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1

Turpin Hills, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turpin Hills, Ohio: Energy Resources Turpin Hills, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1100606°, -84.3799397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1100606,"lon":-84.3799397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Ballard, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

| Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ballard, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

3

Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Jump to: navigation, search County Climate Zone Place Ballard County, Kentucky ASHRAE Standard ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone...

4

ALSTOM Ballard GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JV of ALSTOM and Ballard Generation Systems which is no longer active. Its fuel cell activities were largely reabsorbed into Ballard, following slower than expected market...

5

Ballard Power Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ballard Power Systems Ballard Power Systems Address Two Industrial Avenue Place Lowell, Massachusetts Zip 01851 Sector Hydrogen Product Designs and manufactures fuel cell systems Website http://www.ballard.com/ Coordinates 42.6148469°, -71.3226869° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6148469,"lon":-71.3226869,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

3WM08 Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

esrf sp8 anl esrf sp8 anl View Meeting Photos ESRF, SPring-8, APS Three-Way Meeting Program (3WM08) Argonne National Laboratory Building 402 March 17-19, 2008 Co-organizers: Katherine Harkay, Fabio Comin, Yoshiharu Sakurai Monday, March 17, 2008 (see below for Satellite Workshops 1-3) 17:00 Reception (by invitation) 120 Tuesday, March 18, 2008 Building 402, Auditorium Welcome Time Name Facility Title Mins. 8:30 Robert Rosner Argonne Laboratory Director 15 1. Facility status and updates (90 minutes) Chair: Katherine Harkay, APS 8:45 William Stirling ESRF The ESRF: Current Status and the Upgrade Programme 2008-2017 30 9:15 Akira Kira SPring-8 Socialization of SPring-8 30 9:45 J.Murray Gibson APS APS Renewal 30

7

COPYRIGHT 2009 BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Published with permission of BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS INC.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) International homologation Reliability growth Real world usage #12;2010 P A G E 4 Ballard's Current Bus Product Fuel Cell Module · Next Generation Electric Drive · Next Generation Energy Storage, Electric & H2

8

WBU-13-0014- In the Matter of Earl M. Ballard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On September 30, 2013, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision granting Mr. Earl Ballards Appeal of the Portsmouth/Paducah Project Offices (PPPO) dismissal of his whistleblower...

9

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 disagree significantly. HTTP:PDG.LBL.GOV Page 1 Created: 512007 17:17 Citation: W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (URL: http:pdg.lbl.gov)...

10

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST FOR ADVANCE WAIVER OF PATENT RIGHTS BY BALLARD  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BALLARD BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS, UNDER SUBAWARD QZ0001 UNDER DOE GRANT NO. DE-FG36-07G017017 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND PLUG POWER L.L.C.; W(A)-OS·029, CH-143S The Petitioner, Ballard Power System (Ballard) has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions made solely by Ballard made under its participation under the above referenced award entitled "Intergovernmental Stationary Fuel Cell System Demonstration." The objective of Ballard's subcontract is to develop a fuel cell stack to meet the requirements for the next generation GenSys fuel cell product being developed under the DOE Topic 7c program. Working together with Plug Power, Ballard will focus on development of a low·cost stack that will be compatible with a low cost reformate

11

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-160 p K + K - p HTTP:PDG.LBL.GOV Page 1 Created: 6112007 16:44 Citation: W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (URL: http:pdg.lbl.gov)...

12

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

74 CNTR 2 p p K + K - HTTP:PDG.LBL.GOV Page 1 Created: 7232007 14:58 Citation: W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (URL: http:pdg.lbl.gov)...

13

WM Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name WM Solutions Inc Place Los Angeles, California Product Owns and operates a landfill gas plant located at Bradley Landfill. References WM Solutions Inc1 LinkedIn...

14

REQUEST BY BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS CORPORATION FOR AN BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER UT- BATTELLE, LLC SUBCONTRACT NO. 4000029752 UNDER PRIME CONTRACT NO. DE-AC05-00OR22725; DOE WAIVER DOCKET W(A)- 04-055 [ORO-790] Ballard Power Systems Corporation (Ballard) has made a timely request for an advance waiver of worldwide rights in Subject Inventions made in the course of or under UT- Battelle, LLC Subcontract No. 4000029752, entitled, "Research and Development of Fuel Cell & Advanced Vehicle Power Electronics and Machinery Applications" under UT-Battelle Prime Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. The scope of work involves designing, developing, testing and delivering 4 prototype high voltage to 14V dc-to-dc

15

Ballard Library and Neighborhood Service Center - Seattle, WA by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects [EDRA/Places Awards 2008 -- Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects / Ballard Library 2008WA Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Architects Seattle residents loveService Center, the architects, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson,

Merlino, Kathryn Rogers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Microsoft Word - WM'05paper.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Conference, February 27-March 3, 2005, Tucson, AZ WM-5162 5 Conference, February 27-March 3, 2005, Tucson, AZ WM-5162 Cask Size and Weight Reduction Through the Use of Depleted Uranium Dioxide (DUO 2 )-Steel Cermet Material M. Jonathan Haire, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 Tel: (865) 574-7141 Fax: (865) 574-0382 E-mail: hairemj@ornl.gov Paul M. Swaney, Student North Carolina State University 229 Baymount Dr. Statesville, NC 28625 Tel: (704) 876-4860 E-mail: pmswaney@unity.ncsu.edu For the Waste Management 2005 Conference Tucson, Arizona February 27-March 3, 2005 The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution,

17

Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Reports and Records of Decision The Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) is a nationwide study examining the environmental impacts of managing more than 2 million cubic meters of radioactive wastes from past, present, and future DOE activities. The WM PEIS will assist the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in improving the efficiency and reliability of management of its current and anticipated volumes of radioactive and hazardous wastes and will help DOE continue to comply with applicable laws and regulations and protect workers, public health and safety, and the environment. The WM PEIS

18

WM'05 Conference, February 27 March 3, 2005, Tucson, AZ WM-5202 INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO MONITORING FOR RADIOACTIVELY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

acceptable scrap metal radiation monitoring and response protocol. Second, international training programs radiation exposure to workers and the public, this unwanted radioactive scrap material causes environmentalWM'05 Conference, February 27 ­ March 3, 2005, Tucson, AZ WM-5202 1 INTERNATIONAL APPROACH

19

Microsoft Word - WM06paperR4.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AZ WM-???? DRAFT 12 August, 2005 Cask Size and Weight Reduction Through the Use of Depleted Uranium Dioxide-Concrete Material M. Jonathan Haire, Ph.D. Oak Ridge National...

20

Dr. Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Wm. E. Mott, Director Wm. E. Mott, Director Environmental 8 Safety Eng. Div. 0f.f ice of Environment (EU- 14) Dept. of Energy Washington, DC 20545 Dear Dr. Mott: MED Warehousing Location The sites listed in your letter of Febru; to determine present utilization and ownershi] the information available at this time: 1. Utica Street Warehouse 240 W. Utica Street Buffalo, ?pI The area of 240 and 242 W. Utica St, drive to a 4-story parking garage for Ch The ramp is about 4 years old and previol there was a paved parking lot on the sit 1960' s. The warehouse structure was denI unknown previous date. 2. West Genesee Street Warehouse Buffalo, NY The W. Genesee area is currently abc in .length. About half of the streets prc eliminated to make way for the Niagara E: the remaining streets there is one old bl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_John_Ballard_NMMSS_2013_Presentation_DOE Reconciliation.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reconciliation Reconciliation John Ballard PSI DOE Lead DOE/NNSA Reconciliation  Reconciliation - Facility reported physical inventory balance matches NMMSS generated balances by Reporting Identification Symbol (RIS), material type, owner code, and project number - Foreign obligations totals match NMMSS generated balances by country code and material type 2 DOE/NNSA Reconciliation Why Reconcile?  Confirms balance of SNM with audit trail of all accountable material reports - Balances generated from reported transactions compared to facility reported physical inventory  Future Months cannot be closed in NMMSS until September closing  NMMSS reports show facility balances for report recipients 3 NMMSS Data Users International Atomic Energy The Congress The Department Of

22

Characterization of Tank WM-189 Sodium-bearing Waste at INTEC, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center 300,000-gallon vessel WM-189 was filled in late 2001 with concentrated sodium bearing waste (SBW). Three airlifted liquid samples and a steam jetted slurry sample were obtained for quantitative analysis and characterization of WM-189 liquid phase SBW and tank heel sludge. Estimates were provided for most of the reported data values, based on the greater of (a) analytical uncertainty, and (b) variation of analytical results between nominally similar samples. A consistency check on the data was performed by comparing the total mass of dissolved solids in the liquid, as measured gravimetrically from a dried sample, with the corresponding value obtained by summing the masses of cations and anions in the liquid, based on the reported analytical data. After reasonable adjustments to the nitrate and oxygen concentrations, satisfactory consistency between the two results was obtained. A similar consistency check was performed on the reported compositional data for sludge solids from the steam jetted sample. In addition to the compositional data, various other analyses were performed: particle size distribution was measured for the sludge solids, sludge settling tests were performed, and viscosity measurements were made. WM-189 characterization results were compared with those for WM-180, and other Tank Farm Facility tank characterization data. A 2-liter batch of WM-189 simulant was prepared and a clear, stable solution was obtained, based on a general procedure for mixing SBW simulant that was develop by Dr. Jerry Christian. This WM-189 SBW simulant is considered suitable for laboratory testing for process development.

Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Taylor, Dean Dalton

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Glass Formulation Development for INEEL Sodium -Bearing Waste (FY2001 WM-180)  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study was undertaken to develop a glass composition to demonstrate the vitrification flowsheet of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's sodium bearing waste (SBW) using the latest WM-180 tank composition. Although the previous study did not restrict waste loadings (WLs) based on the potential to form a segregated salt layer, avoiding its development in a melter is beneficial and was the primary focus from the glass-formulation perspective. The testing results described in this report were aimed at providing a candidate glass composition for use in a scaled melter demonstration of direct vitrification of WM-180 in the Research Scale Melter (RSM) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the EV-16 melter at the Clemson Environmental Technology Laboratory.

Peeler, D.K.

2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

24

Data from Table 1, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Data from Table 1, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential. Global Change Biology 6:317-327. Site history Years since agriculture Soil sample depth (cm) Rate of change (g m-2 y-1) Reference MAX AVG Cool temperate moist forest Cultivated to pine plantation 42 - 88 0 - 10 -8.56 -4.44 Pregitzer & Palik (1996) 42 - 88 30 - 40 -5.27 -2.78 Old field succession to northern hardwoods 1 - 60 10 16.03 15.06 Zak et al. (1990) Long-term agriculture to oak forest 83 68.6 61.70 59.60 Jenkinson (1971) Long-term agriculture to oak forest (P amended) 82 68.6 33.30 28.00 Jenkinson (1971) Old field succession to mixed oak stand >250 15 28.30 9.40 Robertson & Vitousek (1981)

25

Soil Profile Data Used in Analysis by W.M. Post and L.K. Mann  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Changes in Soil from Cultivation » Soil Changes in Soil from Cultivation » Soil Profile Data Soil Profile Data Used in Analysis by W.M. Post and L.K. Mann Soil profile data used in analysis by W.M. Post and L.K. Mann. 1990. Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation. pp. 401-406 in A.F. Bouwman, editor, Soils and the Greenhouse Effect. John Wiley & Sons, New York. Profile ID Higher Depth (cm) Lower Depth (cm) Soil Nitrogen (%) Soil Series Name Surface Layer Horizon Vegetation Bulk Density (g/m3) Soil C (%) 1 780005 0 38 0.169 BURLESON . ? 1.31 1.59 0 780005 38 69 0.091 BURLESON . ? 1.32 0.96 0 780005 69 122 0.058 BURLESON . ? 1.42 0.69 1 780006 0 23 0.067 BURLESON . ? 1.44 0.77 0 780006 23 71 0.044 BURLESON . ? 1.43 0.56

26

Composition and Simulation of Tank WM-180 Sodium Bearing Waste at INTEC  

SciTech Connect

The 1-million liters of sodium-bearing waste in the WM-180 tank at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center has been concentrated and will be the first to be processed, at its current composition, by vitrification to prepare the radioactive waste for disposition. The waste has been sampled and analyzed for cations, anions, and radionuclides in the liquid and in the small amount of solids that were entrained with the liquid during sampling. The analytical results have been evaluated and a non-radioactive simulant composition and preparation procedure developed and demonstrated to result in a clear solution. The evaluation and results are reported here. This simulant is suitable for performing laboratory and pilot-scale tests in order to develop the vitrification technology. The solids entrained from the tank with the liquid sample amount to 0.06% of the dissolved solids in the liquid. While their elemental and radionuclide composition was determined, qualitative characterization using x-ray diffraction was not possible. Because of the interest in the properties of solids that may be in the bottom of the WM-180 tank, for tank closure activities, thermodynamic modeling was performed of potential precipitates that may be in equilibrium with the solution. The results were used to derive a possible chemical composition of the solids.

