catalyst layer performance and durability that were addressed are: 1. Catalyst and catalyst layer degradation mechanisms (Pt dissolution, agglomeration, Pt loss, e.g. Pt in the membrane, carbon oxidation and/or corrosion). a. Driving force for the different degradation mechanisms. b. Relationships between MEA performance, catalyst and catalyst layer degradation and operational conditions, catalyst layer composition, and structure. 2. Materials properties a. Changes in catalyst, catalyst layer, and MEA materials properties due to degradation. 3. Catalyst performance a. Relationships between catalyst structural changes and performance. b. Stability of the three-phase boundary and its effect on performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: • The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system • The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model • A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model • An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation • The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model • The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model • The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model • Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions • Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves • A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): • Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) • Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release • Stage 2 - Beta Release o The model code repository is opened to the general public on a beta release c

  15. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  16. Training and Mentoring the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers to Secure Continuity and Successes of the US DOE's Environmental Remediation Efforts - 13387

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagos, L.

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only five years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 85 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management Symposia since 2008 with a total of 68 student posters and 7 oral presentations given at WM. The DOE Fellows participation at WM has resulted in three Best Student Poster Awards (WM09, WM10, and WM11) and one Best Professional Poster Award (WM09). DOE Fellows have also presented their research at ANS DD and R and ANS Robotics Topical meetings. Moreover, several of our DOE Fellows have already obtained employment with DOE-EM, other federal agencies, DOE contractors. This paper will discuss how DOE Fellows program is training and mentoring FIU STEM students in Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management technical challenges and research. This training and mentoring has resulted in the development of well trained and polished young scientists and engineers that will become the future workforce in charge of carrying on DOE-EM's environmental cleanup mission. The paper will showcase FIU's DOE Fellows model and highlight some of the applied research the DOE Fellows have conducted at FIU's Applied Research Center and across the Complex by participating in summer internship assignments. This paper will also present and highlight other Fellowships and internships programs sponsored by National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA), DOE-EM, NRC, Energy (NE), and other federal agencies targeting workforce development. (authors)

  17. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore »in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm?² for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm?²) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, -0.05 and -0.17 Wm?², respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  18. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm?² for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm?²) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, -0.05 and -0.17 Wm?², respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

  19. Experimental Study of the Normal Zone Propagation Velocity in Double-layer 2G-HTS wires by Thermal and Electrical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Z.; Ruiz, H. S.; Lai, L.; Huang, Z.; Wang, W.; Coombs, T.

    2014-11-20

    the cladding/substrate and into the nitrogen. At 77 K, the YBCO itself has a thermal conductivity of 17.25 Wm-1K, this combined with a thickness of 1 micron allows for a heat flux of 1.725×10-5 watt per degree. The steel is thicker and has a thermal... subsequent measurements. An Agilent 6680A system power supply was applied as the current source. Then, a heat pulse with a fixed width of 200 ms was generated by a DC power supply (Agilent E3634A). Initially, a relatively small heat pulse was applied...

  20. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  1. Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

    2008-03-01

    Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

  2. Authorization basis for the 209-E Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIFFANY, M.S.

    1999-02-23

    This Authorization Basis document is one of three documents that constitute the Authorization Basis for the 209-E Building. Per the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) letter 98-WSD-074, this document, the 209-E Building Preliminary Hazards Analysis (WHC-SD-WM-TI-789), and the 209-E Building Safety Evaluation Report (97-WSD-074) constitute the Authorization Basis for the 209-E Building. This Authorization Basis and the associated controls and safety programs will remain in place until safety documentation addressing deactivation of the 209-E Building is developed by the contractor and approved by RL.

  3. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  4. Rate of isomerization of triethyl phosphite to diethyl ethylphosphonate in the presence of ethyl iodide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zerwekh, Ralph Edwin

    1955-01-01

    - ~ that ths inta~ate waa fpimei. but hag cog a ~ent emistsnos because of its instability et tbs. eomlitions of the zyaetk. en, ; deeense. of- AAmcsovcs ~naive wo0h wi'th this seaotion, it is b'av g zy all ag tba t msas ion i'ollows the oonvse yeopossk bg... 44&Vgf & p C ~'& p. p, w4em 4'mymseA@ Qe. emied hag CM@ OA~ M ~l XCtgAII PKQ ~'4658 p&~84%4@ '4@ CCSt 14'5i@@ ~ WM ~40k QC . 4@+ p4%4QC45 . 9@4%4', 'Lk40 ~g4QS, , ~ 1 . -. , ::. "'-':. =-'. "-:. - -'. , ':, , "; j...

  5. ASRC RSS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kiedron, Peter

    2008-01-15

    Once every minute between sunrise and sunset the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) measures simultaneously three irradiances: total horizontal, diffuse horizontal and direct normal in near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared range (approx. 370nm-1050nm) at 512 (RSS103) or 1024 (RSS102 and RSS105) adjacent spectral resolving elements (pixels). The resolution is pixel (wavelength) dependent and it differs from instrument to instrument. The reported irradiances are cosine response corrected. And their radiometric calibration is based on incandescent lamp calibrators that can be traced to the NIST irradiance scale. The units are W/m2/nm.

  6. Reconstruction of solar irradiance using the Group sunspot number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Balmaceda; N. A. Krivova; S. K. Solanki

    2007-03-07

    We present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance since 1610 to the present based on variations of the surface distribution of the solar magnetic field. The latter is calculated from the historical record of the Group sunspot number using a simple but consistent physical model. Our model successfully reproduces three independent data sets: total solar irradiance measurements available since 1978, total photospheric magnetic flux from 1974 and the open magnetic flux since 1868 (as empirically reconstructed from the geomagnetic aa-index). The model predicts an increase in the total solar irradiance since the Maunder Minimum of about 1.3 \\rm{Wm$^{-2}$}.

  7. Training working memory and fluid intelligence in older adults: developing measures and exploring outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hynes, Sinéad

    2013-04-16

    as reflecting g. Such batteries often include measures with a high WM demand (e.g. Wechsler, 1981). Another method is to administer a single test that has a particularly high loading on g (Duncan, Burgess & Emslie, 1995). As discussed further below... is extremely motivating for me to see as a student. To Dr. Russell Thompson for providing the Feature Match task used in chapter two and for his encouraging advice over cups of tea in the kitchen. And my thanks go to two visiting students to the unit...

  8. Considerations for How to Rate CPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Miller, M.; Marion, B.; Emery, K.; McConnell, R.; Surendran, S.; Kimber, A.

    2011-02-01

    The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) industry is introducing multiple products into the marketplace, but, as yet, the; community has not embraced a unified method for assessing a nameplate rating. The choices of whether to use 850,; 900, or 1000 W/m2 for the direct-normal irradiance and whether to link the rating to ambient or cell temperature will; affect how CPV modules are rated and compared with other technologies. This paper explores the qualitative and; quantitative ramifications of these choices using data from two multi-junction CPV modules and two flat-plate; modules.

  9. Supplement 4, Authors: A To K 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segal, Dorothy B.; Doss, Mildred A.; Humphrey, Judith M.

    1955-01-01

    Aires.?Bolet?n de Fomento Rural. Ministerio de Agricultura de la Naci?n. Buenos Aires. Bol. Inst. Invest. Vet., Caracas.?Bolet?n del Instituto de Investigaciones Veterinarias. _ Di- recci?n de Ganader?a. Ministerio de Agricul- tura y Cr?a. Estados...., pp. 6-10. [W.] AESCHLIMANN A. See Geigy, R. ; Wagner, O. ; and Aeschlimann, A. AFRIDI, M. K. I9=Lal^?eP?r? on Parasitology, premunition and epidemiology of malaria WM at? M?d- Trop- et Pabd. v. l. pp. 7-2!: AmUK?,S;mt?V0N BRAND...

  10. Simulating the evolution of ENSO over the late Holocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phipps, Steven J.

