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Sample records for wm turpin ballard

  1. OSTIblog Posts by Michelle Turpin | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Michelle Turpin Michelle Turpin's picture Former OSTI Information Technology Specialist Join the discussion on important DOE research Published on Oct 07, 2008 Our team is excited ...

  2. Ballard Power Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avenue Place: Lowell, Massachusetts Zip: 01851 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Hydrogen Product: Designs and manufactures fuel cell systems Website: www.ballard.com...

  3. ALSTOM Ballard GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name: ALSTOM Ballard GmbH Place: Mannheim, Hessen, Germany Zip: D-68309 Product: Germany-based, JV of ALSTOM and Ballard Generation Systems...

  4. NuCellSys GmbH formerly Ballard AG formerly XCellsis | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Germany Product: Focused on developing and manufacturing fuel cell systems for automotive applications. References: NuCellSys GmbH (formerly Ballard AG, formerly XCellsis)1...

  5. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_JIM_CRABTREE_JOHN_BALLARD_UPDATED_NMMSSTraini...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Courses and Resources John Ballard, LinkNMMSS Jim Crabtree, NNSANA-73 Training Resources NMMSS Courses - Main Focus of Talk NMMSS Users Meetings - Presentations,...

  6. WM Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Los Angeles, California Product: Owns and operates a landfill gas plant located at Bradley Landfill. References: WM Solutions Inc1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

  7. WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions WM2014 Conference - ...

  8. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reports and Records of Decision | Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing more than 2 million cubic meters of radioactive wastes from past, present, and

  9. Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ Remedial activities and subsequent ecological restoration have converted the site...

  10. WM'02 Conference, February 24-28, 2002, Tucson, AZ

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    WM'02 Conference, February 24-28, 2002, Tucson, AZ 1 COMPOSITION OF INSOLUBLE RESIDUES GENERATED DURING SPENT FUEL DISSOLUTION Y. Pokhitonov, V. Aleksandruk, B. Bibichev, G....

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - 8_JIM_CRABTREE_JOHN_BALLARD_UPDATED_NMMSSTraining_2014_Powerpoint crabtree rev 2.ppt [Compatibility Mode

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Training Courses and Resources John Ballard, Link/NMMSS Jim Crabtree, NNSA/NA-73 Training Resources  NMMSS Courses - Main Focus of Talk  NMMSS Users Meetings - Presentations, technical assistance, one-on-one meeting with NMMSS staff - Past Topics * SAMS * Foreign Obligations * IAEA Reporting * Waste Reporting  NMMSS Website - Reference Materials - Reporting guides, tables, forms, past presentations NMMSS courses  Three standard courses - NRC NMMSS I (with reconciliation module) - 2.5

  12. Microsoft Word - Final FY14 WM Committee Work Plan 093013

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Work Plan Approved September 25, 2013 1 Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board (NNMCAB) WASTE MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE 2014 Work Plan SECTION I. MISSION STATEMENT The Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board (NNMCAB) Waste Management (WM) Committee reviews policies, practices and procedures, existing and proposed to provide recommendations, advice, suggestions and opinions to the US Department of Energy (DOE), regarding the waste management operations of Los Alamos National Laboratory

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Effective Use of the Safeguards Management Software (SAMS)_John Ballard [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Effective Use of the Safeguards Management Software (SAMS) John Ballard - NMMSS SAMS 2 What is SAMS? 3 Facility based version of the NMMSS software Functionality and look of the system are similar to NMMSS Benefits to Users Provides NMMSS user the ability to perform edit checks - Minimize errors Input transactions, material balance report, and inventory data - Simplifies reporting 4 Benefits to Users Enables NMMSS analyst to assist the user in real time while preparing facility

  14. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84045. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OA Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Ta nk Wastes M. J. Kupfer, A. L. Boldt, B. A. Higley, K. M. Hodgson, L. W. Shelton, B. C. Simpson, and R. A. Watrous (LMHC); M. 0. LeClair (SAIC); G. 1. Borsheim (BA); R. T. Winward (MA); R. M. Orme (NHC); N. 6. Colton (PNNL); S. 1. Lambert and D. E. Place (SESC); and W. W. SchulZ (W 2 S) Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract DE-AC06-96RL13200

  15. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84047 HNF-SD-WM-TI-740, Rev. OC Standard Inventories of Chemicals and Radionuclides in Hanford Site Tank Wastes M. J. Kupfer, A. L. Boldt, K. N. Hodgson, L. W. Shelton, B. C. Simpson, and R. A. Watrous (LMHC); M. D. LeClair (SAIC); G. 1. Borsheim (BA); R. T. Winward (MA); B. A. Higley and R. M. Orme (NHC); N. G. Colton (PNNL); S. L. Lambert and D. E. Place (Cogema); and W. W. Schulz (112S) Lockheed Martin Hanford Corporation, Richland, WA 99352 U.S. Department of Energy Contract

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_JOHN_BALLARD_MARY_MCCDONNELL_NRC DOE REporting requirements_presentations_4-29-14.ppt [Compatibility M

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Overview of DOE and NRC Reporting to NMMSS Similarities, Differences, and Challenges John Ballard, DOE Reconciliation Mary McConnell, NRC Reconciliation LINK Technologies Reporting to NMMSS Regulatory Compliance DOE Reporting Requirements NRC Reporting Requirements Resources 2 Regulatory Compliance DOE regulatory questions? - Contact Pete Dessaules DOE NMMSS Program Manager 301-903-4525 pete.dessaules@nnsa.doe.gov NRC regulatory questions? - Contact Brian Horn NRC NMMSS Program Manager

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_CARL_BURGER-JOHN_BALLARD_Preview of DOE and NMMSS NMMSS Training Courses_rev2.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Preview of DOE and NRC NMMSS Training Courses Carl Berger, Link/NMMSS John Ballard, Link/NMMSS DOE and NRC Training Scheduled Training Site-Specific Training Annual Users' Meeting NMMSS Website NMMSS Training Resources DOE and NRC Training Courses Scheduled Training  Three standard courses - NRC NMMSS I (with reconciliation module) - 2.5 days - DOE NMMSS I - 3.5 days - DOE NMMSS II - 2.5 days  Usually held at DOE-HQ in Germantown, MD  Available on-site at user facilities  DOE courses

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_MARY_MCCDONNELL_JOHN_BALLARD_Tips for REporting requirements_presentations_4-29-14.ppt [Compatibility

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Tips for Successful Reporting to NMMSS by DOE Contractors and NRC Licensees John Ballard, DOE Reconciliation Mary McConnell, NRC Reconciliation LINK Technologies Outline  The NMMSS process  Best Practices  Tips for success  Resources  Facility Performance 2 NMMSS Flow of Data (Generic Depiction of Data Flow) 3 DOE/NRC Form 741 DOE/NRC Form 740M DOE Form DP-749 * Hardcopies by mail (U) * Faxes (U) * Email (U) * REM (U) * CREM (C) * SIPRNet (C) * SecureNet (C) Sites or Facilities

  19. WM2014 Conference- Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions - 14575

  20. ASCEM WM 2013 Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 2014 Page 1 of 34 Contents: (To go directly to an article, click on its title below.) The Meisner Minute Trinity-NNSA ASC's First Advanced Technology System A New Take on Simulation Uncertainty "Cramming" Sequoia Full of Jobs for Uncertainty Quantification ParticlePack: Packing a Peck of Pickled Peppers Scaling Studies for Simulation of Non-Equilibrium Flow using SPARTA on the Sequoia Platform Pinch Weld Process Modeling to Improve GTS Reservoir Stem Weld Quality Predictive

  1. WM2015 Conference Panel Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    016: Lessons Learned and Return to Operations Following the 2014 Operational Incidents at WIPP Session Co-Chairs: Joe Franco, US DOE, Carlsbad Field Office Robert McQuinn, Nuclear Waste Partnership, LLC Panel Reporter: Roger Nelson, US DOE, Carlsbad Field Office Panelists:  Sean Dunagan, Recovery Manager, Carlsbad Field Office, US DOE  Mark Senderling, Headquarters Recovery Manager, US DOE - EM  Jim Blankenhorn, Recovery Manager, Nuclear Waste Partnership  J.R. Stroble, TRU Sites and

  2. TC&WM EIS Scoping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information, please call the Tank Closure & Waste Management EIS Info Line at 888-829-6347 A Citizen's Guide Background A January 9, 2006, legal settlement requires USDOE to prepare the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. USDOE intends for the EIS to provide a comprehensive and integrated look at near-term waste management and tank waste cleanup actions at Hanford. What are the key points of the settlement? * Expand the

  3. WM2016 Conference, March 6-10, ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... In addition, BLM could authorize subsurface uses such as oil and gas, coal, or geothermal ... Leasable minerals and resources include coal, geothermal, and oil and gas and nonenergy ...

  4. WM_and_Chemical_2012.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    WIPP, Carlsbad Host Department of State Conference WIPP, Carlsbad Host Department of State Conference August 30, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The United States Departments of State (DOS) and Energy (DOE) recently met with a delegation from the Argentina government for the 8th meeting of the U.S./Argentina Joint Standing Committee on Nuclear Energy Cooperation (JSCNEC). Argentina has a small but rapidly developing nuclear

  5. WM Committee FY'16 Work Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety WIPP Monitoring Program Ensures Worker Safety March 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill U.S. DOE Carlsbad Field Office (575) 234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - Officials with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) are citing the recent accreditation of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Laboratory as a cause for reflection on the important role environmental monitoring has played during WIPP's 12-year history. In

  6. Microsoft Word - S07050_WM.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Monitoring Report for Wetland Area near the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site September 2010 LMS/NAP/S07050 This page intentionally left blank LMS/NAP/S07050 Monitoring Report for Wetland Area near the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site September 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Naturita-Monitoring Report for Wetland Area September 2010 Doc. No. S07050 Page i Contents 1.0 Introduction

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_John_Ballard_NMMSS_2013_Presentation...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    * Shortens reconciliation times 18 DOENNSA Reconciliation Reports to help stay balanced during year * TJ-1X - Daily activity by facility - Monthly reports and...

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - 5_CARL_BURGER-JOHN_BALLARD_Preview of...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    accredited by DOE National Training Center (NTC) DOE and NRC Training Courses ... - Forms and reporting guides - Tables of data entry codes - Past presentations DOE and ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_MARY_MCCDONNELL_JOHN_BALLARD_Tips for...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Len Myers Special Requests (301) 903-2180 Len.Myers@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith NRC Reconciliation (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Tips for Success Report with ...

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_JOHN_BALLARD_MARY_MCCDONNELL_NRC DOE...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Len Myers Special Requests (301) 903-2180 Len.Myers@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith NRC Reconciliation (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Reasons to Call NMMSS - How to ...

  11. WBU-13-0014- In the Matter of Earl M. Ballard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 30, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision granting Mr. Earl Ballard’s Appeal of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office’s (PPPO) dismissal of his whistleblower...

  12. WBU-14-0007- In the Matter of Earl M. Ballard

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On August 6, 2014, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision granting Mr. Earl Ballard’s Appeal of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office’s (PPPO) dismissal of his whistleblower...

  13. WM2015 Conference, March 15 - 19, 2015, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Risk Considerations for WIPP Passive Institutional Controls - 15173 Steve Wagner Sandia National Laboratories, 4100 National Parks Highway, Carlsbad, New Mexico 88220 swagner@sandia.gov ABSTRACT The regulatory assurance measures for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) include such things as active and passive institutional controls, monitoring, waste retrieval/removal capabilities and engineered barriers. Passive Institutional Controls (PICs) are an assurance measure intended to reduce the

  14. Dr. Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ramp is about 4 years old and previol there was a paved parking lot on the sit 1960' s. ... Linde has rented here over the years. 5. ;;;;i;zr Street Warehouse , NY The Linde ...

  15. TC&WM EIS doc.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. Microsoft Word - LL-WM08 Paper 8351.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tests on Geosynthetic Clay Liners Subjected to Differential Settlement," MS Thesis, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (1992). 25. W.J. WAUGH, G.M. SMITH, D.BERGMAN-TABBERT, and...

  17. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the APS and the scientific community at large and to enhance the ability of APS to meet the needs of graduate students. It also offers support services and encourages...

  18. HNF-SD-WM-TI-740_Rev_0.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - WM2014_MZ_14575_2014-03-03.ppt

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 2010: Richland, WA (http:srnl.doe.govcopexchangelinks.htm) * May 25-26, 2011: Atlanta. GA (http:srnl.doe.govcopexchange2011links.htm) * In late 2013, the group was ...

  20. WM2015 Conference, March 15-19, 2015, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 WIPP - February 2014 Operational Events and the Compliance Recertification Application (CRA) 2014 - 15293 Ross Kirkes *, Russell Patterson ** * Piru Associates, Inc. 602 Harkness Rd, Carlsbad, NM 88220 ** Department of Energy-Carlsbad Field Office, 4021 national Parks Highway, Carlsbad, NM 88220 ABSTRACT On Wednesday, February 5, 2014, an underground mine fire involving a salt haul truck occurred at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). There were 86 workers in the mine when the fire

  1. WM2015 Conference, March, 15-19, 2015, Phoenix, Arizona, USA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March, 15-19, 2015, Phoenix, Arizona, USA † Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. This research is funded by WIPP programs administered by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) of the U.S Department of Energy. Impacts of an Additional Exhaust Shaft on WIPP

  2. Microsoft Word - doe_nv--1164-WM07-7416FINALpaper.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Waste Disposal Operations at the Nevada Test Site J.T. Carilli U.S. Dept. of Energy, ... of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site. ...

  3. https://sweis.nv.doe.gov/References/RE%20WM%20activities%20at...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... And enjoy the holidays. G.W. Roles| SAIC Nuclear Engineer | ILPSG phone: 301-353-8354 | ... G.W. Roles| SAIC Nuclear Engineer | ILPSG phone: 301-353-8354 | fax 301-428-3713 mobile: ...

  4. HAB_Ecology_Letter_on_Draft_TC-WM-EIS043010.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  5. Microsoft Word - FY13_WM_Committee_Work_Plan_Final_Draft

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    waste, e.g., Transuranic (TRU) and High Level Waste (HLW). It is well underway but CAB should continue to monitor b. Subsurface remediation in the event that buried waste is...

  6. Other Participants 1994 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... School , Tahlequah , OK Thomas Jefferson High School , Alexandria , VA Turpin High School , Cincinnati , OH Venice High School , Los Angeles , CA Westminster School , Atlanta , GA

  7. OO84O4c6sP HNF-SD-WM-II-740, Rev. OB

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolution (CEQ, 2012) | Department of Energy OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (CEQ, 2012) OMB and CEQ Joint Memorandum on Environmental Collaboration and Conflict Resolution (CEQ, 2012) This Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) joint memorandum expands and builds on the November 28, 2005, Environmental Conflict Resolution (ECR) Memorandum, directing departments and agencies to increase the

  8. Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

    2008-11-30

    U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

  9. NMMSS_News_February_2014_FINAL__1_5_2014

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... John Ballard Team Lead DOE Special Requests (301) 903-0092 John.Ballard@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith Senior Analyst - NRC (301) 903-6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Len Myers ...

  10. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Sacramento

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Sacramento, California April 26, 2016 Dr. James David Ballard is a Professor of Sociology at California State University in Northridge (CSUN), California. Professor of Sociology James David Ballard Dr. Ballard received his doctorate from the University of Nevada Las Vegas. His concentrations included political sociology, criminology and deviance. He received his Masters of Arts in General Studies: Economics and Political Science and a Bachelors in Science in Sociology from Jacksonville State

  11. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice109...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Agency, Region 10 Tom Fitzsimmons, Washington Department of Ecology Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  12. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be taken out of context to extrapolate Board agreement on other subject matters. cc: Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official, U.S. Department of Energy Michael...

  13. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice108...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Agency, Region 10 Tom Fitzsimmons, Washington Department of Ecology Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  14. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice102...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chair Hanford Advisory Board cc: Carolyn Huntoon, Department of Energy Headquarters Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  15. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice104...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Board cc: Chuck Clarke, U.S. EPA Tom Fitzsimmons, Washington Department of Ecology Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  16. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice105...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Ecology Chuck Clarke, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  17. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice103...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Waste Adopted: February 4, 2000 cc: Carolyn Huntoon, Department of Energy Headquarters Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  18. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice110...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fitzsimmons, Washington Department of Ecology Dick French, Office of River Protection Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  19. file://L:\\DOE-hanford.gov\\public\\boards\\hab\\advice\\advice113...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boston, Office of River Protection Carolyn Huntoon, Department of Energy Headquarters Wade Ballard, Deputy Designated Federal Official The Oregon and Washington Congressional...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Patton, Howard Los Alamos National Laboratory (2) Phillips, Scott Los Alamos National ... LOCATION. Ballard, Sanford NMN ; Hipp, James R. ; Chael, Eric P. ; Encarnacao, Andre ...

  1. Summary of Decisions - August 4, 2014 - August 8, 2014 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    708 regulations were not applicable to an alleged protected disclosure made within the context of an investigation into Mr. Ballard's actions, were not persuasive. OHA therefore...

  2. DOE Announces Webinars on Engaging Students in Energy, Challenges...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The Energy Department presented a live webinar titled "Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells" on Tuesday, November 19. During the webinar, Ballard Power Systems ...

  3. 2013 User Training Meeting Presentations | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Monday, May 20 All Presentations Gary Hirsch - Overview Mister 'T' McDonnell - Fundamentals John Ballard - DOE Reconciliation Pat Smith - NRC Reconciliation Mitch Hembree - Import...

  4. Paducah News | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    McCracken and Ballard counties to encourage local students to study science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). October 29, 2015 An aerial view of the package boilers...

  5. Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing...

  6. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-029

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by BALLARD POWER SYSTEM, INC. for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC36-07GO17017

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - 7_Jim Crabtree_NMMSS People, Resources...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Gary Hirsch * PSI Team LeadIAEA Reporting Lead 301-903-6870 John Ballard* DOE Lead, Training Lead 301-903-0092 Pat Smith* NRC Lead 301- 903-6860 Len Myers * Special RequestsDIMS...

  8. A Computer Program for Processing In Situ Permeable Flow Sensor Data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-04-15

    FLOW4.02 is used to interpret data from In Situ Permeable Flow Sensors which are instruments that directly measure groundwater flow velocity in saturated, unconsolidated geologic formations (Ballard, 1994, 1996: Ballard et al., 1994: Ballard et al., in press). The program accepts as input the electrical resistance measurements from the thermistors incorporated within the flow sensors, converts the resistance data to temperatures and then uses the temperature information to calculate the groundwater flow velocity and associatedmore » uncertainty. The software includes many capabilities for manipulating, graphically displaying and writing to disk the raw resistance data, the temperature data and the calculated flow velocity information. This version is a major revision of a previously copyrighted version (FLOW1.0).« less

  9. A

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Santa Fe Gerard Martinez, WM Committee Santa Fe Kaitlin Martinez, Student Member Santa Fe Daniel Mayfield, WM & EM&R Committees Santa Fe Alex Puglisi, WM & EM&R Committees Santa Fe...

  10. STEM Mentors Reach Nearly 300 Western Kentucky Sixth Graders | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy STEM Mentors Reach Nearly 300 Western Kentucky Sixth Graders STEM Mentors Reach Nearly 300 Western Kentucky Sixth Graders November 25, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis David Curry (far right) teaches Ayden Mowery, Jake Miller, and Bella Presson (left to right) at Ballard County Middle School to read a pH strip to test water. David Curry (far right) teaches Ayden Mowery, Jake Miller, and Bella Presson (left to right) at Ballard County Middle School to read a pH strip to test water. Ken Davis

  11. Microsoft Word - Contact List Template 11-5-14- ali notes.doc

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Operations www.nnsa.energy.gov/nmmss E-Mail: NMMSS@nnsa.doe.gov Unclassified Fax: 301-903-1998 NMMSS Points-of-Contact for Assistance Name Topic Phone Email Address Karen Antizzo IAEA Reporting General Data Submission Custom Report Requests (301) 903-0872 Karen.Antizzo@nnsa.doe.gov John Ballard DOE/NNSA Reconciliation Training (301) 903-0092 John.Ballard@nnsa.doe.gov Elaine Beacom International Reporting (Import/Export) (301) 903-1328 Elaine.Beacom@hq.doe.gov Carl Berger Special Requests and

  12. EECBG Success Story: St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. ... less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. St. ...

  13. Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) ...

  14. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Approximately 10,000 DOE research documents added to the Information Bridge searchable database by Michelle Turpin on Fri, Apr 18, 2008 Our OSTI team recently completed digitizing and uploading to the Information Bridge database about 10,000 documents issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (from 1991 to 1994). This means that citizens can now search this database and rapidly download these documents in full text - all for free. The

  15. Email Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 2 Public Involvement -- Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS (TC&WM EIS) ... 9 Committee Business......

  16. arm_stm_2007_revercomb_poster.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GOES & RRTM Fluxes and AIRS Partial Fluxes Partial Flux * AIRS obs, * LBLRTM) Total Flux * GOES, * RRTM Year 2000 - 2006 RRTM flux (AIRS Ts, emis) CERES comparison RRTM minus CERES W/m 2 W/m 2 Clear Sky TOA Flux from GOES and Aqua CERES Clear Sky TOA Flux GOES minus CERES * Mean: +5.5 W/m 2 , StdDev: 11.3 W/m 2 Clear Sky TOA Flux from GOES and RRTM calculations Clear Sky TOA Flux GOES minus RRTM calculations W/m 2 W/m 2 wavenumber Obs-Calc (K) Obs-Calc (K) Day Night Day Night Mean Observed

  17. Local firms benefit from Jefferson Lab upgrade | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Local firms benefit from Jefferson Lab upgrade Local firms benefit from Jefferson Lab upgrade Michael Schwartz, Staff Writer Inside Business, February 16, 2009 Just two months into the year, the $310 million upgrade at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is already paying off for local companies. A $14.1 million contract awarded earlier this month to S.B. Ballard made the Virginia Beach-based construction company the second local firm to reap the

  18. Bahman Habibzadeh | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bahman Habibzadeh About Us Bahman Habibzadeh, Ph.D. - Technology Manager Bahman Habibzadeh is a Technology Manager in the Department of Energy's Building Technologies Office (BTO). He is currently on detail with the Fuel Cell Technologies Office. Prior to joining the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of the DOE, Dr. Habibzadeh worked as a research and development engineer at Ballard Power Systems where he performed design and testing on fuel reformers for PEM Fuel Cell

  19. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on TC & WM EIS Page 1 January * DST AY-102 update (Dirk) o Assumptions communication, lessons learned (PIC) * TC & WM EIS o Were previous HAB comments addressed? Do we need new...

  20. J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wm.eduresearchideationscience-and-technologyj-lab-scientist-wins-award-for-graphene-invention6812.php Submitted: Thursday, June 1...

  1. Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

    1996-12-01

    This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Procurement and Cantrads Division

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Procurement and Cantrads Division P.O. BOX 2001 Oak Ridge. TN 37831 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD Dlrect Del very Adotess' U S Deoanmenl of Energy Oar R doe Ooerat ons Ofice ~ r m u r e i e n t s n d Contracts Division ,200 Administration Road, ATTN: Ballard A. Jackson Jr Oak Ridse. TN 37830 I . THIS CONTRACT IS ARATED ORDER UNDER DPAS (15 CFR 700) I NOTE: In sealed bid solicitations "offer" and "offeror" mean "bid" and

  3. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Sacramento

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    David Ballard, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology CONSENT- BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza-Sacramento 300 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814 April 26, 2016 4:00-5:00 PM Informal Open House and Poster Session (Before Meeting Begins) 5:00-5:15 PM Welcoming Remarks Robert Weisenmiller, Chair to the California Energy Comission 5:15-5:30 PM Moving Forward with Consent-Based Siting John Kotek, Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy

  4. Microsoft Word - Awards_Final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Day Award Winners and Honorable Mentions Winners Ricardo Marti-Arbona, B-8 Aditya Mohite, C-PCS/MPA-CINT Tie Wei, CCS-2 David Mascarenas, INST-OFF John Brady, MPA-11 Jeong-Hyun Cho, MPA-CINT Jared Crochet, MPA-CINT/C-PCS Sara Kutchesfahani, N-4 Chaitanya Chandrana, P-21 Ivana Matanovic, T-1/MPA-11 Tsvi Achler, T-5/P-21 Honorable Mentions Beau Ballard, C-IIAC/SPO-SC Scott R. Daly, C-IIAC/INST-OFF Adam Manzanares, HPC-5 Daniel Perea, MPA-CINT Jinkyoung Yoo, MPA-CINT Katherine Lovejoy, MPA-MC/B-8

  5. Agenda CBS Public Meeting-Sacramento

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    David Ballard, Ph.D., Professor of Sociology CONSENT- BASED SITING CONSENT-BASED SITING PUBLIC MEETING Holiday Inn Capitol Plaza-Sacramento 300 J Street Sacramento, CA 95814 April 26, 2016 4:00-5:00 PM Informal Open House and Poster Session (Before Meeting Begins) 5:00-5:15 PM Welcoming Remarks Robert Weisenmiller, Chair to the California Energy Commission 5:15-5:30 PM Moving Forward with Consent-Based Siting John Kotek, Acting Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Department of Energy

  6. WPN 10-19: Guidance for Grant Amendments for the Sustainable Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions | Department of Energy WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk Assessment in Support of Risk-Informed Environmental Management Decisions WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance and Risk

  7. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS) Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) Foreword Summary Ecology believes that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor have prepared a Final TC & WM EIS that presents many important issues for discussion. Ecology's involvement in the production of this TC & WM EIS shows that this document has benefited from quality reviews and quality assurance procedures. In addition, this document benefited from

  8. Email Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bookmark not defined. Tank Closure & Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS) .. ... help from consultants and quality assurancequality control (QAQC) procedures. ...

  9. Microsoft Word - FINAL_TWC_August2007_summary.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS) and other environmental studies. ... When the pump was restarted it got stuck. The operating procedures allow the ...

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-024.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement WM PEIS (DOEEnvironmental Impact ... with Idaho Administrative Procedures Act (IDAPA) 58.01.01.201 and 40 ...

  11. 032510_HAB_AnnualReport_2009.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TC&WM EIS: The Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement intended to provide ... ensure ARRA projects execute safe procedures while managing project scope, cost, ...

  12. FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT FOR THE COMBINED COMMUNITY COMMUNICAT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management (TC&WM) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and are referred to as "interim actions." ... Site plans and procedures, including the Biological Resources Management Plan. ...

  13. Microsoft Word - HAB_FINAL_Feb07_Summ.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS) ......now must be under DOE or EPA supervision until new procedures are established. ...

  14. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Draft TC & WM EIS) and the procedures used to respond to public comments. ...

  15. Section 29

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flux Determination Raw data (V) is converted to absolute fluxes (Wm ) via the 2 dark signal measurements in the field and the experimentally derived calibration constants....

  16. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 APPENDIX V RECHARGE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS In the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Draft TC & WM...

  17. News Archive | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS, DOEEIS-0391, December 2012). With regard to those wastes that, in the future,...

  18. EIS-0391: Notice to Extend Scoping Period | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS) and rescheduling the public scoping meetings. PDF icon EIS-0391-NOI-scop-2006....

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM SGP domain, as a result of correlated subgrid-scale vertical velocity and thermodynamic structure, can reach 2000 Wm2 during strong convective events. This energy...

  20. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The TC & WM EIS analysis confirms the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, Final Environmental Impact Statement (TWRS EIS) (DOE and Ecology 1996) ROD ...

  1. ARM - Datastreams - saszefilterbands

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( wavelength ) Shortwave spectral radiance Zenith radiance at 340 nm W(m2 um sr) zenithradiance340nm ( time ) Shortwave spectral radiance Zenith radiance at 355 nm W...

  2. Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

    1996-12-01

    This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

  3. Document

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Four sites (Hanford Site, INL, Oak Ridge Reservation, and the Savannah River Site) were ... WM-PEIS or in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Disposal Phase Supplemental ...

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... in the prediction of uncertainty and to visualize the relationships between model input and output. less March 2011 , WM Symposium, Tucson, AZ, United States(US). Prev Select ...

  5. The Effect of Foaming and Silica Dissolution on Melter Feed Rheology...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    As the nuclear waste glass melter feed is converted to molten glass, the feed eventually ... Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Waste Management 2014 (WM2014 ...

  6. Radiotoxicity Characterization of Multi-Recycled Thorium Fuel...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The behavior in both thermal and fast neutron energy ranges has been investigated. ... Resource Relation: Conference: WM2012: Waste Management 2012 conference on improving the ...

  7. ARM - VAP Product - beflux1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 basetime Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance Downwelling Longwave Hemisperic Irradiance Wm2 downlonghemisp ( time )...

  8. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Foreword DOE appreciates the efforts of the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology)...

  9. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/078.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Citizens Advisory board (INEEL CAB). This meeting focused on DOE planning efforts for the 2006 Plan and RODs for the WM...

  10. Proceedings of GT2006

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... m h heat transfer coefficient, Wm2K H boundary layer shape factor, H S*S2 k thermal conductivity, WmK K acceleration parameter, vU"2 (dU"dx) L hole length, m Lu energy ...

  11. X:\ARM_19~1\P335-353.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    v r n r (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 a a Wm 2 r e c r e µ c Wm 2 Wm 2 µ 0 µ 0 µ 1 0 µ 0 µ 0 Session Papers (a) R. Wagener now at Analytical Sciences Division. 341 Comparison of Seasonal and Zonal Patterns of the Direct and Indirect Radiative Forcing of Climate by Aerosols R. Wagener and S. E. Schwartz (a) Environmental Chemistry Division Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Aerosols have a climatically significant influence on the The cloud layer consists of droplets (refractive index 1.33)

  12. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10 Foreword After receiving the EPA comments on the Draft TC & WM EIS, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) wrote to the EPA, inviting the EPA to be a cooperating agency in the development of this Final TC & WM EIS. The two agencies signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) in April 2011 to formalize the EPA"s involvement as a cooperating agency and to define each

  13. Microsoft PowerPoint - Last MTRG Sheet May 10.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tribal, Stakeholder, and Public - Information Opportunities The U.S. Department of Energy wants to keep you informed on the continued progress with the TC&WM EIS. As the Public Involvement and agency coordination work evolves, it is important to inform you about opportunities to get information on the TC&WM EIS. The Model Technical Review Group (MTRG) is made up of independent experts whom will provide guidance to the TC&WM EIS contractor on the development of the groundwater model.

  14. Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington--Frequent Asked Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0391) Frequently Asked Questions What are the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed actions in the Final TC & WM EIS? The Final TC & WM EIS (DOE/EIS-0391) evaluates three sets of proposed actions, as follows: Retrieve and treat the waste remaining in 177 underground storage tanks; store the high-level radioactive waste (HLW); dispose of

  15. Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Morgan; Donald Connors; Michael Hickner

    2012-07-10

    Ballard Material Products (BMP) performed a pre-design technical and cost analysis of state of the art production technologies feasible for high volume GDL manufacturing. Based upon criteria that also included environmental health and safety, customer quality requirements, and future needs, BMP selected technologies that can be integrated into its current manufacturing process. These selections included Many-At-A-Time (MAAT) coating and continuous mixing technologies, as well as various on-line process control tools. These processes have allowed BMP to produce high performance GDLs at lower cost for near-term markets, as well as to define the inputs needed to develop a conceptual Greenfield facility to meet the cost targets for automotive volumes of 500,000 vehicles per year.

  16. Microsoft Word - Caldwell EBIF_JPCCresub-1 11-16-2010

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... or more local temperature rise can be anticipated under imaging conditions, but moderately higher thermal conductivities ( 1-10 Wm-K) reduce this estimate to tens of degrees. ...

  17. PIC Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Diff. than 2013 Oct. 4. Land Conveyance EA 5. Natural Gas Pipeline EIS 6. Budget meetings 7. Site-wide permit 8. NEPA ROD for TC & WM EIS Page 15 PIC Meeting Transcribed ...

  18. Microsoft Word - FINAL_PIC_Sept2008_summary.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... out the site-wide permit and explain it to the public. She wants to avoid releasing it at the same time as the TC&WM EIS. Greg anticipated that the presidential election would ...

  19. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    If we want to determine the top of the atmosphere aerosol radiative forcing with the accuracy of 0.5 Wm2 we need to know the aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the land with the...

  20. CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant IICX(s) Applied: B5.1Date: 04/21/2010Location(s): Milam Landfill, IllinoisOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

  1. ARM - Datastreams - sebs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 basetime Battery voltage V batteryvoltage ( time ) Soil heat flow 1, corrected for soil moisture Wm2 corrsoilheatflow1 ( time ) ...