Christian, Jerry Dale

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ballard to Lead Partnerships Directorate  

Kentucky, Mississippi State University, and the University of Tennessee. The ARAs activities will be coordinated by the National Transportation ...

28

OF EXCELLENCE: The Turpin USB project remodeled 12,177  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and sustainable future for our nation through cost-efficient and energy-saving green buildings. USGBC's Mission equipment · Individualized lighting controls · Enhanced commissioning · Green power MATERIALS & RESOURCES · Exemplary furnishings reuse · Green power purchased by employees · Public/student/staff education programs

Feschotte, Cedric

29

Final version published as, Cobern, Wm. W. (1996). Constructivism and Non-Western Science Education Research. International Journal of Science Education, 4(3): 287-302.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final version published as, Cobern, Wm. W. (1996). Constructivism and Non-Western Science Education Research. International Journal of Science Education, 4(3): 287-302. Constructivism and Non-Western Science Education Research Abstract In this paper, I argue that science education research and curriculum

Cobern, William W.

30

References for HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, ``System specification for the double-shell tank system: HNF-PROs, CFRs, DOE Orders, WACs``  

SciTech Connect

HNF-SD-WM-TRD-O07, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System, (hereafter referred to as DST Specification), defines the requirements of the double-shell tank system at the Hanford Site for Phase 1 privatization. Many of the sections in this document reference other documents for design guidance and requirements. Referenced documents include Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) procedures (HNF-PROS), Codes of Federal Regulation (CFRs), DOE Orders, and Washington Administrative Codes (WACs). This document provides rationale for the selection and inclusion of HNF-PROS, CFRs, DOE Orders and WACs.

Shaw, C.P.

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

c0 c0 (1P) I G (J PC ) = 0 + (0 + + ) χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS χ c0 (1P) MASS VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE 3414.76 ± 0.35 OUR AVERAGE Error includes scale factor of 1.2. 3414.21 ± 0.39 ± 0.27 ABLIKIM 05G BES2 ψ(2S) → γ χ c0 3414.7 + 0.7 - 0.6 ± 0.2 1 ANDREOTTI 03 E835 p p → χ c0 → π 0 π 0 3415.5 ± 0.4 ± 0.4 392 2 BAGNASCO 02 E835 p p → χ c0 → J/ψ γ 3417.4 + 1.8 - 1.9 ± 0.2 1 AMBROGIANI 99B E835 p p → e + e - γ 3414.1 ± 0.6 ± 0.8 BAI 99B BES ψ(2S) → γ X 3417.8 ± 0.4 ± 4 1 GAISER 86 CBAL ψ(2S) → γ X 3416 ± 3 ± 4 3 TANENBAUM 78 MRK1 e + e - * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 3407 ± 11 89 4 ABE 04G BELL 10.6 e + e - → J/ψ(c c) 3416.5 ± 3.0 EISENSTEIN 01 CLE2 e + e - → e + e - χ c0 3422 ± 10 3 BARTEL 78B CNTR e + e - → J/ψ 2γ 3415 ± 9 3 BIDDICK 77 CNTR e + e - → γ X 1 Using mass

32

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

µ µ J = 1 2 µ MASS (atomic mass units u) µ MASS (atomic mass units u) µ MASS (atomic mass units u) µ MASS (atomic mass units u) The primary determination of a muon's mass comes from measuring the ratio of the mass to that of a nucleus, so that the result is obtained in u (atomic mass units). The conversion factor to MeV is more uncertain than the mass of the muon in u. In this datablock we give the result in u, and in the following datablock in MeV. VALUE (u) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 0.1134289264 ± 0.0000000030 0.1134289264 ± 0.0000000030 0.1134289264 ± 0.0000000030 0.1134289264 ± 0.0000000030 MOHR 05 RVUE 2002 CODATA value * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 0.1134289168 ± 0.0000000034 1 MOHR 99 RVUE 1998 CODATA value 0.113428913 ± 0.000000017 2 COHEN 87 RVUE 1986 CODATA value 1 MOHR 99 make use of other 1998 CODATA entries below. 2 COHEN 87 make use of other

33

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B B 0 I (J P ) = 1 2 (0 - ) Quantum numbers not measured. Values shown are quark-model predictions. See also the B ± /B 0 ADMIXTURE and B ± /B 0 /B 0 s /b-baryon AD- MIXTURE sections. See the Note "Production and Decay of b-flavored Hadrons" at the beginning of the B ± Particle Listings and the Note on "B 0 -B 0 Mixing" near the end of the B 0 Particle Listings. B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS B 0 MASS The fit uses m B + , (m B 0 - m B + ), and m B 0 to determine m B + , m B 0 , and the mass difference. VALUE (MeV) EVTS DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.4 ± 0.5 OUR FIT 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.3 ± 0.7 OUR AVERAGE 5279.1 ± 0.7 ± 0.3 135 1 CSORNA 00 CLE2 e + e - → Υ(4S) 5281.3 ± 2.2 ± 1.4 51 ABE 96B CDF p p at 1.8 TeV * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 5279.2 ± 0.54 ± 2.0 340

34

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(4S) (4S) or Υ(10580) I G (J PC ) = 0 - (1 - - ) Υ(4S) MASS Υ(4S) MASS Υ(4S) MASS Υ(4S) MASS VALUE (GeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 10.5794 ± 0.0012 OUR AVERAGE 10.5794 ± 0.0012 OUR AVERAGE 10.5794 ± 0.0012 OUR AVERAGE 10.5794 ± 0.0012 OUR AVERAGE 10.5793 ± 0.0004 ± 0.0012 AUBERT 05Q BABR e + e - → hadrons 10.5800 ± 0.0035 1 BEBEK 87 CLEO e + e - → hadrons * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 10.5774 ± 0.0010 2 LOVELOCK 85 CUSB e + e - → hadrons 1 Reanalysis of BESSON 85. 2 No systematic error given. Υ(4S) WIDTH Υ(4S) WIDTH Υ(4S) WIDTH Υ(4S) WIDTH VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT 20.5 ± 2.5 OUR AVERAGE 20.5 ± 2.5 OUR AVERAGE 20.5 ± 2.5 OUR AVERAGE 20.5 ± 2.5 OUR AVERAGE 20.7 ± 1.6 ± 2.5 AUBERT 05Q BABR e + e - → hadrons 20 ± 2 ± 4 BESSON 85 CLEO e + e - → hadrons * * * We do not use the following data for averages, fits, limits, etc. * * * 25 ± 2.5 LOVELOCK 85 CUSB e

35

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(1450) (1450) I G (J PC ) = 1 + (1 - - ) See our mini-review under the ρ(1700). ρ(1450) MASS ρ(1450) MASS ρ(1450) MASS ρ(1450) MASS VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE 1459 ± 11 OUR AVERAGE Includes data from the 3 datablocks that follow this one. Er- ror includes scale factor of 3.4. See the ideogram below. WEIGHTED AVERAGE 1459±11 (Error scaled by 3.4) FUKUI 88 SPEC 1.7 ANTONELLI 88 DM2 0.3 AKHMETSHIN 00D CMD2 6.5 AKHMETSHIN 01B CMD2 7.3 CLEGG 94 RVUE 0.0 EDWARDS 00A CLE2 40.7 AKHMETSHIN 03B CMD2 16.5 ARMSTRONG 89E OMEG 6.5 ACHASOV 97 RVUE 4.8 ABELE 01B CBAR 0.4 χ 2 84.7 (Confidence Level 0.001) 1350 1400 1450 1500 1550 1600 1650 1700 ρ(1450) mass (MeV) η ρ 0 MODE η ρ 0 MODE η ρ 0 MODE η ρ 0 MODE VALUE (MeV) DOCUMENT ID TECN COMMENT The data in this block is included in the average printed for a previous datablock. 1497 ± 14 1 AKHMETSHIN

36

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEARCHES SEARCHES FOR SEARCHES FOR SEARCHES FOR SEARCHES FOR MONOPOLES, MONOPOLES, MONOPOLES, MONOPOLES, SUPERSYMMETRY, SUPERSYMMETRY, SUPERSYMMETRY, SUPERSYMMETRY, TECHNICOLOR, TECHNICOLOR, TECHNICOLOR, TECHNICOLOR, COMPOSITENESS, COMPOSITENESS, COMPOSITENESS, COMPOSITENESS, EXTRA DIMENSIONS, etc. EXTRA DIMENSIONS, etc. EXTRA DIMENSIONS, etc. EXTRA DIMENSIONS, etc. Magnetic Monopole Searches Magnetic Monopole Searches Magnetic Monopole Searches Magnetic Monopole Searches Isolated supermassive monopole candidate events have not been con- firmed. The most sensitive experiments obtain negative results. Best cosmic-ray supermassive monopole flux limit: < 1.0 × 10 -15 cm - 2 sr - 1 s - 1 for 1.1 × 10 -4 < β < 0.1 Supersymmetric Particle Searches Supersymmetric Particle Searches Supersymmetric Particle Searches Supersymmetric Particle Searches Limits

37

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

al. NELSON 03 PRL 90 021601 D. Nelson, G.T. Fleming, G.W. Kilcup ALIKHAN 02 PR D65 054505 A. Ali Khan et al. (CP-PACS Collab.) Also PR D67 059901 (erratum) A. Ali Khan et al....

38

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.47 0.23) 10 -5 2522 K 0 ( 8.6 + 1.3 - 1.1 ) 10 -6 2516 K + - + - mmm < 2.3 10 -4 CL90% 2600 K (892) 0 + - < 1.4 10 -3 CL90% 2557 K ...

39

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01 and CYBURT 03. 3 Limit on the number of neutrino types based on combination of WMAP data and big- bang nucleosynthesis. The limit from WMAP data alone is 8.3. See also...

40

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(- 0.5 2.1) 10 -12 Electric dipole moment d (0.07 0.07) 10 -26 e cm Mean life > 4.6 10 26 yr, CL 90% a J 1 2 Mass m 0.1134289264 ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TESTS OF CONSERVATION LAWS Updated June 2006 by L. Wolfenstein and T.G. Trippe. In keeping with the current interest in tests of conservation laws, we collect together a Table of...

42

Citation: W.-M. Yao  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

03 observe reactor neutrino disappearance at 180 km baseline to various Japanese nuclear power reactors. 5 BOEHM 01 search for neutrino oscillations at 0.75 and 0.89 km...

43

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (otherwise called the "Tri-Party Agreement", or "TPA") contains various enforceable milestones that apply to tank waste management activities. DOE is also required to comply with applicable requirements of

44

Ballard County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0359869°, -89.0179332° 0359869°, -89.0179332° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.0359869,"lon":-89.0179332,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

REQUEST BY BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

dc-to-dc converters embedded within the integrated power train systems used by these manufacturers for their fuel cell vehicle fleets being developed and sold in limited...

46

Microsoft Word - S07050_WM.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

alkaligrass, OBL), Schoenoplectus maritimus (saltmarsh bulrush, NI), Setaria viridis (green foxtail, UPL), Xanthium strumarium (cocklebur, FAC) Naturita-Monitoring Report for...

47

Hydrogen: WM Articles & Other Hydrogen News  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Vermont Station Tour; September Workshop. B-023, Winter 2009 (Jul, 2008 to Sep, 2009), US National Work Group (USNWG) includes: ...

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Microsoft PowerPoint - 4_John_Ballard_NMMSS_2013_Presentation...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

3 NMMSS Data Users International Atomic Energy The Congress The Department Of State DOENNSA Nuclear Regulatory Commission 4 DOENNSA Reconciliation Steps for DOE...