    ­ Atmospheric CO2 concentration = 280ppm ­ Solar constant = 1365 Wm-2 ­ Integrated for 1000 years ­ Simulations al. (2000) FOAM Ni~no 3.4 -20 Phipps (2006) Mk3L-1.0 Ni~no 3.4 -13 Brown at al. (2006) HadCM3 Ni~no 3 -12 CCSM3 -18.6 FGOALS-1.0g -14.6 Zheng et al. (2008) FOAM -11.6 IPSL-CM4 Ni~no 3 -2.9 (PMIP2) MIROC3

  11. ASRC RSS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kiedron, Peter

    Once every minute between sunrise and sunset the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) measures simultaneously three irradiances: total horizontal, diffuse horizontal and direct normal in near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared range (approx. 370nm-1050nm) at 512 (RSS103) or 1024 (RSS102 and RSS105) adjacent spectral resolving elements (pixels). The resolution is pixel (wavelength) dependent and it differs from instrument to instrument. The reported irradiances are cosine response corrected. And their radiometric calibration is based on incandescent lamp calibrators that can be traced to the NIST irradiance scale. The units are W/m2/nm.

  12. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, M.

    1992-04-01

    At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG&G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL`s roadmapping efforts.

  13. Technology development in support of the TWRS process flowsheet. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1995-10-11

    The Tank Waste Remediation System is to treat and dispose of Hanford`s Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank Waste. The TWRS Process Flowsheet, (WHC-SD-WM-TI-613 Rev. 1) described a flowsheet based on a large number of assumptions and engineering judgements that require verification or further definition through process and technology development activities. This document takes off from the TWRS Process Flowsheet to identify and prioritize tasks that should be completed to strengthen the technical foundation for the flowsheet.

  14. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

  15. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  16. Pattern and rate of cognitive decline in cerebral small vessel disease: a prospective study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Andrew J.; Brookes, Rebecca L.; Zeestraten, Eva A.; Barrick, Thomas R.; Morris, Robin G.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2015-07-28

    (all letters) mWCST[22] [22]* Card Sorting Test involving flexible shifting from learned dimensions. Categories Completed & Perseverative Errors+ Global Cognition All tasks listed above Lawrence - 7 mWCST, selected because it is shorter... WM, et al. 16 Longitudinal cognitive decline in subcortical ischemic vascular disease–the LADIS Study. 17 Cerebrovasc Dis. 2009;27: 384–391. doi:10.1159/000207442 18 35. Van den Heuvel DMJ, ten Dam VH, de Craen AJM, Admiraal-Behloul F, Olofsen H...

  17. Expanding the clinical spectrum associated with defects in CNTNAP2 and NRXN1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregor, Anne; Albrecht, Beate; Bader, Ingrid; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Ekici, Arif B.; Engels, Hartmut; Hackmann, Karl; Horn, Denise; Hoyer, Juliane; Klapecki, Jakub; Kohlhase, Jurgen; Maystadt, Isabelle; Nagl, Sandra; Prott, Eva; Tinschert, Sigrid; Ullmann, Reinhard; Wohlleber, Eva; Woods, Geoffrey; Reis, Andre; Rauch, Anita; Zweier, Christiane

    2011-08-09

    JHumGenet 2008, 82(1):150-159. 2. Arking DE, Cutler DJ, Brune CW, Teslovich TM, West K, Ikeda M, Rea A, Guy M, Lin S, Cook EH, Chakravarti A: A common genetic variant in the neurexin superfamily member CNTNAP2 increases familial risk of autism. AmJHumGenet 2008... Mahon WM, Owley T, Sweeney JA, Coon H, Nurnberger JI, Li M, Cantor RM, Minshew NJ, Sutcliffe JS, Cook EH, et al: Genome-wide analyses of exonic copy number variants in a family- based study point to novel autism susceptibility genes. PLoSGenet 2009, 5(6):e...

  18. PI(5)P Regulates Autophagosome Biogenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vicinanza, Mariella; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Ashkenazi, Avraham; Puri, Claudia; Menzies, Fiona M.; Clarke, Jonathan H.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2015-01-08

    , 2015 ª2015 The Authors 227 (legend on next page) 228 Molecular Cell 57, 219–234, January 22, 2015 ª2015 The Authors and MTMR3 is the relevant lipid species for autophagosome generation during glucose starvation. Resveratrol induces auto- phagy... in noncanonical manner, independent of Beclin1 and partially resistant to Wm (Mauthe et al., 2011). The autophagy stimulation of resveratrol was impaired upon PI(5)P depletion due to overexpression of PI5P4K2a, b, and g (but not the catalytic-dead mutant of PI5P4K...

  19. Draft Proposed Plan (PP) for Remedial Action at Quarry Residuals Operable Unit, and Draft Feasibility Study (FS) for Remedial Action for the Quarry Residuals Operable Unit at Weldon Spring Site, June 1997. QY-500-501-1.05.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  20. Durango CO EOI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  1. E

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEP 2Dr.Wm.* .

  2. E&nr Ph. S. W.. Wahhgt~n. D.C. 200242174, TIkpbnc (202) 48a60uo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEP 2Dr.Wm.*

  3. Microsoft Word - wastemngtpaper

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04 Conference,

  4. Microsoft Word - z Appendix A to Z sheets for JC.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04 Conference,APPENDIX

  5. Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04At the Microwave and

  6. Mid-Atlantic Baseline Studies Project | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04At the Microwave

  7. Mid-Level Ethanol Blends

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04At the

  8. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04AtReduce Energy Use

  9. MidAmerican Energy (Electric) - Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04AtReduce Energy

  10. MidAmerican Energy (Gas and Electric) - Commercial New Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04AtReduce

  11. MidAmerican Energy (Gas) - Commercial EnergyAdvantage Rebate Program |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE SafetyofDepartment. "National SecurityWM'04AtReduceDepartment

  12. WRI-14-R002r CONVERSION OF LOW-RANK WYOMING COALS INTO GASOLINE BY DIRECT LIQUEFACTION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b W r .WM'02 Conference,

  13. WSRC-MS-99-00210

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b W r .WM'02

  14. Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project Final Technical Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b W r .WM'02Wabash River

  15. Well-temperate phage: Optimal bet-hedging against local environmental

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnicalInformation4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivityv b W r .WM'02Wabash

  16. J:\ARM_19~1\P335-353.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItem NotJ.NOONC 1 C 1 C Wm 2

  17. J:\ARM_19~1\P367-376.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItem NotJ.NOONC 1 C 1 C Wm 27

  18. J:\ARM_19~1\P367-376.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATIONIntroducing theActivation byIs aItem NotJ.NOONC 1 C 1 C Wm

  19. Surface daytime net radiation estimation using artificial neural networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yi; Liang, Shunlin; Zhang, Xiaotong; Xiao, Zhiqiang

    2014-11-11

    Net all-wave surface radiation (Rn) is one of the most important fundamental parameters in various applications. However, conventional Rn measurements are difficult to collect because of the high cost and ongoing maintenance of recording instruments. Therefore, various empirical Rn estimation models have been developed. This study presents the results of two artificial neural network (ANN) models (general regression neural networks (GRNN) and Neuroet) to estimate Rn globally from multi-source data, including remotely sensed products, surface measurements, and meteorological reanalysis products. Rn estimates provided by the two ANNs were tested against in-situ radiation measurements obtained from 251 global sites between 1991–2010more »both in global mode (all data were used to fit the models) and in conditional mode (the data were divided into four subsets and the models were fitted separately). Based on the results obtained from extensive experiments, it has been proved that the two ANNs were superior to linear-based empirical models in both global and conditional modes and that the GRNN performed better and was more stable than Neuroet. The GRNN estimates had a determination coefficient (R2) of 0.92, a root mean square error (RMSE) of 34.27 W·m–2 , and a bias of –0.61 W·m–2 in global mode based on the validation dataset. In conclusion, ANN methods are a potentially powerful tool for global Rn estimation.« less

  20. Gallium ion implantation greatly reduces thermal conductivity and enhances electronic one of ZnO nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Cheng, Zhaofang; Han, Jinyun; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and its Physics Properties, Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, Department of Applied Physics, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 China (China); Zheng, Minrui [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Sow, Chorng-Haur [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Thong, John T. L. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Li, Baowen [Department of Physics and Centre for Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); National University of Singapore Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Center for Phononics and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physics Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-05-15

    The electrical and thermal conductivities are measured for individual zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires with and without gallium ion (Ga{sup +}) implantation at room temperature. Our results show that Ga{sup +} implantation enhances electrical conductivity by one order of magnitude from 1.01 × 10{sup 3} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} to 1.46 × 10{sup 4} ?{sup ?1}m{sup ?1} and reduces its thermal conductivity by one order of magnitude from 12.7 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} to 1.22 Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1} for ZnO nanowires of 100 nm in diameter. The measured thermal conductivities are in good agreement with those in theoretical simulation. The increase of electrical conductivity origins in electron donor doping by Ga{sup +} implantation and the decrease of thermal conductivity is due to the longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonons scattering by Ga{sup +} point scattering. For pristine ZnO nanowires, the thermal conductivity decreases only two times when its diameter reduces from 100 nm to 46 nm. Therefore, Ga{sup +}-implantation may be a more effective method than diameter reduction in improving thermoelectric performance.