  2. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Typifies Optimizing Resources to Maximize Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) Manager Joe Franco, right, presents a memento to EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga at the February 2013 Waste Management Conference in Phoenix presented by WM Symposia.

  3. Mississippi Public Service Commission Adopts Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. St. Louis Launches Plan for ...

  4. Local Company Purchases William & Mary Land Near Jefferson Lab...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    articles.dailypress.com2010-06-14newsdp-nws-wm-land-20100614-11jefferson-lab-mary-real-estate-foundation-new... Submitted: Tuesday, June 15, 2010 - 12...

  5. Analysis of NaOH releases for Hanford tank farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-12

    The information contained in the canceled document is now located in the document: Consequence Analysis of a NaOH Solution Spray Release During Addition to Waste Tank, WHC-SD-WM-CN-065.

  6. DOE, NEPA, and YOU | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")...

  7. 2000 - 12 | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12302000 - 1:00am Inventors Win Patent: W&M Group Still Working on Lamp (Daily Press) Thu, 12142000 - 1:00am Huge Magnet Arrives at UI, Only To Wait in the Snow (News-Gazette)...

  8. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Irradiance, Wm -2 nm -1 2000ft - Incoming 10,500ft - incoming 2000ft - outgoing 10,500ft - outgoing Sept 24, 2008 California AUAV Air Pollution Profiling Study - CAPPS Craig ...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - arm2008_1.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TEMPLATE DESIGN 2007 www.PosterPresentations.com 20 25 30 35 40 45 Fractional day 0 100 200 300 400 OLR (Wm 2 ) SCAMstd SCAMice OBS 20 25 30 35 40 45 Fractional day 380 400...

  10. michalsky-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of this figure see http:www.arm.govdocsdocumentstechnical conf9803michalsky- 98.pdf). Figure 2. Ratio of spectral sensitivity in countsWm -2 nm -1 at beginning and end of...

  11. Microsoft Word - FINAL_Report_06 March 2010 B+W.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Lack, for the most part of references that postdated the TWRS and HSW EIS indicated that ... System TWRS EIS. The TC & WM EIS acknowledges the existence of these shortfalls. ...

  12. EECBG Success Story: Reducing Energy Costs and Rebuilding the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. EECBG Success Story: St. ...

  13. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. EECBG Success Story: St. ...

  14. EECBG Success Story: St. Paul Parking Ramp Serves as a Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. EECBG Success Story: St. ...

  15. Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2013 Work Plan | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Work Plan Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2013 Work Plan Topics: TA-21 TA-54 RiskBenefit Principles TA-49 Fiscal Year 2012 Budget PDF icon WM-FY13-WP - September 26, 2012 ...

  16. OCEANS'13 MTS/IEEE SAN DIEGO, SEPTEMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microgrid Testbed (SSMTB) 4, 5, 6. Given a time-indexed weather profile (i.e. wind speed (msec), wave crest (m), river currents (msec), solar irradiance (Wm 2 ), etc.)...

  17. CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing ProgramCX(s) Applied: B1.28Date: 07/30/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  18. Irradiation response in weldment and HIP joint of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirose, Takanori [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Odette, G.R. [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2013-11-01

    This work investigates irradiation response in the joints of F82H employed for a fusion breeding blanket. The joints, which were prepared using welding and diffusion welding, were irradiated up to 6 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Post-irradiation tests revealed hardening in weldment (WM) and base metal (BM) greater than 300 MPa. However, the heat affected zones (HAZ) exhibit about half that of WM and BM. Therefore, neutron irradiation decreased the strength of the HAZ, leaving it in danger of local deformation in this region. Further the hardening in WM made with an electron beam was larger than that in WM made with tungsten inert gas welding. However the mechanical properties of the diffusion-welded joint were very similar to those of BM even after the irradiation.

  19. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from 0 to 3.3 WmK. Thus, the dominant thermal carrier in TaOx switches between vibrations and charge carriers and is controllable either by oxygen content during deposition,...

  20. Wind Resource Map: Mexico | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    span two power densities. For example, Wind Power Class 3 represents the Wind Power Density range between 150 watt (W) per square meter (m2) and 200 Wm2. The offset cells in...

  1. DOE, NEPA, and YOU (DOE, 2011) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS"

  2. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1). Correspondingly, the absolute nadir radiance I( 5 ) at m 14 is 15.7 (radiance dimension is Wm -2 sr -1 m -1 ). This value I( 5 ) 15.7 was used here as a threshold...

  3. C~

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... WastDesigaton Tank Waste Volume TRU CS 13 7 (curiesliter) ... Waste Baseline Inventory Report (TWBIR) for WIPP because ... Page 14 of 15 WM'06 Conference, February 26 - March 2, 2006, ...

  4. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND...

  5. A Decision Methodology for Prioritizing R&D Supporting Geologic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WM2014 Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 2-6 Mar 2014 Research Org: Sandia...

  6. A Decision Methodology for Prioritizing R&D Supporting Geologic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WM2014 Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, AZ (United States), 2-6 Mar 2014; Related Information:...

  7. OpenEI Community - SOTU + Energy data

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Highlights from the 2013 State of the Union http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogenergy-highlights-2013-state-union

    WM&featur...

  8. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron transport. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 107:326-331 8. Nealson, K.H. 2010. Sediment reactions defy dogma. Nature 463:1033-1034. 9. Salas, E.C., W.M. Berelson, D.E....

  9. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY NEALSON...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    electron transport. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 107:326-331 8. Nealson, K.H. 2010. Sediment reactions defy dogma. Nature 463:1033-1034. 9. Salas, E.C., W.M. Berelson, D.E....

  10. Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan Waste Management Committee Fiscal Year 2012 Work Plan Topics: TA-21 TA-54 RiskBenefit Principles Consent Order PDF icon WM-FY12-WP...

  11. collab-list-scientific.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Cambridge: J. Jan de Vries, J. Marshall, L. Escudero Sanchez, M. Thomson, J. Weston University of Chicago: W.M. Foreman, J. Ho, D.W. Schmitz, J. Zennamo University of ...

  12. Rotary mode core sampling service trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-056. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-111 Rev.1.

  13. Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    such as global PSP (Wm2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion...

  14. HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 4, 2010 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD March 4, 2010 Richland, WA Topics in This Meeting Summary Executive Summary........................................................................................................................................ 1 Welcome, introductions and announcements ................................................................................................. 2 Independent review of the draft TC&WM EIS and final report

  15. ARM - VAP Product - qcradbrs1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wm2 MFRSRhemispbroadband ( time ) Air Temperature C TempAir ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt DifSWGSW test unitless aqcDifSW2GSW ( time ) GSWSumSW test...

  16. ARM - VAP Product - qcradbeflux1long

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wm2 MFRSRhemispbroadband ( time ) Air Temperature C TempAir ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt DifSWGSW test unitless aqcDifSW2GSW ( time ) GSWSumSW test...

  17. NEPA Reports and Records of Decision | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS") - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology ...

  18. SREL Reprint #3115

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of meadow vole (Microtus pennsylvanicus) populations in central Appalachian wetlands K.E. Francl1, T.C. Glenn2,3, S.B. Castleberry4, and W.M. Ford5 1Department of...

  19. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -1 CHAPTER 1 PROPOSED ACTIONS: BACKGROUND, PURPOSE AND NEED Chapter 1 describes the background, purpose and need for the agency action presented in this Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS). Section 1.1 provides summary information on the size and distribution of the waste inventory at the Hanford Site (Hanford), the specific objectives of this TC & WM EIS, and the regulatory basis for the proposed

  20. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reader's Guide U.S. Department of Energy November 2012 1 Cover Sheet Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Title: Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0391) Location: Benton County, Washington Contacts: For copies of this Final TC & WM EIS, call toll-free

  1. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cover Sheet Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Title: Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0391) Location: Benton County, Washington Contacts: For copies of this Final TC & WM EIS, call toll-free 1-888-829-6347, or contact Mary Beth Burandt at the address

  2. Double shell tank waste analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulkey, C.H.; Jones, J.M.

    1994-12-15

    Waste analysis plan for the double shell tanks. SD-WM-EV-053 is Superseding SD-WM-EV-057.This document provides the plan for obtaining information needed for the safe waste handling and storage of waste in the Double Shell Tank Systems. In Particular it addresses analysis necessary to manage waste according to Washington Administrative Code 173-303 and Title 40, parts 264 and 265 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

  3. One size fits all? An assessment tool for solid waste management at local and national levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broitman, Dani; Ayalon, Ofira; Kan, Iddo

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste management schemes are generally implemented at national or regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local conditions characteristics and constraints are often neglected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an economic model able to compare multi-level waste management options. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A detailed test case with real economic data and a best-fit scenario is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most efficient schemes combine clear National directives with local level flexibility. - Abstract: As environmental awareness rises, integrated solid waste management (WM) schemes are increasingly being implemented all over the world. The different WM schemes usually address issues such as landfilling restrictions (mainly due to methane emissions and competing land use), packaging directives and compulsory recycling goals. These schemes are, in general, designed at a national or regional level, whereas local conditions and constraints are sometimes neglected. When national WM top-down policies, in addition to setting goals, also dictate the methods by which they are to be achieved, local authorities lose their freedom to optimize their operational WM schemes according to their specific characteristics. There are a myriad of implementation options at the local level, and by carrying out a bottom-up approach the overall national WM system will be optimal on economic and environmental scales. This paper presents a model for optimizing waste strategies at a local level and evaluates this effect at a national level. This is achieved by using a waste assessment model which enables us to compare both the economic viability of several WM options at the local (single municipal authority) level, and aggregated results for regional or national levels. A test case based on various WM approaches in Israel (several implementations of mixed and separated waste) shows that local characteristics significantly influence WM costs, and therefore the optimal scheme is one under which each local authority is able to implement its best-fitting mechanism, given that national guidelines are kept. The main result is that strict national/regional WM policies may be less efficient, unless some type of local flexibility is implemented. Our model is designed both for top-down and bottom-up assessment, and can be easily adapted for a wide range of WM option comparisons at different levels.

  4. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  5. Waste Management facilities fault tree databank 1995 status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minnick, W.V.; Wellmaker, K.A.

    1995-08-16

    The Safety Information Management and Analysis Group (SIMA) of the Safety Engineering Department (SED) maintains compilations of incidents that have occurred in the Separations and Process Control, Waste Management, Fuel Fabrication, Tritium and SRTC facilities. This report records the status of the Waste Management (WM) Databank at the end of CY-1994. The WM Databank contains more than 35,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with significant potential for injury or contamination of personnel. This report documents the status of the WM Databank including the availability, training, sources of data, search options, Quality Assurance, and usage to which these data have been applied. Periodic updates to this memorandum are planned as additional data or applications are acquired.

  6. Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

  7. Solid Waste Integrated Forecast Technical (SWIFT) Report FY2001 to FY2046 Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARCOT, R.A.

    2000-08-31

    This report provides up-to-date life cycle information about the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; program-level and waste class-specific estimates; background information on waste sources; and comparisons to previous forecasts and other national data sources. This report does not include: waste to be managed by the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) contractor (i.e., waste that will be disposed of at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF)); waste that has been received by the WM Project to date (i.e., inventory waste); mixed low-level waste that will be processed and disposed by the River Protection Program; and liquid waste (current or future generation). Although this report currently does not include liquid wastes, they may be added as information becomes available.

  8. In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

    2013-08-01

    The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

  9. Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

    2010-04-15

    The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTI’s analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a “Best Case Scenario” for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this “Best Case Scenario” including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

  10. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  11. LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tunesi, Simonetta

    2011-03-15

    An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The contribution and relative importance of recycling and treatment/recovery processes change with the impact category. The lack of reprocessing plants in the area of the case study has shown the relevance of transport distances for recyclate material in reducing the efficiency of a WM system. Highly relevant to the current English WM infrastructural debate, these results for the first time highlight the risk of a significant reduction in the energy that could be recovered by local WM strategies relying only on the market to dispose of the 'fuel from waste' in a non dedicated plant in the case that the SRF had to be sent to landfill for lack of treatment capacity.

  12. ARM - Data Announcements Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2D ARM Best Estimate Data Sets Updated to Include QCECOR Bookmark and Share Surface latent (left) and sensible (right) heat fluxes (units are in W/m2) are shown here for ARMBESTNS in July 2012. The data source is QCECOR. Different sites are color-coded. Surface latent (left) and sensible (right) heat fluxes (units are in W/m2) are shown here for ARMBESTNS in July 2012. The data source is QCECOR. Different sites are color-coded. The ARM Best Estimate 2-dimensional Gridded Surface (ARMBE2DGRID)

  13. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 8, 2013 COTW [TC&WM FEIS] * IM framing of prior HAB advice & agency response - Dale * History/Overview component, Board's involvement with draft advice * Technical research by IMs with DOE about what changed from draft to final - Jean Page 1 TC & WM EIS * New potential proposal - Sounding Board instead of COTW advice? o Will discuss @ TWC 1/9/2013 Page 2 100 - D/H Draft A Proposed Plan * ECY Comments back to DOE in mid-February - Dale & Jean * Rev. 0 next Fiscal Year? End

  14. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The U.S. Department of Energy wants to keep you informed on the continued progress with the TC&WM EIS. As the Public Involvement and agency coordination work evolves, it is important to inform you about opportunities to get information on the TC&WM EIS. Mary Beth Burandt, Document Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450, Mail Stop H6-60 Richland, WA 99352 TC&WMEIS@saic.com Fax: 509-376-7701 - Phone: 888-829-6347 To view related documents on the EIS

  15. Draft HAB Advice on Delaying Decisions Associated with the Final Tank Closure and Waste

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Committee Draft Advice - TC&WM EIS Delayed Decisions v1 - Mattson, et.al. Page 1/1 Draft HAB Advice on Delaying Decisions Associated with the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS Background: The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB or Board) spent a considerable amount of time developing advice on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS, EIS). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has spent over $80 million on the EIS, and thousands of people

  16. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The NNMCAB is comprised of citizens appointed by the Department of Energy to serve up to three two-year terms on the board. The Board members represent broad: geographic, cultural, and ethnic demographics. NNMCAB Membership Roster Members as of March 2016 1 Abeyta, Carla Chimayo EM&R Committee Baca, Max Las Vegas WM Committee Friday, Mary Taos EM&R Committee Girardi, Nona Los Alamos EM&R Committee Gurulé, Angelica Española WM Committee (Chair) Herrera, Ashlee Alcalde Student

  17. Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2013-03-01

    The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

  18. Verification/acceptance test report for the Acromag Calibration System for TMACS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fordham, C.R.

    1995-04-25

    This document provides the Verification/Acceptance Test Report for the Acromag Calibration System (ACS) for the Tank Monitor and Control System. ACS will be implemented to check the calibration of the thermocouple input modules. Purpose of this document is to show that the ACS satisfies the system requirements in WHC-SD-WM-CSRS-009 (WHC 1993b).

  19. Core sample truck improvement test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cockrell, A.B.

    1994-10-14

    This report summarizes the bit testing results done under test plan WHC-SD-WM-TP-236. The conclusions and recommendations state the drill bit that gives the best overall results and will be used in the field for push mode sampling.

  20. TMACS Test Procedure TP011: Panalarm Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seghers, R.; Washburn, S.J.

    1994-05-24

    The TMACS Software Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. The TMACS Test Plan (WHC-SD-WM-TP-148) is fulfilled when all Test Cases are approved. This Test Procedure tests the TMACS Panalarm Interface functions.

  1. Revised Manuscript

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rev. 82 (1951) 305, DA12 1951RO16 W.D. Roseborough, J.J.G. McCue, W.M. Preston and C. Goodman, Phys. Rev. 83 (1951) 1133 1951YA1A Yaffe and Stevens, Can. J. Phys. 29 (1951) 186;...

  2. W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary News &

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events) | Jefferson Lab W&M, JLab Host International Neutrino Workshop (William & Mary News & Events) External Link: http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2012/william--mary-hosts-international-neutrino-w... By jlab_admin on Thu, 2012-07-19

  3. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soils Soil Series and Phase D Fa D LaB TrB D TrC VeC .Wm '" Vegetation Compartment 28 Community D Mixed PineHardwood D Upland Hardwod D Bottomland Hardwood Water D Sandhill...

  4. M E M O R A N D U M D A T

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    iH: GLLdiJ a- ---e M E M O R A N D U M D A T E d e - S U B J E C T : A L T E R N A T E ' N A M E : --- O W N E R (S) -----w-m P a It:...

  5. Tank waste remediation system compensatory measure removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLIKEN, N.J.

    1999-05-18

    In support of Fiscal Year 1998 Performance Agreement TWR1.4.3, ''Replace Compensatory Measures,'' the Tank Waste Remediation System is documenting the completion of field modifications supporting the removal of the temporary exemptions from the approved Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs), HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006. These temporary exemptions or compensatory measures expire September 30, 1998.

  6. High Efficiency Spectrum Splitting Prototype Submodule Using Commercial CPV Cells (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keevers, M.; Lau, J.; Green, M.; Thomas, I.; Lasich, J.; King, R.; Emery, K.

    2014-11-01

    This presentation summarizes progress on the design, fabrication and testing of a proof-of-concept, prototype spectrum splitting CPV submodule using commercial CPV cells, aimed at demonstrating an independently confirmed efficiency above 40% at STC (1000 W/m2, AM1.5D ASTM G173-03, 25 degrees C).

  7. Email Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD TANK WASTE COMMITTEE MEETING March 11, 2010 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome and Introductions ................................................................................................ 1 Single-Shell Tank Integrity Expert Panel Workshop.......................................................... 1 Draft Tank Closure & Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS)

  8. Email Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 18, 2009 FINAL MEETING SUMMARY HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD TANK WASTE COMMITTEE MEETING November 18, 2009 Richland, WA Topics in this Meeting Summary Welcome and Introductions ................................................................................................ 1 Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS) 1 River Protection System Plan, Rev. 4 ................................................................................. 5 Waste Treatment

  9. Test report - caustic addition system operability test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parazin, R.E.

    1995-10-13

    This Operability Test Report documents the test results of test procedure WHC-SD-WM-OTP-167 ``Caustic Addition System Operability Test Procedure``. The Objective of the test was to verify the operability of the 241-AN-107 Caustic Addition System. The objective of the test was met

  10. Systems Engineering Management Plan for Tank Farm Restoration and Safety Operations Project W-314

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCGREW, D.L.

    2000-04-19

    The Systems Engineering Management Plan for Project W-314 has been prepared within the guidelines of HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, TWRS Systems Engineering Management Plan. The activities within this SEMP have been tailored, in accordance with the TWRS SEMP and DOE Order 430.1, Life Cycle Asset Management, to meet the needs of the project.

  11. MEMORANDUfl J: FILE DATE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    J: FILE DATE r so ---w------m FROM: 9. 34oyc -w---v----- SUBJECT: D3 Bo;s CL&;C J mL-;+J; - Rcc cap 049 'A :j: &336;s L-.fh w-f L-1 ALE"nirTE ---...

  12. NUCLEAR REGULATOR%'-C~fiMls6N REGION I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    jNrTED ST&ye I ) r P, NUCLEAR REGULATOR%'-CfiMls6N REGION I 63I PIIRK AVENUE Wcs:in;kcse Elecric Coroorrzion ATTiN: 2. F:. jhaw I-- Zivision Piant Manaaer wm.1.1 I SJeszi ...

  13. Operability test report for rotary mode core sampling system number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-03-01

    This report documents the successful completion of operability testing for the Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) system {number_sign}3. The Report includes the test procedure (WHC-SD-WM-OTP-174), exception resolutions, data sheets, and a test report summary.

  14. From the Woods to the Refinery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 1 MJ biofuel from unmanaged hardwood -3E-16 -2E-16 -1E-16 0 1E-16 2E-16 3E-16 4E-16 5E-16 0 100 200 300 400 500 GWI inst W.m -2 Years Plant at zero Cut at zero Where do we go ...

  15. Key Neutrino behavior observed at Daya Bay (The College of William and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mary) | Jefferson Lab Key Neutrino behavior observed at Daya Bay (The College of William and Mary) External Link: http://www.wm.edu/news/stories/2012/key-neutrino-behavior-observed-at-daya-bay-1... By jlab_admin on Thu, 2012-03-08

  16. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  17. Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

    2001-08-01

    Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

  18. Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Fantoni, Moris; Busto, Mirko; Genon, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Maria Chiara

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

  19. Operational test procedure for SY tank farm replacement exhauster unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClees, J.

    1995-09-26

    This operational test procedure will verify that the remaining functions not tested per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-080, or components disturbed during final installation, as well as interfaces with other tank farm equipment and remote monitoring stations are operating correctly.

  20. Engineering task plan for the annual revision of the rotary mode core sampling system safety equipment list

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-05-13

    This Engineering Task Plan addresses an effort to provide an update to the RMCS Systems 3 and 4 SEL and DCM in order to incorporate the changes to the authorization basis implemented by HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, Rev. 0 (Draft), Addendum 5 , Safety Analysis for Rotary Mode Core Sampling. Responsibilities, task description, cost estimate, and schedule are presented.

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Sunwook Park March 31, 2009 3-hourly surface albedo Radiative flux (Wm -2 ) TOA SFC SWDN SWUP LWUP SWDN SWUP LWDN LWUP OBS 463.7 165.9 173.1 186.7 27.8 433.8 473.0 CRM6...

  2. CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drill One Exploratory Hole On Lease Tract C-WM-17 by Golden Eagle UraniumCX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3Date: 06/02/2010Location(s): Montrose County, ColoradoOffice(s): Legacy Management

  3. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  4. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

  5. Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

    2007-11-26

    We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present-day emissions suggest that future climate projections warrant particular scrutiny.

  6. Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, David, W.

    2012-02-14

    Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

  7. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for Fiscal Year 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) multiprogram laboratory whose primary mission has been to research nuclear technologies. Working with these technologies and conducting other types of research generates waste, including radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. While most of the waste treatment, storage, and disposal practices have been effective, some practices have led to the release of contaminants to the environment. As a result, DOE has developed (1) an Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to identify and, where necessary, cleanup releases from inactive waste sites and (2) a Waste Management (WM) Program to safely treat, store, and dispose of DOE wastes generated from current and future activities in an environmentally sound manner. This document describes the plans for FY 1993 for the INEL`s ER and WM programs as managed by DOE`s Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID).

  8. GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-10-26

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029).

  9. Thermal interface conductance across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride heterojunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chun-Chung; Li, Zhen; Cronin, Stephen B. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2014-02-24

    We measure thermal transport across a graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) interface by electrically heating the graphene and measuring the temperature difference between the graphene and BN using Raman spectroscopy. Because the temperature of the graphene and BN are measured optically, this approach enables nanometer resolution in the cross-plane direction. A temperature drop of 60?K can be achieved across this junction at high electrical powers (14 mW). Based on the temperature difference and the applied power data, we determine the thermal interface conductance of this junction to be 7.4??10{sup 6}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1}, which is below the 10{sup 7}10{sup 8}?Wm{sup ?2}K{sup ?1} values previously reported for graphene/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  10. Experimental study of the proposed super-thermal-conductor: BAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Bing; Lan, Yucheng; Zhang, Qian; Ren, Zhifeng E-mail: cwchu@uh.edu; Wang, Xiqu; Jacobson, Allan J.; Hu, Yongjie; Chen, Gang; Broido, David; Chu, Ching-Wu E-mail: cwchu@uh.edu

    2015-02-16

    Recent calculations predict a super-thermal-conductivity of ∼2000 Wm{sup −1} K{sup −1}, comparable to that of diamond, in cubic boron arsenide (BAs) crystals, which may offer inexpensive insulators with super-thermal-conductivity for microelectronic device applications. We have synthesized and characterized single crystals of BAs with a zinc blende cubic structure and lattice parameters of a = 4.7830(7) Å. A relatively high thermal conductivity of ∼200 Wm{sup −1} K{sup −1} is obtained, close to those of best non-carbon crystal insulators, such as SiC, although still an order of magnitude smaller than the value predicted. Based on our XPS, X-ray single crystal diffraction, and Raman scattering results, steps to achieve the predicted super-thermal conductivity in BAs are proposed.

  11. Engineering evaluation of solids/liquids separation processes applicable to sludge treatment project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, J.B.

    1998-08-25

    This engineering study looks at the solids/liquids separation unit operations after the acid dissolution of the K Basin sludge treatment. Unit operations considered were centrifugation, filtration (cartridge, cross flow, and high shear filtration) and gravity settling. The recommended unit operations for the solids/liquids separations are based upon the efficiency, complexity, and off-the-shelf availability and adaptability. The unit operations recommended were a Robatel DPC 900 centrifuge followed by a nuclearized 31WM cartridge filter. The Robatel DPC 900 has been successfully employed in the nuclear industry on a world wide scale. The 31WM cartridge filter has been employed for filtration campaigns in both the government and civilian nuclear arenas.

  12. ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-11-15

    This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

  13. Investigations of low-temperature geothermal potential in New York State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, D.S.; De Rito, R.; Hifiker, K.; Morgan, P.; Swanberg, C.A.

    1981-09-01

    Temperature gradient map and published heat flow data indicate a possible potential for a geothermal resource in western and central New York State. A new analysis of bottom-hole temperature data for New York State confirms the existence of three positive gradient anomalies: the East Aurora, Cayuga, and Elmira anomalies, with gradients as high as 32/sup 0/C/km, 36/sup 0/C/km, and 36/sup 0/C/km, respectively. Ground waters from two of these anomalies are enriched in silica relative to surrounding areas. Heat flows based on silica geothermometry are 50 to 70 mWm/sup -2/ for the anomalies and 41.4 mWm/sup -2/ for bordering regional flux. A correlation between Bouguer gravity anomalies and the temperature gradient map suggests that the geothermal anomalies may occur above radioactive granites in the basement.

  14. TMACS test procedure TP010: Integration summary. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spurling, D.G.

    1994-09-01

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure verifies that Test Procedures 1, 2, 3, 5 and 9 (WHC-SD-WM-TRP-105, 106, 107, 109 and 113) of TMACS Software Release 4.1 have been successfully completed.

  15. NREL: Measurements and Characterization - Device Performance Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Device Performance Measurement The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is the premier U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research laboratory for testing performance of commercial, developmental, and research photovoltaic (PV) devices. We measure the performance PV cells and modules of any size or technology with respect to standard reporting conditions-defined as a reference temperature (25°C), total irradiance (1000 W/m2), andspectral irradiance distribution (IEC standard 60904-3, ASTM standard

  16. Microsoft Word - 12184b.doc

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    WM2012 Conference, February 26 - March 1, 2012, Phoenix, Arizona, USA 1 Evaluation of Final Radiological Conditions at Areas of the Niagara Falls Storage Site Remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program -12184 Christopher Clayton*, Vijendra Kothari**, Ken Starr***, Michael Widdop ****, and Joey Gillespie**** *U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC; ** U.S Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Morgantown, West Virginia; *** U.S

  17. TANK CHARACTERIATION REPORT FOR SINGLE-SHELL TANK 241-T-111

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, B.C.

    1996-04-06

    This document was initially released as WHC-EP-0806. This document is now being released as WHC-SD-WM-ER-540 in order to accommodate internet publishing. This document summarizes the information on the historical uses, present status, and the sampling and analysis results of waste stored in Tank 241-T-111. This report supports the requirements of the Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-44-05.

  18. SSRL HEADLINES January 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 January, 2005 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: SPEAR3 Receives Authorization for Restart Science Highlight - Researchers Discover Living Nanoscale "Necklace" LCLS Project Gets an Injection of Funds from Congress W.M. Keck Foundation Grant to Advance Ultrafast X-ray Studies in the Chemical Sciences Visitors from DC: US Senate Committee Staff and Deputy Director of the DOE Office of Science Research led by SSRL Faculty

  19. Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling and Multidimensional Optimization of a Tapered Free Electron Laser Authors: Jiao, Y. ; /SLAC /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. ; Wu, J. ; Cai, Y. ; Chao, A.W. ; Fawley, W.M. ; Frisch, J. ; Huang, Z. ; Nuhn, H.D. ; /SLAC ; Pellegrini, C. ; /SLAC /UCLA ; Reiche, S. ; /PSI, Villigen Publication Date: 2013-03-28 OSTI

  20. X:\ARM_19~1\P245-258.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 S latitude, 152 E longitude). 4.7Wm 2 sr 1 Session Papers 245 The Optical Properties of Equatorial Cirrus in the Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment C. M. R. Platt, S. A. Young, P. Manson, G. R. Patterson, and S. Marsden CSIRO, Division of Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Introduction The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported by Platt et al. (1994, 1995). The aim was to develop a reliable and

  1. X:\ARM_19~1\P283-315.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10 W m 2 ±5% ±20 W m 2 . 5 10Wm 2 Session Papers 301 Aspects of the Quality of Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site Broadband Radiation Sensors M. E. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma M. L. Wesely Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois A systematic evaluation of the performance of broadband In this paper, suggested uncertainty values correspond to radiometers at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART)

  2. barr(2)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frequency Interactions to Explain Madden Julian Oscillations and Intra Seasonal Oscillations S. A. Barr-Kumarakulasinghe Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Deep convective activity as seen by outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) (< 180 wm -2 ) is shown to occur at 20 to 60 periods in a more coherent manner during the boreal winters of El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm events. The coherent pattern is seen in the spectra of the TWP equatorial region closer to the date line. The

  3. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  4. Stabilization, Packaging, and Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable Community St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable Community March 1, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis Using money from the Energy Efficiency Block Grant Program, St. Louis installed new LED fixtures in the City Hall parking structure. The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. Using money from the Energy Efficiency Block Grant Program,

  5. MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM:

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2 --' . ' ~vmw tL DATE ,$j& j? /q $:' ---- f ---i--,,,,,, SUBJECT: ALTERNATE . NAME: OWNER(S) ----m-m- Paut 3 Owner contacted 0 yes Current: -------------------------- if yes, drtr contacted --w--m------- TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- F Research b Development H Facility Type 0 Production scale testing jZ Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis w Manufacturing 0 University 0 Researc' h Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other

  6. ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

  7. Technology development in support of the TWRS Process Flowsheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slaathaug, E.J.

    1994-11-01

    The Tank Waste Remediation System is to dispose of Hanford`s Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank waste. The TWRS Process Flowsheet (WHC-SD-WM-TI-613 Rev. 0) was issued recently. The process described by the flowsheet is based on a large number of assumptions that require verification and further definition through process and technology development activities. This development plan identifies and prioritizes tasks that should be completed to strengthen the technical foundation for the flowsheet.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2010-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2009-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  10. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    L-1 APPENDIX L GROUNDWATER FLOW FIELD DEVELOPMENT This appendix describes the development of the regional-scale groundwater flow field used for the groundwater modeling that supports assessment of the groundwater quality impacts discussed in the Draft and Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS), Chapters 5 and 6 and Appendices O and V. Included are an overview of groundwater flow at the site; the purpose

  11. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume 3, Book 1 Section 1: Overview Section 2: Topics of Interest Section 3: Individual Commentors U.S. Department of Energy November 2012 1 Cover Sheet Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Title: Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0391) Location: Benton County,

  12. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE/EIS-0391 Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Summary U.S. Department of Energy November 2012 1 Cover Sheet Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Title: Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS)

  13. Final Technical Report: Electronic Structure Workshop (ES13)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shiwei

    2015-02-26

    The 25th Annual Workshop on Recent Developments in Electronic Structure Methods (ES2013) was successfully held at the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg VA on June 11-14, 2013. The workshop website is at http://es13.wm.edu/ , which contains updated information on the workshop and a permanent archive of the scientific contents. DOE's continued support has been instrumental to the success of the workshop.