49

WA_04_055_BALLARD_POWER_SYSTEMS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications WA02055PRAXAIRWaiverofDomesticandForeignPatentRigh.pdf WA99014UNITEDSOLARSYSTEMSCORPWaiverofDomesticandF.pdf...

50

COPYRIGHT 2009 BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED BUILDING A CLEAN ENERGY GROWTH COMPANY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Courtesy Manhattan Project for Fuel Cell Manufacturing #12;AUGUST 2009 P A G E 4 MEA Manufacturing: WhereW* Save > $30/kW * * Courtesy Manhattan Project for Fuel Cell Manufacturing Save $70/kW * #12;AUGUST 2009 manufacturing processes that would lower cost; * Courtesy Manhattan Project for Fuel Cell Manufacturing

51

Microsoft Word - WM Paper - Eco-Restoration Final.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection At the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites - 8354 J. Powell, F. Johnston, J. Homer Fernald Preserve 10995 Hamilton-Cleves Hwy. Harrison, Ohio 45030 Y. Deyo Weldon Spring 7295 Highway 94 South St. Charles, Missouri 63304 ABSTRACT At both the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Preserve and the Weldon Spring Site, the development of ecological restoration goals and objectives was used to complement and even enhance achievement of selected remedies. Warm-season native grasses and forbs were used for revegetation of remediated areas. The hardiness and ability to establish in low-nutrient conditions make native grasses ideal candidates for reestablishment of vegetation in excavated areas. At the Fernald Preserve, native grasses

52

Microsoft Word - LL-WM08 Paper 8351.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phoenix, AZ Phoenix, AZ Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site W.J. Waugh, M.K. Kastens, L.R.L. Sheader Environmental Sciences Laboratory* 2597 B ¾ Road, Grand Junction, CO 81503 C.H. Benson University of Wisconsin 1415 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 W.H. Albright Desert Research Institute 2215 Raggio Parkway, Reno, NV 89512 P.S. Mushovic U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 1595 Wynkoop Street, Denver, CO 80202 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated on the design and monitoring of an alternative cover for the Monticello uranium mill tailings disposal cell, a Superfund site in

53

Microsoft Word - WM10 10352 FUSRAP coordination revised.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Coordination Between the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-10352 Christopher Clayton and Vijendra Kothari U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Michael Widdop and Joey Gillespie S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, CO 81503 ABSTRACT A predecessor agency to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) in 1974. In 1997, Congress assigned responsibility for assessment and remediation of FUSRAP sites to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). DOE is responsible for determining eligibility and providing long-term surveillance and maintenance. Successful implementation of FUSRAP is facilitated by the close cooperation

54

Microsoft Word - WM10 FUSRAP LTSM 10351 Revision.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The U.S. Department of Energy Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program: Ensuring Protectiveness and Preserving Knowledge-10351 Christopher Clayton, Vijendra Kothari U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Morgantown, West Virginia; Washington, DC Michael Widdop, Joey Gillespie S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado 81503 ABSTRACT This presentation offers four case studies to illustrate the breadth of long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&M) activities required to successfully implement the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management determines eligibility for remediation under FUSRAP and provides LTS&M for remediated sites. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers performs assessments and remediation for

55

HU-Mannschaft bei RoboCup-WM in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WAS KOMMT Vorlesung zur deutsch- britischen Geschichte Das Gro?britannien-Zentrum der HU lädt ein Ehrendoktorwürde an Gerhard Ertl verliehen Der Chemie-Nobelpreisträger Gerhard Ertl erhielt am 16. Ja- nuar die Darwin bis heute. Thema: ,,Charles Darwin und der deutsche Darwin. Zur Hae- ckelrezeption im 20. Jahrhun

Röder, Beate

56

Microsoft PowerPoint - WM_Poster_Johnston3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dimer and Carbonate in the Aluminum Solubility for Hanford Wastes Cliff T. Johnston 1 , Elaine Mihelc 1 , Stephen F. Agnew 2 , and Jacob G. Reynolds 3 1 Purdue University, Center...

57

BallarD NameD TTeD INTerIm DIreCTor C - Oak Ridge National ...  

they use less energy and cost less ... the electricity generated by fossil fuels to ... posal as well as other opportunities to help address Americas energy ...

58

WM '04 Conference, February 29 March 4, 2004, Tucson, AZ WM-4085 METAL MATRIX IMMOBILISATION OF SEALED RADIOACTIVE SOURCES FOR SAFE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to about 70% by weight of BFS are now well established in the construction industry and fully characterised.1°C. At higher temperatures a silicone-oil filled bath and stainless steel cells were used

Sheffield, University of

59

Data from Table 2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processes and Potential. Global Change Biology 6:317-327. Site history Years since agriculture Soil sample depth (cm) Rate of change (g m-2 y-1) Reference MAX AVG Cool temperate...

60

Remote System Technologies for Deactivating Hanford Hot Cells (for WM'03 - abstract included)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote system technologies are being deployed by Fluor Hanford to help accelerate the deactivation of highly-radioactive hot cell facilities. This paper highlights the application of several remotely deployed technologies enabling the deactivation tasks.

BERLIN, G.T.

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hydraulic impact end effector final test report. Automation and robotics section, ER/WM-AT Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One tool being developed for dislodging and fragmenting the hard salt cake waste in the single-shell nuclear waste tanks at the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is the hydraulic impact end effector (HIEE). This total operates by discharging 11-in. slugs of water at ultrahigh pressures. The HIEE was designed, built, and initially tested in 1992. Work in 1993 included advanced developments of the HIEE to further investigate its fragmentation abilities and to determine more effective operating procedures. These tests showed that more fragmentation can be achieved by increasing the charge pressure of 40 kpsi to 55 kpsi and by the use of different operating procedures. The size of the material and the impact energy of the water slug fired from the HIEE are believed to be major factors in material fragmentation. The material`s ability to fracture also appears to depend on the distance a fracture or crack line must travel to a free surface. Thus, larger material is more difficult to fracture than smaller material. Discharge pressures of 40 kpsi resulted in little penetration or fracturing of the material. At 55 kpsi, however, the size and depth of the fractures increased. Nozzle geometry had a significant effect on fragment size and quantity. Fragmentation was about an order of magnitude greater when the HIEE was discharged into drilled holes rather than onto the material surface. Since surface shots tend to create craters, a multi-shot procedure, coupled with an advanced nozzle design, was used to drill (crater) deep holes into large material. With this procedure, a 600-lb block was reduced to smaller pieces without the use of any additional equipment. Through this advanced development program, the HIEE has demonstrated that it can quickly fragment salt cake material into small, easily removable fragments. The HIEE`s material fragmentation ability can be substantially increased through the use of different nozzle geometries and operating procedures.

Couture, S.

1994-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

WM00 Conference, February 27 March 2, 2000 DEMONSTRATING DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TFTR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and decommissioning (D&D) projects such as Trojan and 105c reactors at Hanford for the removal of large mass concrete of various void fillers with the DWC system CONSTRUCTION: A test bed was designed and constructed to accommodate multiple cutting scenarios. The vacuum vessel surrogates (four constructed) were of the same

63

WM00 Conference, February 27-March 2, 2000 DEMONSTRATING DIAMOND WIRE CUTTING OF THE TFTR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reactors at Hanford for the removal of large mass concrete. Concerns for expanded application system CONSTRUCTION: A test bed was designed and constructed to accommodate multiple cutting scenarios. The vacuum vessel surrogates (four constructed) were of the same geometric shape as the TFTR vacuum vessel

64

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASTs UTC: demonstrating long lifetime in real UTC: demonstrating long lifetime in real-world bus operation world bus operation Ballard: developing strategies to Ballard:...

65

Partnerships - Staff Bios - ORNL  

Tom Ballard. Director, Partnerships Directorate Thomas B. (Tom) Ballard was appointed the inaugural Director of Partnerships for UT-Battelle, the managing contractor ...

66

Management competences, not tools and techniques: A grounded examination of software project management at WM-data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditional software project management theory often focuses on desk-based development of software and algorithms, much in line with the traditions of the classical project management and software engineering. This can be described as a tools and techniques ... Keywords: Competence, Software engineering, Software project management

Jeremy Rose; Keld Pedersen; Jens Henrik Hosbond; Pernille Krmmergaard

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Highly Insulating Windows with a U-value less than 0.6 W/m2K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. households rely primarily on three sources of energy: natural gas, electricity, and fuel oil. In the past several decades, electricity consumption by households has grown dramatically, and a significant portion of electricity used in homes is for lighting. Lighting includes both indoor and outdoor lighting and is found in virtually every household in the United States. In 2001, according to the US Energy Information Administration, lighting accounted for 101 billion kWh (8.8 percent) of U.S. household electricity use. Incandescent lamps, which are commonly found in households, are highly inefficient sources of light because about 90 percent of the energy used is lost as heat. For that reason, lighting has been one focus area to increase the efficiency of household electricity consumption. Windows have several functions, and one of the main functions is to provide a view to the outside. Daylighting is another one of windows main functions and determines the distribution of daylight to a space. Daylighting windows do not need to be transparent, and a translucent daylighting window is sufficient, and often desired, to diffuse the light and make the space more environmentally pleasing. In homes, skylights are one source of daylighting, but skylights are not very energy efficient and are inseparably linked to solar heat gain. In some climates, added solar heat gains from daylighting may be welcome; but in other climates, heat gain must be controlled. More energy efficient skylights and daylighting solutions, in general, are desired and can be designed by insulating them with aerogels. Aerogels are a highly insulating and transparent material in its pure form. The overall objective for this project was to prepare an economical, translucent, fiber-reinforced aerogel insulation material for daylighting applications that is durable for manufacturing purposes. This advanced insulation material will increase the thermal performance of daylighting windows, while satisfying constraints such as durability, cost, user acceptance, size limits, and environmental safety concerns. The energy efficient daylighting window will consist of a translucent and resilient aerogel panel sandwiched between glass panes in double glazed windows. Compared to the best windows available today, the double glazed translucent windows with 1/2-inch aerogel inserts will have a U-value of 1.2 W/m{sup 2} K (0.211 BTU/ft{sup 2} h F) without any coating or low conductivity fill gases. These windows will be more effective than the windows with an Energy Star rating of U-2 W/m{sup 2} K and could be made even more efficient by using low-e coated glass glazings and inert gas fills. This report summarizes the work accomplished on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41950. During this project, Aspen Aerogels made transparent and translucent aerogels from TMOS and TEOS. We characterized the transparency of the aerogels, reinforced the transparent aerogels with fibers and prepared large translucent aerogel panels and blankets. We also conducted an initial market study for energy efficient translucent windows. A lab-scale process was developed that could be scaled-up to manufacture blankets of these translucent aerogels. The large blankets prepared were used to fabricate prototype translucent windows and skylights. The primary goal of this project was to develop transparent, resilient, hydrophobic silica aerogels that have low thermal conductivities (R-10/inch) to be used to produce aerogel insulated double-glazing windows with a U value of 0.6 W/m{sup 2}K. To meet this objective we developed a process and equipment to produce blankets of translucent, hydrophobic aerogel. We focused on silica, organically-modified silica aerogels (Ormosils), and fiber reinforced silica aerogels due to the appreciable expertise in silica sol-gel processing available with the personnel at Aspen Aerogels, and also due to the quantity of knowledge available in the scientific literature. The project was conducted in three budget periods, herein called BP1, BP2 and BP3.

Wendell Rhine; Ying Tang; Wenting Dong; Roxana Trifu; Reduane Begag

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

The evolutionary consequences of oxygenic photosynthesis: a body size perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Daphnia O.F. Müller, 1785. Crayfish were fed regularly with wafers of dried algal Spirulina Turpin ex (Ridgway and McPhail 1984), are more susceptible to crayfish predation and increase the parental care costs

Lyons, S. Kathleen

69

Spring 2012 Vol. 17 Number 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the guidance of its members. Editor: John Cardle Managing Editor: JoAnne Makela Photo Editor: Charles Turpin Design: S. Johnson Creative Layout: JoAnne Makela Osher Lifelong Learning Institute 250 McNamara Alumni

Janssen, Michel

70

Fuel Cells: Materials, Processing, Manufacturing, Balance of Plant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Colleen Legzdins, Ballard Power Systems Arumugam Manthiram, The ... Power Electronics and Utility Grid Applications 10. Field experience. Abstracts Due...