  1. The Fourth Positive System of Carbon Monoxide in the Hubble Space Telescope Spectra of Comets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roxana E. Lupu; Paul D. Feldman; Harold A. Weaver; Gian-Paolo Tozzi

    2007-08-22

    The rich structure of the Fourth Positive System (A-X) of carbon monoxide accounts for many of the spectral features seen in long slit HST-STIS observations of comets 153P/Ikeya-Zhang, C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), as well as in the HST-GHRS spectrum of comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. A detailed CO fluorescence model is developed to derive the CO abundances in these comets by simultaneously fitting all of the observed A-X bands. The model includes the latest values for the oscillator strengths and state parameters, and accounts for optical depth effects due to line overlap and self-absorption. The model fits yield radial profiles of CO column density that are consistent with a predominantly native source for all the comets observed by STIS. The derived CO abundances relative to water in these comets span a wide range, from 0.44% for C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), 7.2% for 153P/Ikeya-Zhang, 8.8% for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) to 20.9% for C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). The subtraction of the CO spectral features using this model leads to the first identification of a molecular hydrogen line pumped by solar HI Lyman-beta longward of 1200A in the spectrum of comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. (Abridged)

  2. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  3. Studies of Limits on Uncontrolled Heavy Ion Beam Losses for Allowing Hands-On Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginald M. Ronningen; Igor Remec

    2010-09-11

    Dose rates from accelerator components activated by 1 W/m beam losses are obtained semiempirically for a 1 GeV proton beam and by use of Monte Carlo transport codes for the proton beam and for 777 MeV/u 3He, 500 MeV/u 48Ca, 86Kr, 136Xe, and 400 MeV/u 238U ions. The dose rate obtained by the semi-empirical method, 0.99 mSv/h (99 mrem/h) at 30 cm, 4 h after 100 d irradiation by a 1-GeV proton beam, is consistent with studies at several accelerator facilities and with adopted hands-on maintenance dose rate limits. Monte Carlo simulations verify this result for protons and extend studies to heavy ion beam losses in drift-tube linac and superconducting linac accelerating structures. The studies indicate that the 1 W/m limit imposed on uncontrolled beam losses for high-energy proton beams might be relaxed for heavy ion beams. These studies further suggest that using the ratio of neutrons produced by a heavy ion beam to neutrons produced by a proton beam along with the dose rate from the proton beam (for thin-target scenarios) should allow an estimate of the dose rates expected from heavy ion beam losses.

  4. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

  5. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  6. Final environmental assessment for off-site transportation of low-level waste from four California sites under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office (DOE/OAK) manages sites within California that generate Low Level Waste (LLW) in the course or routine site operations. It is the preference of the DOE to dispose of LLW at federally owned and DOE-operated disposal facilities; however, in some circumstances DOE Headquarters has determined that disposal at commercial facilities is appropriate, as long as the facility meets all regulatory requirements for the acceptance and disposal of LLW, including the passage of a DOE audit to determine the adequacy of the disposal site. The DOE would like to ship LLW from four DOE/OAK sites in California which generate LLW, to NRC-licensed commercial nuclear waste disposal facilities such as Envirocare in Clive, Utah and Chem Nuclear in Barnwell, South Carolina. Transportation impacts for shipment of LLW and MLLW from DOE Oakland sites to other DOE sites was included in the impacts identified in the Department`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS), published in May, 1997, and determined to be low. The low impacts for shipment to commercial sites identified herein is consistent with the WM-PEIS results.

  7. SOLID WASTE INTEGRATED FORECAST TECHNICAL (SWIFT) REPORT FY2005 THRU FY2035 2005.0 VOLUME 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARCOT, R.A.

    2005-08-17

    This report provides up-to-date life cycle information about the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: (1) an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; (2) multi-level and waste class-specific estimates; (3) background information on waste sources; and (4) comparisons to previous forecasts and other national data sources. The focus of this report is low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and transuranic waste, both non-mixed and mixed (TRU(M)). Some details on hazardous waste are also provided, however, this information is not considered comprehensive. This report includes data requested in December, 2004 with updates through March 31,2005. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY2005 through the end of each program's life cycle and are an update of the previous FY2004.1 data version.

  8. Determination of thermal emission spectra maximizing thermophotovoltaic performance using a genetic algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSutter, John; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Optimal radiator thermal emission spectra maximizing thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion efficiency and output power density are determined when temperature effects in the cell are considered. To do this, a framework is designed in which a TPV model that accounts for radiative, electrical and thermal losses is coupled with a genetic algorithm. The TPV device under study involves a spectrally selective radiator at a temperature of 2000 K, a gallium antimonide cell, and a cell thermal management system characterized by a fluid temperature and a heat transfer coefficient of 293 K and 600 Wm-2K-1. It is shown that a maximum conversion efficiency of 38.8% is achievable with an emission spectrum that has emissivity of unity between 0.719 eV and 0.763 eV and zero elsewhere. This optimal spectrum is less than half of the width of those when thermal losses are neglected. A maximum output power density of 41708 Wm-2 is achievable with a spectrum having emissivity values of unity between 0.684 eV and 1.082 eV and zero e...

  9. Thermal Conductivity from Core and Well log Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Andreas; Clauser, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    The relationships between thermal conductivity and other petrophysical properties have been analysed for a borehole drilled in a Tertiary Flysch sequence. We establish equations that permit us to predict rock thermal conductivity from logging data. A regression analysis of thermal conductivity, bulk density, and sonic velocity yields thermal conductivity with an average accuracy of better than 0.2 W/(m K). As a second step, logging data is used to compute a lithological depth profile, which in turn is used to calculate a thermal conductivity profile. From a comparison of the conductivity-depth profile and the laboratory data it can be concluded that thermal conductivity can be computed with an accuracy of less than 0.3 W/(m K)from conventional wireline data. The comparison of two different models shows that this approach can be practical even if old and incomplete logging data is used. The results can be used to infer thermal conductivity for boreholes without appropriate core data that are drilled in a simil...

  10. The Challenges Of Investigating And Remediating Port Hope's Small-Scale Urban Properties - 13115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veen, Walter van; Case, Glenn; Benson, John; Herod, Judy; Yule, Adam

    2013-07-01

    An important component of the Port Hope Project, the larger of the two projects comprising the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), is the investigation of all 4,800 properties in the Municipality of Port Hope for low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and the remediation of approximately 10% of these. Although the majority of the individual properties are not expected to involve technically sophisticated remediation programs, the large number of property owners and individually unique properties are expected to present significant logistic challenges that will require a high degree of planning, organization and communication. The protocol and lessons learned described will be of interest to those considering similar programs. Information presented herein is part of a series of papers presented by the PHAI Management Office (PHAI MO) at WM Symposium '13 describing the history of the Port Hope Project and current project status. Other papers prepared for WM Symposium '13 address the large-scale site cleanup and the construction of the long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) where all of the LLRW will be consolidated and managed within an engineered, above-ground mound. (authors)

  11. Petrophysical analysis of regional-scale thermal properties for improved simulations of geothermal installations and basin-scale heat and fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Andreas; Clauser, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Development of geothermal energy and basin-scale simulations of fluid and heat flow both suffer from uncertain physical rock properties at depth. Therefore, building better prognostic models are required. We analysed hydraulic and thermal properties of the major rock types in the Molasse Basin in Southern Germany. On about 400 samples thermal conductivity, density, porosity, and sonic velocity were measured. Here, we propose a three-step procedure with increasing complexity for analysis of the data set: First, univariate descriptive statistics provides a general understanding of the data structure, possibly still with large uncertainty. Examples show that the remaining uncertainty can be as high as 0.8 W/(m K) or as low as 0.1 W/(m K). This depends on the possibility to subdivide the geologic units into data sets that are also petrophysically similar. Then, based on all measurements, cross-plot and quick-look methods are used to gain more insight into petrophysical relationships and to refine the analysis. Be...