  14. Impact Limiter Tests of Four Commonly Used Materials And Limiter Data Base*

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Limiter Tests of Four Commonly Used Materials And Limiter Data Base* W.M. McMurtry and G.F. Hohnstreiter Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States of America DISCLAIMER I This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor my agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsi- bility for the accuracy,

  15. Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: Interagency Working Group Collaborates on Codisposal of Uranium Mine and Mill Tailings Waste in New Mexico; Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Benchmarking Visit to the LMBC; LM Creates Cooperative Agreement with the Northern Arapaho Tribe; LM Participates in 2012 WM Conference; M Partners with Diné Environmental Institute on Remediation of Uranium Processing Sites; LM Stakeholder Survey 2012 Update; LM: LEEDing the Way; Yucca Mountain

  16. Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials Authors: Robinson, Sharon M [1] ; Patton, Bradley D [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1088123 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WM2013,

  17. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 12, 2013 TC&WM FEIS groundwater modeling * What codes, how/why? Rationale? * How was draft modeling different from final? Particle tracking? * How did Technical Guidance doc & settlement agreement constrain FEIS model? * How was flow model calibrated? Match real conditions? * Sensitivity analyses - what & why? Reduced uncertainty? * What are the limitations of the model that was used in FEIS? * Did FEIS model match up with characterization? Page 1 EIS groundwater modeling

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantifying Error in the Radiative Forcing of the First Aerosol Indirect Effect Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Submitted to Geophysical Research Letters, 06-27-2007. Radiative forcing of aerosol indirect as function of CCN number density and LWP in units of W/m2 per 5% IE error. A survey of recently published works shows that values used to represent the magnitude of

  19. Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_pyrgeometer.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM-05-111 2 Outline * Why the need for longwave data restriction? - Important Considerations and the 12 Wm -2 longwave results problem * What ARM data are effected? - List of station-dates * Can the data be adjusted? - Using available 20-sec data samples * How is ARM addressing pyrgeometer calibration? - In search of a measurement reference * References * Acronyms * Appendix - Fundamentals of pyrgeometer operation and calibration 3 Why a Data Access Restriction? The ARM Program's data quality

  20. Microsoft PowerPoint - ORP-07-0019 HAB Agency Update June 2007.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection Shirley J. Olinger, Acting Manager June 8, 2007 safety performance cleanup closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management Major Activities Looking Back and Looking Ahead River Protection Project * Tri-Party Agreement Negotiations * Regional Budget Meetings * Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC & WM EIS) * Tank Farm Retrievals/Demonstration Bulk Vitrification * Waste Treatment and

  1. J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed as a Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    student at William & Mary (The College of William and Mary, Ideation) | Jefferson Lab J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed as a Ph.D. student at William & Mary (The College of William and Mary, Ideation) External Link: http://www.wm.edu/research/ideation/science-and-technology/j-lab-scientist-wins-... By jlab_admin on Fri, 2012-06-1

  2. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  3. Microsoft Word - MODFLOW TRG Meeting Summary September 2006.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington MODFLOW Technical Review Group September 2006 Meeting Summary The MODFLOW Technical Review Group (TRG) supporting Science Applications International Corporation's (SAIC's) Groundwater Model Development for the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS) met September 4-6, 2006, in Richland, Washington, for an introduction to the project and an overview of the site. The

  4. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management 1 Overview of CERCLA Groundwater Models U.S. Department of Energy August 2013 safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management 2 Subjects * TC&WM EIS Model Transition * CERCLA Models * Vadose Zone Flow & Transport Objectives * Saturated Zone Flow & Transport Objectives * Summary safety  performance  cleanup  closure M E Environmental Management 3 Sitewide Groundwater Model

  5. Section 111

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W/m 2 Session Papers 499 The Status of Quality Measurement Experiments in the Microwave, Longwave, and Shortwave P. D. Brown and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts D. D. Turner and T. R. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. O. Knuteson, H. E. Revercomb and W. L. Smith University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Spectral analyses from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer/Line-by-Line Radiative

  6. Section 55

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W/m 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 , O 3 Session Papers 233 Effects of Improved Radiative Transfer Modeling for Climate Simulations M. J. Iacono, E. J. Mlawer and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts Introduction The interaction of shortwave and infrared radiation in the atmosphere with clouds and greenhouse gases represents a complex process that contributes significantly to maintaining earth's climate system. For climate model simulations to become more accurate,

  7. Community Loblolly Pine Longleaf Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood _ Water _ Bottomland Hardwood/Pine IIIIiI Scrub/Shrub E2:I SRS Bays i&. Roads NUtility ROW EEl Hydric Soils 230 o 230 Vegetation Meters Soils Soil Series and Phase D BaB _w .Wm Figure 10-2. Plant communities and soils associated with the Risher Pond Set-Aside Area. 10-9 Set-Aside 10: Risher Pond

  8. Device Performance. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Measurements & Characterization (Brochure)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Device Performance We measure the performance of PV cells and modules with respect to standard reporting conditions-defined as a reference temperature (25°C), total irradiance (1000 Wm -2 ), and spectral irradiance distribution (IEC standard 60904-3). Typically, these are "global" reference conditions, but we can measure with respect to any reference set. To determine device performance, we conduct two general categories of measurements: spectral responsivity (SR) and current versus

  9. Microsoft Word - 12361

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Appendix F, Page 1 WM2012 Conference, February 26 - March 1, 2012, Phoenix, Arizona, USA 1 Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado - 12361 John A. Boylan* *S.M. Stoller Corporation, Rocky Flats Site, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, Colorado 80021 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Site (the Site), near Denver, Colorado, is a former nuclear weapons facility that was constructed

  10. Microsoft Word - 2015 NTSF Agenda public Feb 10.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LMactivities consist of records management and stakeholder support. At other sites, some residual contamination may remain after remediation and some land uses must be restricted. In these instances, DOE will conduct more "active" LTS&M activities, such as managing institutional controls and performing site inspections or environmental monitoring, to allow the highest beneficial land use while ensuring protectiveness. WM2012 Conference, February 26 - March 1, 2012, Phoenix,

  11. Sandia National Laboratories California Waste Management Program Annual Report February 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brynildson, Mark E.

    2008-02-01

    The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

  12. Tank Farm Closure & Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement <br>

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (DOE/EIS-0391) - Hanford Site Statements Tank Closure & WM EIS Info Documents CERCLA Five-Year Review NEPA - Categorical Exclusions NEPA - Environmental Assessments NEPA - Environmental Impact Statements Environmental Management Performance Reports Tank Farm Closure & Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0391) Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) has prepared a Final Environmental

  13. Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo

  14. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT„INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM MEETING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1/6/12 Page 1 of 2 RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE - 3 MONTH WORK PLAN (SUBJECT TO REVISION) December Committee meeting placeholder: No Committee Week planned for December Committee call placeholder: December 18 @ 1:30 p.m. * Call: TPA Change Package - committee will review package and, if needed, request comment period extension * Other: Participate in potential webinar regarding TW&WM EIS * Advice responses? * Committee Business January Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday, January 8

  15. Optimal linear reconstruction of dark matter from halo catalogues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-04-01

    The dark matter lumps (or "halos") that contain galaxies have locations in the Universe that are to some extent random with respect to the overall matter distributions. We investigate how best to estimate the total matter distribution from the locations of the halos. We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter haloes that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses of halos being used. While the standard biased-Poisson model of the halo distribution predicts that bias weighting is optimal, the simple fact that the mass is comprised of haloes implies that the optimal w(M) will be a mixture of mass-weighting and bias-weighting. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15 noisier than the optimal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost effective.

  16. Engineering Basis Document Review Supporting the Double Shell Tank (DST) System Specification Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LEONARD, M.W.

    2000-03-14

    The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System is required to transition from its current storage mission to a storage and retrieval mission supporting the River Protection Project Phase 1 privatization, defined in HNF-SD-WM-MAR-008, Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report. Requirements for the DST subsystems are being developed using the top-down systems engineering process outlined in HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. This top-down process considers existing designs to the extent that these designs impose unavoidable constraints on the Phase 1 mission. Existing engineering-basis documents were screened, and the unavoidable constraints were identified. The constraints identified herein will be added to the DST System specification (HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System). While the letter revisions of the DST System specification were constructed with a less rigorous review of the existing engineering-basis documents, the Revision 0 release of the specification must incorporate the results of the review documented herein. The purpose of this document is to describe the screening process and criteria used to determine which constraints are unavoidable and to document the screening results.

  17. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Ourmore » findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10Wm 2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5Wm 2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15Wm 2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.« less

  18. Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

    1996-12-01

    Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

  19. Humidity trends imply increased sensitivity to clouds in a warming Arctic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Walden, Von P.; Rowe, Penny M.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2015-12-10

    Infrared radiative processes are implicated in Arctic warming and sea-ice decline. The infrared cloud radiative effect (CRE) at the surface is modulated by cloud properties; however, CRE also depends on humidity because clouds emit at wavelengths that are semi-transparent to greenhouse gases, most notably water vapour. Here we show how temperature and humidity control CRE through competing influences between the mid- and far-infrared. At constant relative humidity, CRE does not decrease with increasing temperature/absolute humidity as expected, but rather is found to be approximately constant for temperatures characteristic of the Arctic. This stability is disrupted if relative humidity varies. Our findings explain observed seasonal and regional variability in Arctic CRE of order 10Wm 2. With the physical properties of Arctic clouds held constant, we calculate recent increases in CRE of 1–5Wm 2 in autumn and winter, which are projected to reach 5–15Wm 2 by 2050, implying increased sensitivity of the surface to clouds.

  20. Optimal linear reconstruction of dark matter from halo catalogues

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cai, Yan -Chuan; Bernstein, Gary; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2011-04-01

    The dark matter lumps (or "halos") that contain galaxies have locations in the Universe that are to some extent random with respect to the overall matter distributions. We investigate how best to estimate the total matter distribution from the locations of the halos. We derive the weight function w(M) to apply to dark-matter haloes that minimizes the stochasticity between the weighted halo distribution and its underlying mass density field. The optimal w(M) depends on the range of masses of halos being used. While the standard biased-Poisson model of the halo distribution predicts that bias weighting is optimal, the simple factmore » that the mass is comprised of haloes implies that the optimal w(M) will be a mixture of mass-weighting and bias-weighting. In N-body simulations, the Poisson estimator is up to 15× noisier than the optimal. Optimal weighting could make cosmological tests based on the matter power spectrum or cross-correlations much more powerful and/or cost effective.« less

  1. Amifostine, a radioprotectant agent, protects rat brain tissue lipids against ionizing radiation induced damage: An FTIR microspectroscopic imaging study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cakmak G.; Miller L.; Zorlu, F.; Severcan, F.

    2012-03-03

    Amifostine is the only approved radioprotective agent by FDA for reducing the damaging effects of radiation on healthy tissues. In this study, the protective effect of amifostine against the damaging effects of ionizing radiation on the white matter (WM) and grey matter (GM) regions of the rat brain were investigated at molecular level. Sprague-Dawley rats, which were administered amifostine or not, were whole-body irradiated at a single dose of 800 cGy, decapitated after 24 h and the brain tissues of these rats were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM). The results revealed that the total lipid content and CH{sub 2} groups of lipids decreased significantly and the carbonyl esters, olefinic=CH and CH{sub 3} groups of lipids increased significantly in the WM and GM after exposure to ionizing radiation, which could be interpreted as a result of lipid peroxidation. These changes were more prominent in the WM of the brain. The administration of amifostine before ionizing radiation inhibited the radiation-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain. In addition, this study indicated that FTIRM provides a novel approach for monitoring ionizing radiation induced-lipid peroxidation and obtaining different molecular ratio images can be used as biomarkers to detect lipid peroxidation in biological systems.

  2. Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.

    1995-04-01

    This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

  3. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  4. Solid waste integrated forecast technical (SWIFT) report: FY1997 to FY 2070, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Morgan, J.

    1997-01-07

    This web site provides an up-to-date report on the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; program-level and waste class-specific estimates; background information on waste sources; and comparisons with previous forecasts and with other national data sources. This web site does not include: liquid waste (current or future generation); waste to be managed by the Environmental Restoration (EM-40) contractor (i.e., waste that will be disposed of at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF)); or waste that has been received by the WM Project to date (i.e., inventory waste). The focus of this web site is on low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (both non-mixed and mixed) (TRU(M)). Some details on low-level waste and hazardous waste are also provided. Currently, this web site is reporting data th at was requested on 10/14/96 and submitted on 10/25/96. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY97 through the end of each program's life cycle. Therefore, these data represent revisions from the previous FY97.0 Data Version, due primarily to revised estimates from PNNL. There is some useful information about the structure of this report in the SWIFT Report Web Site Overview.

  5. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

    2012-08-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

  6. Investigating Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanode Performance Under Different Cathode Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Aaron, D; Tsouris, Costas

    2009-01-01

    A compact, three-in-one, flow-through, porous, electrode design with minimal electrode spacing and minimal dead volume was implemented to develop a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with improved anode performance. A biofilm-dominated anode consortium enriched under a multimode, continuous-flow regime was used. The increase in the power density of the MFC was investigated by changing the cathode (type, as well as catholyte strength) to determine whether anode was limiting. The power density obtained with an air-breathing cathode was 56 W/m3 of net anode volume (590 mW/m2) and 203 W/m3 (2160 mW/m2) with a 50-mM ferricyanide- based cathode. Increasing the ferricyanide concentration and ionic strength further increased the power density, reaching 304 W/m3 (3220 mW/m2, with 200 mM ferricyanide and 200 mM buffer concentration). The increasing trend in the power density indicated that the anode was not limiting and that higher power densities could be obtained using cathodes capable of higher rates of oxidation. The internal solution resistance for the MFC was 5 6 X, which supported the improved performance of the anode design. A new parameter defined as the ratio of projected surface area to total anode volume is suggested as a design parameter to relate volumetric and area-based power densities and to enable comparison of various MFC configurations.

  7. Training and Mentoring the Next Generation of Scientists and Engineers to Secure Continuity and Successes of the US DOE's Environmental Remediation Efforts - 13387

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagos, L.

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) oversees one of the largest and most technically challenging cleanup programs in the world. The mission of DOE-EM is to complete the safe cleanup of the environmental legacy from five decades of nuclear weapons development and government-sponsored nuclear energy research. Since 1995, Florida International University's Applied Research Center (FIU-ARC) has supported the DOE-EM mission and provided unique research capabilities to address some of these highly technical and difficult challenges. This partnership has allowed FIU-ARC to create a unique infrastructure that is critical for the training and mentoring of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) students and has exposed many STEM students to 'hands-on' DOE-EM applied research, supervised by the scientists and engineers at ARC. As a result of this successful partnership between DOE and FIU, DOE requested FIU-ARC to create the DOE-FIU Science and Technology Workforce Development Initiative in 2007. This innovative program was established to create a 'pipeline' of minority STEM students trained and mentored to enter DOE's environmental cleanup workforce. The program was designed to help address DOE's future workforce needs by partnering with academic, government and private companies (DOE contractors) to mentor future minority scientists and engineers in the research, development, and deployment of new technologies and processes addressing DOE's environmental cleanup challenges. Since its inception in 2007, the program has trained and mentored 78 FIU STEM minority students. Although, the program has been in existence for only five years, a total of 75 internships have been conducted at DOE National Laboratories, DOE sites, DOE Headquarters and field offices, and DOE contractors. Over 85 DOE Fellows have participated in the Waste Management Symposia since 2008 with a total of 68 student posters and 7 oral presentations given at WM. The DOE Fellows participation at WM has resulted in three Best Student Poster Awards (WM09, WM10, and WM11) and one Best Professional Poster Award (WM09). DOE Fellows have also presented their research at ANS DD and R and ANS Robotics Topical meetings. Moreover, several of our DOE Fellows have already obtained employment with DOE-EM, other federal agencies, DOE contractors. This paper will discuss how DOE Fellows program is training and mentoring FIU STEM students in Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management technical challenges and research. This training and mentoring has resulted in the development of well trained and polished young scientists and engineers that will become the future workforce in charge of carrying on DOE-EM's environmental cleanup mission. The paper will showcase FIU's DOE Fellows model and highlight some of the applied research the DOE Fellows have conducted at FIU's Applied Research Center and across the Complex by participating in summer internship assignments. This paper will also present and highlight other Fellowships and internships programs sponsored by National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA), DOE-EM, NRC, Energy (NE), and other federal agencies targeting workforce development. (authors)

  8. Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rich Chartrand

    2011-08-31

    A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and reducing costs of PEMFC based power systems using LPG fuel and continues to makes steps towards meeting DOE's targets. Plug Power would like to thank DOE for their support of this program.

  9. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmorein place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm? for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm?) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, -0.05 and -0.17 Wm?, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.less

  10. Measuring Broadband IR Irradiance in the Direct Solar Beam (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Konings, J.; Xie, Y.; Dooraghi, M.; Sengupta, M.

    2015-03-01

    Solar and atmospheric science radiometers, e.g. pyranometers, pyrheliometers, and photovoltaic cells are calibrated with traceability to a consensus reference, which is maintained by Absolute Cavity Radiometers (ACRs). The ACR is an open cavity with no window, developed to measure extended broadband direct solar irradiance beyond the ultraviolet and infrared bands below and above 0.2 micrometers and 50 micrometers, respectively. On the other hand, pyranometers and pyrheliometers are developed to measure broadband shortwave irradiance from approximately 0.3 micrometers to 3 micrcometers, while the present photovoltaic cells are limited to approximately 0.3 micrometers to 1 micrometers. The broadband mismatch of ACR versus such radiometers causes discrepancy in radiometers' calibration methods that has not been discussed or addressed in the solar and atmospheric science literature. Pyrgeometers are also used for solar and atmospheric science applications and calibrated with traceability to consensus reference, yet calibrated during nighttime only, because no consensus reference has yet been established for the daytime longwave irradiance. This poster shows a method to measure the broadband IR irradiance in the direct solar beam from 3 micrometers to 50 micrometers, as first step that might be used to help develop calibration methods to address the mismatch between broadband ACR and shortwave radiometers, and the lack of a daytime reference for pyrgeometers. The irradiance was measured from sunrise to sunset for 5 days when the sun disk was cloudless; the irradiance varied from approximately 1 Wm-2 to 16 Wm-2 for solar zenith angle from 80 degres to 16 degrees respectively; estimated uncertainty is 1.5 Wm-2.

  11. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm? for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm?) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, -0.05 and -0.17 Wm?, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

  12. Test report for calibration grooming and alignment of the LDUA purge air supply (LDUA SYSTEM 5230)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, J.D.

    1996-05-21

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) is a remotely operated manipulator used to enter into underground waste tanks through one of the tank risers. National Electric Code requirements mandate that the in-tank portions of the LDUA be maintained at a positive pressure for entrances into a flammable atmosphere. The LDUA Purge Air Supply System (PASS) uses small portable air compressors to provide a constant low flow of instrument grade air for this purpose. This document contains the results, conclusions and recommendations arrived at by the calibration grooming and alignment tests performed on the PASS in accordance with WHC-SD-WM-TC-070.

  13. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigation of the Impact of Aerosols on Clouds During the May 2003 Intensive Operational Period at the Southern Great Plains H. Guo, J.E. Penner, and M. Herzog Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction The effect of aerosols on the clouds, or the so-called aerosol indirect effect (AIE), is highly uncertain (Penner et al. 2001). The estimation of the AIE can vary from 0.0 to -4.8 W/m 2 in global climate models (GCM).

  14. ASRC RSS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kiedron, Peter

    Once every minute between sunrise and sunset the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) measures simultaneously three irradiances: total horizontal, diffuse horizontal and direct normal in near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared range (approx. 370nm-1050nm) at 512 (RSS103) or 1024 (RSS102 and RSS105) adjacent spectral resolving elements (pixels). The resolution is pixel (wavelength) dependent and it differs from instrument to instrument. The reported irradiances are cosine response corrected. And their radiometric calibration is based on incandescent lamp calibrators that can be traced to the NIST irradiance scale. The units are W/m2/nm.

  15. T~p~ U.S. Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    T~p~ U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 450, MSIN 1-6-60 Richland, Washington 99352 AUG 1 4 2009 09-ESQ-099 Ms. Susan Leckband, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 193 3 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 13 5 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Ms. Leckband: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ADVICE #212 PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (TC & WM) ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT On behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Thank You for the Board's #212 recommendations

  16. X:\ARM_19~1\P139-154.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dA / dN C N k ( 1 to 2 W/m 2 ) 40 3 (2 km) 3 Session Papers 147 (1) Evaluating Aerosol Indirect Effect Through Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Z. N. Kogan, Y. L. Kogan, and D. K. Lilly Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. (1992) and Penner et al. (1994) have demonstrated that

  17. Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands Wind Resource Map at 50 meters

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % % 19-JUN-2007 1.1.1 U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands - 50 m Wind Power Mayaguez 20 0 20 40 60 80 100 Kilometers 20 0 20 40 60 Miles Ponce San Juan Charlotte Amalie Cruz Bay PUERTO RICO VIRGIN ISLANDS Wind Power Class 1 2 3 4 5 Resource Potential Poor Marginal Fair Good Excellent Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 0 - 200 200 - 300 300 - 400 400 - 500 500 - 600 2 Wind Speed at 50 m m/s 0.0 - 5.9

  18. PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old 2 ':

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old 2 ': am wm ..,. :I.::. ? ; \: :.:, .,, : ,. / 1. ..ri:,:,.:, :/ I 8yblBOLa PPaJPT i: >. ,,;.;~:,,; ,;.. !,., ,ip; ,,,:. ;., -. , ^ , . . 3 '>) ! .,:<;:,,..,. ; : :..,, ,,.+ -../ ,:,; I,:;?: ..: : ,, ,,: ; !. (' '; ::, Durine,~~~v%eit'to Amae &8Htate~Coliegd on Mar6h 4 and 2 to dl&ni& prinalpally~~asl~~prd~ess~~~1 also r&&&d wltlvDii 8. Wilhelm and Dr. D. Peterson of An~?e Iowa State College

  19. PROGRAMFOR DEVEZOPING URANIUM FABRICATION PROCESSES WGtfORD

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    m-23269 nJ Y 2 # 1. WK Woods f 3'. fl pylough - JA wes # 4: Jw REh*s f 2. gi&~$.iol - MJ Sanderson - ZI Bach # 7: -WM Mathis #ll. WT Kattner a443. AEC-HO0 #I&. 700 Files .#15. 300 Files #16. Pink copy ~docunented #17. Yellow Copy cope". Srrie* _ January 16, 1952 PROGRAMFOR DEVEZOPING URANIUM FABRICATION PROCESSES WGtfORD I. ROLLrNGDEvELOPMENTPROCRAM Introduction Evaluation of rods used in the program for the development of a rolling process for Fernald has re-emphasized the

  20. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, M.

    1992-04-01

    At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG&G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL`s roadmapping efforts.

  1. Technology development in support of the TWRS process flowsheet. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washenfelder, D.J.

    1995-10-11

    The Tank Waste Remediation System is to treat and dispose of Hanford`s Single-Shell and Double-Shell Tank Waste. The TWRS Process Flowsheet, (WHC-SD-WM-TI-613 Rev. 1) described a flowsheet based on a large number of assumptions and engineering judgements that require verification or further definition through process and technology development activities. This document takes off from the TWRS Process Flowsheet to identify and prioritize tasks that should be completed to strengthen the technical foundation for the flowsheet.

  2. ASRC RSS Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kiedron, Peter

    2008-01-15

    Once every minute between sunrise and sunset the Rotating Shadowband Spectroradiometer (RSS) measures simultaneously three irradiances: total horizontal, diffuse horizontal and direct normal in near ultraviolet, visible and near infrared range (approx. 370nm-1050nm) at 512 (RSS103) or 1024 (RSS102 and RSS105) adjacent spectral resolving elements (pixels). The resolution is pixel (wavelength) dependent and it differs from instrument to instrument. The reported irradiances are cosine response corrected. And their radiometric calibration is based on incandescent lamp calibrators that can be traced to the NIST irradiance scale. The units are W/m2/nm.

  3. Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton, M.D.

    1995-01-19

    This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

  4. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -1 TC & WM EIS Proposed Actions (1) Retrieve, treat, and dispose of waste in single-shell tank (SST) and double-shell tank (DST) farms and close the SST system. (2) Decommission the Fast Flux Test Facility, manage the resulting waste, and manage the disposition of the Hanford Site's (Hanford's) inventory of bulk sodium. (3) Manage waste from tank closure and other Hanford activities, as well as limited volumes received from U.S. Department of Energy sites. CHAPTER 2 PROPOSED ACTIONS AND

  5. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 OVERVIEW OF THE PUBLIC COMMENT PROCESS 1-1 SECTION 1 OVERVIEW OF THE PUBLIC COMMENT PROCESS This section of this Comment-Response Document (CRD) describes the public comment process for the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Draft TC & WM EIS) and the procedures used to respond to public comments. Section 1.1 summarizes the organization of this CRD. Section 1.2 discusses the public comment process and the means

  6. Considerations for How to Rate CPV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, S.; Miller, M.; Marion, B.; Emery, K.; McConnell, R.; Surendran, S.; Kimber, A.

    2011-02-01

    The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) industry is introducing multiple products into the marketplace, but, as yet, the; community has not embraced a unified method for assessing a nameplate rating. The choices of whether to use 850,; 900, or 1000 W/m2 for the direct-normal irradiance and whether to link the rating to ambient or cell temperature will; affect how CPV modules are rated and compared with other technologies. This paper explores the qualitative and; quantitative ramifications of these choices using data from two multi-junction CPV modules and two flat-plate; modules.

  7. nab-ARM_land2_v5.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corresponding result can be seen in the top-of-atmosphere long-wave flux. Figure 3 shows the modelled OLR and that measured by the ARG product. The difference is postulated to be because the AMF ground measurements are not representative of the area within the ARG pixel. Figure 4 shows the SEVIRI 10.8μm-derived skin temperatures: over the region, the temperature variations can account for an upwelling flux variation of 70 Wm -2 . At the AMF, Niamey airport site itself, the November-averaged

  8. Discussions | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Discussions Discussions Presentations and closing discussions of the P&RA CoP December 11-12, 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation More Documents & Publications Status Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice (P&RA CoP) Status Updates on the Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice WM2014 Conference - Building the Community of Practice for Performance

  9. Microsoft Word - Summary_MASTER.docx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Settlement Agreement - FINAL - 01-06-061.doc Microsoft Word - Settlement Agreement - FINAL - 01-06-061.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Settlement Agreement - FINAL - 01-06-061.doc More Documents & Publications Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS") EIS-0391: Record of Decision Richland/Office of

  10. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 Follow up/Holding bin * "Cleanup" definition and comfort with risk (Vince) * Clarify TPA change package potential effects on RCRA permit * F Reactor RI/FS and D & H RI/FS - distribute end of December * Thorium vault at U Canyon? * PA integration WM Area C (TWC lead, joint) * Public understanding of cleanup level (PIC lead, joint) * 200-WA-1 Work Plan (May 2013) Page 1 F Reactor OU Follow Up * Draft A issued end of December 2012 o Regulators/DOE comment/response * Then to

  11. RAP Meeting Transcribed Flipcharts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 9, 2012 Follow Up 1. Check with PIC & RAP re: 100 K schedule for public comment & release of docs (Sept) 2. Susan L. & Maynard to complete draft letter for HAB #242 - Susan H. to distribute to committee 3. Susan H. to distribute draft 200-UP-1 letter to committee for consensus. The committee will convene a call to discuss, if necessary. (also send link to 200-UP-1 document) Page 1 4. Create an "event driven" timeline/strategy for period (if any) between TC&WM

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE_ORP-2003-14 V1_R6.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORP-2003-14, Rev. 2, Volume 1 VOLUME 1: COST REPORT FOR TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT ALTERNATIVES EFFECTIVE DATE: JULY 31, 2009 Environmental Impact Statement for Tank Closure and Waste Management DOE/ORP-2003-14, Rev. 6, Volume 1 at the Hanford Site, Richland, WA DOE/ORP-2003-14, Rev. 6, Volume 1 iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This revision of the Cost Report for Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (TC&WM EIS) Alternatives documents

  13. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  14. Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, R.G.

    1994-11-16

    This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

  15. Appendices for the Basis Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    A-1 Appendix A INTEC Tank Farm Facility Closure Supporting Tables and Photographs A-2 Appendix A INTEC Tank Farm Facility Closure Supporting Tables and Photographs In support of the Tank Farm Facility (TFF) closure, inventory tables were generated for all tanks that have been cleaned up to this point; these tables are presented is Section A-1. Inventories at closure for all of the tanks that have been cleaned show that Tank WM-182 contains the highest Ci content. The inventory at closure for

  16. Environmental Surveillance Reports- Recommendation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    5 Approved May 12, 2011 1 NORTHERN NEW MEXICO CITIZENS' ADVISORY BOARD Recommendation to the Department of Energy No. 2011-05 "Recommendation that Los Alamos National Laboratory Not Be Selected for Disposal of Greater Than Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste" Drafted by the Waste Management (WM) Committee Primary Author: Caroline Mason Background: The Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like

  17. Aerosol indirect effects -- general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2009-04-10

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterizes aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (Ta) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between Ta and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to the representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and Ta as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld - Ta relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between Ta and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - Ta relationship show a strong positive correlation between Ta and fcld The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of Ta, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5+-0.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic Ta and satellite-retrieved Nd - Ta regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.4+-0.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7+-0.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.2+-0.4 Wm-2.

  18. HIGS2: The Next Generation Compton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HIGS2: The Next Generation Compton γ-ray Source M.W Ahmed 1 , A.E. Champagne 2 , C.R. Howell 3 , W.M. Snow 4 , R.P. Springer 5 and Y. Wu 6 31 August 2012 This document provides a prospectus of research opportunities created by an intensity upgrade to the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIGS) at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory (TUNL). The current maximum gamma-ray intensity on target at the HIGS is more than 10 8 γ/s in the energy range between 9 and 12 MeV. An increase of total

  19. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    1 02/09/2010 Fernald Preserve Field Walkdown Inspection Date September 4, 2013 Inspector SM Stoller, Ohio EPA Area Lodge Pond basin, east field, east perimeter, WM1 wetlands, north pines Sub-Area Type of Finding Follow Up No. Location (Use Map Whenever Possible) GPS? Unauthorized Use Disturbance Vegetation Other Description Photo? (File No.) Corrected Maintenance Req'd Cont. Observation 1 East perimeter across from Cell 7 NO X Poison ivy X 2 East of Restoration shed NO X Vines growing up deer

  20. Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board 2 Combined Committee Meeting 3

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    February 10, 2016 Approved at the March 9, 2016 Combined Committee Meeting 1 1 Northern New Mexico Citizens' Advisory Board 2 Combined Committee Meeting 3 February 10, 2016 4 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 5 NNMCAB Office 6 94 Cities of Gold Road 7 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87506 8 9 Minutes 10 11 Meeting Attendees 12 13 Department of Energy 14 1. Lee Bishop, Co-Deputy Designated Federal Officer (Co-DDFO) 15 2. Mike Gardipe, Co-Deputy Designated Federal Officer 16 17 NNMCAB Members 18 1. Angelica Gurulé, WM

  1. Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Vacuum Insulation Panels (Conference) | SciTech Connect Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Performance of Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems Containing Vacuum Insulation Panels A high-performance wall system is under development to improve wall thermal performance to a level of U-factor of 0.19 W/(m2 K) (R-30 [h ft2 F]/Btu) in a standard wall thickness by incorporating vacuum

  2. Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) in a Potential Future U.S. Fuel

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cycle Scenario (Conference) | SciTech Connect Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) in a Potential Future U.S. Fuel Cycle Scenario Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Utilization of Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) in a Potential Future U.S. Fuel Cycle Scenario Authors: Worrall, Andrew [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL [ORNL Publication Date: 2013-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1087026 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: WM2013 Symposium,

  3. BIGHORN SHEEP: SUPPLEMENTAL ANALYSIS TO THE FOREST PLAN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT„INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM MEETING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4/9/13 Page 1 of 2 RIVER AND PLATEAU COMMITTEE - 3 MONTH WORK PLAN (SUBJECT TO REVISION) May Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday, May 7 Committee call placeholder: Tuesday, May 14 @ 1:30 p.m. * Advice development for the 300 Area RI/FS and Proposed Plan Rev 0 * Advice development for 100-F Area RI/FS and Proposed Plan Draft A * Impacts from the TC&WM EIS groundwater modeling on future cleanup proposals * Advice responses? * Committee Business June Committee meeting placeholder: Tuesday,

  4. Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wessel, Silvia; Harvey, David

    2013-06-28

    The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications that target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 40,000 hours by 2015, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different structural compositions and under different fuel cell conditions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project was to address catalyst durability by using a dual path approach that coupled an extensive range of experimental analysis and testing with a multi-scale modeling approach. With this, the major technical areas/issues of catalyst and catalyst layer performance and durability that were addressed are: 1. Catalyst and catalyst layer degradation mechanisms (Pt dissolution, agglomeration, Pt loss, e.g. Pt in the membrane, carbon oxidation and/or corrosion). a. Driving force for the different degradation mechanisms. b. Relationships between MEA performance, catalyst and catalyst layer degradation and operational conditions, catalyst layer composition, and structure. 2. Materials properties a. Changes in catalyst, catalyst layer, and MEA materials properties due to degradation. 3. Catalyst performance a. Relationships between catalyst structural changes and performance. b. Stability of the three-phase boundary and its effect on performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release Stage 2 - Beta Release o The model code repository is opened to the general public on a beta release concept, with a mechanism for bug tracking and feedback from a large user group o Code will be tracked and patched for any discovered bugs or relevant feedback from the user community, upon the completion of three months without a major bug submission the code will be moved to a full version release Stage 3 - Full Version Release o Code is version to revision 1.0 and that version is frozen in development/patching

  5. Environmental Restoration/Waste Management - applied technology. Semiannual report, July 1992--June 1993, Volume 1, Number 2, and Volume 2, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, P.W.; Bruner, J.M.; Price, M.E.; Talaber, C.J.