71

Science Fiction Atmospheres R.T. Pierrehumbert  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that Ballard actually had a quite reasonable premise in The Drowned World. A long-lived solar storm increases Ballard's plot line, but let's give him the benefit of the doubt and assume he had in mind that the Solar- tance of this work. Be that as it may, the Sun can do the job Ballard needs it to do. In fact, the main

Boyce, C. Kevin

72

WM2008 Conference, February 24-28, 2008, Phoenix, AZ Shielded Payload Containers Will Enhance the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Safety and Efficiency of the DOE's Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Disposal Operations - 8199 R. A for Remote Handled (RH) waste. CH waste is emplaced in a variety of payload container configurations. This robust configuration provides an overpack for waste that otherwise would be remotely handled. Up to a 3

73

A self-consistent MoD-WM/MM structural refinement method: characterization of hydrogen bonding in the orytricha nova G-1uar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper generalizes the MoD-QM/MM hybrid method, developed for ab initio computations of protein electrostatic potentials [Gasc6n, l.A.; Leung, S.S.F.; Batista, E.R.; Batista, V.S. J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2006,2, 175-186], as a practical algorithm for structural refinement of extended systems. The computational protocol involves a space-domain decomposition scheme for the formal fragmentation of extended systems into smaller, partially overlapping, molecular domains and the iterative self-consistent energy minimization of the constituent domains by relaxation of their geometry and electronic structure. The method accounts for mutual polarization of the molecular domains, modeled as Quantum-Mechanical (QM) layers embedded in the otherwise classical Molecular-Mechanics (MM) environment according to QM/MM hybrid methods. The method is applied to the description of benchmark models systems that allow for direct comparisons with full QM calculations, and subsequently applied to the structural characterization of the DNA Oxytricha nova Guanine quadruplex (G4). The resulting MoD-QM/MM structural model of the DNA G4 is compared to recently reported highresolution X-ray diffraction and NMR models, and partially validated by direct comparisons between {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts that are highly sensitive to hydrogen-bonding and stacking interactions and the corresponding theoretical values obtained at the density functional theory DFT QM/MM (BH&H/6-31 G*:Amber) level in conjunction with the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method for the ab initio self consistent-field (SCF) calculation of NMR chemical shifts.

Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newcomer, Micharel B [YALE UNIV; Raggin, Christina M [YALE UNIV; Gascon, Jose A [YALE UNIV; Loria, J Patrick [YALE UNIV; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Technology Commercialization and Partnerships | Nanocrystal ...  

Nuclear & Particle Physics; ... Computational model optimized with Density Functional Theory superimposed over a high-resolution scanning ... Ballard Power Systems, a ...

75

West Kentucky Regional Middle School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Fulton, Hickman, Carlisle, Ballard, McCracken, Graves, Livingston, Calloway, Daviess, Ohio, Butler, Muhlenberg, Warren, Allen, Simpson, Logan, Todd, Christian, Trigg, Marshall,...

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - Axess Ebus - EBUS22FC New Flyer - Xcelsior Ballard Power Systems - FCvelocity-HD6 fuel cell...

77

University of Colorado Boulder Colorado Springs Denver Anschutz Medical Campus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chi float is right. 49 #12;so Sp,.ing on the Jerry Emison, senior business student and member of Tri around Queen Jerry include Marsha J ensch, Delta Gamma; Marlene Hopkins, Ddta Gamma; ) err)' Emison Joe Tom Tom Turpin Bob Wallace Jerry Wray Douglas Young #12;Tonsilitis. BETA 68 High-class garbage

Stowell, Michael

78

Department of Energy Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Line Personnel Training Hythane L-10 Hythane L-10 Ballard P4 Fuel Cell Bus Ballard P4 Fuel Cell Bus PV Solar Arrays PV Solar Arrays Public Education & Outreach Public Education & Outreach HBT Partial Oxidation and wind blown dust 15% production lost due to system faults and limited equipment reliability #12;5 #12

79

Grouting at the Idaho National Laboratory Tank Farm Facility, R. Mark Shaw  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grouting at the Grouting at the Idaho National Laboratory Tank Farm Facility R. Mark Shaw, U. S. Department of Energy safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 2 Topics/Agenda * Tank Farm Overview * Tank and Vault Grouting * Cooling Coil and Transfer Line Grouting safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management Environmental Management 3 INTEC TANK FARM CLOSURE INTEC TANK FARM CLOSURE VES-WM-103 VES-WM-104 VES-WM-105 VES-WM-106 182 183 185 186 187 189 190 188 184 181 180 Tank Farm Facility Octagon Vaults: WM-180, WM-181 Pillar and Panel Vaults: WM-182, WM-183, WM-184, WM-185, WM-186 Square Vaults: WM-187, WM-188, WM-189, WM-190 GV99 0008 safety v performance v cleanup v closure M E Environmental Management

80

THE COLLECTIONS IN FISCAL YEAR 1998  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

articles, reviews, and bibliographies, and three books this year. ¢ Research Associate Silvio A. Bedini Bai Douglas B. Ball Mary W. Ballard Corrine Barsky Joseph Barth Silvio A. Bedini Amy A. Begg Abdallah

Mathis, Wayne N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IPR":15-2008 09:22 From: IPR":15-2008 09:22 From: To: 912025862805 P.2/5 STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY HUNTSMAN ADVANCED MATERIALS AMERICAS, INC. (HUNTSMAN) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RlGI-iTS UNDER DOE GRANT NO. DE-FG36-07G017012~ W(A)-08-004 The Petitioner, Huntsman, has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the ahove referenced grant entitled "Next Generation "Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells." The Petitioner will be collaborating with GraiTech International, Ltd., Ballard Power Systems ("Ballard"), and Case Westem Reserve University. Ballard is subject to this waiver request. GrafTeeh is the prime awardee under the grant, with Ballard and Huntsman as sub-

82

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ballard Power Systems (3) Balqon (3) Bosch Rexroth (1) Boulder Electric Ballard Power Systems (3) Balqon (3) Bosch Rexroth (1) Boulder Electric Vehicle (1) Capstone Turbine Corp. (2) Cummins (2) Cummins Westport (2) Electric Vehicles International (1) Enova Systems (1) Ford Motor Co. (5) General Motors (5) Hino (1) KEM (1) Navistar (1) Paccar (2) Smith Electric Vehicles (2) UQM (2) UTC Power (1) Valence (1) Vision Motor Corp. (2) Volvo (1) Westport Innovations (1) Fuel Type All CNG (8) Electricity (11) Ethanol (2) Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic (5) Hydrogen (3) LNG (4) Propane (10) Application All Bus - School (6) Bus - Shuttle (9) Bus - Transit (11) Refuse hauler (2) Street sweeper (5) Tractor (13) Trolley (3) Van (9) Vocational truck (16) Go Compare Ballard Power Systems - FCvelocity-HD6 fuel cell Ballard Power Systems - Hydrogen Fuel Cell

83

*-MINIMAX performance in backgammon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the first performance results for Ballard's *-Minimax algorithms applied to a realworld domain: backgammon. It is shown that with effective move ordering and probing the Star2 algorithm considerably outperforms Expectimax. ...

Thomas Hauk; Michael Buro; Jonathan Schaeffer

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Axess Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ballard Power Systems -...

85

ORNL, Da Vinci Sign Licensing Agreement | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Da Vinci Sign Licensing Agreement April 12, 2012 Seated are (l to r) ORNL Partnerships Director Tom Ballard and Da Vinci CEO Kent Froelund. Standing are (l to r) Johney Green, ORNL...

86

Microsoft Word - NMMSS 2011 FINAL Attendee List.docx  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

6 Marissa Bailey NRC 7 Natasha Bajema DOD 8 Steve Baker ORNL 9 John Ballard PSINMMSS 10 Jim Bird DOE-ORO 11 Sheri Bone NNSA 12 Len Bowers SRNS 13 Glen Bradham9* AEPDC Cook 14...

87

Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusion Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte membrane fuel cells, 2009. C. Lim and C. Y.directly into full fuel-cell simulations to predictFCgen1020ACS, www.ballard.com/fuel-cell-products, Accessed

Gunterman, Haluna Penelope Frances

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Doublets and Other Allied Well Patterns SUPRI TR-122  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into W ¼ Wm þ eWf ; ð12? where Wm and eWf represent the matrix and the fracture subdomains, respectively

89

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY EATON CORPORATION (EATON) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EATON CORPORATION (EATON) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF EATON CORPORATION (EATON) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE AWARD NO. DE-EE0005665 W(A) 2012-032 EATON has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above-referenced award entitled "Roots Air Management System with Integrated Expander." The award was made under the Research and Development of Fuel Cells for Stationary and Transportation Applications Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA-0000360). Ballard Power Systems Inc. (Ballard) and Kettering University (Kettering) are sub-recipients under the award. This waiver only applies to EATON. Ballard will have to petition for a patent waiver if it wants the patent rights to subject inventions

90

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Remotely Accessed Photovoltaic Power Project. Remotely Accessed Photovoltaic Power Project. (7806 K) Hutzel, WJ; Healy, WM. ...

91

ESARDA paper, IRSN-SCM SA, May 2007 Implementation of an experimental design to evaluate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERDC/ELTR-12-25 Army Range Technology Program Large-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium-Scale Physical Separation of Depleted Uranium from Soil Steven Larson, Victor Medina, John Ballard, Chris Griggs) at Yuma Proving Ground (YPG) to evaluate this technique for removal of depleted uranium (DU) metal from

92

A. A. Snow, p. 1 ALLISON A. SNOW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QURESH S. LATIF1,5 , J. LETITIA GRENIER2 , SACHA K. HEATH3 , GRANT BALLARD3,4 , AND MARK E. HAUBER4 1 populations (Nice 1943, Sealy 1994; O'Connor et al., in press) across the species' wide geographic range) in the study area (Grenier 2004). We obtained genotypes at 10 nuclear microsatellite loci: MME 1­3, 7, 8

Snow, Allison A.

93

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov US DOE Non-Metallic Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Toyota, UTC Power, Nissan, Ballard, Plug Power, Panasonic, Delphi Technologies Clean Energy Patent Growth ­ 2015 timeframe, including Toyota, Honda, GM, Daimler, Hyundai-Kia. Projected Global Market Revenues Matthew, Nissan, Scottish & Southern Energy, Tata Motors, The BOC Group, Toyota, Vauxhall Motors

94

Peroneal artery pseudoaneurysm - a case report and literature review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:233-5. 6. McKee MA, Ballard JL: Mycotic aneurysms of the tibioperoneal arteries. Ann Vasc Surg 1999, 13(2):188-90. 7. Toyota N, Kimura F, Yoshida S, Mitsui N, Mochizuki T, Naito A, Ito K: Peroneal artery aneurysm treated by transcatheter coil embolization...

Sadat, Umar; See, Teikchoon; Cousins, Claire; Hayes, Paul; Gaunt, Michael E

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

Overview of Fusion Nuclear Technology in the US  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the SNS, HFIR and ISIS. "Even in com- parison to cuprates, this is experimentally the best indication, and Partnerships Director Tom Ballard. Spin excitations SNS, HFIR research bolsters theories of high, combined with steady-state neutron beams from the recently upgraded HFIR, give researchers at Oak Ridge

96

Radiative Heat Transfer in Enhanced Hydrogen Outgassing of Glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W/m 2 .m) f (?T ) Blackbody radiation function I ? SpectralW/m 2 .sr.m) I b,? Blackbody radiation intensity (W/m 2 .can be treated as blackbody radiation at temperature T sur .

Kitamura, Rei; Pilon, Laurent

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NEW MEXICO ENVIRONNIENT DEPARTNIENT Resource Protection Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U-201 through U-204 C-101 through C-112 Savannah River Site - 51 Tanks Tank 1 through 51 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory - 15 Tanks WM-103 through WM-106...