  12. Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-01

    Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earth’s atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

  13. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  14. Earth's Energy Imbalance and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James; Kharecha, Pushker; von Schuckmann, Karina

    2011-01-01

    Improving observations of ocean temperature confirm that Earth is absorbing more energy from the sun than it is radiating to space as heat, even during the recent solar minimum. The inferred planetary energy imbalance, 0.59 \\pm 0.15 W/m2 during the 6-year period 2005-2010, provides fundamental verification of the dominant role of the human-made greenhouse effect in driving global climate change. Observed surface temperature change and ocean heat gain constrain the net climate forcing and ocean mixing rates. We conclude that most climate models mix heat too efficiently into the deep ocean and as a result underestimate the negative forcing by human-made aerosols. Aerosol climate forcing today is inferred to be -1.6 \\pm 0.3 W/m2, implying substantial aerosol indirect climate forcing via cloud changes. Continued failure to quantify the specific origins of this large forcing is untenable, as knowledge of changing aerosol effects is needed to understand future climate change. A recent decrease in ocean heat uptake ...

  15. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  16. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-05-18

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  17. Standard Practice for Exposure of Solar Collector Cover Materials to Natural Weathering Under Conditions Simulating Stagnation Mode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1992-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the exposure of solar collector cover materials to the natural weather environment at elevated temperatures that approximate stagnation conditions in solar collectors having a combined back and edge loss coefficient of less than 1.5 W/(m2 · °C). 1.2 This practice is suitable for exposure of both glass and plastic solar collector cover materials. Provisions are made for exposure of single and double cover assemblies to accommodate the need for exposure of both inner and outer solar collector cover materials. 1.3 This practice does not apply to cover materials for evacuated collectors, photovoltaic cells, flat-plate collectors having a combined back and edge loss coefficient greater than 1.5 W/(m2 ·° C), or flat-plate collectors whose design incorporates means for limiting temperatures during stagnation. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard t...

  18. Enhancement in current density and energy conversion efficiency of 3-dimensional MFC anodes using pre-enriched consortium and continuous supply of electron donors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A

    2011-01-01

    Using a pre-enriched microbial consortium as the inoculum and continuous supply of carbon source, improvement in performance of a three-dimensional, flow-through MFC anode utilizing ferricyanide cathode was investigated. The power density increased from 170 W/m3 (1800 mW/m2) to 580 W/m3 (6130 mW/m2), when the carbon loading increased from 2.5 g/l-day to 50 g/l-day. The coulombic efficiency (CE) decreased from 90% to 23% with increasing carbon loading. The CEs are among the highest reported for glucose and lactate as the substrate with the maximum current density reaching 15.1 A/m2. This suggests establishment of a very high performance exoelectrogenic microbial consortium at the anode. A maximum energy conversion efficiency of 54% was observed at a loading of 2.5 g/l-day. Biological characterization of the consortium showed presence of Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the dominant members. Imaging of the biofilms revealed thinner biofilms compared to the inoculum MFC, but a 1.9-fold higher power density.

  19. Integrating engineering design improvements with exoelectrogen enrichmentprocess to increase power output from microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Leak, David; Andras, Calin; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Keller, Martin; Davison, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) hold promise as a green technology for bioenergy production. The challenge is to improve the engineering design while exploiting the ability of microbes to generate and transfer electrons directly to electrodes. A strategy using a combination of improved anode design and an enrichment processwas formulated to improve power densities. The designwas based on a flow-through anode with minimal dead volume and a high electrode surface area per unit volume. The strategy focused on promoting biofilm formation via a combination of forced flow through the anode, carbon limitation, and step-wise reduction of external resistance. The enrichment process resulted in development of exoelectrogenic biofilm communities dominated by Anaeromusa spp. This is the first report identifying organisms fromthe Veillonellaceae family in MFCs. The power density of the resulting MFC using a ferricyanide cathode reached 300Wm?3 net anode volume (3220mWm?2), which is about a third of what is estimated to be necessary for commercial consideration. The operational stability of the MFC using high specific surface area electrodes was demonstrated by operating the MFC for a period of over four months.

  20. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and reducing costs of PEMFC based power systems using LPG fuel and continues to makes steps towards meeting DOE's targets. Plug Power would like to thank DOE for their support of this program.

  1. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

  2. Deployment of an Alternative Closure Cover and Monitoring System at the Mixed Waste Disposal Unit U-3ax/bl at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitt, D.G.; Fitzmaurice, T.M.

    2001-02-01

    In October 2000, final closure was initiated of U-3ax/bl, a mixed waste disposal unit at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The application of approximately 30 cm of topsoil, composed of compacted native alluvium onto an operational cover, seeding of the topsoil, installation of soil water content sensors within the cover, and deployment of a drainage lysimeter facility immediately adjacent to the disposal unit initiated closure. This closure is unique in that it required the involvement of several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) groups: Waste Management (WM), Environmental Restoration (ER), and Technology Development (TD). Initial site characterization of the disposal unit was conducted by WM. Regulatory approval for closure of the disposal unit was obtained by ER, closure of the disposal unit was conducted by ER, and deployment of the drainage lysimeter facility was conducted by WM and ER, with funding provided by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment ( ASTD) program, administered under TD. In addition, this closure is unique in that a monolayer closure cover, also known as an evapotranspiration (ET) cover, consisting of native alluvium, received regulatory approval instead of a traditional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) multi-layered cover. Recent studies indicate that in the arid southwestern United States, monolayer covers may be more effective at isolating waste than layered covers because of the tendency of clay layers to desiccate and crack, and subsequently develop preferential pathways. The lysimeter facility deployed immediately adjacent to the closure cover consists of eight drainage lysimeters with three surface treatments: two were left bare; two were revegetated with native species; two were allowed to revegetate with invader species; and two are reserved for future studies. The lysimeters are constructed such that any drainage through the bottoms of the lysimeters can be measured. Sensors installed in the closure cover provide soil water content data, whereas sensors installed in the lysimeters provide soil water content, soil water potential, soil temperature, and drainage data for a detailed evaluation of the cover performance. Revegetation establishes a stable plant community that maximizes water loss through transpiration and reduces water and wind erosion and ultimately restores the disposal unit to its surrounding Great Basin Desert environment.

  3. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  4. Photoconductivities in anatase TiO{sub 2} nanorods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ruei-San, E-mail: rsc@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Applied Science and Technology, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yi-Ling; Chan, Ching-Hsiang; Huang, Ying-Sheng [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-13

    The photoconduction (PC) properties of single-crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanorods (NRs) with anatase phase were investigated and compared. By examining the material's inherent properties, the anatase TiO{sub 2} NRs exhibit superior PC efficiency (quantitatively defined by normalized gain) which is near one order of magnitude higher than that of the rutile ones. The optimal photoconductive gain of the anatase NR device can also reach 1.6?×?10{sup 7} at the light intensity of 0.02?Wm{sup ?2} and a low bias of 0.1?V. The power-dependent and time-resolved PC measurements were performed to investigate the physical mechanisms. The higher quantum efficiency and mobility product was confirmed to be responsible for the higher PC efficiency in the anatase TiO{sub 2} NRs in comparison to the rutile ones.

  5. Low-level waste vitrification phase 1 vendor test sample analysis data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, E.S.

    1995-10-04

    A multi-phase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests was performed in vendor test facilities using simulated LLW and was completed during FY-1995. Test samples taken during Phase 1 testing were analyzed by independent laboratories who reported the analyses results to Westinghouse Hanford Company for integration and evaluation. The reported analytical results were integrated into an electronic data base using Microsoft Excel*5.0. This report documents this data base as of the end of FY-1995, and is supplemental to the Phase 1 LLW melter testing summary report, WHC-SD-WM-ER-498, revision 0.