    1993-12-31

    The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program is developing restoration and waste treatment technologies needed for the ongoing environmental cleanup of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and treatment technologies for wastes generated in the nuclear weapons production complex. These technologies can find application to similar problems nationally and even worldwide. They can be demonstrated at the Livermore site, which mirrors (on a small scale) many of the environmental and waste management problems of the rest of the DOE complex. Their commercialization should speed cleanup, and the scope of the task should make it attractive to US industry. The articles in this semi-annual report cover the following areas: ceramic final forms for residues of mixed waste treatment; treatment of wastes containing sodium nitrate; actinide volatility in thermal oxidation processes; in situ microbial filters for remediating contaminated soils; collaboration with scientists in the former Soviet Union on new ER/WM technologies; and fiber-optic sensors for chlorinated organic solvents.

  6. The Challenges Of Investigating And Remediating Port Hope's Small-Scale Urban Properties - 13115

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veen, Walter van; Case, Glenn; Benson, John; Herod, Judy; Yule, Adam

    2013-07-01

    An important component of the Port Hope Project, the larger of the two projects comprising the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), is the investigation of all 4,800 properties in the Municipality of Port Hope for low level radioactive waste (LLRW) and the remediation of approximately 10% of these. Although the majority of the individual properties are not expected to involve technically sophisticated remediation programs, the large number of property owners and individually unique properties are expected to present significant logistic challenges that will require a high degree of planning, organization and communication. The protocol and lessons learned described will be of interest to those considering similar programs. Information presented herein is part of a series of papers presented by the PHAI Management Office (PHAI MO) at WM Symposium '13 describing the history of the Port Hope Project and current project status. Other papers prepared for WM Symposium '13 address the large-scale site cleanup and the construction of the long-term waste management facility (LTWMF) where all of the LLRW will be consolidated and managed within an engineered, above-ground mound. (authors)

  7. Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-01

    Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earth’s atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

  8. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivitymore » of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.« less

  9. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  10. Integrating engineering design improvements with exoelectrogen enrichmentprocess to increase power output from microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Leak, David; Andras, Calin; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Keller, Martin; Davison, Brian H

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) hold promise as a green technology for bioenergy production. The challenge is to improve the engineering design while exploiting the ability of microbes to generate and transfer electrons directly to electrodes. A strategy using a combination of improved anode design and an enrichment processwas formulated to improve power densities. The designwas based on a flow-through anode with minimal dead volume and a high electrode surface area per unit volume. The strategy focused on promoting biofilm formation via a combination of forced flow through the anode, carbon limitation, and step-wise reduction of external resistance. The enrichment process resulted in development of exoelectrogenic biofilm communities dominated by Anaeromusa spp. This is the first report identifying organisms fromthe Veillonellaceae family in MFCs. The power density of the resulting MFC using a ferricyanide cathode reached 300Wm?3 net anode volume (3220mWm?2), which is about a third of what is estimated to be necessary for commercial consideration. The operational stability of the MFC using high specific surface area electrodes was demonstrated by operating the MFC for a period of over four months.

  11. SOLID WASTE INTEGRATED FORECAST TECHNICAL (SWIFT) REPORT FY2005 THRU FY2035 2005.0 VOLUME 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARCOT, R.A.

    2005-08-17

    This report provides up-to-date life cycle information about the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: (1) an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; (2) multi-level and waste class-specific estimates; (3) background information on waste sources; and (4) comparisons to previous forecasts and other national data sources. The focus of this report is low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and transuranic waste, both non-mixed and mixed (TRU(M)). Some details on hazardous waste are also provided, however, this information is not considered comprehensive. This report includes data requested in December, 2004 with updates through March 31,2005. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY2005 through the end of each program's life cycle and are an update of the previous FY2004.1 data version.

  12. Reexamination of Basal Plane Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Graphene Samples Measured by Electro-Thermal Micro-Bridge Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Insun; Pettes, Michael; Lindsay, Lucas R; Ou, Eric; Weathers, Annie; Moore, Arden; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li

    2015-01-01

    Thermal transport in suspended graphene samples has been measured in prior works and this work with the use of a suspended electro-thermal micro-bridge method. These measurement results are analyzed here to evaluate and eliminate the errors caused by the extrinsic thermal contact resistance. It is noted that the thermal resistance measured in a recent work increases linearly with the suspended length of the single-layer graphene samples synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and that such a feature does not reveal the failure of Fourier s law despite the increase in the apparent thermal conductivity with length. The re-analyzed thermal conductivity of a single-layer CVD graphene sample reaches about ( 1680 180 )Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, which is close to the highest value reported for highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. In comparison, the thermal conductivity values measured for two suspended exfoliated bi-layer graphene samples are about ( 880 60 ) and ( 730 60 ) Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, and approach that of the natural graphite source above room temperature. However, the low-temperature thermal conductivities of these suspended graphene samples are still considerably lower than the graphite values, with the peak thermal conductivities shifted to much higher temperatures. Analysis of the thermal conductivity data reveals that the low temperature behavior is dominated by phonon scattering by polymer residue instead of by the lateral boundary.

  13. Overview of the Special Issue: A Multi-Model Framework to Achieve Consistent Evaluation of Climate Change Impacts in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldhoff, Stephanie T.; Martinich, Jeremy; Sarofim, Marcus; DeAngelo, B. J.; McFarland, Jim; Jantarasami, Lesley; Shouse, Kate C.; Crimmins, Allison; Ohrel, Sara; Li, Jia

    2015-07-01

    The Climate Change Impacts and Risk Analysis (CIRA) modeling exercise is a unique contribution to the scientific literature on climate change impacts, economic damages, and risk analysis that brings together multiple, national-scale models of impacts and damages in an integrated and consistent fashion to estimate climate change impacts, damages, and the benefits of greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation actions in the United States. The CIRA project uses three consistent socioeconomic, emissions, and climate scenarios across all models to estimate the benefits of GHG mitigation policies: a Business As Usual (BAU) and two policy scenarios with radiative forcing (RF) stabilization targets of 4.5 W/m2 and 3.7 W/m2 in 2100. CIRA was also designed to specifically examine the sensitivity of results to uncertainties around climate sensitivity and differences in model structure. The goals of CIRA project are to 1) build a multi-model framework to produce estimates of multiple risks and impacts in the U.S., 2) determine to what degree risks and damages across sectors may be lowered from a BAU to policy scenarios, 3) evaluate key sources of uncertainty along the causal chain, and 4) provide information for multiple audiences and clearly communicate the risks and damages of climate change and the potential benefits of mitigation. This paper describes the motivations, goals, and design of the CIRA modeling exercise and introduces the subsequent papers in this special issue.

  14. Thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} tilted nanowires, a molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Shen Lacroix, David; Termentzidis, Konstantinos; Chaput, Laurent; Stein, Nicolas; Frantz, Cedric

    2015-06-08

    Evidence for an excellent compromise between structural stability and low thermal conductivity has been achieved with tilted Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires. The latter ones were recently fabricated and there is a need in modeling and characterization. The structural stability and the thermal conductivity of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires along the tilted [015]* direction and along the [010] direction have been explored. For the two configurations of nanowires, the effect of the length and the cross section on the thermal conductivity is discussed. The thermal conductivity of infinite size tilted nanowire is 0.34?W/m K, significantly reduced compared to nanowire along the [010] direction (0.59?W/m K). This reveals that in Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowires the structural anisotropy can be as important as size effects to reduce the thermal conductivity. The main reason is the reduction of the phonon mean free path which is found to be 1.7?nm in the tilted nanowires, compared to 5.3?nm for the nanowires along the [010] direction. The fact that tilted Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanowire is mechanically stable and it has extremely low thermal conductivity suggests these nanowires as a promising material for future thermoelectric generation application.

  15. Final environmental assessment for off-site transportation of low-level waste from four California sites under the management of the U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office (DOE/OAK) manages sites within California that generate Low Level Waste (LLW) in the course or routine site operations. It is the preference of the DOE to dispose of LLW at federally owned and DOE-operated disposal facilities; however, in some circumstances DOE Headquarters has determined that disposal at commercial facilities is appropriate, as long as the facility meets all regulatory requirements for the acceptance and disposal of LLW, including the passage of a DOE audit to determine the adequacy of the disposal site. The DOE would like to ship LLW from four DOE/OAK sites in California which generate LLW, to NRC-licensed commercial nuclear waste disposal facilities such as Envirocare in Clive, Utah and Chem Nuclear in Barnwell, South Carolina. Transportation impacts for shipment of LLW and MLLW from DOE Oakland sites to other DOE sites was included in the impacts identified in the Department`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS), published in May, 1997, and determined to be low. The low impacts for shipment to commercial sites identified herein is consistent with the WM-PEIS results.

  16. Enhancement in current density and energy conversion efficiency of 3-dimensional MFC anodes using pre-enriched consortium and continuous supply of electron donors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A

    2011-01-01

    Using a pre-enriched microbial consortium as the inoculum and continuous supply of carbon source, improvement in performance of a three-dimensional, flow-through MFC anode utilizing ferricyanide cathode was investigated. The power density increased from 170 W/m3 (1800 mW/m2) to 580 W/m3 (6130 mW/m2), when the carbon loading increased from 2.5 g/l-day to 50 g/l-day. The coulombic efficiency (CE) decreased from 90% to 23% with increasing carbon loading. The CEs are among the highest reported for glucose and lactate as the substrate with the maximum current density reaching 15.1 A/m2. This suggests establishment of a very high performance exoelectrogenic microbial consortium at the anode. A maximum energy conversion efficiency of 54% was observed at a loading of 2.5 g/l-day. Biological characterization of the consortium showed presence of Burkholderiales and Rhodocyclales as the dominant members. Imaging of the biofilms revealed thinner biofilms compared to the inoculum MFC, but a 1.9-fold higher power density.

  17. The effect of large-scale model time step and multiscale coupling frequency on cloud climatology, vertical structure, and rainfall extremes in a superparameterized GCM

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Sungduk; Pritchard, Michael S.

    2015-12-17

    The effect of global climate model (GCM) time step—which also controls how frequently global and embedded cloud resolving scales are coupled—is examined in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model ver 3.0. Systematic bias reductions of time-mean shortwave cloud forcing (~10 W/m2) and longwave cloud forcing (~5 W/m2) occur as scale coupling frequency increases, but with systematically increasing rainfall variance and extremes throughout the tropics. An overarching change in the vertical structure of deep tropical convection, favoring more bottom-heavy deep convection as a global model time step is reduced may help orchestrate these responses. The weak temperature gradient approximation is more faithfullymore » satisfied when a high scale coupling frequency (a short global model time step) is used. These findings are distinct from the global model time step sensitivities of conventionally parameterized GCMs and have implications for understanding emergent behaviors of multiscale deep convective organization in superparameterized GCMs. Lastly, the results may also be useful for helping to tune them.« less

  18. A safety equipment list for rotary mode core sampling systems operation in single shell flammable gas tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SMALLEY, J.L.

    1999-05-18

    This document identifies all interim safety equipment to be used for rotary mode core sampling of single-shell flammable gas tanks utilizing Rotary Mode Core Sampling systems (RMCS). This document provides the safety equipment for RMCS trucks HO-68K-4600, HO-68K-4647, trucks three and four respectively, and associated equipment. It is not intended to replace or supersede WHC-SD-WM-SEL-023, (Kelly 1991), or WHC-SD-WM-SEL-032, (Corbett 1994), which classifies 80-68K-4344 and HO-68K-4345 respectively. The term ''safety equipment'' refers to safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) equipment, where equipment refers to structures, systems and components (SSC's). The identification of safety equipment in this document is based on the credited design safety features and analysis contained in the Authorization Basis (AB) for rotary mode core sampling operations in single-shell flammable gas tanks. This is an interim safety classification since the AB is interim. This document will be updated to reflect the final RMCS equipment safety classification designations upon completion of a final AB which will be implemented with the release of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).

  19. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.260.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  20. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modification of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.

  1. Thermal conductivity of tubrostratic carbon nanofiber networks

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Saltonstall, Chris B.; Leseman, Zayd C.; Beechem, Thomas E.; Hopkins, Patrick E.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2016-01-01

    Composite material systems composed of a matrix of nano materials can achieve combinations of mechanical and thermophysical properties outside the range of traditional systems. While many reports have studied the intrinsic thermal properties of individual carbon fibers, to be useful in applications in which thermal stability is critical, an understanding of heat transport in composite materials is required. In this work, air/ carbon nano fiber networks are studied to elucidate the system parameters influencing thermal transport. Sample thermal properties are measured with varying initial carbon fiber fill fraction, environment pressure, loading pressure, and heat treatment temperature through a bidirectional modificationmore » of the 3ω technique. The nanostructures of the individual fibers are characterized with small angle x-ray scattering and Raman spectroscopy providing insight to individual fiber thermal conductivity. Measured thermal conductivity varied from 0.010 W/(m K) to 0.070 W/(m K). An understanding of the intrinsic properties of the individual fibers and the interactions of the two phase composite is used to reconcile low measured thermal conductivities with predictive modeling. This methodology can be more generally applied to a wide range of fiber composite materials and their applications.« less

  2. Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Stoffel, T.

    2012-03-01

    Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG.

  3. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  4. Deployment of an Alternative Closure Cover and Monitoring System at the Mixed Waste Disposal Unit U-3ax/bl at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitt, D.G.; Fitzmaurice, T.M.

    2001-02-01

    In October 2000, final closure was initiated of U-3ax/bl, a mixed waste disposal unit at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The application of approximately 30 cm of topsoil, composed of compacted native alluvium onto an operational cover, seeding of the topsoil, installation of soil water content sensors within the cover, and deployment of a drainage lysimeter facility immediately adjacent to the disposal unit initiated closure. This closure is unique in that it required the involvement of several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) groups: Waste Management (WM), Environmental Restoration (ER), and Technology Development (TD). Initial site characterization of the disposal unit was conducted by WM. Regulatory approval for closure of the disposal unit was obtained by ER, closure of the disposal unit was conducted by ER, and deployment of the drainage lysimeter facility was conducted by WM and ER, with funding provided by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment ( ASTD) program, administered under TD. In addition, this closure is unique in that a monolayer closure cover, also known as an evapotranspiration (ET) cover, consisting of native alluvium, received regulatory approval instead of a traditional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) multi-layered cover. Recent studies indicate that in the arid southwestern United States, monolayer covers may be more effective at isolating waste than layered covers because of the tendency of clay layers to desiccate and crack, and subsequently develop preferential pathways. The lysimeter facility deployed immediately adjacent to the closure cover consists of eight drainage lysimeters with three surface treatments: two were left bare; two were revegetated with native species; two were allowed to revegetate with invader species; and two are reserved for future studies. The lysimeters are constructed such that any drainage through the bottoms of the lysimeters can be measured. Sensors installed in the closure cover provide soil water content data, whereas sensors installed in the lysimeters provide soil water content, soil water potential, soil temperature, and drainage data for a detailed evaluation of the cover performance. Revegetation establishes a stable plant community that maximizes water loss through transpiration and reduces water and wind erosion and ultimately restores the disposal unit to its surrounding Great Basin Desert environment.

  5. Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-08-22

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

  6. Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2013-03-28

    Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands. 

  7. Xyce Parallel Electronic Simulator - Users' Guide Version 2.1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, Scott A; Hoekstra, Robert J.; Russo, Thomas V.; Rankin, Eric; Pawlowski, Roger P.; Fixel, Deborah A; Schiek, Richard; Bogdan, Carolyn W.; Shirley, David N.; Campbell, Phillip M.; Keiter, Eric R.

    2005-06-01

    This manual describes the use of theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator.Xycehasbeen designed as a SPICE-compatible, high-performance analog circuit simulator, andhas been written to support the simulation needs of the Sandia National Laboratorieselectrical designers. This development has focused on improving capability over thecurrent state-of-the-art in the following areas:%04Capability to solve extremely large circuit problems by supporting large-scale par-allel computing platforms (up to thousands of processors). Note that this includessupport for most popular parallel and serial computers.%04Improved performance for all numerical kernels (e.g., time integrator, nonlinearand linear solvers) through state-of-the-art algorithms and novel techniques.%04Device models which are specifically tailored to meet Sandia's needs, includingmany radiation-aware devices.3 XyceTMUsers' Guide%04Object-oriented code design and implementation using modern coding practicesthat ensure that theXyceParallel Electronic Simulator will be maintainable andextensible far into the future.Xyceis a parallel code in the most general sense of the phrase - a message passingparallel implementation - which allows it to run efficiently on the widest possible numberof computing platforms. These include serial, shared-memory and distributed-memoryparallel as well as heterogeneous platforms. Careful attention has been paid to thespecific nature of circuit-simulation problems to ensure that optimal parallel efficiencyis achieved as the number of processors grows.The development ofXyceprovides a platform for computational research and de-velopment aimed specifically at the needs of the Laboratory. WithXyce, Sandia hasan %22in-house%22 capability with which both new electrical (e.g., device model develop-ment) and algorithmic (e.g., faster time-integration methods, parallel solver algorithms)research and development can be performed. As a result,Xyceis a unique electricalsimulation capability, designed to meet the unique needs of the laboratory.4 XyceTMUsers' GuideAcknowledgementsThe authors would like to acknowledge the entire Sandia National Laboratories HPEMS(High Performance Electrical Modeling and Simulation) team, including Steve Wix, CarolynBogdan, Regina Schells, Ken Marx, Steve Brandon and Bill Ballard, for their support onthis project. We also appreciate very much the work of Jim Emery, Becky Arnold and MikeWilliamson for the help in reviewing this document.Lastly, a very special thanks to Hue Lai for typesetting this document with LATEX.TrademarksThe information herein is subject to change without notice.Copyrightc 2002-2003 Sandia Corporation. All rights reserved.XyceTMElectronic Simulator andXyceTMtrademarks of Sandia Corporation.Orcad, Orcad Capture, PSpice and Probe are registered trademarks of Cadence DesignSystems, Inc.Silicon Graphics, the Silicon Graphics logo and IRIX are registered trademarks of SiliconGraphics, Inc.Microsoft, Windows and Windows 2000 are registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.Solaris and UltraSPARC are registered trademarks of Sun Microsystems Corporation.Medici, DaVinci and Taurus are registered trademarks of Synopsys Corporation.HP and Alpha are registered trademarks of Hewlett-Packard company.Amtec and TecPlot are trademarks of Amtec Engineering, Inc.Xyce's expression library is based on that inside Spice 3F5 developed by the EECS De-partment at the University of California.All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.ContactsBug Reportshttp://tvrusso.sandia.gov/bugzillaEmailxyce-support%40sandia.govWorld Wide Webhttp://www.cs.sandia.gov/xyce5 XyceTMUsers' GuideThis page is left intentionally blank6

  8. Test report for fine calibration grooming and alignment of the LDUA optical alignment scope (LDUA system 6250)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-15

    The Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) is a remotely operated manipulator used to enter into underground waste tanks through one of the tank risers. The LDUA must be carefully aligned with the tank riser during the installation process. The Optical Alignment Scope (OAS) is used to determine when optimum alignment has been achieved between the LDUA and the riser. Calibration,grooming and alignment (CG{ampersand}A) is performed on the OAS to assure that the instrumentation and equipment comprising the OAS is properly adjusted in order to achieve its intended functions successfully. This document contains the results, conclusions and recommendations arrived at by the CG{ampersand}A tests performed on the OAS in accordance with WHC-SD-WM- TC-070.

  9. A novel fabrication technique for thin metallic vacuum chambers with low eddy current losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouptsidis, J.; Banthau, R.; Hartwig, H.

    1985-10-01

    Eddy current problems in synchrotrons have been avoided until now by using costly and thick ceramic vacuum chambers which reduce the free magnet aperture. These disadvantages are eliminated by a novel fabrication technique developed for the chambers of the new 9 GeV electron synchrotron DESY II operating with 12.5 Hz repetion rate. The elliptical chambers 80x40 mm are made from .3 mm thick stainless steel tubes reinforced by thin ribs. The ribs are brazed on the tubes by a high temperature Ni-base brazing alloy. The linear eddy current losses are 60 W/m and increase the chamber temperature to only 50/sup 0/C. The available beam aperture is now 93% of the magnet gap. A still higher repetion rate up to 100 Hz can be achieved by reducing the wall thickness to .1 mm and using tubes made from a Ti-alloy having higher resistivity than stainless steel.

  10. ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTS FOR TANK 241-AY-101 CORE 325 SEGMENTS 16R1 & 16R2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; WYRWAS RB

    2007-11-14

    The interstitial liquid in the double-shell tank 241-AY-101 settled solids layer is below the hydroxide chemistry control limit required by HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements, Administrative Control 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls'. Operating tanks outside of the specification may increase the propensity corrosion of the carbon steel wall. This report is concerned with generalized electrochemical corrosion mechanism that may occur at specific loci. All cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans exhibited a negative hysteresis, scan reversing at lower current density, indicating that there was no pitting propensity. The general electrochemical corrosion rates ranged from 4.4E-02 to 1.5E-03 mpy with the first round of coupons, while the second round yielded corrosion rates of 2.5E-03 to 2.9E-02 mpy.

  11. FY 95 engineering work plan for the design reconstitution implementation action plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigbee, J.D.

    1994-11-09

    Design reconstitution work is to be performed as part of an overall effort to upgrade Configuration Management (CM) at TWRS. WHC policy is to implement a program that is compliant with DOE-STD-1073-93, Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program. DOE-STD-1073 requires an adjunct program for reconstituting design information. WHC-SD-WM-CM-009, Design Reconstitution Program Plan for Waste Tank Farms and 242-A Evaporator of Tank Waste Remediation System, is the TWRS plan for meeting DOE-STD-1073 design reconstitution requirements. The design reconstitution plan is complex requiring significant time and effort for implementation. In order to control costs, and integrate the work into other TWRS activities, a Design Reconstitution Implementation Action Plan (DR IAP) will be developed, and approved by those organizations having ownership or functional interest in this activity.

  12. GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: 100-kg melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the 100-kg melter offgas report on testing performed by GTS Duratek, Inc., in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The document contains the complete offgas report on the 100-kg melter as prepared by Parsons Engineering Science, Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the GTS Duratek, Phase I Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-027).

  13. DOE Identifies its Preferred Alternative for Certain Hanford Tank Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing its preferred alternative for wastes contained in underground radioactive waste storage tanks evaluated in the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391, December 2012). With regard to those wastes that, in the future, may be properly and legally classified as mixed transuranic waste (mixed TRU waste). DOE's preferred alternative is to retrieve, treat, package, and characterize and certify the wastes for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico, a geologic repository for the disposal of mixed TRU waste generated by atomic energy defense activities.

  14. Thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline In4Se3 and In4Te3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Xun; Cho, Jung Y; Salvador, James R.; Yang, Jihui; Wang, Hsin

    2010-01-01

    High thermoelectric performance of a single crystal layered compound In{sub 4}Se{sub 3} was reported recently. We present here an electrical and thermal transport property study over a wide temperature range for polycrystalline samples of In{sub 4}Se{sub 3} and In{sub 4}Te{sub 3}. Our data demonstrate that these materials are lightly doped semiconductors, leading to large thermopower and resistivity. Very low thermal conductivity, below 1 W/m K, is observed. The power factors for In{sub 4}Se{sub 3} and In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} are much smaller when compared with state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. This combined with the very low thermal conductivity results in the maximum ZT value of less than 0.6 at 700 K for In{sub 4}Se{sub 3}.

  15. Radiation calculations for the ILC cryomodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, N.; Mokhov, N.V.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    The MARS15 radiation simulations were performed for the ILC cryomodule. The model assumes a uniform beam loss intensity of 1 W/m of 750-MeV and 250-GeV electron along the inner surface of the beam pipe and the cavity iris of the 12-m cryomodule. Two-dimensional distributions of radiation dose in the module were obtained. Absorbed dose rate and energy spectra of electrons, photons, neutrons and protons were also obtained at the three cryogenic thermometers locations by filling with silicon material in the appropriate locations, and radiation hardness of the thermometers was discussed. From the obtained results, maximum absorbed dose of thermometers at the cooling pipe is 0.85mGy/sec (85 mRad/sec), that is 0.31 MGy (31 MRad) for 20 years.

  16. Calculated transport properties of CdO: thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power factor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R.; Parker, David S.

    2015-10-01

    We present first principles calculations of the thermal and electronic transport properties of the oxide semiconductor CdO. In particular, we find from theory that the accepted thermal conductivity κ value of 0.7 Wm-1K-1 is approximately one order of magnitude too small; our calculations of κ of CdO are in good agreement with recent measurements. We also find that alloying of MgO with CdO is an effective means to reduce the lattice contribution to κ, despite MgO having a much larger thermal conductivity. We further consider the electronic structure of CdO in relation to thermoelectric performance, finding that large thermoelectric powermore » factors may occur if the material can be heavily doped p-type. This work develops insight into the nature of thermal and electronic transport in an important oxide semiconductor.« less

  17. Section 54

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eT ' A (z T &z b ) )s vT m zT zB wNsN v dz BIR' I z C z B (wNsN v ) dz I z T z C (wNsN v ) dz < BIR max , q wM z T z B q w s v )s vT s v w eB z c BIR max z B BIR max 2 q v Session Papers 227 Development of an Elevated Mixed Layer Model for Parameterizing Altocumulus Cloud Layers S. Liu and S. K. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Altocumulus (Ac) clouds play an important role in the earth's energy budget through their effects on solar

  18. Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    * Slash Pine D Mixed Pine/Hardwood D Upland Hardwood D Bottomland Hardwood * Water ElI] Bottomland Hardwood/Pine 1:\1 Streams ~Rails NUtility ROW o Openwells Ii NPDES outfall Roads c::J Other Set-Asides o SRS Bays EEJ Hydric Soils 450 L Soil Series and Phase DAnB DBaB I::J NoB .Pk c:J Rm DWaB .Wm o Soils 450 900 Meters N A sc Figure 8-1. Plant cO/ll/llunities and soils associated with the Steel Creek Bay Set-Aside Area. 8-7 Set-Aside 8: Steel Creek Bay

  19. Calculated transport properties of CdO: thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R.; Parker, David S.

    2015-10-01

    We present first principles calculations of the thermal and electronic transport properties of the oxide semiconductor CdO. In particular, we find from theory that the accepted thermal conductivity κ value of 0.7 Wm-1K-1 is approximately one order of magnitude too small; our calculations of κ of CdO are in good agreement with recent measurements. We also find that alloying of MgO with CdO is an effective means to reduce the lattice contribution to κ, despite MgO having a much larger thermal conductivity. We further consider the electronic structure of CdO in relation to thermoelectric performance, finding that large thermoelectric power factors may occur if the material can be heavily doped p-type. This work develops insight into the nature of thermal and electronic transport in an important oxide semiconductor.

  20. DACS upgrade acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuehlke, A.C.

    1994-12-21

    The DACS, which is housed in a trailer located just outside of the north fence at the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors located in and around the SY-101 tank. These sensors provide information such as: (1) tank vapor space and ventilation system H{sub 2} concentration; (2) tank waste temperature; (3) tank pressure; (4) waste density; (5) operating pump parameters such as speed, flow, rotational position, discharge pressure, and internal temperature; (6) strain (for major equipment); and (7) waste level. The output of these sensors is conditioned and transmitted to the DACS computers where these signals are displayed, recorded, and monitored for out-of-specification conditions. If abnormal conditions are detected, then, in certain situations, the DACS automatically generates alarms and causes the system to abort pump operations. The report documents testing performed per WHC-SD-WM-ATP-082. Rev. 0-13.

  1. Thermal properties of the optically transparent pore-free nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, S.; Teweldebrhan, D.; Morales, J. R.; Garay, J. E.; Balandin, A. A.

    2009-12-01

    The authors report results of investigation of thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline yttria-stabilized zirconia. The optically transparent pore-free bulk samples were prepared via the spark plasma sintering process to ensure homogeneity. Thermal conductivity K was measured by two different techniques. It was found that the pore-free nanostructured bulk zirconia is an excellent thermal insulator with the room-temperature Kapprox1.7-2.0 W/m K. It was also shown that the 'phonon-hopping' model can accurately describe specifics of K dependence on temperature and the grain size. The obtained results are important for optimization of zirconia properties for specific applications in advanced electronics and coatings.

  2. Analysis of vehicle fuel release resulting in waste tank fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, L.S.

    2003-03-21

    This document reevaluates several aspects of the in-tank vehicle fuel fire/deflagration accident formally documented as an independent accident (representative accident [rep acc] 2). This reevaluation includes frequencies for the accidents and incorporates the behavior of gasoline and diesel fuel in more detail than previous analysis. This reevaluation uses data from RPP-13121, ''Historical Summary of Occurrences from the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report'', Table B-1, ''Tank Farm Events, Off-Normal and Critiques,'' and B-2, ''Summary of Occurrences,'' and from the River Protection Project--Occurrence Reporting & Processing System (ORPS) reports as a basis for changing some of the conclusions formally reported in HNF-SD-WM-CN-037, ''Frequency Analysis of Vehicle Fuel Releases Resulting in Waste Tank Fire''. This calculation note will demonstrate that the in-tank vehicle fuel fire/deflagration accident event may be relocated to other, more bounding accidents.

  3. Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

    2010-03-12

    Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

  4. Post-buckling analysis for the precisely controlled buckling of thin film encapsulated by elastomeric subsrates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, H.; Sun, Y.; Rogers, J. A.; Huang, Y.; Arizona State Univ.; Univ. of Illinois; Northwestern Univ.

    2008-04-01

    The precisely controlled buckling of stiff thin films (e.g., Si or GaAs nano ribbons) on the patterned surface of elastomeric substrate (e.g., poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)) with periodic inactivated and activated regions was designed by Sun et al. [Sun, Y., Choi, W.M., Jiang, H., Huang, Y.Y., Rogers, J.A., 2006. Controlled buckling of semiconductor nanoribbons for stretchable electronics. Nature Nanotechnology 1, 201-207] for important applications of stretchable electronics. We have developed a post-buckling model based on the energy method for the precisely controlled buckling to study the system stretchability. The results agree with Sun et al.'s (2006) experiments without any parameter fitting, and the system can reach 120% stretchability.

  5. Low-level waste vitrification phase 1 vendor test sample analysis data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mast, E.S.

    1995-10-04

    A multi-phase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests was performed in vendor test facilities using simulated LLW and was completed during FY-1995. Test samples taken during Phase 1 testing were analyzed by independent laboratories who reported the analyses results to Westinghouse Hanford Company for integration and evaluation. The reported analytical results were integrated into an electronic data base using Microsoft Excel*5.0. This report documents this data base as of the end of FY-1995, and is supplemental to the Phase 1 LLW melter testing summary report, WHC-SD-WM-ER-498, revision 0.

  6. Results from the Second International Module Intercomparison

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rummel, S.; Anderberg, A.; Emery, K.

    2005-11-01

    The peak-watt rating is a primary indicator of PV performance. The peak power rating is the maximum electrical power that is produced when the PV device is continuously illuminated at 1000 Wm/sup-2/ total irradiance under International Electrotechnical Commission Standard 60904-2 reference spectrum, and 25 deg C cell temperature. Most manufacturers trace their peak-watt rating through calibrations performed at recognized terrestrial calibration facilities. Manufacturers typically perform intercomparisons among a set of their modules internally with other plants and among. Sometimes they have the same module measured at different calibration facilities to determine the differences in calibration. This intercomparison was to mimic this procedure and supply new thin film samples along with samples that could pose other problems. These intercomparisons sample the laboratories' everyday procedures better than a formal intercomparison where the laboratories' best procedures and data scrutiny are used.