98

Soil moisture in complex terrain: quantifying effects on atmospheric boundary layer flow and providing improved surface boundary conditions for mesoscale models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensible heat flux (W/m 2 ) on 350 m grid for (a) weaksensible heat flux (W/m 2 ) on 350 m grid for (a) weakgrids to some extent through the advection and mixing terms of the heat

Daniels, Megan Hanako

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (QAIMP)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by WM (when necessary) DOE Orders y J Figure WM QA Programfrom the Quality Assurance DOE Order 5700.6C, the LBL IQAP,2 from ASME NQA-1-1989, DOE Order 5700.6C, Criterion 1, and

Albert editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Capacity-Speed Relationships in Prefrontal Cortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working memory (WM) capacity and WM processing speed are simple cognitive measures that underlie human performance in complex processes such as reasoning and language comprehension. These cognitive measures have shown to ...

Prabhakaran, Vivek

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

LYON REGULATORY CONSIDERATIONS FOR USE OF CEMENTITOUS MATERIALS IN  

Tank Waste Storage Project Manager Department of Ecology, State of Washington. ... TC & WM EIS = Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental ...

102

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... energy consumption. ... Healy, WM; Effect of Usage Conditions on Household Refrigerator-Freezer and Freezer Energy Consumption. ...

103

Guidance document for the preparation of waste management plans for the Environmental Restoration Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

A project waste management (WM) plan is required for all Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program remedial investigation, decommission and decontamination (D&D), and remedial action (RA) activities. The project WM plan describes the strategy for handling, packaging, treating, transporting, characterizing, storing, and/or disposing of waste produced as part of ORNL ER Program activities. The project WM plan also contains a strategy for ensuring worker and environmental protection during WM activities.

Clark, C. Jr.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

NIST: Electron-Impact Cross Section Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of Chemistry, Washington, DC 20059 5: NIST, Physics Laboratory, Office of ... are gratefully acknowledged: WM Huo, NASA Ames Research Center ...

105

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

the discussion on important DOE research the discussion on important DOE research by Michelle Turpin on Tue, 7 Oct, 2008 Our team is excited to announce that you can now join in or start discussions on important DOE research and development in the Information Bridge collection. Our new social networking feature, Document Discussion, has been added to the Information Bridge to provide a forum for moderated, substantive commentary on DOE research and development. Users may perform a search at the Information Bridge site and then begin a discussion or add to a discussion about any of the documents in the results list returned. Authors of the research documents will be notified so that they may view and contribute to the discussion. The Information Bridge is a core OSTI product featuring approximately

106

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Approximately 10,000 DOE research documents added to the Information Bridge Approximately 10,000 DOE research documents added to the Information Bridge searchable database by Michelle Turpin on Thu, 17 Apr, 2008 Information Bridge icon Our OSTI team recently completed digitizing and uploading to the Information Bridge database about 10,000 documents issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (from 1991 to 1994). This means that citizens can now search this database and rapidly download these documents in full text - all for free. The exciting part? Previous to this upload, these documents were very difficult to find - either on the Internet or in hard copy. Even more exciting? These documents bring the total Information Bridge Energy Department reports (issued from 1991 to present) to more than 165,000. This research is in science fields such as physics, chemistry,

107

Transport in PEMFC Stacks - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Cortney Mittelsteadt (Primary Contact), Hui Xu, Junqing Ma (GES); John Van Zee, Sirivatch Shimpalee, Visarn Lilavivat (USC); James E. McGrath Myoungbae Lee, Nobuo Hara, Kwan-Soo Lee, Chnng Hyun (VT); Don Conners, Guy Ebbrell (Ballard); Kevin Russell (Tech Etch) Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC 89 Rumford Ave. Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0529 Email: cmittelsteadt@ginerinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000471 Subcontractors: * Tech-Etch, Plymouth, MA * Ballard Material Products, Inc., Lowell, MA

108

NAME  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Operations Operations www.nnsa.energy.gov/nmmss E-Mail: NMMSS@nnsa.doe.gov Unclassified Fax: 301-903-1998. Classified Fax: 301-903-8341 UNCLASSIFIED/OVERNIGHT SURFACE MAIL ADDRESSES The NMMSS classified mailing address is available on the Safeguards and Security Information Management System (SSIMS) or by calling a NMMSS analyst. Identify Gary L. Hirsch as recipient and NA-73 as the organization. NMMSS TEAM: Name Title Phone (301-903+Ext.) Email Gary Hirsch Team Lead 6870 Gary.Hirsch@nnsa.doe.gov John Ballard DOE Lead / Special Requests 0092 John.Ballard@nnsa.doe.gov Patricia Smith NRC Lead 6860 PatriciaR.Smith@nnsa.doe.gov Len Myers Analyst 2180 Len.Myers@nnsa.doe.gov Mitch Hembree Analyst 6299 Mitch.Hembree@nnsa.doe.gov Deborah Larabay Analyst 6148 Deborah.Larabay@nnsa.doe.gov

109

Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dr. Silvia Wessel (Primary Contact), David Harvey, Dr. Vesna Colbow Ballard Power Systems 9000 Glenlyon Parkway Burnaby, B.C. V5J 5J8 Phone: (604) 453-3668 Email: silvia.wessel@ballard.com DOE Managers HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor John Kopasz Phone: (630) 252-7531 Email: kopasz@anl.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000466 Subcontractors: * Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Dr. S.S. Yang) * Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (Dr. R. Borup) * Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI

110

TEAM HEV ARC HITECTURE ENGIN E FU EL TRANS MISSION EN ERGY STOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEAM TEAM HEV ARC HITECTURE ENGIN E FU EL TRANS MISSION EN ERGY STOR AGE MO TOR Michigan Technological University Through-the-road Parallel 2.0-L 4 Cylinder Spark Ignition Reformulated Gasoline 4-speed Automatic COBASYS, Nickel Metal Hydride - 288V 50 kW Solectria AC Induction Transaxle Mississippi State University Through-the-road Parallel 1.9-L GM Direct Injection Turbo Diesel Bio Diesel (B20) GM F40 6-speed Manual Johnson Controls, Nickel Metal Hydride - 330V 45 kW Ballard Integrated Power Transaxle The Ohio State University Through-the-road Parallel 1.9-L GM Direct Injection Turbo Diesel Bio Diesel (B20) Aisin-Warner AF40 6-speed Automatic Transaxle Panasonic, Nickel Metal Hydride - 300V 67 kW Ballard AC Induction Transaxle /10.6 kW Kollmorgen Brushless DC Generator Pennsylvania State

111

Partnership Newsletter + '07 Year-in-Review_Issue 1-08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IN THIS ISSUE IN THIS ISSUE New Year Brings New Name 1 Ballard to Lead Directorate 1 Message from the Director 2 Building Economic Development Venture Forum 2 TVC Conference 3 ORNL and OCAST 4 S&T Park Site Preparation 11 People and Events Fischer Receives Award 4 Gordon and M2M Visit 4 Technology Events Global Venture Challenge 5 Spotlight on Partnerships Technology 2020 Recognized 6 Building a Technology-Based Economy Maturation Funding 7 New Faces in Partnerships Directorate Three New Staff Members 8 Impacts on Economic Development ORNL and IVP 9 Safety Reminder 11 Upcoming Events 12 Delivery Notice 12 N E W D e l i v e r y P o l i c y ! S e e B a c k P a g e (continued on page 10) Ballard to Lead Partnerships Directorate The ORNL Partnerships Directorate seeks to foster economic development and the growth of business

112

VOL. 57, NO. 17 1 SEPTEMBER 2000J O U R N A L O F T H E A T M O S P H E R I C S C I E N C E S 2000 American Meteorological Society 2793  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P?Ewf?Eta&w dwf dt P? Ewf &w dwf dt P? Ewf &w whereEttranspirationratefromthedryfractionoftheleaveskgm?2 s?1 interceptionstores Ewf& qs f?qaf rb Ewf &cp ! es f?eaf rb wf wm 2a3 Ewf& qaf?qs f rb wf wm 2a3 TranspirationratesEtHwEwf1? wf wm 2a3 45 LAI SAI rb rbrc EwfEt &cp ! es f?eaf rbrc 1? wf wm 2a3 Et& qaf?qs f rbrc 1? wf wm 2a

Neelin, J. David

113

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level waste (LLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment method and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS and are not repeated in this report. This report presents additional information that is not presented in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLW. Included are definition of the LLW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, data related to the inventory and to the physical and radiological characteristics of WM LLW, an overview of the risk assessment method, and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLW alternative considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Supplemental information related to risk assessment for the off-site transportation of low-level mixed waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report provides supplemental information to support the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers both the radioactive and chemical hazards associated with LLMW transportation. Detailed descriptions of the transportation health risk assessment methods and results of the assessment are presented in Appendix E of the WM PEIS. This report presents additional information that is not included in Appendix E but that was needed to conduct the transportation risk assessment for Waste Management (WM) LLMW. Included are definitions of the LLMW alternatives considered in the WM PEIS; data related to the inventory and to the physical, chemical, and radiological characteristics of WM LLMW; an overview of the risk assessment methods; and detailed results of the assessment for each WM LLMW case considered.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Lazaro, M.A.; Antonopoulos, A.A.; Hartmann, H.M.; Policastro, A.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

COLD DISCHARGE OF CF,I IN A SIMULATED AIRCRAFT ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and Pitts, WM (eds.), Evaluation of Alternative In-Flight Fire Suppressants for FUN-Scale Testing in Simulated Aircraji Engine Nacelles and Diy B qs ...

2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

116

Estrogen shapes dopamine-dependent cognitive processes: Implications for women's health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of genetic variation in catechol-o- methyltransferase (Weinberger DR (2006) Catechol-O-methyltransferase cognitionVAC: VTA: WM: WCST: catechol-o-methyltransferase dopamine

Jacobs, Emily Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 42 p.Insulation Materials Testing and ... JW; Brandenburg, NJ; Healy, WM; Heat and Moisture Transfer in Wood-Based Wall Construction: Measured ...

118

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Insulation Materials: Testing and Applications, 4th Volume ... RR; Hahn, MH; Healy, WM; Detection of Moisture Accumulation in Wall Assemblies Using ...

119

Natural analogue synthesis report, TDR-NBS-GS-000027 rev00 icn 02  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L.A. and Murphy, W.M. , eds. NUREG/CP-0147. Pages 75- 99.Geologic Repository Design. NUREG-1494. Washington, D.C. :

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Microsoft Word - CX-BigEddy-ChemawaCityofWilsonvilleBarber-KinsmanExte...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

changing insulators, and replacement of poles, circuit breakers, conductors, transformers, and crossarms. Location: S14 T3S R1W WM, in Clackamas County, Oregon Proposed by:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (108 K) Healy, WM. SL-08-009; ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 114, No. 2, 1-15, June 2008. Keywords: water heaters; electric ...

122

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Factors of Electric Water Heaters. SL-08-009;ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 114, No. 2, 1-15, June 2008. Healy, WM; Effects of ...

123

Building and Fire Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ASHRAE 118.2. Effect of Temperature ... SL-08-009;ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 114, No. 2, 1-15, June 2008. Healy, WM. The National Institute ...

124

Advanced Materials for Energy Conversion II TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Table of Contents is from Advanced Materials for Energy Conversion II ... Energy Crisis Fact or Fiction? [pp. .... W.-M. Chien, A. Price and D. Chandra.

125

Previous Session - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... University, Houghton, MI 49931; B.K. Cheong, W.M. Kim, S.G. Kim, Materials Design Laboratory, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea.

126

Report of the Laws and Regulations Committee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to increase absorption of solar energy, or ... the weights and measures community to share ... the W&M and hydrogen communities, appropriate trials of ...

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

NIST Optical Technol. Div. - 2004: Strategic Focus 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... measurements, critical for assessing the absolute magnitude of the approximately 1366 W/m 2 solar radiation driving Earth's weather and climate. ...

128

No Slide Title  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Total Solar Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Total Solar Irradiance Database Page 9. 9 ... Components NOAA Fire Weather Regional Community Residence 8 km ...