  6. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2010-03-12

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

  7. Collimation system design for beam loss localization with slipstacking injection in the Fermilab Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Brown, B.C.; Johnson, D.E.; Koba, K.; Kourbanis, I.; Mokhov, N.V.; Rakhno, I.L.; Sidorov, V.I.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Results of modeling with the 3-D STRUCT and MARS15 codes of beam loss localization and related radiation effects are presented for the slipstacking injection to the Fermilab Main Injector. Simulations of proton beam loss are done using multi-turn tracking with realistic accelerator apertures, nonlinear fields in the accelerator magnets and time function of the RF manipulations to explain the results of beam loss measurements. The collimation system consists of one primary and four secondary collimators. It intercepts a beam power of 1.6 kW at a scraping rate of 5% of 5.5E+13 ppp, with a beam loss rate in the ring outside the collimation region of 1 W/m or less. Based on thorough energy deposition and radiation modeling, a corresponding collimator design was developed that satisfies all the radiation and engineering constraints.

  8. Commercial Feedings Stuffs 1913: Feed Law. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youngblood, B.

    1914-01-01

    EXPERIMENT STATION B u l l e t in Bul eti A p r i l , 1914 FEED CONTROL SERVICE Commercial Feeding Stuffs 1913 FEED LAW nAprA,,E.Hs .uLLJaJ pRTRSuWm KyTouP .uCWRhm rJgTPl 3AB KA0.0OMBBIFABHp .Alm ndEBrHdpm MfprEBm rH1Mp AGRICULTURAL AND MECHANICAL... COLLEGE OF TEXAS . 9 T y L J P n C y h J T y m President Pro Tern. rH1Mp M4dE.fxrfdMx H1nHdEOHBr prMrEAB BOARD OF DIRECTORS Hl Kl . CP9SWam Presidentm GuCPRuWllll lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll r...

  9. uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignotte, Max

    © q qr z p r x z x m n q x ~{ nx n r ox x ns u x z |~x © q p r x z x m n x n r ox n} pq x © p © © t ~x © · nx snt pm q x © poq © q x © q t ox m nx © o yt pm © © x yz x m n{ nt pm q x © spm np r o © x ! wm{ x · nx snt pm q tox snx q x © o yt pm © © { m © ~x © spm np r o © © x yz x m n

  10. Results from the Second International Module Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rummel, S.; Anderberg, A.; Emery, K.

    2005-11-01

    The peak-watt rating is a primary indicator of PV performance. The peak power rating is the maximum electrical power that is produced when the PV device is continuously illuminated at 1000 Wm/sup-2/ total irradiance under International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 60904-2 reference spectrum, and 25 deg C cell temperature. Most manufacturers trace their peak-watt rating through calibrations performed at recognized terrestrial calibration facilities. Manufacturers typically perform intercomparisons among a set of their modules internally with other plants and among. Sometimes they have the same module measured at different calibration facilities to determine the differences in calibration. This intercomparison was to mimic this procedure and supply new thin film samples along with samples that could pose other problems. These intercomparisons sample the laboratories' everyday procedures better than a formal intercomparison where the laboratories' best procedures and data scrutiny are used.

  11. Measurement of Rb 5P3/2 scalar and tensor polarizabilities in a 1064 nm light field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yun-Jhih; Raithel, Georg

    2015-01-01

    We employ doubly-resonant two-photon excitation into the 74S Rydberg state to spectroscopically measure the dynamic scalar polarizability, alpha 0, and tensor polarizability, alpha 2, of rubidium 5P3/2. To reach the necessary high intensities, we employ a cavity-generated 1064 nm optical-lattice light field, allowing us to obtain intensities near 2x10^11 W/m^2. In the evaluation of the data we use a self-referencing method that renders the polarizability measurement largely free from the intensity calibration of the laser light field. We obtain experimental values alpha 0 =-1149 (pm 2.5 percent) and alpha 2 = 563 (pm 4.2 percent), in atomic units. Methods and results are supported by simulations.

  12. An analysis of egg marketing practices of first buyers of Texas eggs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaarder, Raymond Olaf

    1950-01-01

    I?a, Tbe 4s?1~ eso awagel ?e ia Tshle 5. The ~ ~ ?f th? ?sseegs dsahse sa ekase a?L4 te eeasswsas s?toi1 etseee, %8 6 ~ Vggg@S Of SQXSO M8 CI~CCRl Cf ~ + ?gg haah~ ~, X9g local prodaee ~, oeetnal tdoleaalara ead ~ ia eheaa. SA all the 4eaLeaa of each... tbaae dealer? net eayeatiad oagkete W~m aa their opeeatiena ~ of ~ ?Lae he thais type of teaineaa, aa4 handled thais ogive in the aaae faahlea ao tbe ~ ~ of thole type, TdNe V 1iata the enbnwa ead aweek ef egga peeknae4 in 1%0 by' the 48 4salora...

  13. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)] [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027).

  14. Enhancing the thermoelectric figure of merit through the reduction of bipolar thermal conductivity with heterostructure barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahk, Je-Hyeong, E-mail: jbahk@purdue.edu; Shakouri, Ali [Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2014-08-04

    In this paper, we present theoretically that the thermoelectric figure of merit for a semiconductor material with a small band gap can be significantly enhanced near the intrinsic doping regime at high temperatures via the suppression of bipolar thermal conductivity when the minority carriers are selectively blocked by heterostructure barriers. This scheme is particularly effective in nanostructured materials where the lattice thermal conductivity is lowered by increased phonon scatterings at the boundaries, so that the electronic thermal conductivity including the bipolar term is limiting the figure of merit zT. We show that zT can be enhanced to above 3 for p-type PbTe, and above 2 for n-type PbTe at 900?K with minority carrier blocking, when the lattice thermal conductivity is as low as 0.3?W/m K.

  15. Radiation calculations for the ILC cryomodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, N.; Mokhov, N.V.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MARS15 radiation simulations were performed for the ILC cryomodule. The model assumes a uniform beam loss intensity of 1 W/m of 750-MeV and 250-GeV electron along the inner surface of the beam pipe and the cavity iris of the 12-m cryomodule. Two-dimensional distributions of radiation dose in the module were obtained. Absorbed dose rate and energy spectra of electrons, photons, neutrons and protons were also obtained at the three cryogenic thermometers locations by filling with silicon material in the appropriate locations, and radiation hardness of the thermometers was discussed. From the obtained results, maximum absorbed dose of thermometers at the cooling pipe is 0.85mGy/sec (85 mRad/sec), that is 0.31 MGy (31 MRad) for 20 years.

  16. Towards Space Solar Power - Examining Atmospheric Interactions of Power Beams with the HAARP Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leitgab, M

    2014-01-01

    In the most common space solar power (SSP) system architectures, solar energy harvested by large satellites in geostationary orbit is transmitted to Earth via microwave radiation. Currently, only limited information about the interactions of microwave beams with energy densities of several tens to hundreds of W/m$^2$ with the different layers of the atmosphere is available. Governmental bodies will likely require detailed investigations of safety and atmospheric effects of microwave power beams before issuing launch licenses for SSP satellite systems. This paper proposes to collect representative and comprehensive data of the interaction of power beams with the atmosphere by extending the infrastructure of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, USA. Estimates of the transmission infrastructure performance as well as measurement devices and scientific capabilities of possible upgrade scenarios will be discussed. The proposed upgrade of the HAARP facility is expected to d...

  17. Thermal properties of the optically transparent pore-free nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Teweldebrhan, D.; Morales, J. R.; Garay, J. E.; Balandin, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    The authors report results of investigation of thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia. The optically transparent pore-free bulk samples were prepared via the spark plasma sintering process to ensure homogeneity. Thermal conductivity K was measured by two different techniques. It was found that the pore-free nanostructured bulk zirconia is an excellent thermal insulator with the room-temperature Kapprox1.7-2.0 W/m K. It was also shown that the 'phonon-hopping' model can accurately describe specifics of K dependence on temperature and the grain size. The obtained results are important for optimization of zirconia properties for specific applications in advanced electronics and coatings.

  18. Three utilitarian writers: Bentham, Mill, and Shaw 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Gordon Duncan

    1962-01-01

    1~, approxbcately, )fclevy says only that "by the beg~l- of the ~or '7i"i~, the Utilitarian doctrine, ns re~ ards padioial nnt- he d to have been iiotablished fn every partiolg are ii ii ~ hslsvf taiga' tO 4KLvL'y oredht JQ!15 ". '~pi ag a DIQCLQe...+ . 'ill ~ois i". . eeera& iiif t, 'ie 'hii&eee4 Q@. ministry akl )iic 1~ Ija is, wm it, e isis hei of i~ ukJUi~w3. nay" "the ?etetomiii 4y cd t "A j~+lw4 4@4 'hler' 1 i~~ 4%v@t 4t+~~it. eliio4si he ~ 4xgtO~sig hip iiin4 ~ ; ~ eaAkkiieiie UA4oL" iiihie...