  7. Unintended consequences of atmospheric injection of sulphate aerosols.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brady, Patrick Vane; Kobos, Peter Holmes; Goldstein, Barry

    2010-10-01

    Most climate scientists believe that climate geoengineering is best considered as a potential complement to the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions, rather than as an alternative to it. Strong mitigation could achieve the equivalent of up to -4Wm{sup -2} radiative forcing on the century timescale, relative to a worst case scenario for rising CO{sub 2}. However, to tackle the remaining 3Wm{sup -2}, which are likely even in a best case scenario of strongly mitigated CO{sub 2} releases, a number of geoengineering options show promise. Injecting stratospheric aerosols is one of the least expensive and, potentially, most effective approaches and for that reason an examination of the possible unintended consequences of the implementation of atmospheric injections of sulphate aerosols was made. Chief among these are: reductions in rainfall, slowing of atmospheric ozone rebound, and differential changes in weather patterns. At the same time, there will be an increase in plant productivity. Lastly, because atmospheric sulphate injection would not mitigate ocean acidification, another side effect of fossil fuel burning, it would provide only a partial solution. Future research should aim at ameliorating the possible negative unintended consequences of atmospheric injections of sulphate injection. This might include modeling the optimum rate and particle type and size of aerosol injection, as well as the latitudinal, longitudinal and altitude of injection sites, to balance radiative forcing to decrease negative regional impacts. Similarly, future research might include modeling the optimum rate of decrease and location of injection sites to be closed to reduce or slow rapid warming upon aerosol injection cessation. A fruitful area for future research might be system modeling to enhance the possible positive increases in agricultural productivity. All such modeling must be supported by data collection and laboratory and field testing to enable iterative modeling to increase the accuracy and precision of the models, while reducing epistemic uncertainties.

  8. MULTIFUNCTIONAL SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS RESEARCH PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byard Wood, Lance Seefeldt, Ronald Sims, Bradley Wahlen, and Dan Dye

    2012-06-29

    The solar energy available within the visible portion of the solar spectrum is about 300 W/m2 (43%) and that available in the UV and IR portion is about 400 W/m2 (57%). This provides opportunities for developing integrated energy systems that capture and use specific wavelengths of the solar spectrum for different purposes. For example: biofuels from photosynthetic microbes use only the visible light; solar cells use a narrow band of the solar spectrum that could be either mostly in the visible or in the IR regions of the solar spectrum, depending on the photovoltaic materials, e.g., gallium antimonide (GaSb) cells utilize predominately IR radiation; and finally, solar panels that heat water utilize a broad range of wavelengths (visible plus IR). The basic idea of this research is that sunlight has many possible end-use applications including both direct use and energy conversion schemes; it is technically feasible to develop multifunctional solar energy systems capable of addressing several end-use needs while increasing the overall solar energy utilization efficiency when compared to single-purpose solar technologies. Such a combination of technologies could lead to more cost-competitive ?multifunctional? systems that add value and broaden opportunities for integrated energy systems. The goal of this research is to increase the overall energy efficacy and cost competitiveness of solar systems. The specific objectives of this research were: 1) Evaluate the efficacy of a combined photobioreactor and electric power system; 2) Improve the reliability and cost effectiveness of hybrid solar lighting systems ? a technology in which sunlight is collected and distributed via optical fibers into the interior of a building; 3) Evaluate the efficacy of using filtered light to increase the production of biomass in photobioreactors and provide more solar energy for other uses; 4) Evaluates several concepts for wavelength shifting such that a greater percentage of the solar spectrum energy can be used for photosynthesis.

  9. Greenhouse gas policy influences climate via direct effects of land-use change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.; Torn, Margaret S.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.; Chini, Louise M.; Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Thornton, Peter; Hurtt, George; Wise, Marshall A.

    2013-06-01

    Proposed climate mitigation measures do not account for direct biophysical climate impacts of land-use change (LUC), nor do the stabilization targets modeled for the 5th Climate Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). To examine the significance of such effects on global and regional patterns of climate change, a baseline and alternative scenario of future anthropogenic activity are simulated within the Integrated Earth System Model, which couples the Global Change Assessment Model, Global Land-use Model, and Community Earth System Model. The alternative scenario has high biofuel utilization and approximately 50% less global forest cover compared to the baseline, standard RCP4.5 scenario. Both scenarios stabilize radiative forcing from atmospheric constituents at 4.5 W/m2 by 2100. Thus, differences between their climate predictions quantify the biophysical effects of LUC. Offline radiative transfer and land model simulations are also utilized to identify forcing and feedback mechanisms driving the coupled response. Boreal deforestation is found to strongly influence climate due to increased albedo coupled with a regional-scale water vapor feedback. Globally, the alternative scenario yields a 21st century warming trend that is 0.5 °C cooler than baseline, driven by a 1 W/m2 mean decrease in radiative forcing that is distributed unevenly around the globe. Some regions are cooler in the alternative scenario than in 2005. These results demonstrate that neither climate change nor actual radiative forcing are uniquely related to atmospheric forcing targets such as those found in the RCP’s, but rather depend on particulars of the socioeconomic pathways followed to meet each target.

  10. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  11. Impacts of aerosol-cloud interactions on past and future changes in tropospheric composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unger, N.; Menon, S.; Shindell, D. T.; Koch, D. M.

    2009-02-02

    The development of effective emissions control policies that are beneficial to both climate and air quality requires a detailed understanding of all the feedbacks in the atmospheric composition and climate system. We perform sensitivity studies with a global atmospheric composition-climate model to assess the impact of aerosols on tropospheric chemistry through their modification on clouds, aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI). The model includes coupling between both tropospheric gas-phase and aerosol chemistry and aerosols and liquid-phase clouds. We investigate past impacts from preindustrial (PI) to present day (PD) and future impacts from PD to 2050 (for the moderate IPCC A1B scenario) that embrace a wide spectrum of precursor emission changes and consequential ACI. The aerosol indirect effect (AIE) is estimated to be -2.0 Wm{sup -2} for PD-PI and -0.6 Wm{sup -2} for 2050-PD, at the high end of current estimates. Inclusion of ACI substantially impacts changes in global mean methane lifetime across both time periods, enhancing the past and future increases by 10% and 30%, respectively. In regions where pollution emissions increase, inclusion of ACI leads to 20% enhancements in in-cloud sulfate production and {approx}10% enhancements in sulfate wet deposition that is displaced away from the immediate source regions. The enhanced in-cloud sulfate formation leads to larger increases in surface sulfate across polluted regions ({approx}10-30%). Nitric acid wet deposition is dampened by 15-20% across the industrialized regions due to ACI allowing additional re-release of reactive nitrogen that contributes to 1-2 ppbv increases in surface ozone in outflow regions. Our model findings indicate that ACI must be considered in studies of methane trends and projections of future changes to particulate matter air quality.

  12. A Method of Correcting for Tilt From Horizontal in Downwelling Shortwave Irradiance Measurements on Moving Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Jonsson, Haf; Schmid, Beat; Vogelmann, A. M.; Wood, John

    2010-04-14

    Significant errors occur in downwelling shortwave irradiance measurements made on moving platforms due to tilt from horizontal because, when the sun is not completely blocked by overhead cloud, the downwelling shortwave irradiance has a prominent directional component from the direct sun. A-priori knowledge of the partitioning between the direct and diffuse components of the total shortwave irradiance is needed to properly apply a correction for tilt. This partitioning information can be adequately provided using a newly available commercial radiometer that produces reasonable measurements of the total and diffuse shortwave irradiance, and by subtraction the direct shortwave irradiance, with no moving parts and regardless of azimuthal orientation. We have developed methodologies for determining the constant pitch and roll offsets of the radiometers for aircraft applications, and for applying a tilt correction to the total shortwave irradiance data. Results suggest that the methodology is for tilt up to +/-10, with 90% of the data corrected to within 10 Wm-2 at least for clear-sky data. Without a proper tilt correction, even data limited to 5 of tilt as is typical current practice still exhibits large errors, greater than 100 Wm-2 in some cases. Given the low cost, low weight, and low power consumption of the SPN1 total and diffuse radiometer, opportunities previously excluded for moving platform measurements such as small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and solar powered buoys now become feasible using our methodology. The increase in measurement accuracy is important, given current concerns over long-term climate variability and change especially over the 70% of the Earths surface covered by ocean where long-term records of these measurements are sorely needed and must be made on ships and buoys.

  13. A 10 Year Climatology of Arctic Cloud Fraction and Radiative Forcing at Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Xi, Baike; Crosby, Kathryn; Long, Charles N.; Stone, R. S.; Shupe, Matthew D.

    2010-09-15

    A 10-yr record of Arctic cloud fraction and surface radiation budget has been generated using data collected from June 1998 to May 2008 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site and the nearby NOAA Barrow Observatory (BRW). The record includes the seasonal variations of cloud fraction (CF), cloud liquid water path (LWP), precipitable water vapor (PWV), surface albedo, shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) fluxes and cloud radative forcings (CRFs), as well as their decadal variations. Values of CF derived from different instruments and methods agree well, having an annual average of ~0.74. Cloudiness increases from March to May, remains high (~0.8-0.9) from May to October, and then decreases over winter. More clouds and higher LWP and PWV occurred during the warm season (May-October) than the cold season (November-April). These results are strongly associated with southerly flow which transports warm, moist air masses to Barrow from the North Pacific and over area of Alaska already free of snow during the warm season and with a dipole pattern of pressure in which a high is centered over the Beaufort Sea and low over the Aleutians during the cold season. The monthly means of estimated clear-sky and measured allsky SW-down and LW-down fluxes at the two facilities are almost identical with the annual mean differences less than 1.6 W m-2. The downwelling and upwelling LW fluxes remain almost constant from January to March, then increase from March and peak during July-August. SW-down fluxes are primarily determined by seasonal changes in the intensity and duration of insolation over Northern Alaska, and are also strongly dependent on cloud fraction and optical depth, and surface albedo. The monthly variations of NET CRF generally follow the cycle of SW CRF, modulated by LW effects. On annual average, the negative SW CRF and positive LW CRF tend to cancel, resulting in annual average NET CRF of 2-4.5 Wm-2. Arctic clouds have a 3 net warming effect on the surface throughout the year, with exception of the snow-free period from middle June to middle September when there tends to be a cooling effect. The daily average surface albedos agree well at the two sites remaining high (>0.8) until late May, dropping below 0.2 after the snow melts around June and increasing during autumn once snow begins to accumulate. On the basis of long-term regression analyses CF has decreased by about 0.048 while temperature has risen by ?1.1 K over the 10-yr period, which can be characterized by tendencies of warming mainly during December and April. With regard to the 2007 record minimum Arctic ice extent, this study provides additional empirical evidence that decreased cloud cover and increased SW-down flux during summer contributed to anomalous ice melt in the region north of Barrow. At Barrow, average June-August CF decreased by 0.062 in 2007 from the 10-yr mean, while SW-down and NET fluxes increased by 28.4 Wm-2 and 11.3 Wm-2, respectively. The increase in the NET radiative flux during summer 2007 most likely contributed to an increase in surface air temperature of 1.6 K.

  14. Evaluation of Technetium Getters to Improve the Performance of Cast Stone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla P.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Lawter, Amanda R.; Stephenson, John R.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-11-01

    Cast Stone has been selected as the preferred waste form for solidification of aqueous secondary liquid effluents from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process condensates and low-activity waste (LAW) melter off-gas caustic scrubber effluents. Cast Stone is also being evaluated as a supplemental immobilization technology to provide the necessary LAW treatment capacity to complete the Hanford tank waste cleanup mission in a timely and cost effective manner. One of the major radionuclides that Cast Stone has the potential to immobilize is technetium (Tc). The mechanism for immobilization is through the reduction of the highly mobile Tc(VII) species to the less mobile Tc(IV) species by the blast furnace slag (BFS) used in the Cast Stone formulation. Technetium immobilization through this method would be beneficial because Tc is one of the most difficult contaminants to address at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site due to its complex chemical behavior in tank waste, limited incorporation in mid- to high-temperature immobilization processes (vitrification, steam reformation, etc.), and high mobility in subsurface environments. In fact, the Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS) identifies technetium-99 (99Tc) as one of the radioactive tank waste components contributing the most to the environmental impact associated with the cleanup of the Hanford Site. The TC&WM EIS, along with an earlier supplemental waste-form risk assessment, used a diffusion-limited release model to estimate the release of different contaminants from the WTP process waste forms. In both of these predictive modeling exercises, where effective diffusivities based on grout performance data available at the time, groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well exceeded the allowable maximum permissible concentrations for 99Tc. (900 pCi/L). Recent relatively short-term (63 day) leach tests conducted on both LAW and secondary waste Cast Stone monoliths indicated that 99Tc diffusivities were at or near diffusivities where the groundwater at the 100-m down-gradient well would exceed the allowable maximum permissible 99Tc concentrations. There is, therefore, a need and an opportunity to improve the retention of Tc in the Cast Stone waste form. One method to improve the performance of the Cast Stone waste form is through the addition of “getters” that selectively sequester Tc inside Cast Stone.

  15. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-08-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

  16. Validity of Five Satellite-Based Latent Heat Flux Algorithms for Semi-arid Ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Fei; Chen, Jiquan; Li, Xianglan; Yao, Yunjun; Liang, Shunlin; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Nannan; Guo, Yang; Yu, Jian; Sun, Minmin

    2015-12-09

    Accurate estimation of latent heat flux (LE) is critical in characterizing semiarid ecosystems. Many LE algorithms have been developed during the past few decades. However, the algorithms have not been directly compared, particularly over global semiarid ecosystems. In this paper, we evaluated the performance of five LE models over semiarid ecosystems such as grassland, shrub, and savanna using the Fluxnet dataset of 68 eddy covariance (EC) sites during the period 2000–2009. We also used a modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA) dataset, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Fractional Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR) from the moderate resolutionmore » imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) products; the leaf area index (LAI) from the global land surface satellite (GLASS) products; and the digital elevation model (DEM) from shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM30) dataset to generate LE at region scale during the period 2003–2006. The models were the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer LE (MOD16) algorithm, revised remote sensing based Penman–Monteith LE algorithm (RRS), the Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (PT-JPL), the modified satellite-based Priestley–Taylor LE algorithm (MS-PT), and the semi-empirical Penman LE algorithm (UMD). Direct comparison with ground measured LE showed the PT-JPL and MS-PT algorithms had relative high performance over semiarid ecosystems with the coefficient of determination (R2) ranging from 0.6 to 0.8 and root mean squared error (RMSE) of approximately 20 W/m2. Empirical parameters in the structure algorithms of MOD16 and RRS, and calibrated coefficients of the UMD algorithm may be the cause of the reduced performance of these LE algorithms with R2 ranging from 0.5 to 0.7 and RMSE ranging from 20 to 35 W/m2 for MOD16, RRS and UMD. Sensitivity analysis showed that radiation and vegetation terms were the dominating variables affecting LE Fluxes in global semiarid ecosystem.« less

  17. Simulating 3-D Radiative Transfer Effects over the Sierra Nevada Mountains using WRF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Yu; Liou, K. N.; Lee, W- L.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2012-10-30

    A surface solar radiation parameterization based on deviations between 3-D and conventional plane-parallel radiative transfer models has been incorporated into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to understand the solar insolation over mountain/snow areas and to investigate the impact of the spatial and temporal distribution and variation of surface solar fluxes on land-surface processes. Using the Sierra-Nevada in the western United States as a testbed, we show that mountain effect could produce up to ?50 to + 50Wm?2 deviations in the surface solar fluxes over the mountain areas, resulting in a temperature increase of up to 1 C on the sunny side. Upward surface sensible and latent heat fluxes are modulated accordingly to compensate for the change in surface solar fluxes. Snow water equivalent and surface albedo both show decreases on the sunny side of the mountains, indicating more snowmelt and hence reduced snow albedo associated with more solar insolation due to mountain effect. Soil moisture increases on the sunny side of the mountains due to enhanced snowmelt, while decreases on the shaded side. Substantial differences are found in the morning hours from 8-10 a.m. and in the afternoon around 3-5 p.m., while differences around noon and in the early morning and late afternoon are comparatively smaller. Variation in the surface energy balance can also affect atmospheric processes, such as cloud fields, through the modulation of vertical thermal structure. Negative changes of up to ?40 gm?2 are found in the cloud water path, associated with reductions in the surface insolation over the cloud region. The day-averaged deviations in the surface solar flux are positive over the mountain areas and negative in the valleys, with a range between ?12~12Wm?2. Changes in sensible and latent heat fluxes and surface skin temperature follow the solar insolation pattern. Differences in the domain-averaged diurnal variation over the Sierras show that the mountain area receives more solar insolation during early morning and late afternoon, resulting in enhanced upward sensible heat and latent heat fluxes from the surface and a corresponding increase in surface skin temperature. During the middle of the day, however, the surface insolation and heat fluxes show negative changes, indicating a cooling effect. Hence overall, the diurnal variations of surface temperature and surface fluxes in the Sierra-Nevada are reduced through the interactions of radiative transfer and mountains. The hourly differences of the surface solar insolation in higher elevated regions, however, show smaller magnitude in negative changes during the middle of the day and possibly more solar fluxes received during the whole day.

  18. Re-evaluation of the 1995 Hanford Large Scale Drum Fire Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J M

    2007-05-02

    A large-scale drum performance test was conducted at the Hanford Site in June 1995, in which over one hundred (100) 55-gal drums in each of two storage configurations were subjected to severe fuel pool fires. The two storage configurations in the test were pallet storage and rack storage. The description and results of the large-scale drum test at the Hanford Site were reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246, ''Solid Waste Drum Array Fire Performance,'' Rev. 0, 1995. This was one of the main references used to develop the analytical methodology to predict drum failures in WHC-SD-SQA-ANAL-501, 'Fire Protection Guide for Waste Drum Storage Array,'' September 1996. Three drum failure modes were observed from the test reported in WHC-SD-WM-TRP-246. They consisted of seal failure, lid warping, and catastrophic lid ejection. There was no discernible failure criterion that distinguished one failure mode from another. Hence, all three failure modes were treated equally for the purpose of determining the number of failed drums. General observations from the results of the test are as follows: {lg_bullet} Trash expulsion was negligible. {lg_bullet} Flame impingement was identified as the main cause for failure. {lg_bullet} The range of drum temperatures at failure was 600 C to 800 C. This is above the yield strength temperature for steel, approximately 540 C (1,000 F). {lg_bullet} The critical heat flux required for failure is above 45 kW/m{sup 2}. {lg_bullet} Fire propagation from one drum to the next was not observed. The statistical evaluation of the test results using, for example, the student's t-distribution, will demonstrate that the failure criteria for TRU waste drums currently employed at nuclear facilities are very conservative relative to the large-scale test results. Hence, the safety analysis utilizing the general criteria described in the five bullets above will lead to a technically robust and defensible product that bounds the potential consequences from postulated fires in TRU waste facilities, the means of storage in which are the Type A, 55-gal drums.

  19. Comparison of Energy Efficiency and Power Density in Pressure Retarded Osmosis and Reverse Electrodialysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yip, NY; Elimelech, M

    2014-09-16

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) and reverse electrodialysis (RED) are emerging membrane-based technologies that can convert chemical energy in salinity gradients to useful work. The two processes have intrinsically different working principles: controlled mixing in PRO is achieved by water permeation across salt-rejecting membranes, whereas RED is driven by ion flux across charged membranes. This study compares the energy efficiency and power density performance of PRO and RED with simulated technologically available membranes for natural, anthropogenic, and engineered salinity gradients (seawater-river water, desalination brine-wastewater, and synthetic hypersaline solutions, respectively). The analysis shows that PRO can achieve both greater efficiencies (54-56%) and higher power densities (2.4-38 W/m(2)) than RED (18-38% and 0.77-1.2 W/m(2)). The superior efficiency is attributed to the ability of PRO membranes to more effectively utilize the salinity difference to drive water permeation and better suppress the detrimental leakage of salts. On the other hand, the low conductivity of currently available ion exchange membranes impedes RED ion flux and, thus, constrains the power density. Both technologies exhibit a trade-off between efficiency and power density: employing more permeable but less selective membranes can enhance the power density, but undesired entropy production due to uncontrolled mixing increases and some efficiency is sacrificed. When the concentration difference is increased (i.e., natural -> anthropogenic -> engineered salinity gradients), PRO osmotic pressure difference rises proportionally but not so for RED Nernst potential, which has logarithmic dependence on the solution concentration. Because of this inherently different characteristic, RED is unable to take advantage of larger salinity gradients, whereas PRO power density is considerably enhanced. Additionally, high solution concentrations suppress the Donnan exclusion effect of the charged RED membranes, severely reducing the permselectivity and diminishing the energy conversion efficiency. This study indicates that PRO is more suitable to extract energy from a range of salinity gradients, while significant advancements in ion exchange membranes are likely necessary for RED to be competitive with PRO.

  20. Texas Hydrogen Highway Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus and Fueling Infrastructure Technology Showcase - Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitchcock, David

    2012-06-29

    The Texas Hydrogen Highway project has showcased a hydrogen fuel cell transit bus and hydrogen fueling infrastructure that was designed and built through previous support from various public and private sector entities. The aim of this project has been to increase awareness among transit agencies and other public entities on these transportation technologies, and to place such technologies into commercial applications, such as a public transit agency. The initial project concept developed in 2004 was to show that a skid-mounted, fully-integrated, factory-built and tested hydrogen fueling station could be used to simplify the design, and lower the cost of fueling infrastructure for fuel cell vehicles. The approach was to design, engineer, build, and test the integrated fueling station at the factory then install it at a site that offered educational and technical resources and provide an opportunity to showcase both the fueling station and advanced hydrogen vehicles. The two primary technology components include: Hydrogen Fueling Station: The hydrogen fueling infrastructure was designed and built by Gas Technology Institute primarily through a funding grant from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. It includes hydrogen production, clean-up, compression, storage, and dispensing. The station consists of a steam methane reformer, gas clean-up system, gas compressor and 48 kilograms of hydrogen storage capacity for dispensing at 5000 psig. The station is skid-mounted for easy installation and can be relocated if needed. It includes a dispenser that is designed to provide temperaturecompensated fills using a control algorithm. The total station daily capacity is approximately 50 kilograms. Fuel Cell Bus: The transit passenger bus built by Ebus, a company located in Downey, CA, was commissioned and acquired by GTI prior to this project. It is a fuel cell plug-in hybrid electric vehicle which is ADA compliant, has air conditioning sufficient for Texas operations, and regenerative braking for battery charging. It uses a 19.3 kW Ballard PEM fuel cell, will store 12.6 kg of hydrogen at 350 Bar, and includes a 60 kWh battery storage system. The objectives of the project included the following: (a) To advance commercialization of hydrogen-powered transit buses and supporting infrastructure; (b) To provide public outreach and education by showcasing the operation of a 22-foot fuel cell hybrid shuttle bus and Texas first hydrogen fueling infrastructure; and (c) To showcase operation of zero-emissions vehicle for potential transit applications. As mentioned above, the project successfully demonstrated an early vehicle technology, the Ebus plug-in hybrid fuel cell bus, and that success has led to the acquisition of a more advanced vehicle that can take advantage of the same fueling infrastructure. Needed hydrogen station improvements have been identified that will enhance the capabilities of the fueling infrastructure to serve the new bus and to meet the transit agency needs. Over the course of this project, public officials, local government staff, and transit operators were engaged in outreach and education activities that acquainted them with the real world operation of a fuel cell bus and fueling infrastructure. Transit staff members in the Dallas/Ft. Worth region were invited to a workshop in Arlington, Texas at the North Central Texas Council of Governments to participate in a workshop on hydrogen and fuel cells, and to see the fuel cell bus in operation. The bus was trucked to the meeting for this purpose so that participants could see and ride the bus. Austin area transit staff members visited the fueling site in Austin to be briefed on the bus and to participate in a fueling demonstration. This led to further meetings to determine how a fuel cell bus and fueling station could be deployed at Capital Metro Transit. Target urban regions that expressed additional interest during the project in response to the outreach meetings and showcase events include San Antonio and Austin, Texas. In summary, the project objectives were achieved in the following ways: Through presentations and papers provided to a variety of audiences in multiple venues, the project team fulfilled its goal of providing education and outreach on hydrogen technology to statewide audiences. The project team generated interest that exists well beyond the completion of the project, and indeed, helped to generate financial support for a subsequent hydrogen vehicle project in Austin. The University of Texas, Center for ElectroMechanics operated the fuel cell-electric Ebus vehicle for over 13,000 miles in Austin, Texas in a variety of routes and loading configurations. The project took advantage of prior efforts that created a hydrogen fueling station and fuel cell electric-hybrid bus and continued to verify their technical foundation, while informing and educating potential future users of how these technologies work.

  1. RGA-5 process gas analyzer test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weamer, J.L.

    1994-11-09

    The gas monitoring system, GMS-2, includes two gas monitors. GC-2 measures high hydrogen concentrations (0.2--10%) and GC-3 measures the lower concentration levels (10--100 ppm). Although redundant instruments are in place for accurately measuring the higher hydrogen concentrations, there are no redundant instruments to accurately measure the relatively low baseline hydrogen concentrations. The RGA-5 process gas analyzer is a two-column GC that will replace GC-2 and provide redundancy for GC-3. This upgrade will provide faster response time and reduce tank farm entries for routine operations because the RGA-5 is remotely operable. Tests were conducted according to WHC-SD-WM-TP-262, RGA-5 Process Gas Analyzer Test Plan. The first objective was to verify that the vendor-supplied RGA host data acquisition software allowed communication between the RGA-5 and an ISA bus personal computer. The second objective was to determine the capabilities of the RGA-5 process gas analyzer. The tests did the following: with a constant flow rate and pressure, determined the concentration range that each column can accurately and precisely measure; identified any uncorrected interferences from other tank gases such as ammonia, nitrous oxide, or methane; and determined the response and decay time.

  2. Aerosol Properties from Multi-spectral and Multi-angular Aircraft 4STAR Observations: Expected Advantages and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The airborne Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) is developed to retrieve aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. The necessarily compact design of the 4STAR may cause noticeable apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles. We assess the sensitivity of expected 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval to such enhancement by applying the operational AERONET retrieval code and constructed synthetic 4STARlike data. Also, we assess the sensitivity of the broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing to uncertainties in aerosol retrievals associated with the sky radiance enhancement. Our sensitivity study results suggest that the 4STARbased aerosol retrieval has limitations in obtaining detailed information on particle size distribution and scattering phase function. However, these limitations have small impact on the retrieved bulk optical parameters, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or 0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 2%, or 0.02), and the calculated direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 6%, or 2 Wm-2).

  3. Global Distribution and Climate Forcing of Marine Organic Aerosol - Part 2: Effects on Cloud Properties and Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gantt, Brett; Xu, Jun; Meskhidze, N.; Zhang, Yang; Nenes, Athanasios; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2012-07-25

    A series of simulations with the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) with a 7-mode Modal Aerosol Model were conducted to assess the changes in cloud microphysical properties and radiative forcing resulting from marine organic aerosols. Model simulations show that the anthropogenic aerosol indirect forcing (AIF) predicted by CAM5 is decreased in absolute magnitude by up to 0.09 Wm{sup -2} (7 %) when marine organic aerosols are included. Changes in the AIF from marine organic aerosols are associated with small global increases in low-level incloud droplet number concentration and liquid water path of 1.3 cm{sup -3} (1.5 %) and 0.22 gm{sup -2} (0.5 %), respectively. Areas especially sensitive to changes in cloud properties due to marine organic aerosol include the Southern Ocean, North Pacific Ocean, and North Atlantic Ocean, all of which are characterized by high marine organic emission rates. As climate models are particularly sensitive to the background aerosol concentration, this small but non-negligible change in the AIF due to marine organic aerosols provides a notable link for ocean-ecosystem marine low-level cloud interactions and may be a candidate for consideration in future earth system models.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF NEG COATING FOR RHIC EXPERIMENTAL BEAMTUBES.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEISS, D.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; TODD, R.

    2005-05-16

    As RHIC beam intensity increases beyond original scope, pressure rises have been observed in some regions. The luminosity limiting pressure rises are associated with electron multi-pacting, electron stimulated desorption and beam induced desorption. Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) coated beamtubes have been proven effective to suppress pressure rise in synchrotron radiation facilities. Standard beamtubes have been NEG coated by a vendor and added to many RHIC UHV regions. BNL is developing a cylindrical magnetron sputtering system to NEG coat special beryllium beamtubes installed in RHIC experimental regions, It features a hollow, liquid cooled cathode producing power density of 500 W/m and deposition rate of 5000 Angstrom/hr on 7.5cm OD beamtube. The cathode, a titanium tube partially covered with zirconium and vanadium ribbons, is oriented for horizontal coating of 4m long chambers. Ribbons and magnets are arranged to provide uniform sputtering distribution and deposited NEG composition. Vacuum performance of NEG coated tubes was measured. Coating was analyzed with energy dispersion spectroscopy, auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. System design, development, and analysis results are presented.

  5. Beckmann rearrangement and reduction of the E isomer of 1,5,5-trimethylbicyclo(2. 2. 1)heptan-2-one oxime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlov, N.G.; Popova, L.A.

    1987-10-10

    In the Beckmann rearrangement of the E isomer of 1,5,5-trimethylbicyclo(2.2.1)-heptan-2-one (isofenchone)oxime 1,6,6-trimethyl-2-azabicyclo(3.2.1)octan-3-one was obtained as a result of stereospecific migration of the C/sup 2/ carbon atom situated in the anti position to the hydroxime hydroxyl group. Reduction of the product with lithium aluminum hydride led to 1,6,6-trimethyl-2-azabicyclo(3.2.1)-octane. Reduction of isofenchone oxime with lithium aluminum hydride in THF leads to the formation of a mixture of 1,5,5-trimethylbicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2-yl-endo-amine, the corresponding exo-amine, and 1,6,6-trimethyl-2-aza- and 1,6,6-trimethyl-3-azabicyclo(3.2.1)octanes in ratios of 45:10:5:40. The /sup 1/H and /sup 13/C NMR spectra were measured on a Bruker WM-360 spectrometer at 360 MHz for /sup 1/H and 90 MHz for /sup 13/C. The compounds were prepared for the spectra in the form of 10% solutions in deuterochloroform.

  6. U.S. Bureau of Mines, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Melter offgas report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C.

    1995-10-27

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the melter offgas report on testing performed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. The Bureau of Mines (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate carbon electrode melter technology (also called carbon arc or electric arc) under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384216. The document contains the complete offgas report for the first 24-hour melter test (WHC-1) as prepared by Entropy Inc. A summary of this report is also contained in the``U.S. Bureau of Mines, Phase 1 Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Final Report`` (WHC-SD-WM-VI-030).

  7. More Frequent Cloud-Free Sky and Less Surface Solar Radiation in China from 1955 to 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Yun; Kaiser, Dale P.; Leung, Lai R.; Xu, Ming

    2006-01-11

    Newly available data from extended weather stations and time period reveal that much of China has experienced statistically significant decreases in total cloud cover and low cloud cover over roughly the last half of the Twentieth century. This conclusion is supported by our recent analysis of the more reliably observed frequency of cloud-free sky and overcast sky. The total cloud cover and low cloud cover have decreased 0.88% and 0.33% per decade, respectively, and cloud-free days have increased 0.60% and overcast days decreased 0.78% per decade in China from 1954-2001. Meanwhile, both solar radiation and pan evaporation have decreased in most parts of China, with solar radiation decreasing 3.1 W/m2 and pan evaporation decreasing 39 mm per decade. Combined with other evidences documented in previous studies, we conjectured that increased air pollution may have produced a fog-like haze that reflected/absorbed radiation from the sun and resulted in less solar radiation reaching the surface, despite concurrent upward trends in cloud-free skies over China.

  8. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets; Part B, Remedial action, robotics/automation, waste management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, R.L.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  9. Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, R.L.

    1993-02-26

    The Oak Ridge K-25 Technology Logic Diagram (TLD), a decision support tool for the K-25 Site, was developed to provide a planning document that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WN) problems at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. The TLD technique identifies the research necessary to develop these technologies to a state that allows for technology transfer and application to waste management, remediation, decontamination, and decommissioning activities. The TLD consists of four separate volumes-Vol. 1, Vol. 2, Vol. 3A, and Vol. 3B. Volume 1 provides introductory and overview information about the TLD. Volume 2 contains logic diagrams. Volume 3 has been divided into two separate volumes to facilitate handling and use. This volume 3 B provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (Remedial Action Robotics and Automation, Waste Management) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than each technology in Vol. 2. The TEDS are arranged alphanumerically by the TEDS code number in the upper right corner of each data sheet. Volume 3 can be used in two ways: (1) technologies that are identified from Vol. 2 can be referenced directly in Vol. 3 by using the TEDS codes, and (2) technologies and general technology areas (alternatives) can be located in the index in the front of this volume.