2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

129

Massachusetts's 5th congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts. Massachusetts. Registered Policy Organizations in Massachusetts's 5th congressional district Concord Comprehensive Sustainable Energy Committee Registered Energy Companies in Massachusetts's 5th congressional district ATS Lighting Inc AltE Ballard Power Systems Borrego Solar (Massachusetts) Composite Engineering Inc Enel Green Power North America Enel North America EnerSpective Environmental Solar Systems Fideris Inc formerly Lynntech Industries Geothermal Drilling of New England GreenRay Inc Kadant Inc Konarka Technologies Konarka Technologies Inc Luminus Devices Inc M J Bradley Associates Inc Nanoptek Nanoptek Inc New England Breeze Solar and Wind Installers Nuvera Fuel Cells Nuvera Fuel Cells Inc Reeves Wind Company Solar Design Associates Inc Solar Trade Corporation STC

130

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Storage Options for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Buses for Urban Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United Nations Development Program/Global Environment Facility (UNDP/GEF) Fuel Cell Bus Project will develop a fuel cell transit bus by combining two Ballard automotive fuel cells with an energy storage system. The battery system will be an important component of the bus and will assist the fuel cell systems (FC-S) to store regenerative baking energy in the hybrid system. The battery also has the potential to increase fuel cell system performance, efficiency, and durability by reducing FC-S transient...

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

Riso-M-2546 g Wind Turbine Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Riso-M-2546 g Wind Turbine Test Wind Matic WM 17S Troels Friis Pedersen The Test Station TEST WIND MATIC WM 17S Troels Friis Pedersen The Test Station for Windmills, Ris0 Abstract* The report; DYNAMIC LOADS; HORIZONTAL AXIS TUR- BINES; MECHANICAL TESTS; NOISE; PERFORMANCE TESTING; POWER GENERATION

132

Brookhaven National Laboratory Solar Energy and Smarter Grid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development · Advanced simulation of distribution networks and systems (e.g. graph trace analysis using (1000 W/m2) Power (600 W/m2) T = 25 Quick Introduction to Solar Power #12;3 Design: 164,312 Si Mods./25 · Evaluation of new technologies and control strategies for improved efficiency and reliability · Automated

133

THERMAL IMPACT OF WASTE EMPLACEMENT AND SURFACE COOLING ASSOCIATED WITH GEOLOGIC DISPOSAL OF NUCLEAR WASTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

47 W/m (190 kW/acre , and shale a t 30 W/m (120 kW/acre) assalt, granite, basalt, shale, tuff, and dry alluvium aret r e s s nonlinearly, and shale shrinks above t h e b o i l

Wang, J.S.Y.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

PEM Stack Manufacturing: Industry Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

© 2009 BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED © 2009 BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED JULY 2009 B U I L D I N G A C L E A N E N E R G Y G R O W T H C O M P A N Y B A L L A R D P O W E R S Y S T E M S PEM Stack Manufacturing: Industry Status Duarte R. Sousa, PE August 11, 2011 AUGUST 2009 P A G E 2 Overview of PEM Stack Manufacturing MEA Manufacturing Plate Manufacturing Stack Assembly Stack Conditioning and Testing Package and Ship For each of the four main processes, the following will be provided: 1. A brief history of where we have been; 2. Where we are today; 3. Where we would like to transition to; 4. Gaps and proposals. AUGUST 2009 P A G E 3 PEM Stack Manufacturing: Cost Overview * The MEA was readily identified as the major cost driver in a 10 kW stationary stack. * The precious metal catalyst electrode is the major cost driver for the MEA.

135

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (WM) PROTECTION AND WASTE MANAGEMENT (WM) Objective WM.1 - BWXT line management has established environmental protection and waste management programs to ensure safe accomplishment of work (or is adequately applying an existing approved program). Personnel exhibit an awareness of environmental protection and waste management requirements and, through their actions, demonstrate a high-priority commitment to comply with these requirements. (Core Requirement 1) Criteria * All environment compliance and waste management matrix support functions are identified for system operations. * Appropriate environmental protection/waste management plans and procedures for operational support services are issued. * Adequate staffing is available to support environmental protection and waste management

136

Two NACP Data Sets Published from Regional Synthesis and Site...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NACP Regional: Original Observation Data and Biosphere and Inverse Model Outputs . Data set prepared by R.B. Cook, W.M. Post, P.E. Thornton, A. Jacobson, D.N. Huntzinger, Y....

137

The Neural Substrate of Orientation Working Memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have used positron emission tomography (PET) to identify the neural substrate of two major cognitive components of working memory (WM), maintenance and manipulation of a single elementary visual attribute, i.e., the orientation of a grating presented ...

L. Cornette; P. Dupont; E. Salmon; Guy A. Orban

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), Stockholm Intl Peace Research Inst, Oxford University Oress 337 p., 1997. Arkin, WM and J Handler, Naval Geochemistry (eds. AC Sigleo and A Hattori), Lewis Publishers, Inc., Chelsea, MI, 97-119, 1985. Brungot, AL

139

Prarie View RDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRAIRIE VIEW RDF PRAIRIE VIEW RDF 2 Prairie View RDF  Located at JAAP (approx. 40 miles southwest of Chicago), 223 acres on 455 Acre Parcel  Will County Owner; Waste Management, Operator  Maximum 23-Year Life WM/Will County Methane to Energy Plant  Landfill Contract Signed w/WM in 1997 w/Gas-to- Energy Plant Clause  County Retains Gas Rights &WM Installs Gas Collection System  WM owns Methane to Energy Plant &Tax Credits 3 CONTRACT PHASE  DOE Grant Applied 6/09  County Board Approves DOE EECBG Strategy 11/09  1 Million DOE Funds to Methane to Energy Plant  Schiff Harden Hired to Negotiate Gas to Energy Contract  February 2010 County Board Authorizes Contract Execution 4 5 METHANE TO ENERGY PLANT DETAILS  Waste Management Required To

140

Microsoft PowerPoint - IHEP_052803_Marone1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

glass reinforced thermoplastic * k 0.22 wm-C * 300K - 4K heat load * 1.5 W total heat load Lead End revisions * Bellows flange revised to provide 190mm x 50mm clearance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceeding Plancks blackbody radiation law. Applied PhysicsA] I b ? spectral blackbody radiation intensity [W/m 2 ] kNanoscale radiation blackbody radiation limit. In addition,

Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Current Experiments in Elementary Particle Physics (Revised June 1992)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

821 MORSE, MOSER, W.M. (Brookhaven) BNL-845 U. (Bern U) SIN-NA-042 REMSBERG, L.P. (Brookhaven) BNL- 859 REUCROFT, S. (013 W. (Cracow) FNAL-667 (Brookhaven) BNL-855 S.S. (Toky. U)

Galic, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Parent Volatiles and Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1 Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, code 693,. Greenbelt, MD ... 4 Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Rowan University, Glassboro, NJ 08028, USA. 5 W.M. Keck .... sample a range of rotational energies

144

Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Waste Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Waste Management. WM's fleet of nearly 1,700 CNG and liquefied natural gas (LNG) vehicles is the largest in the North American waste industry. In 2012, natural gas...

145

Analysis of NaOH releases for Hanford tank farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in the canceled document is now located in the document: Consequence Analysis of a NaOH Solution Spray Release During Addition to Waste Tank, WHC-SD-WM-CN-065.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Polymorphisms in the 5-httlpr gene mediate storage capacity of visual working memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Working memory (WM) is a limited capacity system that permeates nearly all levels of cognition, ranging from perceptual awareness to intelligence. Through behavioral, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging work, substantial gains have been made in understanding ...

David E. Anderson; Theodore A. Bell; Edward Awh

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Resistive Wall Heating Due to Image Current on the Beam Chamber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

as a function of the harmonics n f(M f 0 ). By applying the anomalous skin effect (green curves) for alpha > 3, the calculated heat load per unit length was 2.13 Wm. By...

148

Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 91st Edition - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

04/7/2011 - Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 91st Edition (2010), W.M. ... is a one-of-a-kind handbook which gives the fundamental data on: units, symbols,...

149

The Boom of Electricity Demand in the Residential Sector in the Developing World and the Potential for Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitigation Potential 2010-2030 SH FL WH AC Fan WM SB IL TVfrom 1% in 2005 to 9% in 2030 is assumed, following (Zhou,that between 2010 and 2030, households will gradually

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Material World: Forecasting Household Appliance Ownership in a Growing Global Economy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of appliance diffusion through 2030 for several scenarios ofOECD Western Europe North America Latin America 2030 REFREF 2030 LOW 2030 HIGH WM 2030 REF 2030 LOW 2030 HIGH TV

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quality impacts from 1980 to 2030 Table 1. Description ofincreases to 309.9 Wm ?2 for 2030. References Albrecht B Aquality impacts from 1980 to 2030 Shindell D, Faluvegi G,

Menon, Surabi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Transient plane source measurements of the thermal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... conductivity of (2.12.2) W/(m K). While the HS bounds are fairly tight in Fig. ... Res 33:363371 8. Xu Y, Chung DDL (2000) Effect of sand addition on ...

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

153

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

south of WM1 NO X Callery pear X 20 By road pull off NO X Bare area X Additional Notes U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management LMS 3047FER Page 1 of 2 02022010...

154

Riggs, R.K. Mr. Roark, J.E. Mr. Robenhymer, F.D. Mr. Robinson...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regifter' Vol. 58, No. 178 Thursday, September 16, 1993 Notices Riggs, R.K. Mr. Roark, J.E. Mr. Robenhymer, F.D. Mr. Robinson, B.B. Dr. Robinson, W.M. Mr. Rojas, RIR Mr....

155

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of...

156

Modulhandbuch Bachelor-Studiengang Biochemie Studiengang Bachelor-Studiengang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Semester SS / 2. Semester Verantwortliche Morgner Dozenten Morgner m.WM Sprache Deutsch Zuordnung zum Curriculum B.Sc. Chemie Chemie (Diplom) Fächerübergreifender B.Sc./B.A. BSc. Biochemie B.Sc. Technical

Manstein, Dietmar J.

157

Tank characterization report for single-shell tank 241-B-201  

SciTech Connect

This tank characterization report for Tank 241-B-201 was initially released as PNL-10100. This document is now being released as WHC-SD- WM-ER-550 in order to accommodate internet publishing.

Conner, J.M.

1996-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Removal of pertechnetate from simulated nuclear waste streams using supported zerovalent iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3. ?? TM/JD 2. Westinghouse Hanford Co. , Report WHC-SD-WM-Department of Energys Hanford Site: (1) the direct removaltypical of those found in Hanford tank waste; and (2) the

Darab, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Comments on research for sustaining the nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.degtyareva@gl.ciw.edu This work and HP-CAT are supported by DOE-BES, DOE-NNSA, DOD- TACOM, NSF, NASA, and the W.M. Keck Foundation

Kemner, Ken

160

Climate System Response to External Forcings and Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate System Response to External Forcings and Climate Change Projections in CCSM4 Submitted by mkaczmar on March 8, 2012 - 11:03 Authors: Meehl, G.A., Washington, WM, Arblaster,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

10 Questions for a Quantitative Geneticist: Wellington Muchero...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

revolved around us. Q: What is 'cell wall recalcitrance' and why does it matter for biofuels production? WM: Cellulose is one of the most abundant polymers on earth -- most of...

162

Development of a Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

together with measured solar radiation in the weather data.simulations were as follows: Direct solar radiation (W/ m )Total horizontal solar radiation (W/m 2 ) Outdoor air dry-

Walker, Iain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Investigation of Aerosol Sources, Lifetime and Radiative Forcing through Multi-Instrument Data Assimilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as clouds reflect solar radiation and trap outgoing CHAPTEReffectively scatter solar radiation, such as sulfate, reduceF o = 1361W/m 2 (Solar Radiation and Climate Experiement (

Rubin, Juli Irene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that exposure to solar radiation (i.e. daylight), has aterm perceptions of solar radiation, and changes within afound that for direct solar radiation exceedng 60 W/m 2 (

Konis, Kyle Stas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Light, Nearwork, and Visual Environment Risk Factors in Myopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hours and integrated solar radiation during each study15 minutes and included precipitation and solar radiation.The solar radiation data, in W/m 2 , were converted to lux

Alvarez, Amanda Aleksandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Cape Lisburne Barrow Canyon= hydrographic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, hydrography, light, nutrients, ice thickness, and zooplankton biomass and size composition. The instruments job adapting to the many challenges during the cruise. Thanks to S. Salo, Wm Floering, and L. De

167

I N S T I T U T F U R I N F O R M A T I K Seminar: Sustainability in Software Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cyber Security, www.nist.gov/smartgrid, Sept. 2010. 2. Wang J, Biviji MA, Wang WM. Lessons Learned from and Distributed Algorithms, in Proc. Second SmartGrid- Comm, Brussels, Belgium, Oct. 2011. 7. Diffie W, Hellman ME

168

Progress on Superconducting Magnets for the MICE Cooling Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

second stage with its condenser. The white part is thefluid is creating a condenser circuit that causes theWm -2 . The area of the condenser must be large enough such

Green, Michael A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 29 26 -10.34% White Female (W,F) 19 16 -15.79% Change DIVERSITY Change Livermore Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

170

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

-8.33% White Male (W,M) 34 34 0.00% White Female (W,F) 17 16 -5.88% Change DIVERSITY Change Sandia Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change GENDER...