  19. Calculated transport properties of CdO: thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power factor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R.; Parker, David S.

    2015-10-01

    We present first principles calculations of the thermal and electronic transport properties of the oxide semiconductor CdO. In particular, we find from theory that the accepted thermal conductivity ? value of 0.7 Wm-1K-1 is approximately one order of magnitude too small; our calculations of ? of CdO are in good agreement with recent measurements. We also find that alloying of MgO with CdO is an effective means to reduce the lattice contribution to ?, despite MgO having a much larger thermal conductivity. We further consider the electronic structure of CdO in relation to thermoelectric performance, finding that large thermoelectric powermore »factors may occur if the material can be heavily doped p-type. This work develops insight into the nature of thermal and electronic transport in an important oxide semiconductor.« less

  20. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  1. Heat flow and seismicity patterns in the vicinity of the eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blackwell, D.D. Kelley, S.A.; Steele, J.L. (Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    New heat flow data and thermal modeling are used to calculate crustal temperatures in and adjacent to the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP). The estimated crustal temperature are then used to investigate the relationship between crustal strength and the observed parabolic pattern of seismicity around the SRP. Heat flow below the SRP aquifer in deep wells on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site near the northern margin of the SRP is 107 [plus minus] 15 mWm[sup [minus]2]. Heat flow values from deep wells on both the northern and southern margins of the eastern SRP average 100 [plus minus] 15 mWm[sup [minus]2]. 2-D finite-difference thermal models were developed to fit seismic and heat flow data in the vicinity of the SRP. The models have a shallow silicic magma chamber that is as wide as the SRP. The silicic chamber is underlain by mafic heat sources in the middle to lower crust and in the upper mantle. The heat flow data are best fit by models with deep heat sources that are wider than the SRP. These results are consistent with the presence of young basaltic centers that have been observed outside the SRP. The temperature from the authors thermal models were used to calculate strength envelopes for the crust in the SRP/Basin and Range region. The weakest part of the crust is along the edge of the Basin and Range, where it is heated by the SRP; thus the boundary to the two provinces may be a zone of weak coupling. Their modeling indicates that it is difficult to explain the earthquake pattern in the vicinity of the SRP as a thermomechanical effect related to the passage of the Yellowstone hot spot.

  2. Constraining Parameters of Generalized Cosmic Chaplygin Gas in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chayan Ranjit; Ujjal Debnath

    2014-09-20

    We have assumed the FRW universe in loop quantum cosmology (LQC) model filled with the dark matter and the Generalized Cosmic Chaplygin gas (GCCG) type dark energy where dark matter follows the linear equation of state. We present the Hubble parameter in terms of the observable parameters $\\Omega_{m0}$ and $H_{0}$ with the redshift $z$ and the other parameters like $A$, $B$, $w_{m}$, $ \\omega$ and $\\alpha$ which coming from our model. From Stern data set (12 points)\\& SNe Type Ia 292 data (from \\cite{Riess1,Riess2,Astier}) we have obtained the bounds of the arbitrary parameters by minimizing the $\\chi^{2}$ test. The best-fit values of the parameters are obtained by 66\\%, 90\\% and 99\\% confidence levels. Next due to joint analysis with Stern+BAO and Stern+BAO+CMB observations, we have also obtained the bounds of the parameters ($A,B$) by fixing some other parameters $\\alpha$, $w_{m}$ and $\\omega$. From the best fit values of the parameters, we have obtained the distance modulus $\\mu(z)$ for our theoretical GCCG model in LQC and from Supernovae Type Ia (union2 sample 552 data from [\\cite{Amanullah}] \\& Riess 292 data from [\\cite{Riess1,Riess2,Astier}]), we have concluded that our model is in agreement with the Supernovae Type Ia sample data. In addition, we have investigated in details about the various types of Future Singularities that may be formed in this model and it is notable that our model is completely free from any types of future singularities.

  3. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the accuracy and precision of the models, while reducing epistemic uncertainties.

  4. A Method of Correcting for Tilt From Horizontal in Downwelling Shortwave Irradiance Measurements on Moving Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Jonsson, Haf; Schmid, Beat; Vogelmann, A. M.; Wood, John

    2010-04-14

    Significant errors occur in downwelling shortwave irradiance measurements made on moving platforms due to tilt from horizontal because, when the sun is not completely blocked by overhead cloud, the downwelling shortwave irradiance has a prominent directional component from the direct sun. A-priori knowledge of the partitioning between the direct and diffuse components of the total shortwave irradiance is needed to properly apply a correction for tilt. This partitioning information can be adequately provided using a newly available commercial radiometer that produces reasonable measurements of the total and diffuse shortwave irradiance, and by subtraction the direct shortwave irradiance, with no moving parts and regardless of azimuthal orientation. We have developed methodologies for determining the constant pitch and roll offsets of the radiometers for aircraft applications, and for applying a tilt correction to the total shortwave irradiance data. Results suggest that the methodology is for tilt up to +/-10°, with 90% of the data corrected to within 10 Wm-2 at least for clear-sky data. Without a proper tilt correction, even data limited to 5° of tilt as is typical current practice still exhibits large errors, greater than 100 Wm-2 in some cases. Given the low cost, low weight, and low power consumption of the SPN1 total and diffuse radiometer, opportunities previously excluded for moving platform measurements such as small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and solar powered buoys now become feasible using our methodology. The increase in measurement accuracy is important, given current concerns over long-term climate variability and change especially over the 70% of the Earth’s surface covered by ocean where long-term records of these measurements are sorely needed and must be made on ships and buoys.

  5. Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unger, N.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D. M.

    2009-02-02

    The development of effective emissions control policies that are beneficial to both climate and air quality requires a detailed understanding of all the feedbacks in the atmospheric composition and climate system. We perform sensitivity studies with a global atmospheric composition-climate model to assess the impact of aerosols on tropospheric chemistry through their modification on clouds, aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). The model includes coupling between both tropospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry and aerosols and liquid-phase clouds. We investigate past impacts from preindustrial (PI) to present day (PD) and future impacts from PD to 2050 (for the moderate IPCC A1B scenario) that embrace a wide spectrum of precursor emission changes and consequential ACI. The aerosol indirect effect (AIE) is estimated to be -2.0 Wm{sup -2} for PD-PI and -0.6 Wm{sup -2} for 2050-PD, at the high end of current estimates. Inclusion of ACI substantially impacts changes in global mean methane lifetime across both time periods, enhancing the past and future increases by 10% and 30%, respectively. In regions where pollution emissions increase, inclusion of ACI leads to 20% enhancements in in-cloud sulfate production and {approx}10% enhancements in sulfate wet deposition that is displaced away from the immediate source regions. The enhanced in-cloud sulfate formation leads to larger increases in surface sulfate across polluted regions ({approx}10-30%). Nitric acid wet deposition is dampened by 15-20% across the industrialized regions due to ACI allowing additional re-release of reactive nitrogen that contributes to 1-2 ppbv increases in surface ozone in outflow regions. Our model findings indicate that ACI must be considered in studies of methane trends and projections of future changes to particulate matter air quality.

  6. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  7. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - Users' Guide Version 2.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, Scott A; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Fixel, Deborah A; Schiek, Richard; Bogdan, Carolyn W.; Shirley, David N.; Campbell, Phillip M.; Keiter, Eric R.