  10. Characterisation of radiation damage in W and W-based alloys from 2MeV self-ion near-bulk implantations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yi, Xiaoou; Culham Science Centre, Abingdon; Jenkins, Michael L.; Hattar, Khalid; Edmondson, Philip D.; Roberts, Steve G.; Culham Science Centre, Abingdon

    2015-04-21

    The displacement damage induced in bulk W and W-5 wt.% Re and W-5 wt.% Ta alloys by 2 MeV W+ irradiation to doses 3.3×1017 - 2.5×1019 W+/m2 at temperatures ranging from 300 to750°C has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy. An automated sizing and counting approach based on Image J has been proposed and performed for all irradiation data. In all cases the damage comprised dislocation loops, mostly of interstitial type, with Burgers vectors b = ½<111> (> 60%) and b = <100>. The diameters of loops did not exceed 20 nm, with the majority being ≤ 6 nm. Themore » loop number density varied between 1022 and 1023 loops/m3 . With increasing irradiation temperature, the loop size distributions shifted towards larger sizes, and there was a substantial decrease in loop number densities. The damage microstructure was less sensitive to dose than to temperature. Under the same irradiation conditions, loop number densities in the alloys were higher than in pure W but loops were smaller. In grains with normals close to z = <001>, loop strings developed in W at temperatures ≥ 500°C and doses ≥ 1.2 dpa, but such strings were not observed in the W-Re or W-Ta alloys. However, in other grain orientations complex structures appeared in all materials and dense dislocation networks formed at higher doses.« less

  11. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part A, Decontamination and Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation is a generalized planning document that identifies broad categories of issues that keep ORNL outside full compliance with the law and other legally binding agreements. Possible generic paths to compliance, issues, and the schedule for resolution of the issues one identified. The role of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) is then to identify specific site issues (problems), identify specific technologies that can be brought to bear on the issues, and assess the current status and readiness of these remediation technologies within the constraints of the schedule commitment. Regulatory requirements and commitments contained in the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation are also included in the TLD as constraints to the application of immature technological solutions. Some otherwise attractive technological solutions may not be employed because they may not be deployable on the schedule enumerated in the regulatory agreements. The roadmap for ORNL includes a list of 46 comprehensive logic diagrams for WM of low-level, radioactive-mixed, hazardous, sanitary and industrial. and TRU waste. The roadmapping process gives comparisons of the installation as it exists to the way the installation should exist under full compliance. The identification of the issues is the goal of roadmapping. This allows accurate and timely formulation of activities.

  12. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 2: Technology logic diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Volume 2 contains the logic linkages among environmental management goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 2 has been divided into five sections: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Robotics/Automation, and Waste Management. Each section contains logical breakdowns of the Y-12 D and D problems by subject area and identifies technologies that can be reasonably applied to each D and D challenge.

  13. Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. [Appendix contains accromyms list and maps of waste management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance at its waste sites and facilities, while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities, planned and completed, undertaken to implement these FYP goals at the DOE Field Office-Oak Ridge (DOE/OR) installations and programs; specifically, for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), and Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program (HAZWRAP). Activities described in this SSP address hazardous, radioactive, mixed, and sanitary wastes, along with treatment, storage, and disposal of current production waste and legacy waste from past operation. The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Corrective Activities (A), Environmental Restoration (ER), Waste Management (WM), Technology Development (TD), and Transportation; and includes descriptions of activities, resources, and milestones by installation or program. 87 tabs.

  14. Tank waste remediation system configuration management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vann, J.M.

    1998-01-08

    The configuration management program for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Project Mission supports management of the project baseline by providing the mechanisms to identify, document, and control the functional and physical characteristics of the products. This document is one of the tools used to develop and control the mission and work. It is an integrated approach for control of technical, cost, schedule, and administrative information necessary to manage the configurations for the TWRS Project Mission. Configuration management focuses on five principal activities: configuration management system management, configuration identification, configuration status accounting, change control, and configuration management assessments. TWRS Project personnel must execute work in a controlled fashion. Work must be performed by verbatim use of authorized and released technical information and documentation. Application of configuration management will be consistently applied across all TWRS Project activities and assessed accordingly. The Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) configuration management requirements are prescribed in HNF-MP-013, Configuration Management Plan (FDH 1997a). This TWRS Configuration Management Plan (CMP) implements those requirements and supersedes the Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Program Plan described in Vann, 1996. HNF-SD-WM-CM-014, Tank Waste Remediation System Configuration Management Implementation Plan (Vann, 1997) will be revised to implement the requirements of this plan. This plan provides the responsibilities, actions and tools necessary to implement the requirements as defined in the above referenced documents.

  15. Review Guidance for the TWRS FSAR amendment for Waste Retrieval and waste feed delivery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIFFITH, R.W.

    1999-10-01

    This review guidance (Guide) was developed for Office of River Protection (ORP) reviewers to use in reviewing the amendment to the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) covering waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. Waste retrieval and waste feed delivery are necessary to supply nuclear waste from TWRS storage tanks to the TWRS Privatization (TWRS-P) Contractor's vitrification facility and to receive intermediate waste from the vitrification facility back into the TWRS tank farms for interim storage. An amendment to the approved TWRS FSAR (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Rev. 0) is necessary to change the authorization basis to accommodate waste retrieval and waste feed delivery. The ORP'S safety responsibility in reviewing the FSAR amendment is to determine that reasonable assurance exists that waste retrieval and waste feed delivery operations can be accomplished with adequate safety for the workers, the public, and the environment. To carry out this responsibility, the ORP will evaluate the Contractor's amendment to the TWRS FSAR for waste retrieval and waste feed delivery to determine whether the submittal provides adequate safety and complies with applicable regulatory requirements.

  16. Optically enhanced photon recycling in mechanically stacked multijunction solar cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Steiner, Myles A.; Geisz, John F.; Ward, J. Scott; Garcia, Ivan; Friedman, Daniel J.; King, Richard R.; Chiu, Philip T.; France, Ryan M.; Duda, Anna; Olavarria, Waldo J.; et al

    2015-11-09

    Multijunction solar cells can be fabricated by mechanically bonding together component cells that are grown separately. Here, we present four-junction four-terminal mechanical stacks composed of GaInP/GaAs tandems grown on GaAs substrates and GaInAsP/GaInAs tandems grown on InP substrates. The component cells were bonded together with a low-index transparent epoxy that acts as an angularly selective reflector to the GaAs bandedge luminescence, while simultaneously transmitting nearly all of the subbandgap light. As determined by electroluminescence measurements and optical modeling, the GaAs subcell demonstrates a higher internal radiative limit and, thus, higher subcell voltage, compared with GaAs subcells without the epoxy reflector.more » The best cells demonstrate 38.8 ± 1.0% efficiency under the global spectrum at 1000 W/m2 and ~ 42% under the direct spectrum at ~100 suns. As a result, eliminating the series resistance is the key challenge for further improving the concentrator cells.« less

  17. Setting clear expectations for safety basis development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORENO, M.R.

    2003-05-03

    DOE-RL has set clear expectations for a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule) which will ensure long-term benefit to Hanford. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development resulting in a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was issued to standardized methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was issued for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated for Hanford. A standard Site Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) detailing the safety management programs was issued for use as a means of compliance with a majority of 3009 Standard chapters. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. As a result of setting expectations and providing safety analysis tools, the four Hanford Site waste management nuclear facilities were able to integrate into one Master Waste Management Documented Safety Analysis (WM-DSA).

  18. Organic solvent topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COWLEY, W.L.

    1999-05-13

    This report provides the basis for closing the organic solvent safety issue. Sufficient information is presented to conclude that risk posed by an organic solvent fire is within risk evaluation guidelines. This report updates information contained in Analysis of Consequences of Postulated Solvent Fires in Hanford Site Waste Tanks. WHC-SD-WM-CN-032. Rev. 0A (Cowley et al. 1996). However, this document will not replace Cowley et al (1996) as the primary reference for the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) until the recently submitted BIO amendment (Hanson 1999) is approved by the US Department of Energy. This conclusion depends on the use of controls for preventing vehicle fuel fires and for limiting the use of flame cutting in areas where hot metal can fall on the waste surface.The required controls are given in the Tank Waste Remediation System Technical Safety Requirements (Noorani 1997b). This is a significant change from the conclusions presented in Revision 0 of this report. Revision 0 of this calcnote concluded that some organic solvent fire scenarios exceeded risk evaluation guidelines, even with controls imposed.

  19. CONTROL CHART DASHBOARDS MANAGING YOUR NUMBERS INSTEAD OF YOU NUMBER MANAGING YOU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PREVETTE, S.S.

    2006-11-15

    This paper, which documents Fluor Hanford's application of Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Dashboards to support planning and decision making, is a sequel to ''Leading with Leading Indicators'' that was presented at WM 05. This year's paper provides more detail on management's use of SPC and control charts and discusses their integration into an executive summary using the popular color-cod3ed dashboard methodology. Fluor Hanford has applied SPC in a non-traditional (that is non-manufacturing) manner. Dr. Shewhart's 75-year-old control-chart methodologies have been updated to modern data processing, but are still founded on his sound, tried and true principles. These methods are playing a key role in safety and quality at what has been called the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site played a pivotal role in the nation's defense, beginning in the 1940s when it was established as part of the Manhattan Project. After more than 50 years of producing nuclear weapons, Hanford--which covers 586 square miles in southeastern Washington state--is now focused on three outcomes: (1) restoring the Columbia River corridor for multiple uses; (2) transitioning the central plateau to support long-term waste management; and (3) putting DOE assets to work for the future.

  20. High power laser heating of low absorption materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, K.; Talghader, J.; Ogloza, A.; Thomas, J.

    2014-09-28

    A model is presented and confirmed experimentally that explains the anomalous behavior observed in continuous wave (CW) excitation of thermally isolated optics. Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) high reflective optical thin film coatings of HfO₂ and SiO₂were prepared with a very low absorption, about 7 ppm, measured by photothermal common-path interferometry. When illuminated with a 17 kW CW laser for 30 s, the coatings survived peak irradiances of 13 MW/cm², on 500 μm diameter spot cross sections. The temperature profile of the optical surfaces was measured using a calibrated thermal imaging camera for illuminated spot sizes ranging from 500 μm to 5 mm; about the same peak temperatures were recorded regardless of spot size. This phenomenon is explained by solving the heat equation for an optic of finite dimensions and taking into account the non-idealities of the experiment. An analytical result is also derived showing the relationship between millisecond pulse to CW laser operation where (1) the heating is proportional to the laser irradiance (W/m²) for millisecond pulses, (2) the heating is proportional to the beam radius (W/m) for CW, and (3) the heating is proportional to W/m∙ tan⁻¹(√(t)/m) in the transition region between the two.

  1. Nanostructured Cobalt Oxide Clusters in Mesoporous Silica as Efficient Oxygen-Evolving Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Feng; Frei, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The development of integrated artificial photosynthetic systems for the direct conversion of carbon dioxide and water to fuel depends on the availability of efficient and robust catalysts for the chemical transformations. Catalysts need to exhibit turnover frequency (TOF) and density (hence size) commensurate with the solar flux at ground level (1000Wm2, airmass (AM) 1.5)[1]to avoid wasting of incidentsolar photons. For example, a catalyst with a TOF of 100 s1 requires a density of one catalytic site per square nanometer. Catalysts with lower rates or taking up a larger space will require a high-surface-area, nanostructured support that affords tens to hundreds of catalytic sites per square nanometer. Furthermore, catalysts need to operate close to the thermodynamic potential of the redox reaction so that amaximum fraction of the solar photon energy is converted to chemical energy. Stability considerations favor all-inorganic oxide materials, as does avoidance of harsh reaction conditions of pH value or temperature.

  2. Nanocrystalline SiC and Ti3SiC2 Alloys for Reactor Materials: Thermal and Mechanical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Alvine, Kyle J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Shin, Yongsoon; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Borlaug, Brennan A.; Jiang, Weilin

    2014-04-01

    SiC-polymers (pure polycarbosilane and polycarbosilane filled with SiC-particles) are being combined with Si and TiC powders to create a new class of polymer-derived ceramics for consideration as advanced nuclear materials in a variety of applications. Compared to pure SiC these materials have increased fracture toughness with only slightly reduced thermal conductivity. Future work with carbon nanotube (CNT) mats will be introduced with the potential to increase the thermal conductivity and the fracture toughness. At present, this report documents the fabrication of a new class of monolithic polymer derived ceramics, SiC + SiC/Ti3SiC2 dual phase materials. The fracture toughness of the dual phase material was measured to be significantly greater than Hexoloy SiC using indentation fracture toughness testing. However, thermal conductivity of the dual phase material was reduced compared to Hexoloy SiC, but was still appreciable, with conductivities in the range of 40 to 60 W/(m K). This report includes synthesis details, optical and scanning electron microscopy images, compositional data, fracture toughness, and thermal conductivity data.

  3. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  4. o

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I D- 6 0 4 2 r m m m m port m fm f m T m jm tm r n m m m m m m m , wm rm m a m s m , %$, i 960 ?o m n , iU, i f 6i , m 0 *8 . m m m w m sm m m m m m m so , a . t . (11*1 ) - i 0 (m0I » ) JItete of IdaSjs I t , 196® 1, of Bos««]*6b R rojootr tlie iM ixm em o f in d .io fio g ttie in£ OSEtoSlOBW i s SSNHIOpldi^lt« t , tM tooiw i^ W w m m tim jf BoiwKNb DivtsleB* BdoonisstMBf B idiiW , 3. I«ai6F of Rxojoeti E. #. IfiOJUofi frefoooor of k . VooIe aojMMwsttjOmi^ «n gyw w fei Searlir a ll the

  5. NATIONAL GEODATABASE OF TIDAL STREAM POWER RESOURCE IN USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brennan T; Neary, Vincent S; Stewart, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    A geodatabase of tidal constituents is developed to present the regional assessment of tidal stream power resource in the USA. Tidal currents are numerically modeled with the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and calibrated with the available measurements of tidal current speeds and water level surfaces. The performance of the numerical model in predicting the tidal currents and water levels is assessed by an independent validation. The geodatabase is published on a public domain via a spatial database engine with interactive tools to select, query and download the data. Regions with the maximum average kinetic power density exceeding 500 W/m2 (corresponding to a current speed of ~1 m/s), total surface area larger than 0.5 km2 and depth greater than 5 m are defined as hotspots and documented. The regional assessment indicates that the state of Alaska (AK) has the largest number of locations with considerably high kinetic power density, followed by, Maine (ME), Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), California (CA), New Hampshire (NH), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), North and South Carolina (NC, SC), Georgia (GA), and Florida (FL).

  6. RESULTS OF PHYSICOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND CAUSTIC DISSOLUTION TESTS ON TANK 241-C-108 HEEL SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CALLAWAY WS; HUBER HJ

    2010-07-01

    Based on an ENRAF waste surface measurement taken February 1, 2009, double-shell tank (DST) 241-AN-106 (AN-106) contained approximately 278.98 inches (793 kgal) of waste. A zip cord measurement from the tank on February 1, 2009, indicated a settled solids layer of 91.7 inches in height (280 kgal). The supernatant layer in February 2009, by difference, was approximately 187 inches deep (514 kgal). Laboratory results from AN-106 February 1, 2009 (see Table 2) grab samples indicated the supernatant was below the chemistry limit that applied at the time as identified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements, Administrative Control (AC) 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls.' (The limits have since been removed from the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) and are captured in OSD-T-151-00007, Operating Specifications for the Double-Shell Storage Tanks.) Problem evaluation request WRPS-PER-2009-0218 was submitted February 9, 2009, to document the finding that the supernatant chemistry for grab samples taken from the middle and upper regions of the supernatant was noncompliant with the chemistry control limits. The lab results for the samples taken from the bottom region of the supernatant met AC 5.16 limits.

  7. Reengineering of waste management at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myrick, T.E.

    1997-08-01

    A reengineering evaluation of the waste management program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was conducted during the months of February through July 1997. The goal of the reengineering was to identify ways in which the waste management process could be streamlined and improved to reduce costs while maintaining full compliance and customer satisfaction. A Core Team conducted preliminary evaluations and determined that eight particular aspects of the ORNL waste management program warranted focused investigations during the reengineering. The eight areas included Pollution Prevention, Waste Characterization, Waste Certification/Verification, Hazardous/Mixed Waste Stream, Generator/WM Teaming, Reporting/Records, Disposal End Points, and On-Site Treatment/Storage. The Core Team commissioned and assembled Process Teams to conduct in-depth evaluations of each of these eight areas. The Core Team then evaluated the Process Team results and consolidated the 80 process-specific recommendations into 15 overall recommendations. Volume 2 consists of nine appendices which contain the Process Team reports and Benchmarking reports.

  8. 340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Detection Project W-302 Functional Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stordeur, R.T.

    1995-03-01

    This functional design criteria for the upgrade to the 340 radioactive liquid waste storage facility (Project W-302) specifically addresses the secondary containment issues at the current vault facility of the 340 Complex. This vault serves as the terminus for the Radioactive Liquid Waste System (RLWS). Project W-302 is necessary in order to bring this portion of the Complex into full regulatory compliance. The project title, ``340 Facility Secondary Containment and Leak Detection``, illustrates preliminary thoughts of taking corrective action directly upon the existing vault (such as removing the tanks, lining the vault, and replacing tanks). However, based on the conclusion of the engineering study, ``Engineering Study of the 300 Area Process Wastewater Handling System``, WHC-SD-WM-ER-277 (as well as numerous follow-up meetings with cognizant staff), this FDC prescribes a complete replacement of the current tank/vault system. This offers a greater array of tanks, and provides greater operating flexibility and ease of maintenance. This approach also minimizes disruption to RLWS services during ``tie-in``, as compared to the alternative of trying to renovate the old vault. The proposed site is within the current Complex area, and maintains the receipt of RLWS solutions through gravity flow.

  9. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  10. Key Elements of and Materials Performance Targets for Highly Insulating Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arild; Grynning, Steinar; Arasteh, Dariush; Jelle, Bjorn Petter; Goudey, Howdy

    2011-03-28

    The thermal performance of windows is important for energy efficient buildings. Windows typically account for about 30-50 percent of the transmission losses though the building envelope, even if their area fraction of the envelope is far less. The reason for this can be found by comparing the thermal transmittance (U-factor) of windows to the U-factor of their opaque counterparts (wall, roof and floor constructions). In well insulated buildings the U-factor of walls, roofs an floors can be between 0.1-0.2 W/(m2K). The best windows have U-values of about 0.7-1.0. It is therefore obvious that the U-factor of windows needs to be reduced, even though looking at the whole energy balance for windows (i.e. solar gains minus transmission losses) makes the picture more complex.In high performance windows the frame design and material use is of utmost importance, as the frame performance is usually the limiting factor for reducing the total window U-factor further. This paper describes simulation studies analyzing the effects on frame and edge-of-glass U-factors of different surface emissivities as well as frame material and spacer conductivities. The goal of this work is to define materials research targets for window frame components that will result in better frame thermal performance than is exhibited by the best products available on the market today.

  11. Tank 214-AW-105, grab samples, analytical results for the finalreport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esch, R.A.

    1997-02-20

    This document is the final report for tank 241-AW-105 grab samples. Twenty grabs samples were collected from risers 10A and 15A on August 20 and 21, 1996, of which eight were designated for the K Basin sludge compatibility and mixing studies. This document presents the analytical results for the remaining twelve samples. Analyses were performed in accordance with the Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and the Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DO). The results for the previous sampling of this tank were reported in WHC-SD-WM-DP-149, Rev. 0, 60-Day Waste Compatibility Safety Issue and Final Results for Tank 241-A W-105, Grab Samples 5A W-95-1, 5A W-95-2 and 5A W-95-3. Three supernate samples exceeded the TOC notification limit (30,000 microg C/g dry weight). Appropriate notifications were made. No immediate notifications were required for any other analyte. The TSAP requested analyses for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) for all liquids and centrifuged solid subsamples. The PCB analysis of the liquid samples has been delayed and will be presented in a revision to this document.

  12. REPORT ON ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION TESTING FOR TANK 241-AN-106 USING 2009 SAMPLING CAMPAIGN GRAB SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WYRWAS RB

    2010-05-11

    Based on an ENRAF waste surface measurement taken February 1, 2009, double-shell tank (DST) 24l-AN-l06 (AN-106) contained approximately 278.98 inches (793 kgal) of waste. A zip cord measurement from the tank on February 1, 2009, indicated a settled solids layer of 9l.7 inches in height (280 kgal). The supernatant layer in February 2009, by difference, was approximately 187 inches deep (514 kgal). Laboratory results from AN-l06 February 1, 2009 (see Table 2) grab samples indicated the supernatant was below the chemistry limit that applied at the time as identified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, 'Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements', Administrative Control (AC) 5.16, 'Corrosion Mitigation Controls.' The limits have since been removed from the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) and are captured in OSD-T-15l-00007, 'Operating Specifications for the Double-Shell Storage Tanks.' Problem evaluation request WRPS-PER-2009-0218 was submitted February 9,2009, to document the finding that the supernatant chemistry for grab samples taken from the middle and upper regions of the supernatant was noncompliant with the chemistry control limits. The lab results for the samples taken from the bottom region of the supernatant met AC 5.16 limits.

  13. Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrader, T. A.; Macbeth, P. J.

    2002-02-26

    On February 25, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLW/MLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLW/MLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified dispos al process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

  14. U.S. Bureau of Mines, Phase 1 Hanford low-level waste melter tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Oden, L.L.; O`Connor, W.K. [Bureau of Mines, Albany, OR (United States). Albany Research Center

    1995-11-01

    A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense wastes stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the melter offgas report on testing performed by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, Albany Research Center in Albany, Oregon. The Bureau of Mines (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate carbon electrode melter technology (also called carbon arc or electric arc) under WHC Subcontract number MMI-SVV-384216. The report contains description of the tests, observation, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. Testing consisted of melter feed preparation and three melter tests, the first of which was to fulfill the requirements of the statement of work (WHC-SD-EM-RD-044), and the second and third were to address issues identified during the first test. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas report issued as a separate document U.S. Bureau of Mines, Phase 1 Hanford Low-Level Waste Melter Tests: Melter Offgas Report (WHC-SD-WM-VI-032).

  15. Standardization of DOE Disposal Facilities Waste Acceptance Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHRADER, T.; MACBETH, P.

    2002-01-01

    On February 25, 2000, the US. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) for low-level and mixed low-level wastes (LLW/ MLLW) treatment and disposal. The ROD designated the disposal sites at Hanford and the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to dispose of LLWMLLW from sites without their own disposal facilities. DOE's Richland Operations Office (RL) and the National Nuclear Security Administration's Nevada Operations Office (NV) have been charged with effectively implementing the ROD. To accomplish this task NV and RL, assisted by their operating contractors Bechtel Nevada (BN), Fluor Hanford (FH), and Bechtel Hanford (BH) assembled a task team to systematically map out and evaluate the current waste acceptance processes and develop an integrated, standardized process for the acceptance of LLWMLLW. A structured, systematic, analytical process using the Six Sigma system identified disposal process improvements and quantified the associated efficiency gains to guide changes to be implemented. The review concluded that a unified and integrated Hanford/NTS Waste Acceptance Process would be a benefit to the DOE Complex, particularly the waste generators. The Six Sigma review developed quantitative metrics to address waste acceptance process efficiency improvements, and provides an initial look at development of comparable waste disposal cost models between the two disposal sites to allow quantification of the proposed improvements.

  16. Numerical study on coupled fluid flow and heat transfer process in parabolic trough solar collector tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Y.B.; He, Y.L.

    2010-10-15

    A unified two-dimensional numerical model was developed for the coupled heat transfer process in parabolic solar collector tube, which includes nature convection, forced convection, heat conduction and fluid-solid conjugate problem. The effects of Rayleigh number (Ra), tube diameter ratio and thermal conductivity of the tube wall on the heat transfer and fluid flow performance were numerically analyzed. The distributions of flow field, temperature field, local Nu and local temperature gradient were examined. The results show that when Ra is larger than 10{sup 5}, the effects of nature convection must be taken into account. With the increase of tube diameter ratio, the Nusselt number in inner tube (Nu{sub 1}) increases and the Nusselt number in annuli space (Nu{sub 2}) decreases. With the increase of tube wall thermal conductivity, Nu{sub 1} decreases and Nu{sub 2} increases. When thermal conductivity is larger than 200 W/(m K), it would have little effects on Nu and average temperatures. Due to the effect of the nature convection, along the circumferential direction (from top to down), the temperature in the cross-section decreases and the temperature gradient on inner tube surface increases at first. Then, the temperature and temperature gradients would present a converse variation at {theta} near {pi}. The local Nu on inner tube outer surface increases along circumferential direction until it reaches a maximum value then it decreases again. (author)

  17. Y-12 Plant decontamination and decommissioning technology logic diagram for Building 9201-4. Volume 3: Technology evaluation data sheets; Part A: Characterization, dismantlement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    The Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Technology Logic Diagram for Building 9201-4 (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) problems at Bldg. 9201-4 to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD uses information from the Strategic Roadmap for the Oak Ridge Reservation, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Technology Logic Diagram, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram, and a previous Hanford logic diagram. This TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed for sufficient development of these technologies to allow for technology transfer and application to D and D and waste management (WM) activities. It is essential that follow-on engineering studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in the TLD and by finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk. This report consists of the characterization and dismantlement data sheets.

  18. Status of the NRC Decommissioning Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlando, D. A.; Camper, L.; Buckley, J.; Pogue, E.; Banovac, K.

    2003-02-24

    On July 21, 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published the final rule on Radiological Criteria for License Termination (the License Termination Rule or LTR) as Subpart E to 10 CFR Part 20. NRC regulations require that materials licensees submit Decommissioning Plans to support the decommissioning of its facility if it is required by license condition, or if the procedures and activities necessary to carry out the decommissioning have not been approved by NRC and these procedures could increase the potential health and safety impacts to the workers or the public. NRC regulations also require that reactor licensees submit Post-shutdown Decommissioning Activities Reports and License Termination Plans to support the decommissioning of nuclear power facilities. This paper provides an update on the status of the NRC's decommissioning program that was presented during WM'02. It discusses the staff's current efforts to streamline the decommissioning process, current issues being faced in the decommissioning program, such as partial site release and restricted release of sites, as well as the status of the decommissioning of complex sites and those listed in the Site Decommissioning Management Plan. The paper discusses the status of permanently shut-down commercial power reactors and the transfer of complex decommissioning sites and sites listed on the SDMP to Agreement States. Finally the paper provides an update of the status of various tools and guidance the NRC is developing to assist licensees during decommissioning, including an effort to consolidate and risk-inform decommissioning guidance.

  19. TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

    2003-05-21

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

  20. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

    2003-05-21

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

  1. THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

    2003-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

  2. TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

    2003-05-01

    The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

  3. PHLUX: Photographic Flux Tools for Solar Glare and Flux

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-02

    A web-based tool to a) analytically and empirically quantify glare from reflected light and determine the potential impact (e.g., temporary flash blindness, retinal burn), and b) produce flux maps for central receivers. The tool accepts RAW digital photographs of the glare source (for hazard assessment) or the receiver (for flux mapping), as well as a photograph of the sun for intensity and size scaling. For glare hazard assessment, the tool determines the retinal irradiance (W/cm2)more » and subtended source angle for an observer and plots the glare source on a hazard spectrum (i.e., low-potential for flash blindness impact, potential for flash blindness impact, retinal burn). For flux mapping, the tool provides a colored map of the receiver scaled by incident solar flux (W/m2) and unwraps the physical dimensions of the receiver while accounting for the perspective of the photographer (e.g., for a flux map of a cylindrical receiver, the horizontal axis denotes receiver angle in degrees and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters; for a flat panel receiver, the horizontal axis denotes horizontal position in meters and the vertical axis denotes vertical position in meters). The flux mapping capability also allows the user to specify transects along which the program plots incident solar flux on the receiver.« less

  4. Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Vleet, R.J.

    1994-10-05

    This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

  5. Advanced development of PV encapsulants. Annual subcontract report, 30 December 1992--31 March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holley, W.; Agro, S.; Galica, J.; Thoma, L.; White, R.; Yorgensen, R.

    1994-11-01

    This report describes work under Phase II of a Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project to conduct laboratory problem definition with an emphasis on controlled aging studies to evaluate the influence of various compositional, processing, and operating parameters on ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) discoloration. In support of future accelerated UV aging studies (AAS) of coupon-sized EVA laminates, an Atlas xenon arc Ci35A Weather-Ometer was procured, installed, and calibrated for temperature and irradiance. In preparing for the AAS studies, UV-visible spectroscopy measurements were performed on various types of low-iron glass, representive of materials used for module superstrates. It was discovered that the transmission spectra of some of the grades in the UV region from 250 to 400 nm was significantly different. Older grades of Solatex and solite, and StarPhire 'cut off' well below 290 nm, while newer grades of Solatex and Solite, and StarPhire and Airphire greatly reduce the UV transmittance between 280 and 330 nm. Controlled aging studies are presently underway at 0.55 W/m2, 340 nm, and 100 degrees C, and we expect comparative data on yellowing to be available soon.

  6. Calibrating Pyrgeometers Outdoors Independent from the Reference Value of the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hickey, J. R.; Grobner, J.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.

    2006-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for the calibration of thermopile pyrgeometers in the absence of a reference for measurement of atmospheric longwave irradiance. This is referred to as the incoming longwave irradiance in this article. The method is based on an indoor calibration using a low-temperature blackbody source to obtain the calibration coefficients that determine the pyrgeometer's radiation characteristics. From these coefficients the outgoing irradiance of the pyrgeometer can be calculated. The pyrgeometer is then installed outdoors on an aluminum plate that is connected to a circulating temperature bath. By adjusting the temperature bath to the approximate value of the effective sky temperature, the pyrgeometer's body temperature is lowered changing the pyrgeometer's thermopile output. If the incoming longwave irradiance is stable, the slope of the outgoing irradiance versus the pyrgeometer's thermopile output is the outdoor net irradiance responsivity (RSnet), independent of the absolute value of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. The indoor calibration coefficients and the outdoor RSnet are then used in the pyrgeometer equation to calculate the incoming longwave irradiance. To evaluate this method, the calculated irradiance using the derived coefficients was compared to the irradiance measured using a pyrgeometer with direct traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This is maintained at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Switzerland. Based on results from four pyrgeometers calibrations, this method suggests measurement agreement with the WISG to within +/- 3 W/m2 for all sky conditions.

  7. Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2011-08-01

    We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

  8. Understanding Long-term Changes in Microbial Fuel Cell Performance Using Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Aaron, D; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Tsouris, Costas

    2010-01-01

    Changes in the anode, cathode, and solution/membrane impedances during enrichment of an anode microbial consortium weremeasuredusing electrochemicalimpedancespectroscopy. The consortium was enriched in a compact, flow-through porous electrode chamber coupled to an air-cathode. The anode impedance initially decreased from 296.1 to 36.3 in the first 43 days indicating exoelectrogenic biofilm formation. The external load on the MFC was decreased in a stepwise manner to allow further enrichment. MFC operation at a final load of 50 decreased the anode impedance to 1.4 , with a corresponding cathode and membrane/solution impedance of 12.1 and 3.0 , respectively. An analysis of the capacitive element suggested that most of the three-dimensional anode surface was participating in the bioelectrochemical reaction. The power density of the air-cathode MFC stabilized after 3 months of operation and stayed at 422 ( 42 mW/m2 (33 W/m3) for the next 3 months. The normalized anode impedance for theMFCwas 0.017 k cm2, a 28-fold reduction over that reported previously. This study demonstrates a unique ability of biological systems to reduce the electron transfer resistance in MFCs, and their potential for stable energy production over extended periods of time.