171

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 15 13 -13.33% White Female (W,F) 8 6 -25.00% Change DIVERSITY Change Savannah River Field Office As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

172

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

0.00% White Male (W,M) 85 71 -16.47% White Female (W,F) 33 30 -9.09% Change DIVERSITY Change NNSA Production Office (NPO) As of September 26, 2013 TOTAL WORKFORCE Change...

173

YEAR  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

White Male (W,M) 389 400 2.83% White Female (W,F) 21 19 -9.52% Change DIVERSITY Change Assistant Deputy Administrator for Secure Transportation (NA-15) As of...

174

Current-enhanced SASE using an optical laser and its application to the LCLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE LCLS A.A. Zholents, W.M. Fawleymore fully the potential of ESASE tech- niques at the LCLS.REFERENCES [1] LCLS Conceptual Design Report, SLAC-R-593 (

Zholents, Alexander A.; Fawley, William M.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Zhirong; Reiche, Sven; Stupakov, Gennady

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04212010 Location(s): Milam...

176

CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04212010 Location(s): Milam...

177

Rheology and Convective Heat Transfer of Colloidal Gas Aphrons in Horizontal Minichannels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-phase convective heat transfer in microchannels: aand Newell, M. E. , 1967. Heat transfer in fully developed3 /s at 130 W. Water CGA Heat Transfer Coefficient, h (W/m 2

Tseng, H.; Pilon, L.; Warrier, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of Heat Transfer Enhancement Techniques for ExternalCooling of an Advanced Reactor Vessel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nucleate boiling is a well-recognized means for passively removinghigh heat loads (up to 106 W/m2) generated by amolten reactor core under severe accident conditions whilemaintaining (more)

Yang, Jun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

OpenEI Community - SOTU + Energy data  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Highlights from the 2013 State of the Union http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogenergy-highlights-2013-state-union

WM&featur...

180

Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building with no windows) Figure 3 Washington DC: Lines ofbuilding with no windows) Figure 8 Washington DC: Lines ofdynamic window. U-factor [W/(m^2-K)] Washington DC -

Arasteh, Dariush; Goudey, Howdy; Huang, Joe; Kohler, Christian; Mitchell, Robin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High Performance Solar Control Office Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar Control Office Windows William King December 1977 C'eSOLAR CONTROL OFFICE WINDOWS Wm. J. King KINETIC COATINGS,R. Berman. Consultation on window characteristics and aid in

King, William J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NIST Technical Note I380  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1. "Resolved-sideband Raman cooling of a bound atom to the 3-D zero-point energy," C. Monroe, DM Meekhof, BE King, S. R. Jefferts, WM Itano ...

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of radioactive...

184

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Descriptions Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (Site Descriptions) West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon...

185

Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for Central America from NREL

(Abstract):50 m wind power density (Wm2) maps of Central...

186

Using Building Simulation and Optimization to Calculate Lookup Tables for Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ambient temperature (C) solar at weather station (W/m2) dayTRNSYS weather reader was used to calculate the solar gainsWeather disturbances used in the annual simulation ambient temp (C) solar

Coffey, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Using Building Simulation and Optimization to Calculate Lookup Tables for Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ambient temperature (C) solar at weather station (W/m2) dayTRNSYS weather reader was used to calculate the solar gainsWeather disturbances used in the annual simulation ambient temp (C) solar

Coffey, Brian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of housesbuilttocurrentstandards. PassiveHouse:Passivehousestypicallyrequireamaximumof10W/m2ofwereprovidedwithpassivehouseframesandhavetriple

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Waste Management Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Environment Department addresses its responsibilities through activities in a variety of areas. The need for a comprehensive management control system for these activities has been identified by the Department of Energy (DOE). The WM QA (Waste Management Quality Assurance) Plan is an integral part of a management system that provides controls necessary to ensure that the department`s activities are planned, performed, documented, and verified. This WM QA Plan defines the requirements of the WM QA program. These requirements are derived from DOE Order 5700.6C, Quality Assurance, the LBL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP, LBL PUB-3111), and other environmental compliance documents applicable to WM activities. The requirements presented herein, as well as the procedures and methodologies that direct the implementation of these requirements, will undergo review and revisions as necessary. The provisions of this QA Plan and its implementing documents apply to quality-affecting activities performed by and for WM. It is also applicable to WM contractors, vendors, and other LBL organizations associated with WM activities, except where such contractors, vendors, or organizations are governed by their own WM-approved QA programs. References used in the preparation of this document are (1) ASME NQA-1-1989, (2) ANSI/ASQC E4 (Draft), (3) Waste Management Quality Assurance Implementing Management Plan (LBL PUB-5352, Rev. 1), (4) LBL Operating and Assurance Program Plan (OAP), LBL PUB-3111, 2/3/93. A list of terms and definitions used throughout this document is included as Appendix A.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

arm_stm_2007_revercomb_poster.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GOES & RRTM Fluxes and AIRS Partial Fluxes GOES & RRTM Fluxes and AIRS Partial Fluxes Partial Flux * AIRS obs, * LBLRTM) Total Flux * GOES, * RRTM Year 2000 - 2006 RRTM flux (AIRS Ts, emis) CERES comparison RRTM minus CERES W/m 2 W/m 2 Clear Sky TOA Flux from GOES and Aqua CERES Clear Sky TOA Flux GOES minus CERES * Mean: +5.5 W/m 2 , StdDev: 11.3 W/m 2 Clear Sky TOA Flux from GOES and RRTM calculations Clear Sky TOA Flux GOES minus RRTM calculations W/m 2 W/m 2 wavenumber Obs-Calc (K) Obs-Calc (K) Day Night Day Night Mean Observed minus Calculated STDDEV Observed minus Calculated wavenumber Obs-Calc (K) Tb (K) BBHRP Assessment Part 1: Clear Sky Analysis Using Ground and Satellite-based High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations Hank Revercomb, Leslie Moy, Dave Tobin, Bob Knuteson, Dave Turner, Bob Holz, Daniel DeSlover, Jun Li

191

Parabolic Trough Receiver Heat Loss Testing (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough receivers, or heat collection elements (HCEs), absorb sunlight focused by the mirrors and transfer that thermal energy to a fluid flowing within them. Thje absorbing tube of these receivers typically operates around 400 C (752 F). HCE manufacturers prevent thermal loss from the absorbing tube to the environment by using sputtered selective Cermet coatings on the absorber and by surrounding the absorber with a glass-enclosed evacuated annulus. This work quantifies the heat loss of the Solel UVAC2 and Schott PTR70 HCEs. At 400 C, the HCEs perform similarly, losing about 400 W/m of HCE length. To put this in perspective, the incident beam radiation on a 5 m mirror aperture is about 4500 W/m, with about 75% of that energy ({approx} 3400 W/m) reaching the absorber surface. Of the 3400 W/m on the absorber, about 3000 W/m is absorbed into the working fluid while 400 W/m is lost to the environment.

Price, H.; Netter, J.; Bingham, C.; Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Brandemuehl, M.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Accelerated Testing Validation - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Rangachary Mukundan 1 (Primary Contact), Rod Borup 1 , John Davey 1 , Roger Lujan 1 , Dennis Torraco 1 , David Langlois 1 , Fernando Garzon 1 , Dusan Spernjak 1 , Joe Fairweather 1 , Sivagaminathan Balasubramanian 2 , Adam Weber 2 , Mike Brady 3 , Karren More 3 , Greg James 4 , Dana Ayotte 4 , and Steve Grot 5 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory MS D429, P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 665-8523 Email: Mukundan@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: 2 Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 3 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 4 Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC V5J 5J8 Canada 5 Ion Power, New Castle, DE Project Start Date: Oct 2009

193

Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 2009 October 2009 BUILDING A CLEAN ENERGY GROWTH COMPANY B A L L A R D P O W E R S Y S T E M S Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kick-off Meeting COPYRIGHT © 2009 BALLARD POWER SYSTEMS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED Project Objectives ƒ Understand and quantify the fundamental degradation mechanisms Establish relationships between morphology, operational conditions, and the rate of catalyst/catalyst layer degradation ƒ Understand the impact of degradation on the mechanical/chemical stability of the component interfaces, including the stability of the 3-phase interface ƒ Develop mechanistic, forward predictive kinetic and materials aging models for catalyst layer degradation

194

FW Response to Notice of Inquire on Questions Concerning Technology Transfer Tractices at DOE Laboratories.txt - Notepad  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

esponse to Notice of Inquire on Questions Concerning Technology Transfer Tractices at DOE Laboratories. esponse to Notice of Inquire on Questions Concerning Technology Transfer Tractices at DOE Laboratories. From: Malozemoff, Alex [AMalozemoff@amsc.com] Sent: Tuesday, January 27, 2009 4:09 PM To: GC-62 Cc: Ballard, Thomas B.; McGahn, Daniel Subject: FW: Response to Notice of Inquire on Questions Concerning Technology Transfer Tractices at DOE Laboratories > Response to Fed Register 73, no. 229, Nov. 26, 2008 Notices > > DOE Questions Concerning Technology Transfer Practices at DOE > Laboratories > > Answer by > > Dr. Alexis P. Malozemoff > Executive V. P. and Chief Technical Officer > American Superconductor > 64 Jackson Rd., Devens MA 01434 USA > ph: 978-842-3331 > cell: 508-243-9693 > amalozemoff@amsc.com > > 1. American Superconductor (AMSC), a leader in alternative energy

195

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2_hirsh Monday 5-20 Overview.ppt [Compatibility Mode]  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Overview Overview Gary L. Hirsch Project Lead  NMMSS - Nuclear Material Management and Safeguards System - It is the US Government's database used to track movements and inventories of nuclear materials. 2  NMMSS - Owned by Department of Energy (DOE)/NNSA -NA73 - Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has interagency contract - Operated by Protection Strategies, Inc. (PSI) 3  NMMSS Supports the US government in: - Treaty commitments - Congressional law - Domestic rules and regulations - Business Practices - Health & Safety issues - Public Trust - Government needs 4  Staff Introductions - Analysts - Programmers 5 Analyst 301-903-XXXX - Karen Antizzo, X-0872, Export License, Contract Numbers - John Ballard, X-0092, Training, DOE Reconciliations, Daily Processing Errors - Mitch Hembree, X-6299, NRC Reconciliations, Obligations

196

U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Procurement and Cantrads Division  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Oak Ridge Operations Offlce Procurement and Cantrads Division P.O. BOX 2001 Oak Ridge. TN 37831 SOLICITATION, OFFER AND AWARD Dlrect Del very Adotess' U S Deoanmenl of Energy Oar R doe Ooerat ons Ofice ~ r m u r e i e n t s n d Contracts Division ,200 Administration Road, ATTN: Ballard A. Jackson Jr Oak Ridse. TN 37830 I . THIS CONTRACT IS ARATED ORDER UNDER DPAS (15 CFR 700) I NOTE: In sealed bid solicitations "offer" and "offeror" mean "bid" and "bidder". SOLICITATION 9. Sealed offers in original and S e e Section L copies for furnishing the supplies or selvices in the Schedule will b e received at the place specified in I t e m % or if handcarried, in the depository located i n the Federal Office Buildinq a t Oak Ridqe. T

197

U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: Progress and Future Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: Progress and Future Directions Total Energy USA Houston, Texas Dr. Sunita Satyapal 11/27/2012 Director, Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents Geographic Distribution 2002-2011 Top 10 companies: GM, Honda, Samsung, Toyota, UTC Power, Nissan, Ballard, Plug Power, Panasonic, Delphi Technologies Clean Energy Patent Growth Index Source: Clean Energy Patent Growth Index Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011.