    2005-06-01

    This manual describes the use of theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator.Xycehasbeen designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, andhas been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratorieselectrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over thecurrent state-of-the-art in the following areas:%04Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale par-allel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includessupport for most popular parallel and serial computers.%04Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinearand linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques.%04Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, includingmany radiation-aware devices.3 XyceTMUsers' Guide%04Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practicesthat ensure that theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable andextensible far into the future.Xyceis a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passingparallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible numberof computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memoryparallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to thespecific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiencyis achieved as the number of processors grows.The development ofXyceprovides a platform for computational research and de-velopment aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. WithXyce, Sandia hasan %22in-house%22 capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model develop-ment) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms)research and development can be performed. As a result,Xyceis a unique electricalsimulation capability, designed to meet the unique needs of the laboratory.4 XyceTMUsers' GuideAcknowledgementsThe authors would like to acknowledge the entire Sandia National Laboratories HPEMS(High Performance Electrical Modeling and Simulation) team, including Steve Wix, CarolynBogdan, Regina Schells, Ken Marx, Steve Brandon and Bill Ballard, for their support onthis project. We also appreciate very much the work of Jim Emery, Becky Arnold and MikeWilliamson for the help in reviewing this document.Lastly, a very special thanks to Hue Lai for typesetting this document with LATEX.TrademarksThe information herein is subject to change without notice.Copyrightc 2002-2003 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.XyceTMElectronic Simulator andXyceTMtrademarks of Sandia Corporation.Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence DesignSystems, Inc.Silicon Graphics, the Silicon Graphics logo and IRIX are registered trademarks of SiliconGraphics, Inc.Microsoft, Windows and Windows 2000 are registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.Solaris and UltraSPARC are registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Corporation.Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation.HP and Alpha are registered trademarks of Hewlett-Packard company.Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc.Xyce's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS De-partment at the University of California.All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.ContactsBug Reportshttp://tvrusso.sandia.gov/bugzillaEmailxyce-support%40sandia.govWorld Wide Webhttp://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce5 XyceTMUsers' GuideThis page is left intentionally blank6

  8. A 10 Year Climatology of Arctic Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing at Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Crosby, Kathryn; Long, Charles N.; Stone, R. S.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2010-09-15

    A 10-yr record of Arctic cloud fraction and surface radiation budget has been generated using data collected from June 1998 to May 2008 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site and the nearby NOAA Barrow Observatory (BRW). The record includes the seasonal variations of cloud fraction (CF), cloud liquid water path (LWP), precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface albedo, shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes and cloud radative forcings (CRFs), as well as their decadal variations. Values of CF derived from different instruments and methods agree well, having an annual average of ~0.74. Cloudiness increases from March to May, remains high (~0.8-0.9) from May to October, and then decreases over winter. More clouds and higher LWP and PWV occurred during the warm season (May-October) than the cold season (November-April). These results are strongly associated with southerly flow which transports warm, moist air masses to Barrow from the North Pacific and over area of Alaska already free of snow during the warm season and with a dipole pattern of pressure in which a high is centered over the Beaufort Sea and low over the Aleutians during the cold season. The monthly means of estimated clear-sky and measured allsky SW-down and LW-down fluxes at the two facilities are almost identical with the annual mean differences less than 1.6 W m-2. The downwelling and upwelling LW fluxes remain almost constant from January to March, then increase from March and peak during July-August. SW-down fluxes are primarily determined by seasonal changes in the intensity and duration of insolation over Northern Alaska, and are also strongly dependent on cloud fraction and optical depth, and surface albedo. The monthly variations of NET CRF generally follow the cycle of SW CRF, modulated by LW effects. On annual average, the negative SW CRF and positive LW CRF tend to cancel, resulting in annual average NET CRF of 2-4.5 Wm-2. Arctic clouds have a 3 net warming effect on the surface throughout the year, with exception of the snow-free period from middle June to middle September when there tends to be a cooling effect. The daily average surface albedos agree well at the two sites remaining high (>0.8) until late May, dropping below 0.2 after the snow melts around June and increasing during autumn once snow begins to accumulate. On the basis of long-term regression analyses CF has decreased by about 0.048 while temperature has risen by ?1.1 K over the 10-yr period, which can be characterized by tendencies of warming mainly during December and April. With regard to the 2007 record minimum Arctic ice extent, this study provides additional empirical evidence that decreased cloud cover and increased SW-down flux during summer contributed to anomalous ice melt in the region north of Barrow. At Barrow, average June-August CF decreased by 0.062 in 2007 from the 10-yr mean, while SW-down and NET fluxes increased by 28.4 Wm-2 and 11.3 Wm-2, respectively. The increase in the NET radiative flux during summer 2007 most likely contributed to an increase in surface air temperature of 1.6 K.

  9. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  10. Simulating 3-D Radiative Transfer Effects over the Sierra Nevada Mountains using WRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Yu; Liou, K. N.; Lee, W- L.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-10-30

    A surface solar radiation parameterization based on deviations between 3-D and conventional plane-parallel radiative transfer models has been incorporated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to understand the solar insolation over mountain/snow areas and to investigate the impact of the spatial and temporal distribution and variation of surface solar fluxes on land-surface processes. Using the Sierra-Nevada in the western United States as a testbed, we show that mountain effect could produce up to ?50 to + 50Wm?2 deviations in the surface solar fluxes over the mountain areas, resulting in a temperature increase of up to 1 °C on the sunny side. Upward surface sensible and latent heat fluxes are modulated accordingly to compensate for the change in surface solar fluxes. Snow water equivalent and surface albedo both show decreases on the sunny side of the mountains, indicating more snowmelt and hence reduced snow albedo associated with more solar insolation due to mountain effect. Soil moisture increases on the sunny side of the mountains due to enhanced snowmelt, while decreases on the shaded side. Substantial differences are found in the morning hours from 8-10 a.m. and in the afternoon around 3-5 p.m., while differences around noon and in the early morning and late afternoon are comparatively smaller. Variation in the surface energy balance can also affect atmospheric processes, such as cloud fields, through the modulation of vertical thermal structure. Negative changes of up to ?40 gm?2 are found in the cloud water path, associated with reductions in the surface insolation over the cloud region. The day-averaged deviations in the surface solar flux are positive over the mountain areas and negative in the valleys, with a range between ?12~12Wm?2. Changes in sensible and latent heat fluxes and surface skin temperature follow the solar insolation pattern. Differences in the domain-averaged diurnal variation over the Sierras show that the mountain area receives more solar insolation during early morning and late afternoon, resulting in enhanced upward sensible heat and latent heat fluxes from the surface and a corresponding increase in surface skin temperature. During the middle of the day, however, the surface insolation and heat fluxes show negative changes, indicating a cooling effect. Hence overall, the diurnal variations of surface temperature and surface fluxes in the Sierra-Nevada are reduced through the interactions of radiative transfer and mountains. The hourly differences of the surface solar insolation in higher elevated regions, however, show smaller magnitude in negative changes during the middle of the day and possibly more solar fluxes received during the whole day.

  11. Advanced Design Studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, Don [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The ARIES-CS project was a multi-year multi-institutional project to assess the feasibility of a compact stellarator as a fusion power plant. The work herein describes efforts to help design one aspect of the device, the divertor, which is responsible for the removal of particle and heat flux from the system, acting as the first point of contact between the magnetically confined hot plasma and the outside world. Specifically, its location and topology are explored, extending previous work on the sub ject. An optimized design is determined for the thermal particle flux using a suite of 3D stellarator design codes which trace magnetic field lines from just inside the confined plasma edge to their strike points on divertor plates. These divertor plates are specified with a newly developed plate design code. It is found that a satisfactory thermal design exists which maintains the plate temperature and heat load distribution below tolerable engineering limits. The design is unique, including a toroidal taper on the outboard plates which was found to be important to our results. The maximum thermal heat flux for the final design was 3.61 M W/m2 and the maximum peaking factor was 10.3, below prescribed limits of 10 M W/m2 and 15.6, respectively. The median length of field lines reaching the plates is about 250 m and their average angle of inclination to the surface is 2 deg. Finally, an analysis of the fast alphas, resulting from fusion in the core, which escape the plasma was performed. A method is developed for obtaining the mapping from magnetic coordinates to real-space coordinates for the ARIES-CS. This allows the alpha exit locations to be identified in real space for the first time. These were then traced using the field line algorithm as well as a guiding center routine accounting for their mass, charge, and specific direction and energy. Results show that the current design is inadequate for accommodating the alpha heat flux, capturing at most 1/3 of lost alphas. However the distribution of the alphas on the device first wall indicates that a viable solution likely exists. It is noted that future designs must be sought which specifically address the fusion alphas through an integrated approach involving physics and engineering teams.