  9. Session 31B - Panel: Opportunities in the UK with the Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benda, Gary; Hayes, David; Gorham, Ron; Wareing, Mark; Simper, Adrian; Selby, Terry

    2006-07-01

    The NDA participated in a panel session 31B on Wednesday afternoon starting at 3:15. The NDA is a non-departmental public body, set up in April 2005 under the Energy Act 2004 to take strategic responsibility for the UK's nuclear legacy. Details of their organization and history are located on their web site at www.nda.gov.uk. Also copies of their Power Point presentations made at WM'06 are available on their web site. Their core objective is to ensure that the 20 civil public sector nuclear sites under our ownership are decommissioned and cleaned up safely, securely, cost effectively and in ways that protect the environment for this and future generations. They lead the development of a unified and coherent decommissioning strategy, working in partnership with regulators and site licensees to achieve best value, optimum impact on local communities, and the highest environmental standards. The NDA's main task is the decommissioning and clean up of civil nuclear sites. If the Government decides it is necessary, however, the Energy Act 2004 allows the NDA to take responsibility for sites currently operated by, or on behalf of, the Ministry of Defence (MoD). Resources will then be transferred from the MoD to meet the costs of clean up. The NDA made a number of presentations to allow conference delegates the opportunity to understand some of the major aspects of their work and to interact with NDA staff. These included the following topics and gave opportunity for audience discussion: - A brief presentation to update on progress by the NDA; - Outline of low level waste management and the prioritisation process; - Discussion of the competition schedule related to low level waste management and the Drigg site. The following presentations and handout were delivered in various sessions of the conference as noted below and are available on their web page including the WM'06 Plenary Session presentation by Sir Anthony Cleaver, Chairman of the NDA. During Session 31B, the following Power Point presentations were made. NDA Overview by David Hayes, Director of Special Projects National M and O Contractor Work Prioritisation Process by Mark Wareing, including topics on: - Need for prioritisation; - Development of the process; - Using the process as a measure of progress. Competition by Ron Gorham, Head of Procurement, including topics on: - The current model; - What NDA are actually competing; - The acquisition process; - NDA aspirations for competition; - NDA aspirations from the market. Low Level Waste Contracting in the UK by Adrian Simper, Expenditure and Programme Strategy Manager, including topics on: - Low Level Waste: NDA responsibilities, Definitions, Arisings; - Proposed NDA Procurement for LLW Management: Scope, Contracting approach, Timetable. The NDA responded to questions from the audience and also announced that the NDA will be holding a special Industry Day for potential contractors interested in the first NDA competition - the Low Level Waste Repository near Drigg in Cumbria. The event is scheduled on the 25-26 April 2006 with more details on their web site at www.nda.gov.uk. (authors)

  10. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

  11. Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-10-24

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements by adapting a theoretical approach previously developed for the AERONET measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1) an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2) and an offset (i.e. uncertainty) of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the upwelling and downwelling broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03), and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or 0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or 0.04). Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 Wm-2).

  12. MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite photoanode for visible light induced water splitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefzadeh, Samira; Reyhani, Ali; Naseri, Naimeh; Moshfegh, Alireza Z.

    2013-08-15

    The Multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films with different MWCNTs weight percentages were prepared by solgel method as visible light induced photoanode in water splitting reaction. Weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films was confirmed by TGA/DSC analysis. According to XPS analysis, oxygenated groups at the surface of the MWCNT and stoichiometric formation of WO{sub 3} thin films were determined, while the crystalline structure of the nanocomposite samples was studied by XRD indicating (0 0 2) peak of MWCNT in the monoclinic phase of WO{sub 3}. The influence of different weight percentage (wt%) of MWCNT on WO{sub 3} photoactivity showed that the electron conductivity, charge transfer and electron life time had improved as compared with the pure WO{sub 3}. Based on linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry measurements, the (1 wt%) MWCNT/WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films photoanode has a maximum photocurrent density of ?4.5 A/m{sup 2} and electron life time of about 57 s. - Graphical abstract: Photocurrent density versus time at constant potential (0.7 V) for the WO{sub 3} films containing different MWCNT weight percentages annealed at 400 C under 1000 Wm{sup ?2} visible photo-illumination. Display Omitted - Highlights: MWCNT/ WO{sub 3} nanocomposite thin films were synthesized using solgel derived method. TGA/DSC confirmed the weight percentage of MWCNT in the all nanocomposite thin films. XPS analysis revealed that WO{sub 3} was attached on the oxygenated group of MWCNT surface. The Highest Photoelectrochemical activity is achieved for (1 wt%)MWCNT/WO{sub 3} thin film.

  13. International Technology Exchange Division: 1993 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The Office of Technology Development (OTD) was established to ensure that reliable and acceptable technologies are available for implementation at DOE sites and that a technically trained work force is available to complete the EM mission by 2019. OTD established the International Technology Exchange Staff (ITES) to identify, evaluate, and acquire international technologies which can accelerate US DOE cleanup operations. ITES`s goal is to pursue international collaboration among government organizations, educational institutions, and private industry to identify world-wide needs and available technologies that will meet US environmental needs in general, and EM cleanup needs in particular; and establish mechanisms by which US government ER/WM technologies will be transferred to the US private sector for commercialization and export to international markets. ITES has developed the following strategic objectives to implement its international goals: develop and implement EM`s policy for international programs in accordance with DOE and US Government policies and regulations; establish efficient and predictable international technology transfer mechanisms; assist the US private sector in the commercialization and deployment of federally funded EM technologies and related knowledge in international markets; leverage US and non-US resources to accelerate international development and regulatory acceptance of EM technologies; contribute to the improvement of EM`s training of US students, scientists, and managers on international environmental issues. A summary and descriptions of program activities and accomplishments are given for 17 programs which comprise the four main areas of the ITES program: Activities with the Former Soviet Union, International Technology Transfer, International Cooperation, and Information Systems and Publications. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. Use of Computed X-ray Tomographic Data for Analyzing the Thermodynamics of a Dissociating Porous Sand/Hydrate Mixture

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Freifeld, Barry M.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Tomutsa, Liviu; Stern, Laura A.; Kirby, Stephen H.

    2002-02-28

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is a method that has been used extensively in laboratory experiments for measuring rock properties and fluid transport behavior. More recently, CT scanning has been applied successfully to detect the presence and study the behavior of naturally occurring hydrates. In this study, we used a modified medical CT scanner to image and analyze the progression of a dissociation front in a synthetic methane hydrate/sand mixture. The sample was initially scanned under conditions at which the hydrate is stable (atmospheric pressure and liquid nitrogen temperature, 77 K). The end of the sample holder was then exposed to the ambient air, and the core was continuously scanned as dissociation occurred in response to the rising temperature. CT imaging captured the advancing dissociation front clearly and accurately. The evolved gas volume was monitored as a function of time. Measured by CT, the advancing hydrate dissociation front was modeled as a thermal conduction problem explicitly incorporating the enthalpy of dissociation, using the Stefan moving-boundary-value approach. The assumptions needed to perform the analysis consisted of temperatures at the model boundaries. The estimated value for thermal conductivity of 2.6 W/m K for the remaining water ice/sand mixture is higher than expected based on conduction alone; this high value may represent a lumped parameter that incorporates the processes of heat conduction, methane gas convection, and any kinetic effects that occur during dissociation. The technique presented here has broad implications for future laboratory and field testing that incorporates geophysical techniques to monitor gas hydrate dissociation.

  15. Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

    2014-01-01

    Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

  16. Spatial Variability of Surface Irradiance Measurements at the Manus ARM Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-05-16

    The location of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site on Manus island in Papua New Guinea was chosen because it is very close the coast, in a geographically at, near-sea level area of the island, minimizing the impact of local island effects on the meteorology of the measurements [Ackerman et al., 1999]. In this study, we confirm that the Manus site is in deed less impacted by the island meteorology than slightly inland by comparing over a year of broadband surface irradiance and ceilometer measurements and derived quantities at the standard Manus site and a second location 7 km away as part of the AMIE-Manus campaign. The two sites show statistically similar distributions of irradiance and other derived quantities for all wind directions except easterly winds, when the inland site is down wind from the standard Manus site. Under easterly wind conditions, which occur 17% of the time, there is a higher occurrence of cloudiness at the down wind site likely do to land heating and orographic effects. This increased cloudiness is caused by shallow, broken clouds often with bases around 700 m in altitude. While the central Manus site consistently measures a frequency of occurrence of low clouds (cloud base height less than 1200 m) about 25+4% regardless of wind direction, the AMIE site has higher frequencies of low clouds (38%) when winds are from the east. This increase in low, locally produced clouds causes an additional -20 W/m2 shortwave surface cloud radiative effect at the AMIE site in easterly conditions than in other meteorological conditions that exhibit better agreement between the two sites.

  17. Modeling the Transport and Radiative Forcing of Taklimakan Dust over the Tibetan Plateau: A case study in the summer of 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Siyu; Huang, J.; Zhao, Chun; Qian, Yun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Ben

    2013-01-30

    The Weather Research and Forecasting model with chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to investigate an intense dust storm event during 26 to 30 July 2006 that originated over the Taklimakan Desert (TD) and transported to the northern slope of Tibetan Plateau (TP). The dust storm is initiated by the approach of a strong cold frontal system over the TD. In summer, the meridional transport of TD dust to the TP is favored by the thermal effect of the TP and the weakening of the East Asian westerly winds. During this dust storm, the transport of TD dust over the TP is further enhanced by the passage of the cold front. As a result, TD dust breaks through the planetary boundary layer and extends to the upper troposphere over the northern TP. TD dust flux arrived at the TP with a value of 6.6 Gg/day in this 5 day event but decays quickly during the southward migration over the TP due to dry deposition. The simulations show that TD dust cools the atmosphere near the surface and heats the atmosphere above with a maximum heating rate of 0.11 K day-1 at ~7 km over the TP. The event-averaged net radiative forcings of TD dust over the TP are -3.97, 1.61, and -5.58 Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere (TOA), in the atmosphere, and at the surface, respectively. The promising performance of WRF-Chem in simulating dust and its radiative forcing provides confidence for use in further investigation of climatic impact of TD dust over the TP.

  18. Hazard evaluation for 244-AR vault facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BRAUN, D.J.

    1999-08-25

    This document presents the results of a hazard identification and evaluation performed on the 244-AR Vault Facility to close a USQ (USQ No.TF-98-0785, Potential Inadequacy in Authorization Basis (PIAB): To Evaluate Miscellaneous Facilities Listed In HNF-2503 And Not Addressed In The TWRS Authorization Basis) that was generated as part of an evaluation of inactive TWRS facilities. A hazard evaluation for the Hanford Site 244-AR Vault Facility was performed. The process and results of the hazard evaluation are provided in this document. A previous hazard evaluation was performed for the 244-AR Vault Facility in 1996 in support of the Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) (HNF-SD-WM-BIO-001, 1998, Revision 1) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS). The results of that evaluation are provided in the BIO. Upon review of those results it was determined that hazardous conditions that could lead to the release of radiological and toxicological material from the 244-AR vaults due to flooding was not addressed in the original hazards evaluation. This supplemental hazard evaluation addresses this oversight of the original hazard evaluation. The results of the hazard evaluation were compared to the current TWRS BIO to identify any hazardous conditions where Authorization Basis (AB) controls may not be sufficient or may not exist. This document is not part of the AB and is not a vehicle for requesting changes to the AB. It is only intended to provide information about hazardous conditions associated with the condition and configuration of the 244-AR vault facility. The AB Control Decision process could be used to determine the applicability and adequacy of existing AB controls as well as any new controls that may be needed for the identified hazardous conditions associated with 244-AR vault flooding. This hazard evaluation does not constitute an accident analysis.

  19. Development of high-bandgap AlGaInP solar cells grown by organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Perl, Emmett E.; Simon, John; Geisz, John F.; Olavarria, Waldo; Young, Michelle; Duda, Anna; Friedman, Daniel J.; Steiner, Myles A.

    2016-03-29

    AlGaInP solar cells with bandgaps between 1.9 and 2.2 eV are investigated for use in next-generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. This quaternary alloy is of great importance to the development of III-V solar cells with five or more junctions and for cells optimized for operation at elevated temperatures because of the high bandgaps required in these designs. In this work, we explore the conditions for the organometallic vapor-phase epitaxy growth of AlGaInP and study their effects on cell performance. Initial efforts focused on developing ~2.0-eV AlGaInP solar cells with a nominal aluminum composition of 12%. Under the direct spectrum at 1000more » W/m2 (AM1.5D), the best of these samples had an open-circuit voltage of 1.59 V, a bandgap-voltage offset of 440 mV, a fill factor of 88.0%, and an efficiency of 14.8%. We then varied the aluminum composition of the alloy from 0% to 24% and were able to tune the bandgap of the AlGaInP layers from ~1.9 to ~2.2 eV. Furthermore, while the samples with a higher aluminum composition exhibited a reduced quantum efficiency and increased bandgap-voltage offset, the bandgap-voltage offset remained at 500 mV or less, up to a bandgap of ~2.1 eV.« less

  20. Accounting for radiative forcing from albedo change in future global land-use scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Andrew D.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Collins, William D.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a new method for quantifying radiative forcing from land use and land cover change (LULCC) within an integrated assessment model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The method relies on geographically differentiated estimates of radiative forcing from albedo change associated with major land cover transitions derived from the Community Earth System Model. We find that conversion of 1 km² of woody vegetation (forest and shrublands) to non-woody vegetation (crops and grassland) yields between 0 and –0.71 nW/m² of globally averaged radiative forcing determined by the vegetation characteristics, snow dynamics, and atmospheric radiation environment characteristic within each of 151 regions we consider globally. Across a set of scenarios designed to span a range of potential future LULCC, we find LULCC forcing ranging from –0.06 to –0.29 W/m² by 2070 depending on assumptions regarding future crop yield growth and whether climate policy favors afforestation or bioenergy crops. Inclusion of this previously uncounted forcing in the policy targets driving future climate mitigation efforts leads to changes in fossil fuel emissions on the order of 1.5 PgC/yr by 2070 for a climate forcing limit of 4.5 Wm–2, corresponding to a 12–67 % change in fossil fuel emissions depending on the scenario. Scenarios with significant afforestation must compensate for albedo-induced warming through additional emissions reductions, and scenarios with significant deforestation need not mitigate as aggressively due to albedo-induced cooling. In all scenarios considered, inclusion of albedo forcing in policy targets increases forest and shrub cover globally.

  1. Tank farms hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  2. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectivesreducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  3. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Area Groups 1-7 and 10 Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Brien, M.C.; Meservey, R.H.; Little, M.; Ferguson, J.S.; Gilmore, M.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) problems at the INEL to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to an environmental restoration need. It is essential that follow-on engineering and system studies be conducted to build on the output of this project. These studies will begin by selecting the most promising technologies identified in this TLD and finding an optimum mix of technologies that will provide a socially acceptable balance between cost and risk to meet the site windows of opportunity. The TLD consists of three separate volumes: Volume I includes the purpose and scope of the TLD, a brief history of the INEL Waste Area Groups, and environmental problems they represent. A description of the TLD, definitions of terms, a description of the technology evaluation process, and a summary of each subelement, is presented. Volume II (this volume) describes the overall layout and development of the TLD in logic diagram format. This section addresses the environmental restoration of contaminated INEL sites. Specific INEL problem areas/contaminants are identified along with technology solutions, the status of the technologies, precise science and technology needs, and implementation requirements. Volume III provides the Technology Evaluation Data Sheets (TEDS) for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) activities that are referenced by a TEDS codenumber in Volume II. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than provided for technologies in Volume II.

  4. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  5. Understanding the contribution of non-carbon dioxide gases in deep mitigation scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gernaat, David; Calvin, Katherine V.; Lucas, Paul; Luderer, Gunnar; Otto, Sander; Rao, Shilpa; Strefler, Jessica; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-07-01

    The combined 2010 emissions of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and the fluorinated gasses (F-gas) account for about 20-30% of total emissions and about 30% of radiative forcing. At the moment, most studies looking at reaching ambitious climate targets project the emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) to be reduced to zero (or less) by the end of the century. As for non-CO2 gases, the mitigation potential seem to be more constrained, we find that by the end of the century in the current deep mitigation scenarios non-CO2 emissions could form the lion’s share of remaining greenhouse gas emissions. In order to support effective climate policy strategies, in this paper we provide a more in-depth look at the role of non-CO2¬ emission sources (CH4, N2O and F-gases) in achieving deep mitigation targets (radiative forcing target of 2.8 W/m2 in 2100). Specifically, we look at the sectorial mitigation potential and the remaining non-CO2 emissions. By including a set of different models, we provide some insights into the associated uncertainty. Most of the remaining methane emissions in 2100 in the climate mitigation scenario come from the livestock sector. Strong reductions are seen in the energy supply sector across all models. For N2O, less reduction potential is seen compared to methane and the sectoral differences are larger between the models. The paper shows that the assumptions on remaining non-CO2 emissions are critical for the feasibility of reaching ambitious climate targets and the associated costs.

  6. Experimental and Numerical Examination of the Thermal Transmittance of High Performance Window Frames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen Ph.D., Arild; Goudey, Howdy; Kohler, Christian; Arasteh P.E., Dariush; Uvslokk, Sivert; Talev, Goce; Petter Jelle Ph.D., Bjorn

    2010-06-17

    While window frames typically represent 20-30percent of the overall window area, their impact on the total window heat transfer rates may be much larger. This effect is even greater in low-conductance (highly insulating) windows which incorporate very low conductance glazings. Developing low-conductance window frames requires accurate simulation tools for product research and development. The Passivhaus Institute in Germany states that windows (glazing and frames, combined) should have U-values not exceeding 0.80 W/(m??K). This has created a niche market for highly insulating frames, with frame U-values typically around 0.7-1.0 W/(m2 cdot K). The U-values reported are often based on numerical simulations according to international simulation standards. It is prudent to check the accuracy of these calculation standards, especially for high performance products before more manufacturers begin to use them to improve other product offerings. In this paper the thermal transmittance of five highly insulating window frames (three wooden frames, one aluminum frame and one PVC frame), found from numerical simulations and experiments, are compared. Hot box calorimeter results are compared with numerical simulations according to ISO 10077-2 and ISO 15099. In addition CFD simulations have been carried out, in order to use the most accurate tool available to investigate the convection and radiation effects inside the frame cavities. Our results show that available tools commonly used to evaluate window performance, based on ISO standards, give good overall agreement, but specific areas need improvement.

  7. B Plant Complex preclosure work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ADLER, J.G.

    1999-02-02

    This preclosure work plan describes the condition of the dangerous waste treatment storage, and/or disposal (TSD) unit after completion of the B Plant Complex decommissioning Transition Phase preclosure activities. This description includes waste characteristics, waste types, locations, and associated hazards. The goal to be met by the Transition Phase preclosure activities is to place the TSD unit into a safe and environmentally secure condition for the long-term Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Phase of the facility decommissioning process. This preclosure work plan has been prepared in accordance with Section 8.0 of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) (Ecology et al. 1996). The preclosure work plan is one of three critical Transition Phase documents, the other two being: B Plant End Points Document (WHC-SD-WM-TPP-054) and B Plant S&M plan. These documents are prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and its contractors with the involvement of Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). The tanks and vessels addressed by this preclosure work plan are limited to those tanks end vessels included on the B Plant Complex Part A, Form 3, Permit Application (DOE/RL-88-21). The criteria for determining which tanks or vessels are in the Part A, Form 3, are discussed in the following. The closure plan for the TSD unit will not be prepared until the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process is initiated, which follows the long-term S&M Phase. Final closure will occur during the Disposition Phase of the facility decommissioning process. The Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility (WESF) is excluded from the scope of this preclosure work plan.

  8. Preparing Los Alamos National Laboratory's Waste Management Program for the Future - 12175

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Scotty W.; Dorries, Alison M.; Singledecker, Steven [Los Alamos National Laboratory, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Henckel, George [Los Alamos Site Office, MS-A316, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The waste management program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is undergoing significant transition to establish a lean highly functioning waste management program that will succeed the large environmental cleanup waste management program. In the coming years, the environmental cleanup activities will be mostly completed and the effort will change to long-term stewardship. What will remain in waste management is a smaller program focused on direct off-site shipping to cost-effectively enable the enduring mission of the laboratory in support of the national nuclear weapons program and fundamental science and research. It is essential that LANL implement a highly functioning efficient waste management program in support of the core missions of the national weapons program and fundamental science and research - and LANL is well on the way to that goal. As LANL continues the transition process, the following concepts have been validated: - Business drivers including the loss of onsite disposal access and completion of major environmental cleanup activities will drive large changes in waste management strategies and program. - A well conceived organizational structure; formal management systems; a customer service attitude; and enthusiastic managers are core to a successful waste management program. - During times of organizational transition, a project management approach to managing change in a complex work place with numerous complex deliverables is successful strategy. - Early and effective engagement with waste generators, especially Project Managers, is critical to successful waste planning. - A well-trained flexible waste management work force is vital. Training plans should include continuous training as a strategy. - A shared fate approach to managing institutional waste decisions, such as the LANL Waste Management Recharge Board is effective. - An efficient WM program benefits greatly from modern technology and innovation in managing waste data and reports. - Use of six-sigma tools can help improve the quality and efficiency of waste management processes. - A fair, easy to understand, transparent, and well-overseen process for distributing the cost of waste disposal and waste program oversight is essential. (authors)

  9. Modeling a Typical Winter-time Dust Event over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalenderski, S.; Stenchikov, G.; Zhao, Chun

    2013-02-20

    We used WRF-Chem, a regional meteorological model coupled with an aerosol-chemistry component, to simulate various aspects of the dust phenomena over the Arabian Peninsula and Red Sea during a typical winter-time dust event that occurred in January 2009. The model predicted that the total amount of emitted dust was 18.3 Tg for the entire dust outburst period and that the two maximum daily rates were ~2.4 Tg/day and ~1.5 Tg/day, corresponding to two periods with the highest aerosol optical depth that were well captured by ground- and satellite-based observations. The model predicted that the dust plume was thick, extensive, and mixed in a deep boundary layer at an altitude of 3-4 km. Its spatial distribution was modeled to be consistent with typical spatial patterns of dust emissions. We utilized MODIS-Aqua and Solar Village AERONET measurements of the aerosol optical depth (AOD) to evaluate the radiative impact of aerosols. Our results clearly indicated that the presence of dust particles in the atmosphere caused a significant reduction in the amount of solar radiation reaching the surface during the dust event. We also found that dust aerosols have significant impact on the energy and nutrient balances of the Red Sea. Our results showed that the simulated cooling under the dust plume reached 100 W/m2, which could have profound effects on both the sea surface temperature and circulation. Further analysis of dust generation and its spatial and temporal variability is extremely important for future projections and for better understanding of the climate and ecological history of the Red Sea.

  10. Nano-Scale Fission Product Phases in an Irradiated U-7Mo Alloy Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis Keiser, Jr.; Brandon Miller; James Madden; Jan-Fong Jue; Jian Gan

    2014-09-01

    Irradiated nuclear fuel is a very difficult material to characterize. Due to the large radiation fields associated with these materials, they are hard to handle and typically have to be contained in large hot cells. Even the equipment used for performing characterization is housed in hot cells or shielded glove boxes. The result is not only a limitation in the techniques that can be employed for characterization, but also a limitation in the size of features that can be resolved The most standard characterization techniques include light optical metallography (WM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). These techniques are applied to samples that are typically prepared using grinding and polishing approaches that will always generate some mechanical damage on the sample surface. As a result, when performing SEM analysis, for example, the analysis is limited by the quality of the sample surface that can be prepared. However, a new approach for characterizing irradiated nuclear fuel has recently been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. It allows for a dramatic improvement in the quality of characterization that can be performed when using an instrument like an SEM. This new approach uses a dual-beam scanning microscope, where one of the beams isa focused ion beam (FIB), which can be used to generate specimens of irradiated fuel (-10m x 10m) for microstructural characterization, and the other beam is the electron beam of an SEM. One significant benefit of this approach is that the specimen surface being characterized has received much less damage (and smearing) than is caused by the more traditional approaches, which enables the imaging of nanometer sized microstructural features in the SEM. The process details are for an irradiated low-enriched uranium (LEU) U-Mo alloy fuel Another type of irradiated fuel that has been characterized using this technique is a mixed oxide fuel.

  11. A Sensitivity Analysis of a Thin Film Conductivity Estimation Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMasters, Robert L; Dinwiddie, Ralph Barton

    2010-01-01

    An analysis method was developed for determining the thermal conductivity of a thin film on a substrate of known thermal properties using the flash diffusivity method. In order to determine the thermal conductivity of the film using this method, the volumetric heat capacity of the film must be known, as determined in a separate experiment. Additionally, the thermal properties of the substrate must be known, including conductivity and volumetric heat capacity. The ideal conditions for the experiment are a low conductivity film adhered to a higher conductivity substrate. As the film becomes thinner with respect to the substrate or, as the conductivity of the film approaches that of the substrate, the estimation of thermal conductivity of the film becomes more difficult. The present research examines the effect of inaccuracies in the known parameters on the estimation of the parameter of interest, the thermal conductivity of the film. As such, perturbations are introduced into the other parameters in the experiment, which are assumed to be known, to find the effect on the estimated thermal conductivity of the film. A baseline case is established with the following parameters: Substrate thermal conductivity 1.0 W/m-K Substrate volumetric heat capacity 106 J/m3-K Substrate thickness 0.8 mm Film thickness 0.2 mm Film volumetric heat capacity 106 J/m3-K Film thermal conductivity 0.01 W/m-K Convection coefficient 20 W/m2-K Magnitude of heat absorbed during the flash 1000 J/m2 Each of these parameters, with the exception of film thermal conductivity, the parameter of interest, is varied from its baseline value, in succession, and placed into a synthetic experimental data file. Each of these data files is individually analyzed by the program to determine the effect on the estimated film conductivity, thus quantifying the vulnerability of the method to measurement errors.

  12. Decontamination Strategy for Large Area and/or Equipment Contaminated with Chemical and Biological Agents using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoske, Richard; Kennedy, Patrick; Duty, Chad E; Smith, Rob R; Huxford, Theodore J; Bonavita, Angelo M; Engleman, Greg; Vass, Arpad Alexander; Griest, Wayne H; Ilgner, Ralph H; Brown, Gilbert M

    2009-04-01

    A strategy for the decontamination of large areas and or equipment contaminated with Biological Warfare Agents (BWAs) and Chemical Warfare Agents (CWAs) was demonstrated using a High Energy Arc Lamp (HEAL) photolysis system. This strategy offers an alternative that is potentially quicker, less hazardous, generates far less waste, and is easier to deploy than those currently fielded by the Department of Defense (DoD). For example, for large frame aircraft the United States Air Force still relies on the combination of weathering (stand alone in environment), air washing (fly aircraft) and finally washing the aircraft with Hot Soapy Water (HSW) in an attempt to remove any remaining contamination. This method is laborious, time consuming (upwards of 12+ hours not including decontamination site preparation), and requires large amounts of water (e.g., 1,600+ gallons for a single large frame aircraft), and generates large amounts of hazardous waste requiring disposal. The efficacy of the HEAL system was demonstrated using diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP) a G series CWA simulant, and Bacillus globigii (BG) a simulant of Bacillus anthracis. Experiments were designed to simulate the energy flux of a field deployable lamp system that could stand-off 17 meters from a 12m2 target area and uniformly expose a surface at 1360 W/m2. The HEAL system in the absence of a catalyst reduced the amount of B. globigii by five orders of magnitude at a starting concentration of 1.63 x 107 spores. In the case of CWA simulants, the HEAL system in the presence of the catalyst TiO2 effectively degraded DIMP sprayed onto a 100mm diameter Petri dish in 5 minutes.

  13. Energy production from food industry wastewaters using bioelectrochemical cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Choo Yieng

    2009-01-01

    Conversion of waste and renewable resources to energy using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is an upcoming technology for enabling a cleaner and sustainable environment. This paper assesses the energy production potential from the US food industry wastewater resource. It also reports on an experimental study investigating conversion of wastewater from a local milk dairy plant to electricity. An MFC anode biocatalyst enriched on model sugar and organic acid substrates was used as the inoculum for the dairy wastewater MFC. The tests were conducted using a two-chamber MFC with a porous three dimensional anode and a Pt/C air-cathode. Power densities up to 690 mW/m2 (54 W/m3) were obtained. Analysis of the food industry wastewater resource indicated that MFCs can potentially recover 2 to 260 kWh/ton of food processed from wastewaters generated during food processing, depending on the biological oxygen demand and volume of water used in the process. A total of 1960 MW of power can potentially be produced from US milk industry wastewaters alone. Hydrogen is an alternate form of energy that can be produced using bioelectrochemical cells. Approximately 2 to 270 m3 of hydrogen can be generated per ton of the food processed. Application of MFCs for treatment of food processing wastewaters requires further investigations into electrode design, materials, liquid flow management, proton transfer, organic loading and scale-up to enable high power densities at the larger scale. Potential for water recycle also exists, but requires careful consideration of the microbiological safety and regulatory aspects and the economic feasibility of the process.

  14. Controlling Accumulation of Fermentation Inhibitors in Biorefinery Recycle Water Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Leak, David; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Andras, Calin

    2009-01-01

    Background Microbial fuel cells (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cells are electrical devices that treat water using microorganisms and convert soluble organic matter into electricity and hydrogen, respectively. Emerging cellulosic biorefineries are expected to use large amounts of water during production of ethanol. Pretreatment of cellulosic biomass results in production of fermentation inhibitors which accumulate in process water and make the water recycle process difficult. Use of MFCs to remove the inhibitory sugar and lignin degradation products from recycle water is investigated in this study. Results Use of an MFC to reduce the levels of furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, vanillic acid, 4- hydroxybenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxyacetophenone while simultaneously producing electricity is demonstrated here. An integrated MFC design approach was used which resulted in high power densities for the MFC, reaching up to 3700mW/m2 (356W/m3 net anode volume) and a coulombic efficiency of 69%. The exoelectrogenic microbial consortium enriched in the anode was characterized using a 16S rRNA clone library method. A unique exoelectrogenic microbial consortium dominated by -Proteobacteria (50%), along with -Proteobacteria (28%), -Proteobacteria (14%), -Proteobacteria (6%) and others was identified. The consortium demonstrated broad substrate specificity, ability to handle high inhibitor concentrations (5 to 20mM) with near complete removal, while maintaining long-term stability with respect to power production. Conclusions Use of MFCs for removing fermentation inhibitors has implications for: 1) enabling higher ethanol yields at high biomass loading in cellulosic ethanol biorefineries, 2) improved water recycle and 3) electricity production up to 25% of total biorefinery power needs.

  15. Comparison of TG-43 and TG-186 in breast irradiation using a low energy electronic brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Shane A.; Landry, Guillaume; Reniers, Brigitte; Fonseca, Gabriel Paiva; Beaulieu, Luc; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The recently updated guidelines for dosimetry in brachytherapy in TG-186 have recommended the use of model-based dosimetry calculations as a replacement for TG-43. TG-186 highlights shortcomings in the water-based approach in TG-43, particularly for low energy brachytherapy sources. The Xoft Axxent is a low energy (<50 kV) brachytherapy system used in accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). Breast tissue is a heterogeneous tissue in terms of density and composition. Dosimetric calculations of seven APBI patients treated with Axxent were made using a model-based Monte Carlo platform for a number of tissue models and dose reporting methods and compared to TG-43 based plans. Methods: A model of the Axxent source, the S700, was created and validated against experimental data. CT scans of the patients were used to create realistic multi-tissue/heterogeneous models with breast tissue segmented using a published technique. Alternative water models were used to isolate the influence of tissue heterogeneity and backscatter on the dose distribution. Dose calculations were performed using Geant4 according to the original treatment parameters. The effect of the Axxent balloon applicator used in APBI which could not be modeled in the CT-based model, was modeled using a novel technique that utilizes CAD-based geometries. These techniques were validated experimentally. Results were calculated using two dose reporting methods, dose to water (D{sub w,m}) and dose to medium (D{sub m,m}), for the heterogeneous simulations. All results were compared against TG-43-based dose distributions and evaluated using dose ratio maps and DVH metrics. Changes in skin and PTV dose were highlighted. Results: All simulated heterogeneous models showed a reduced dose to the DVH metrics that is dependent on the method of dose reporting and patient geometry. Based on a prescription dose of 34 Gy, the average D{sub 90} to PTV was reduced by between ?4% and ?40%, depending on the scoring method, compared to the TG-43 result. Peak skin dose is also reduced by 10%15% due to the absence of backscatter not accounted for in TG-43. The balloon applicator also contributed to the reduced dose. Other ROIs showed a difference depending on the method of dose reporting. Conclusions: TG-186-based calculations produce results that are different from TG-43 for the Axxent source. The differences depend strongly on the method of dose reporting. This study highlights the importance of backscatter to peak skin dose. Tissue heterogeneities, applicator, and patient geometries demonstrate the need for a more robust dose calculation method for low energy brachytherapy sources.

  16. A WRF Simulation of the Impact of 3-D Radiative Transfer on Surface Hydrology over the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liou, K. N.; Gu, Y.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lee, W- L.; Fovell, R. G.