  12. Evaluation of Technetium Getters to Improve the Performance of Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lawter, Amanda R.; Stephenson, John R.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-11-01

    Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. One of the major radionuclides that Cast Stone has the potential to immobilize is technetium (Tc). The mechanism for immobilization is through the reduction of the highly mobile Tc(VII) species to the less mobile Tc(IV) species by the blast furnace slag (BFS) used in the Cast Stone formulation. Technetium immobilization through this method would be beneficial because Tc is one of the most difficult contaminants to address at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site due to its complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes (vitrification, steam reformation, etc.), and high mobility in subsurface environments. In fact, the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS) identifies technetium-99 (99Tc) as one of the radioactive tank waste components contributing the most to the environmental impact associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site. The TC&WM EIS, along with an earlier supplemental waste-form risk assessment, used a diffusion-limited release model to estimate the release of different contaminants from the WTP process waste forms. In both of these predictive modeling exercises, where effective diffusivities based on grout performance data available at the time, groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well exceeded the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for 99Tc. (900 pCi/L). Recent relatively short-term (63 day) leach tests conducted on both LAW and secondary waste Cast Stone monoliths indicated that 99Tc diffusivities were at or near diffusivities where the groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well would exceed the allowable maximum permissible 99Tc concentrations. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of Tc in the Cast Stone waste form. One method to improve the performance of the Cast Stone waste form is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc inside Cast Stone.

  13. Comparison of Energy Efficiency and Power Density in Pressure Retarded Osmosis and Reverse Electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yip, NY; Elimelech, M

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural -> anthropogenic -> engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the charged RED membranes, severely reducing the permselectivity and diminishing the energy conversion efficiency. This study indicates that PRO is more suitable to extract energy from a range of salinity gradients, while significant advancements in ion exchange membranes are likely necessary for RED to be competitive with PRO.

  14. Response of atmospheric ground level temperatures to changes in the total solar irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlykin, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    The attribution of part of global warming to changes in the total solar irradiance (TSI) is an important topic which is not, yet, fully understood. Here, we examine the TSI induced temperature (T) changes on a variety of time scales, from one day to centuries and beyond, using a variety of assumptions. Also considered is the latitude variation of the T-TSI correlations, where it appears that over most of the globe there is a small increase in the sensitivity of temperature to TSI in time. It is found that the mean global sensitivity (alpha)measured in K(Wm-2)-1 varies from about 0.003 for 1 day, via 0.05 for 11-years to about 0.2 for decades to centuries. We conclude that mean global temperature changes related to TSI are not significant from 1975 onwards. Before 1975, when anthropogenic gases were less important, many of the temperature changes can be attributed to TSI variations. Over much longer periods of time, from Kyear to Myear, the TSI changes are more efficient still, the sensitivity alpha increasing...

  15. Automated baseline change detection phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD) project is supported by the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) as part of its ER&WM cross-cutting technology program in robotics. Phase 1 of the Automated Baseline Change Detection project is summarized in this topical report. The primary objective of this project is to apply robotic and optical sensor technology to the operational inspection of mixed toxic and radioactive waste stored in barrels, using Automated Baseline Change Detection (ABCD), based on image subtraction. Absolute change detection is based on detecting any visible physical changes, regardless of cause, between a current inspection image of a barrel and an archived baseline image of the same barrel. Thus, in addition to rust, the ABCD system can also detect corrosion, leaks, dents, and bulges. The ABCD approach and method rely on precise camera positioning and repositioning relative to the barrel and on feature recognition in images. In support of this primary objective, there are secondary objectives to determine DOE operational inspection requirements and DOE system fielding requirements.

  16. Effects of the Cu off-stoichiometry on transport properties of wide gap p-type semiconductor, layered oxysulfide LaCuSO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goto, Yosuke, E-mail: ygoto@z8.keio.jp; Tanaki, Mai; Okusa, Yuki; Matoba, Masanori; Kamihara, Yoichi [Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan); Shibuya, Taizo; Yasuoka, Kenji [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    Layered oxysulfide LaCu{sub 1?x}SO (x?=?0–0.03) was prepared to elucidate the effect of Cu off-stoichiometry on their electrical and thermal transport properties. Electrical resistivity drastically decreases down from ?10{sup 5} ?·cm to ?10{sup ?1} ?·cm as a result of Cu deficiency (x?=?0.01) at 300?K. Thermal conductivity of the samples at 300?K, which is dominated by lattice components, is estimated to be 2.3(3) Wm{sup ?1}K{sup ?1}. Stoichiometric LaCuSO has an optical band gap of 3.1?eV, while broad optical absorption at photon energies of approximately 2.1?eV was observed for Cu-deficient samples. Density functional theory calculation suggests that these broad absorption structures probably originate from the in-gap states generated by the sulfur vacancies created to compensate the charge imbalance due to Cu off-stoichiometry. These results clearly demonstrate that Cu deficiency plays a crucial role in determining the electrical transport properties of Cu-based p-type transparent semiconductors.

  17. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 2: Technology logic diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 2 has been divided into five sections: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Robotics/Automation, and Waste Management. Each section contains logical breakdowns of the Y-12 D and D problems by subject area and identifies technologies that can be reasonably applied to each D and D challenge.

  18. Predictive Capability for Strongly Correlated Systems: Mott Transition in MnO, Multielectron Magnetic Moments, and Dynamics Effects in Correlated Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krakauer, Henry; Zhang, Shiwei

    2013-02-21

    There are classes of materials that are important to DOE and to the science and technology community, generically referred to as strongly correlated electron systems (SCES), which have proven very difficult to understand and to simulate in a material-specific manner. These range from actinides, which are central to the DOE mission, to transition metal oxides, which include the most promising components of new spin electronics applications as well as the high temperature superconductors, to intermetallic compounds whose heavy fermion characteristics and quantum critical behavior has given rise to some of the most active areas in condensed matter theory. The objective of the CMSN cooperative research team was to focus on the application of these new methodologies to the specific issue of Mott transitions, multi-electron magnetic moments, and dynamical properties correlated materials. Working towards this goal, the W&M team extended its first-principles phaseless auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method to accurately calculate structural phase transitions and excited states.

  19. Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Thermal and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Shin, Yongsoon; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Jiang, Weilin

    2014-04-01

    SiC-polymers (pure polycarbosilane and polycarbosilane filled with SiC-particles) are being combined with Si and TiC powders to create a new class of polymer-derived ceramics for consideration as advanced nuclear materials in a variety of applications. Compared to pure SiC these materials have increased fracture toughness with only slightly reduced thermal conductivity. Future work with carbon nanotube (CNT) mats will be introduced with the potential to increase the thermal conductivity and the fracture toughness. At present, this report documents the fabrication of a new class of monolithic polymer derived ceramics, SiC + SiC/Ti3SiC2 dual phase materials. The fracture toughness of the dual phase material was measured to be significantly greater than Hexoloy SiC using indentation fracture toughness testing. However, thermal conductivity of the dual phase material was reduced compared to Hexoloy SiC, but was still appreciable, with conductivities in the range of 40 to 60 W/(m K). This report includes synthesis details, optical and scanning electron microscopy images, compositional data, fracture toughness, and thermal conductivity data.

  20. Full-dispersion Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport in micron-sized graphene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, S., E-mail: smei4@wisc.edu; Knezevic, I., E-mail: knezevic@engr.wisc.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Maurer, L. N. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Aksamija, Z. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    We simulate phonon transport in suspended graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with real-space edges and experimentally relevant widths and lengths (from submicron to hundreds of microns). The full-dispersion phonon Monte Carlo simulation technique, which we describe in detail, involves a stochastic solution to the phonon Boltzmann transport equation with the relevant scattering mechanisms (edge, three-phonon, isotope, and grain boundary scattering) while accounting for the dispersion of all three acoustic phonon branches, calculated from the fourth-nearest-neighbor dynamical matrix. We accurately reproduce the results of several experimental measurements on pure and isotopically modified samples [S. Chen et al., ACS Nano 5, 321 (2011);S. Chen et al., Nature Mater. 11, 203 (2012); X. Xu et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 3689 (2014)]. We capture the ballistic-to-diffusive crossover in wide GNRs: room-temperature thermal conductivity increases with increasing length up to roughly 100??m, where it saturates at a value of 5800?W/m K. This finding indicates that most experiments are carried out in the quasiballistic rather than the diffusive regime, and we calculate the diffusive upper-limit thermal conductivities up to 600?K. Furthermore, we demonstrate that calculations with isotropic dispersions overestimate the GNR thermal conductivity. Zigzag GNRs have higher thermal conductivity than same-size armchair GNRs, in agreement with atomistic calculations.