    2013-12-03

    We investigate 3-D mountains/snow effects on solar flux distributions and their impact on surface hydrology over the western United States, specifically the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, applied at a 30 km grid resolution, is used in conjunction with a 3-D radiative transfer parameterization covering a time period from 1 November 2007 to 31 May 2008, during which abundant snowfall occurred. A comparison of the 3-D WRF simulation with the observed snow water equivalent (SWE) and precipitation from Snowpack Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites shows reasonable agreement in terms of spatial patterns and daily and seasonal variability, although the simulation generally has a positive precipitation bias. We show that 3-D mountain features have a profound impact on the diurnal and monthly variation of surface radiative and heat fluxes, and on the consequent elevation dependence of snowmelt and precipitation distributions. In particular, during the winter months, large deviations (3-DPP, in which PP denotes the plane-parallel approach) of the monthly mean surface solar flux are found in the morning and afternoon hours due to shading effects for elevations below 2.5 km. During spring, positive deviations shift to the earlier morning. Over mountaintops higher than 3 km, positive deviations are found throughout the day, with the largest values of 40-60Wm?2 occurring at noon during the snowmelt season of April to May. The monthly SWE deviations averaged over the entire domain show an increase in lower elevations due to reduced snowmelt, which leads to a reduction in cumulative runoff. Over higher elevation areas, positive SWE deviations are found because of increased solar radiation available at the surface. Overall, this study shows that deviations of SWE due to 3-D radiation effects range from an increase of 18%at the lowest elevation range (1.5-2 km) to a decrease of 8% at the highest elevation range (above 3 km). Since lower elevation areas occupy larger fractions of the land surface, the net effect of 3-D radiative transfer is to extend snowmelt and snowmelt-driven runoff into the warm season. Because 60-90% of water resources originate from mountains worldwide, the aforementioned differences in simulated hydrology due solely to 3-D interactions between solar radiation and mountains/snow merit further investigation in order to understand the implications of modeling mountain water resources, and these resources vulnerability to climate change and air pollution.

  17. Update on electron-cloud power deposition for the LHC arcdipoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furman, Miguel A.; Chaplin, Vernon H.

    2006-01-30

    We revisit the estimation of the power deposited by the electron cloud (EC) in the arc dipoles of the LHC by means of simulations. We adopt, as simulation input, a set of electron-related parameters closely resembling those used in recent simulations at CERN [1]. We explore values for the bunch population Nb in the range 0.4 x 10^11 <= Nb <=1.6 x 10^11, peak secondary electron yield (SEY) delta max in the range 1.0 <= delta max <= 2.0, and bunch spacing tb either 25 or 75 ns. For tb=25 ns we find that the EC average power deposition per unit length of beam pipe, dPbar/dz, will exceed the available cooling capacity, which we take to be 1.7 W/m at nominal Nb [2], if delta max exceeds ~1.3, but dPbar/dz will be comfortably within the cooling capacity if delta max <= 1.2. For tb =75 ns dPbar/dz exceeds the cooling capacity only when delta max > 2 and Nb > 1.5 x 10^11 taken in combination. The rediffused component of the secondary electron emission spectrum plays a significant role: if we artificially suppress this component while keeping delta max fixed, dPbar/dz is roughly cut in half for most values of Nb explored here, and in this case we find good agreement with the results in Ref. 1, as expected. We provide a fairly detailed explanation of the mechanism responsible for such a relatively large effect. We assess the sensitivity of our results to numerical simulation parameters, and to physical parameters such as the photoelectric yield, bunch train length, etc. Owing to the lack of detailed knowledge of the electron emission spectrum, the sensitivity of dPbar/dz to the rediffused component appears to be the most significant source of uncertainty in our results. Nevertheless, taking our results as a whole, the condition delta max <= 1.2 seems to be a conservative requirement for the cooling capacity not to be exceeded.

  18. Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce A. Wright

    2012-03-27

    Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

  19. Optimizing Distributed Energy Resources and building retrofits with the strategic DER-CAModel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stadler, M.; Groissböck, M.; Cardoso, G.; Marnay, C.

    2014-08-05

    The pressuring need to reduce the import of fossil fuels as well as the need to dramatically reduce CO2 emissions in Europe motivated the European Commission (EC) to implement several regulations directed to building owners. Most of these regulations focus on increasing the number of energy efficient buildings, both new and retrofitted, since retrofits play an important role in energy efficiency. Overall, this initiative results from the realization that buildings will have a significant impact in fulfilling the 20/20/20-goals of reducing the greenhouse gas emissions by 20%, increasing energy efficiency by 20%, and increasing the share of renewables to 20%,more » all by 2020. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) is an optimization tool used to support DER investment decisions, typically by minimizing total annual costs or CO2 emissions while providing energy services to a given building or microgrid site. This document shows enhancements made to DER-CAM to consider building retrofit measures along with DER investment options. Specifically, building shell improvement options have been added to DER-CAM as alternative or complementary options to investments in other DER such as PV, solar thermal, combined heat and power, or energy storage. The extension of the mathematical formulation required by the new features introduced in DER-CAM is presented and the resulting model is demonstrated at an Austrian Campus building by comparing DER-CAM results with and without building shell improvement options. Strategic investment results are presented and compared to the observed investment decision at the test site. Results obtained considering building shell improvement options suggest an optimal weighted average U value of about 0.53 W/(m2K) for the test site. This result is approximately 25% higher than what is currently observed in the building, suggesting that the retrofits made in 2002 were not optimal. Furthermore, the results obtained with DER-CAM illustrate the complexity of interactions between DER and passive measure options, showcasing the need for a holistic optimization approach to effectively optimize energy costs and CO2 emissions. Lastly, the simultaneous optimization of building shell improvements and DER investments enables building owners to take one step further towards nearly zero energy buildings (nZEB) or nearly zero carbon emission buildings (nZCEB), and therefore support the 20/20/20 goals.« less

  20. DAiSES: Dynamic Adaptivity in Support of Extreme Scale Department of Energy Project No. ER25622 Prime Contract No. DE-FG02-04ER25622 Final Report for September 15, 2004-September 14, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PI: Patricia J. Teller, Ph.D.

    2009-05-05

    The DAiSES project [Te04] was focused on enabling conventional operating systems, in particular, those running on extreme scale systems, to dynamically customize system resource management in order to offer applications the best possible environment in which to execute. Such dynamic adaptation allows operating systems to modify the execution environment in response to changes in workload behavior and system state. The main challenges of this project included determination of what operating system (OS) algorithms, policies, and parameters should be adapted, when to adapt them, and how to adapt them. We addressed these challenges by using a combination of static analysis and runtime monitoring and adaptation to identify a priori profitable targets of adaptation and effective heuristics that can be used to dynamically trigger adaptation. Dynamic monitoring and adaptation of the OS was provided by either kernel modifications or the use of KernInst and Kperfmon [Wm04]. Since Linux, an open source OS, was our target OS, patches submitted by kernel developers and researchers often facilitated kernel modifications. KernInst operates on unmodified commodity operating systems, i.e., Solaris and Linux; it is fine-grained, thus, there were few constraints on how the underlying OS can be modified. Dynamically adaptive functionality of operating systems, both in terms of policies and parameters, is intended to deliver the maximum attainable performance of a computational environment and meet, as best as possible, the needs of high-performance applications running on extreme scale systems, while meeting system constraints. DAiSES research endeavored to reach this goal by developing methodologies for dynamic adaptation of OS parameters and policies to manage stateful and stateless resources [Te06] and pursuing the following two objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms to dynamically sense, analyze, and adjust common performance metrics, fluctuating workload situations, and overall system environment conditions. (2) Demonstration, via Linux prototypes and experiments, of dynamic self-tuning and self-provisioning in HPC environments. From a high level, the DAiSES methodology, depicted in Figure 1, includes characterization of application resource usage patterns, identification of candidate (profitable) adaptation targets, determination of feasible adaptation ranges, definition of heuristics to trigger adaptation, design and implementation of OS monitoring, triggering, and adaptation code, and quantification of performance gains.

  1. Safety equipment list for the light duty utility arm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, G.A.

    1998-03-02

    The initial issue (Revision 0) of this Safety Equipment List (SEL) for the Light Duty Utility Arm (LDUA) requires an explanation for both its existence and its being what it is. All LDUA documentation leading up to creation of this SEL, and the SEL itself, is predicated on the LDUA only being approved for use in waste tanks designated as Facility Group 3, i.e., it is not approved for use in Facility Group 1 or 2 waste tanks. Facility Group 3 tanks are those in which a spontaneous or induced hydrogen gas release would be small, localized, and would not exceed 25% of the LFL when mixed with the remaining air volume in the dome space; exceeding these parameters is considered unlikely. Thus, from a NFPA flammable gas environment perspective the waste tank interior is not classified as a hazardous location. Furthermore, a hazards identification and evaluation (HNF-SD-WM-HIE-010, REV 0) performed for the LDUA system concluded that the consequences of actual LDUA system postulated accidents in Flammable Gas Facility Group 3 waste tanks would have either NO IMPACT or LOW IMPACT on the offsite public and onsite worker. Therefore, from a flammable gas perspective, there is not a rationale for classifying any of SSCs associated with the LDUA as either Safety Class (SC) or Safety Significant (SS) SSCs, which, by default, categorizes them as General Service (GS) SSCs. It follows then, based on current PHMC procedures (HNF-PRO-704 and HNF-IP-0842, Vol IV, Section 5.2) for SEL creation and content, and from a flammable gas perspective, that an SEL is NOT REQ@D HOWEVER!!! There is both a precedent and a prudency to capture all SSCS, which although GS, contribute to a Defense-In-Depth (DID) approach to the design and use of equipment in potentially flammable gas environments. This Revision 0 of the LDUA SEL has been created to capture these SSCs and they are designated as GS-DID in this document. The specific reasons for doing this are listed.

  2. Effect of Terrestrial and Marine Organic Aerosol on Regional and Global Climate: Model Development, Application, and Verification with Satellite Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Zhang, Yang; Kamykowski, Daniel

    2012-03-28

    In this DOE project the improvements to parameterization of marine primary organic matter (POM) emissions, hygroscopic properties of marine POM, marine isoprene derived secondary organic aerosol (SOA) emissions, surfactant effects, new cloud droplet activation parameterization have been implemented into Community Atmosphere Model (CAM 5.0), with a seven mode aerosol module from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)’s Modal Aerosol Model (MAM7). The effects of marine aerosols derived from sea spray and ocean emitted biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) on microphysical properties of clouds were explored by conducting 10 year CAM5.0-MAM7 model simulations at a grid resolution 1.9°×2.5° with 30 vertical layers. Model-predicted relationship between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of CCN in remote marine atmosphere was compared to data from the A-Train satellites (MODIS, CALIPSO, AMSR-E). Model simulations show that on average, primary and secondary organic aerosol emissions from the ocean can yield up to 20% increase in Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) at 0.2% Supersaturation, and up to 5% increases in droplet number concentration of global maritime shallow clouds. Marine organics were treated as internally or externally mixed with sea salt. Changes associated with cloud properties reduced (absolute value) the model-predicted short wave cloud forcing from -1.35 Wm-2 to -0.25 Wm-2. By using different emission scenarios, and droplet activation parameterizations, this study suggests that addition of marine primary aerosols and biologically generated reactive gases makes an important difference in radiative forcing assessments. All baseline and sensitivity simulations for 2001 and 2050 using global-through-urban WRF/Chem (GU-WRF) were completed. The main objective of these simulations was to evaluate the capability of GU-WRF for an accurate representation of the global atmosphere by exploring the most accurate configuration of physics options in GWRF for global scale modeling in 2001 at a horizontal grid resolution of 1° x 1°. GU-WRF model output was evaluated using observational datasets from a variety of sources including surface based observations (NCDC and BSRN), model reanalysis (NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis and CMAP), and remotely-sensed data (TRMM) to evaluate the ability of GU-WRF to simulate atmospheric variables at the surface as well as aloft. Explicit treatment of nanoparticles produced from new particle formation in GU-WRF/Chem-MADRID was achieved by expanding particle size sections from 8 to 12 to cover particles with the size range of 1.16 nm to 11.6 µm. Simulations with two different nucleation parameterizations were conducted for August 2002 over a global domain at a 4º by 5º horizontal resolution. The results are evaluated against field measurement data from the 2002 Aerosol Nucleation and Real Time Characterization Experiment (ANARChE) in Atlanta, Georgia, as well as satellite and reanalysis data. We have also explored the relationship between “clean marine” aerosol optical properties and ocean surface wind speed using remotely sensed data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on board the CALIPSO satellite and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) on board the AQUA satellite. Detailed data analyses were carried out over 15 regions selected to be representative of different areas of the global ocean for the time period from June 2006 to April 2011. We show that for very low (less than 4 m s-1) and very high (more than 12 m s-1) wind speed conditions the mean CALIPSO-derived aerosol optical depth (AOD) has little dependency on the surface wind speed. For an intermediate (between 4 and 12 m s-1) marine AOD was linearly correlated with the surface wind speed values, with a slope of 0.0062 s m-1. Results of our study suggest that considerable improvements to both optical properties of marine aerosols and their production mechanisms can be achieved by discriminating “clean marine” aerosols (or sea salt particles) from all other types of aerosols present over the ocean.

  3. Heat Flow and Gas Hydrates on the Continental Margin of India: Building on Results from NGHP Expedition 01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trehu, Anne; Kannberg, Peter

    2011-06-30

    The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 presented the unique opportunity to constrain regional heat flow derived from seismic observations by using drilling data in three regions on the continental margin of India. The seismic bottom simulating reflection (BSR) is a well-documented feature in hydrate bearing sediments, and can serve as a proxy for apparent heat flow if data are available to estimate acoustic velocity and density in water and sediments, thermal conductivity, and seafloor temperature. Direct observations of temperature at depth and physical properties of the sediment obtained from drilling can be used to calibrate the seismic observations, decreasing the uncertainty of the seismically-derived estimates. Anomalies in apparent heat flow can result from a variety of sources, including sedimentation, erosion, topographic refraction and fluid flow. We constructed apparent heat flow maps for portions of the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin, the Mahanadi basin, and the Andaman basin and modeled anomalies using 1-D conductive thermal models. Apparent heat flow values in the Krishna-Godavari (K-G) basin and Mahanadi basin are generally 0.035 to 0.055 watts per square meter (W/m2). The borehole data show an increase in apparent heat flow as water depth increases from 900 to 1500 m. In the SW part of the seismic grid, 1D modeling of the effect of sedimentation on heat flow shows that ~50% of the observed increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth can be attributed to trapping of sediments behind a "toe-thrust" ridge that is forming along the seaward edge of a thick, rapidly accumulating deltaic sediment pile. The remainder of the anomaly can be explained either by a decrease in thermal conductivity of the sediments filling the slope basin or by lateral advection of heat through fluid flow along stratigraphic horizons within the basin and through flexural faults in the crest of the anticline. Such flow probably plays a role in bringing methane into the ridge formed by the toe-thrust. Because of the small anomaly due to this process and the uncertainty in thermal conductivity, we did not model this process explicitly. In the NE part of the K-G basin seismic grid, a number of local heat flow lows and highs are observed, which can be attributed to topographic refraction and to local fluid flow along faults, respectively. No regional anomaly can be resolved. Because of lack of continuity between the K-G basin sites within the seismic grid and those ~70 km to the NE in water depths of 1200 to 1500 m, we do not speculate on the reason for higher heat flow at these depths. The Mahanadi basin results, while limited in geographic extent, are similar to those for the KG basin. The Andaman basin exhibits much lower apparent heat flow values, ranging from 0.015 to 0.025 W/m2. Heat flow here also appears to increase with increasing water depth. The very low heat flow here is among the lowest heat flow observed anywhere and gives rise to a very thick hydrate stability zone in the sediments. Through 1D models of sedimentation (with extremely high sedimentation rates as a proxy for tectonic thickening), we concluded that the very low heat flow can probably be attributed to the combined effects of high sedimentation rate, low thermal conductivity, tectonic thickening of sediments and the cooling effect of a subducting plate in a subduction zone forearc. Like for the K-G basin, much of the local variability can be attributed to topography. The regional increase in heat flow with water depth remains unexplained because the seismic grid available to us did not extend far enough to define the local tectonic setting of the slope basin controlling this observational pattern. The results are compared to results from other margins, both active and passive. While an increase in apparent heat flow with increasing water depth is widely observed, it is likely a result of different processes in different places. The very low heat flow due to sedimentation and tectonics in the Andaman basin is at the low end of glob

  4. Inclusion of cool roofs in nonresidential Title 24 prescriptive requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Konopacki, Steve; Bretz, Sarah

    2002-12-15

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance (high ability to reflect sunlight) and high thermal emittance (high ability to radiate heat) tend to stay cool in the sun. The same is true of low-emittance roofs with exceptionally high solar reflectance. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof tends to decrease cooling electricity use, cooling power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower the ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. DOE-2.1E building energy simulations indicate that use of a cool roofing material on a prototypical California nonresidential building with a low-sloped roof yields average annual cooling energy savings of approximately 300 kWh/1000 ft2 [3.2 kWh/m2], average annual natural gas deficits of 4.9 therm/1000 ft2 [5.6 MJ/m2], average source energy savings of 2.6 MBTU/1000 ft2 [30 MJ/m2], and average peak power demand savings of 0. 19 kW/1000 ft2 [2.1 W/m2]. The 15-year net present value (NPV) of energy savings averages $450/1000 ft2 [$4.90/m2] with time dependent valuation (TDV), and $370/1000 ft2 [$4.00/m2] without TDV. When cost savings from downsizing cooling equipment are included, the average total savings (15-year NPV + equipment savings) rises to $550/1000 ft2 [$5.90/m2] with TDV, and to $470/1000 ft2 [$5.00/m2] without TDV. Total savings range from 0.18 to 0.77 $/ft2 [1.90 to 8.30 $/m2] with TDV, and from 0.16 to 0.66 $/ft2 [1.70 to 7.10 $/m2] without TDV, across California's 16 climate zones. The typical cost premium for a cool roof is 0.00 to 0.20 $/ft2 [0.00 to 2.20 $/m2]. Cool roofs with premiums up to $0.20/ft2 [$2.20/m2] are expected to be cost effective in climate zones 2 through 16; those with premiums not exceeding $0.18/ft2 [$1.90/m2] are expected to be also cost effective in climate zone 1. Hence, this study recommends that the year-2005 California building energy efficiency code (Title 24, Pa rt 6 of the California Code of Regulations) for nonresidential buildings with low-sloped roofs include a cool-roof prescriptive requirement in all California climate zones. Buildings with roofs that do not meet prescriptive requirements may comply with the code via an ''overall-envelope'' approach (non-metal roofs only), or via a performance approach (all roof types).

  5. Shipping Remote Handled Transuranic Waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant - An Operational Experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, S.; Bradford, J.; Clements, T.; Crisp, D.; Sherick, M.; D'Amico, E.; Lattin, W.; Watson, K.

    2008-07-01

    On January 18, 2007, the first ever shipment of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH TRU) waste left the gate at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), headed toward the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for disposal, thus concluding one of the most stressful, yet rewarding, periods the authors have ever experienced. The race began in earnest on October 16, 2006, with signature of the New Mexico Environment Department Secretary's Final Order, ruling that the '..draft permit as changed is hereby approved in its entirety.' This established the effective date of the approved permit as November 16, 2006. The permit modification was a consolidation of several Class 3 modification requests, one of which included incorporation of RH TRU requirements and another of which incorporated the requirements of Section 311 of Public Law 108-137. The obvious goal was to complete the first shipment by November 17. While many had anticipated its approval, the time had finally come to actually implement, and time seemed to be the main item lacking. At that point, even the most aggressive schedule that could be seriously documented showed a first ship date in March 2007. Even though planning for this eventuality had started in May 2005 with the arrival of the current Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) contractor (and even before that), there were many facility and system modifications to complete, startup authorizations to fulfill, and many regulatory audits and approvals to obtain before the first drum could be loaded. Through the dedicated efforts of the ICP workers, the partnership with Department of Energy (DOE) - Idaho, the coordinated integration with the Central Characterization Project (CCP), the flexibility and understanding of the regulatory community, and the added encouragement of DOE - Carlsbad Field Office and at Headquarters, the first RH TRU canister was loaded on December 22, 2006. Following final regulatory approval on January 17, 2007, the historic event finally occurred the following day. While some of the success of this endeavor can be attributed to the sheer will and determination of the individuals involved, the fact that it was established and managed as a separate sub-project under the ICP, accounts for a majority of the success. Utilizing a structured project management approach, including development of, and management to, a performance baseline, allowed for timely decision making and the flexibility to adapt to changing conditions as the various aspects of the project matured. This paper provides some insight into how this was achieved, in a relatively short time, and provides an overview of the experience of start-up of a new retrieval, characterization, loading, and transportation operation in the midst of an aggressive cleanup project. Additionally, as one might expect, everything within the project did not go as planned, which provides a great opportunity to discuss some lessons learned. Finally, the first shipment was just the beginning. There are 224 additional shipments scheduled. In keeping with the theme of WM 2008, Phoenix Rising: Moving Forward in Waste Management, this paper will address the future opportunities and challenges of RH TRU waste management at the INL. (authors)

  6. High Spectral Resolution Infrared and Raman Lidar Observations for the ARM Program: Clear and Cloudy Sky Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry Revercomb, David Tobin, Robert Knuteson, Lori Borg, Leslie Moy

    2009-06-17

    This grant began with the development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) for ARM. The AERI has provided highly accurate and reliable observations of downwelling spectral radiance (Knuteson et al. 2004a, 2004b) for application to radiative transfer, remote sensing of boundary layer temperature and water vapor, and cloud characterization. One of the major contributions of the ARM program has been its success in improving radiation calculation capabilities for models and remote sensing that evolved from the multi-year, clear-sky spectral radiance comparisons between AERI radiances and line-by-line calculations (Turner et al. 2004). This effort also spurred us to play a central role in improving the accuracy of water vapor measurements, again helping ARM lead the way in the community (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003). In order to add high-altitude downlooking AERI-like observations over the ARM sites, we began the development of an airborne AERI instrument that has become known as the Scanning High-resolution Interferometer Sounder (Scanning-HIS). This instrument has become an integral part of the ARM Unmanned Aerospace Vehicle (ARM-UAV) program. It provides both a cross-track mapping view of the earth and an uplooking view from the 12-15 km altitude of the Scaled Composites Proteus aircraft when flown over the ARM sites for IOPs. It has successfully participated in the first two legs of the grand tour of the ARM sites (SGP and NSA), resulting in a very good comparison with AIRS observations in 2002 and in an especially interesting data set from the arctic during the Mixed-Phase Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) in 2004. More specifically, our major achievements for ARM include 1. Development of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) to function like a satellite on the ground for ARM, providing a steady stream of accurately calibrated spectral radiances for Science Team clear sky and cloud applications (Knuteson et al. 2004a), 2. Detailed radiometric calibration and characterization of AERI radiances, with uncertainty estimates established from complete error analyses and proven by inter-comparison tests (Knuteson et al. 2004b), 3. AERI data quality assessment and maintenance over the extended time frames needed to support ARM (Dedecker et al., 2005) 4. Key role in the radiative transfer model improvements from the AERI/LBLRTM QME (Turner et al. 2004) and AERI-ER especially from the SHEBA experiment (Tobin et al. 1999), 5. Contributed scientific and programmatic leadership leading to significant water vapor accuracy improvements and uncertainty assessments for the low to mid troposphere (Turner et al. 2003a, Revercomb et al. 2003), 6. Leadership of the ARM assessment of the accuracy of water vapor observations from radiosondes, Raman Lidar and in situ aircraft observations in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (Tobin et al. 2002, Ferrare et al. 2004), 7. New techniques for characterizing clouds from AERI (DeSlover et al. 1999, Turner 2003b, Turner et al. 2003b), 8. Initial design and development of the Scanning-HIS aircraft instrument and application to ARM UAV Program missions (Revercomb et al. 2005), and 9. Coordinated efforts leading to the use of ARM observations as a key validation tool for the high resolution Atmospheric IR Sounder on the NASA Aqua platform (Tobin et al. 2005a) 10. Performed ARM site and global clear sky radiative closure studies that shows closure of top-of-atmosphere flux at the level of ~1 W/m2 (Moy et al 2008 and Section 3 of this appendix) 11. Performed studies to characterize SGP site cirrus cloud property retrievals and assess impacts on computed fluxes and heating rate profiles (Borg et al. 2008 and Section 2 of this appendix).

  7. Final Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement Richland, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-02-13

    This Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) provides environmental and technical information concerning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ongoing and proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The HSW EIS updates some analyses of environmental consequences from previous documents and provides evaluations for activities that may be implemented consistent with the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS; DOE 1997c) Records of Decision (RODs). The draft HSW EIS was initially issued in April 2002 for public comment (DOE 2002b). A revised draft HSW EIS was issued in March 2003 to address new waste management alternatives that had been proposed since the initial draft HSW EIS was prepared, and to address comments received during the public review period for the first draft (DOE 2003d). The revised draft HSW EIS also incorporated alternatives for disposal of immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) from treatment of Hanford Site tank waste in the waste treatment plant (WTP) currently under construction, an activity that was not included in the first draft (68 FR 7110). This final HSW EIS describes the DOE preferred alternative, and in response to public comments received on the March 2003 revised draft, provides additional analyses for some environmental consequences associated with the preferred alternative, with other alternatives, and with cumulative impacts. Public comments on the revised draft HSW EIS are addressed in the comment response document (Volume III of this final EIS). This HSW EIS describes the environmental consequences of alternatives for constructing, modifying, and operating facilities to store, treat, and/or dispose of low-level (radioactive) waste (LLW), transuranic (TRU) waste, ILAW, and mixed low-level waste (MLLW) including WTP melters at Hanford. In addition, the potential long-term consequences of LLW, MLLW, and ILAW disposal on groundwater and surface water are evaluated for a 10,000-year period, although the DOE performance standards only require assessment for the first 1000 years after disposal (DOE 2001f). This document does not address non-radioactive waste that contains ''hazardous'' or ''dangerous'' waste, as defined under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) of 1976 (42 USC 6901) and Washington State Dangerous Waste regulations (WAC 173-303). Following a previous National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA, 42 USC 4321) review (DOE 1997d), DOE decided to dispose of TRU waste in New Mexico at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a repository that meets the requirements of 40 CFR 191 (63 FR 3623). This HSW EIS has been prepared in accordance with NEPA, the DOE implementing procedures for NEPA 10 CFR 1021, and the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) Regulations for Implementing the Procedural Provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508).

  8. Session 70 - Panel: Consequence Management of a Radiological Dispersion Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, Rick; Lenox, Dave; Wilson, Pete; Schumann, Jean; Honerlah, Hans; Chen, S.Y.; Gwiazdowski, Gene

    2006-07-01

    This was an unusual panel session in that the panelists did not give presentations but responded to a tabletop exercise where they postulated decisions necessary after radiological dispersal device detonation event (dirty bomb). Articles in the daily WM'06 newsletter sought to prepare the participants for a simulated exercise involving the sighting of a known terrorist and the theft of radiological materials. During the slide presentation (in the form of a developing television news broadcast) the audience played decision makers and their 'votes' were tallied for multiple choice decisions and questions. After that was completed, the expert panel was asked to give their best responses for those decisions. The audience was allowed to ask questions and to give opinions as the panel responded. During the exercise the session co-chairs alternated announcing the events as they unfolded in the exercise and polled the audience using multiple-choice options for decisions to be made during the event. The answers to those questions were recorded and compared to the panelists' answers. The event chronology and decisions (audience questions) are shown in this report. - An explosion was reported at the Tucson International Airport (9:35 am). 1. Who is in charge? - Witnesses report 10-20 fatalities, 50 injured and massive damage to the airport, no cause determined yet (9:55 am). 2. IC's Next Action Should Be? - KRAD (local television station) Investigative News Reporters interviewed witnesses that observed a 25 foot U-Haul truck pull up onto the departure ramp just moments before the explosion (10:02 am). Terrorism has not been ruled out. 3. When is the incident declared a potential crime scene? - City of Tucson IC has ordered an evacuation of the airport to a holding area at a nearby long term parking area (10:10 am). No information has been given as to why the evacuation took place. The explosion is suspected to contain chemical, biological or radiological agents. County and State emergency operations centers have been activated. 4. Terrorism is suspected; next action is? - KRAD News has just learned that elevated levels of radiation have been detected at the airport and by the University of Arizona remote detectors (10:17 am). A 'dirty bomb' is now suspected. 5. What should the IC do next? - KRAD reporters have learned that dose rates are approximately 7.5 mR/hr gamma radiation in the short-term parking area (10:28 am). Experts attending a conference at the Tucson Convention Center state that these levels are not life threatening, but well above acceptable levels. 6. What does the IC do next? 7. Who is the coordinating agency? - Forensics indicate that the radioactive material used in the explosion at the Tucson Airport is apparently a mixture of high jacked low level waste from a nuclear facility and stolen radiation sources for medical or industrial purposes (11:21 am). The origin of the waste material is from an audience member's plant (assume it is your own material). 8. Who is responsible for surveys and characterization? 9. Who is responsible for the decontamination? 10. Where are the injured and contaminated victims treated? KRAD learned from the University of Arizona that the plume from the 'dirty bomb' elevated radiation levels above approved levels over a 3 square mile area downwind of the Tucson Airport (1:13 pm). People in the affected area are checking in at emergency rooms at the hospital to learn if they're in danger of radiation health affects. Gridlock has set in as panicked people are either leaving the area or headed for emergency rooms. 11. What should be done to help mitigate fears? DHS raises the National Terrorism Alert to Code Red (late afternoon). 12. What should your nuclear facility do next? 13. KRAD reporter contacts you at your nuclear facility and asks, 'Since title to the waste remains with your company, will your company cover the cost of the terrorist event including all decontamination and medical expenses? The results of the question were very interesting and stimulated quite a bit of discussion am

  9. Integrated Cost and Schedule using Monte Carlo Simulation of a CPM Model - 12419

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulett, David T.; Nosbisch, Michael R.

    2012-07-01

    This discussion of the recommended practice (RP) 57R-09 of AACE International defines the integrated analysis of schedule and cost risk to estimate the appropriate level of cost and schedule contingency reserve on projects. The main contribution of this RP is to include the impact of schedule risk on cost risk and hence on the need for cost contingency reserves. Additional benefits include the prioritizing of the risks to cost, some of which are risks to schedule, so that risk mitigation may be conducted in a cost-effective way, scatter diagrams of time-cost pairs for developing joint targets of time and cost, and probabilistic cash flow which shows cash flow at different levels of certainty. Integrating cost and schedule risk into one analysis based on the project schedule loaded with costed resources from the cost estimate provides both: (1) more accurate cost estimates than if the schedule risk were ignored or incorporated only partially, and (2) illustrates the importance of schedule risk to cost risk when the durations of activities using labor-type (time-dependent) resources are risky. Many activities such as detailed engineering, construction or software development are mainly conducted by people who need to be paid even if their work takes longer than scheduled. Level-of-effort resources, such as the project management team, are extreme examples of time-dependent resources, since if the project duration exceeds its planned duration the cost of these resources will increase over their budgeted amount. The integrated cost-schedule risk analysis is based on: - A high quality CPM schedule with logic tight enough so that it will provide the correct dates and critical paths during simulation automatically without manual intervention. - A contingency-free estimate of project costs that is loaded on the activities of the schedule. - Resolves inconsistencies between cost estimate and schedule that often creep into those documents as project execution proceeds. - Good-quality risk data that are usually collected in risk interviews of the project team, management and others knowledgeable in the risk of the project. The risks from the risk register are used as the basis of the risk data in the risk driver method. The risk driver method is based in the fundamental principle that identifiable risks drive overall cost and schedule risk. - A Monte Carlo simulation software program that can simulate schedule risk, burn WM2012 rate risk and time-independent resource risk. The results include the standard histograms and cumulative distributions of possible cost and time results for the project. However, by simulating both cost and time simultaneously we can collect the cost-time pairs of results and hence show the scatter diagram ('football chart') that indicates the joint probability of finishing on time and on budget. Also, we can derive the probabilistic cash flow for comparison with the time-phased project budget. Finally the risks to schedule completion and to cost can be prioritized, say at the P-80 level of confidence, to help focus the risk mitigation efforts. If the cost and schedule estimates including contingency reserves are not acceptable to the project stakeholders the project team should conduct risk mitigation workshops and studies, deciding which risk mitigation actions to take, and re-run the Monte Carlo simulation to determine the possible improvement to the project's objectives. Finally, it is recommended that the contingency reserves of cost and of time, calculated at a level that represents an acceptable degree of certainty and uncertainty for the project stakeholders, be added as a resource-loaded activity to the project schedule for strategic planning purposes. The risk analysis described in this paper is correct only for the current plan, represented by the schedule. The project contingency reserve of time and cost that are the main results of this analysis apply if that plan is to be followed. Of course project managers have the option of re-planning and re-scheduling in the face of new facts, in part by m