198

Fuel Cell Portable Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Power Department of Energy Workshop January 17, 2002 2 Portable Markets - Table of Contents 1. Opportunity Summary for Portable Markets 2. Commercialization Path and Resource Map 3. Value Chain Issues 4. Ballard "State of the Art" 5. Fuel Options and Issues 6. Where can the D.O.E. Help 3 Opportunity Summary - Portable Markets Infrequent Frequent Typical Applications Backup - Batteries & Gensets Peaking power and seasonal use; mobile power Preferred Fuels Hydrocarbon & Hydrogen Hydrocarbon (H2?) Total Available Market Large - But Fractured into many apps Moderate Price Target Low (Pockets willing to pay high $ for certain attributes) Moderate (Lifecycle) Environmental Impact Low Moderate Timing Short term Mid term 4 Technical Challenge Low High Micro Markets H2 Backup Power HC Frequent

199

file://C:\Documents and Settings\cofield\Desktop\GC-62 Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elisabeth Brown [brown@orcc.org] Elisabeth Brown [brown@orcc.org] Sent: Monday, January 26, 2009 4:45 PM To: GC-62 Cc: Kim Denton; Ballard, Thomas B.; Mason, Thom (OR); Smith, Jeff (ORNL) Subject: DOE Request Dear Sir/Madam: The Oak Ridge Economic Partnership is an economic development corporation in Oak Ridge, TN and a partner in Innovation Valley Inc., a regional economic development initiative. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory is vital to the growth and success of both our community and region. The resources available at the lab are second to none and are indeed paramount to economic development success in the region. One such example of this success includes the VW assembly plant announcement in Chattanooga, TN. ORNL and its technology capabilities were instrumental in landing this $1 billion manufacturing win for our entire region. We are

200

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5036: Fuel Cell Stack Durability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Date: April 20, 2006 6 Date: April 20, 2006 Title: Fuel Cell Stack Durability Originator: Valri Lightner Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: Over the past several years, the durability of the fuel cell stack has doubled. Supporting Information: Fuel cell and component developers, supported by the DOE program (through the FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership, which includes DOE, USCAR, and the five major U.S. energy companies), have developed fuel cell components having improved performance and durability. These improvements have been demonstrated in fuel cell stacks built by industry having double the lifetime - from 1,000 hours to 2,000 hours over the past two years. These results have been independently verified by Ballard, a fuel cell developer/supplier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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201

Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Dave Hancock Plug Power Inc. 968 Albany Shaker Rd Latham, NY 12110 Phone: (518) 782-7700 Email: david_hancock@plugpower.com DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Walt Podolski Phone: (630) 252-7558 Email: podolski@anl.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000473 Subcontractor: Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada Project Start Date: June 1, 2009 Project End Date: November 15, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Advance the state of the art in technology for air-cooled * proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive(tm) material handling application fuel

202

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record #13007: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Date: 09/05/2013 7 Date: 09/05/2013 Title: Industry Deployed Fuel Cell Backup Power (BuP) Originators: Pete Devlin, Jim Alkire, Sara Dillich, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Rick Farmer and Sunita Satyapal Date: 09/09/13 Item: Table 1: Number of fuel cells deployments (current and planned) for applications in backup power. The funding of 903 Department of Energy (DOE) fuel cell backup power systems has led to over 3,500 industry installations and on-order backup power units with no DOE funding. Data/Assumptions/Calculations: The manufacturers providing the fuel cells for the deployments (current and planned) mentioned in Table 1 above are: Altergy Ballard / Ida Tech Hydrogenics ReliOn, Inc. Total DOE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) investment for these fuel cell

203

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kentucky Kentucky based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Kentucky and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Kentucky, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 4 Adair Edmonson Knox Nicholas Allen Elliott LaRue Ohio Anderson Estill Laurel Oldham Ballard Fayette Lawrence Owen Barren Fleming Lee Owsley Bath Floyd Leslie Pendleton Bell Franklin Letcher Perry Boone Fulton Lewis Pike

204

Fuel Cell Freeze Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuesday, February 1, 2005 8:30 Welcome- Workshop Expectations Nancy Garland, DOE 8:45 Glenn Skala, General Motors 9:10 Jeremy Meyers, UTC Fuel Cells 9:35 Ballard Contribution presented by Larry Blair, DOE consultant 9:55 Richard Gaylord, Plug Power 10:15 Break 10:30 Tom Zawodzinski, CWRU 10:50 Phil Ross, LBNL 11:10 Bryan Pivovar, LANL 11:30 Rajesh Ahluwalia, ANL 11:50 Lunch 12:45 Open Discussion Moderated by Doug Wheeler (NREL consultant) 1:45 Breakout Group Assignments and instructions - Shawna McQueen, Energetics 2:00 Breakout Groups (Effects) 3:00 Break 3:20 Breakout Groups (Challlenges) 4:30 Reconvene/Discuss break out group findings Wednesday, February 2, 2005 8:00 Breakout Groups (Research Directions) 10:00 Break

205

DOE Durability Working Group May 2011 Meeting Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Durability Working Group Wednesday, May 11, 2011, 7:00-10:00 pm Marriott Crystal Gateway "Salon V" (Ballroom Level) Meeting Agenda 7:00 pm Welcome and introductory comments Debbie Myers (Argonne) and Rod Borup (Los Alamos) - co-chairs 7:10 pm Compilation of decay mechanisms, impact, evidence, and diagnostic procedures Proposed by: Adam Weber (LBNL), Mike Perry (UTRC) Assigned to: Debbie Myers, Rod Borup, Rangachary Mukundan (LANL) 7:30 pm PEFC start-up protocol Assigned to: Greg James (Ballard) - lead, Rod Borup (LANL), Mike Perry (UTRC) 7:50 pm Accelerated stress test for non-carbon supports (e.g., metal oxides) Proposed by: Shyam Kocha (NREL), Assigned to: Shyam Kocha (NREL) - lead Mahlon Wilson and Eric Brosha (LANL) 8:10 pm Discussion of electrochemical equivalent of accelerated stress test for MEAs

206

DOE-EERE Durability Working Group Meeting, October 10, 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE-EERE Durability Working Group Meeting October 10, 2010 Agenda 6 pm Welcome and introductory comments Debbie Myers (Argonne) and Rod Borup (Los Alamos) - co-chairs 6:15 pm Overview of electrocatalyst and support degradation mechanisms Sarah Ball, Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells 6:45 pm Discussion/presentations by project PIs/representatives (5-10 minutes each) * Overview of electrocatalyst and support degradation aspects of projects * Protocols/testing procedures/diagnostics used to resolve the electrocatalyst and support degradation mechanisms * Ballard, Nuvera, LANL-Borup, Argonne, DuPont, UTC Power, LANL-Mukund, NREL, HNEI, 3M 8:15 pm Discussion on relevance and impact of degradation studies of each stack component Led by Rod Borup Discussion on standardized generic start-up and shut-down protocols

207

Putting Science to Work BUILDING NANOTECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

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BUILDING BUILDING NANOTECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT THOM MAsON NAMED ORNL DiRECTOR Accompanying Congressman Wamp (at lectern) during the grant announcement are, from left, Oak Ridge City Councilwoman Lou Dunlap; Tom Ballard, ORNL director of Economic Development and Partnerships; and Gerald Boyd, manager, DOE Oak Ridge Office. THOM MAsON NAMED ORNL DiRECTOR T hom Mason has been named ORNL's new direc- tor, effective July 1. The choice was announced in late May by UT-Battelle Board of Governors Chair Carl Kohrt and Vice Chair John Petersen. Mason's most recent role has been associate labora- tory director for Neutron Sciences. As head of the Spallation Neutron Source project, he led a consortium of six DOE labs in the design and construction of the $1.4 billion neutron accelerator. Completed on time,

208

Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative and Durable High Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Development of Alternative and Durable High Development of Alternative and Durable High Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Performance Cathode Supports for PEM Fuel Cells PNNL: Yong Wang Conrad Zhang Vilayanur Viswanath Yuehe Lin Jun Liu Project kick Project kick - - off meeting off meeting Feb 13 Feb 13 - - 14, 2007 14, 2007 Ballard Power Systems: Stephen Campbell University of Delaware: Jingguang Chen ORNL: Sheng Dai 2 Technical Issues and Objective Technical Issues and Objective Current technical issues z Carbon support „ Susceptible to oxidation under fuel cell operating conditions. „ Oxidation further catalyzed by Pt „ Corrosion leads to Pt migration and agglomeration

209

The Effect of Airborne Contaminants on Fuel Cell Performance and Durability - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63 63 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Jean St-Pierre (Primary Contact), Yunfeng Zhai, Michael Angelo, Trent Molter, Leonard Bonville, Ugur Pasaogullari, Mark Aindow, William Collins, Silvia Wessel Hawaii Natural Energy Institute 1680 East-West Road Honolulu, HI 96822 Phone: (808) 956-3909 Email: jsp7@hawaii.edu DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Walt Podolski Phone: (630) 252-7558 Email: podolski@anl.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000467 Subcontractors: * University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT * UTC Power, South Windsor, CT * Ballard Power Systems, Burnaby, BC, Canada

210

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY GRAFTECH INTERNATIONAL LTD. (GRAFTECH) FOR AN ADVANCE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GRAFTECH INTERNATIONAL LTD. (GRAFTECH) FOR AN ADVANCE GRAFTECH INTERNATIONAL LTD. (GRAFTECH) FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE GRANT NO. DE-FG36-07GO17012; W(A)-07-040 The Petitioner, GrafTech, has requested a waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights for all subject inventions arising from its participation under the above referenced grant entitled "Next Generation "Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells." The Petitioner will be collaborating with Ballard Power Systems, Huntsman Advanced Materials, and Case Western Reserve University, none of which is subject to this waiver request. The objective of the grant is to develop the next-generation automotive bipolar plate based on an engineered composite of expanded graphite and resin. The new plate composite will

211

The Science And Engineering of Duralbe Ultralow PGM Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies 2009 Kickoff Meeting The Science And Engineering of Durable Ultralow PGM Catalysts Eric Brosha, Neil Henson and Fernando Garzon (PI) LANL 1 Los Alamos National Laboratory (lead participant) Ballard Power Systems (BPS) University of California Riverside (UCR) University of New Mexico (UNM) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) *Development of durable, high mass activity Platinum Group Metal cathode catalysts *Elucidation of the fundamental relationships between PGM catalyst shape, particle size and activity *Optimization of the cathode electrode layer to maximize the performance of PGM catalysts *Understanding the performance degradation mechanisms of high mass activity cathode catalysts *Development and testing of fuel cells using ultra-low loading high activity

212

Accelerated Testing Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Validation Testing Validation Rangachary Mukundan (PI), Rodney Borup, John Davey, Roger Lujan Los Alamos National Laboratory Adam Z. Weber Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Greg James Ballard Power Systems, Inc Mike Brady Oak Ridge National Laboratory Steve Grot Ion Power, Inc This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Objective/Barrier/Target The objectives of this project are 3-fold 1. Correlation of the component lifetimes measured in an AST to real-world behavior of that component. 2. Validation of existing ASTs for Catalyst layers and Membranes 3. Development of new ASTs for GDLs, bipolar plates and interfaces Technical Barrier Addressed: A. Durability * Durability of fuel cell systems operating over automotive drive cycles has not

213

DOE Durability Working Group February 2013 Meeting Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Durability Working Group (DWG) DOE Durability Working Group (DWG) Meeting Agenda Thursday, February 28, 2013 Crystal City Marriott Crystal City, VA 8:30 am Welcome and introductory comments Debbie Myers (Argonne) and Rod Borup (Los Alamos) - co-chairs 8:45 am Introduction to meeting objectives Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, Department of Energy, Fuel Cell Technologies Office Summary of what has been learned in DOE durability-related projects and durability R&D needs/gaps (PI's or project representatives; 10 min talks per person) 9:00 am Session I. Durability: Nuvera (Olga Polevaya), Ballard (Silvia Wessel), LANL (Rod Borup), and ANL (Debbie Myers) 9:40 am Session II. Modeling: LBNL (Adam Weber), ANL (Rajesh Ahluwalia) 10:00 am Session III. Catalyst and Impurities: 3M (Radoslav Atanasoski),

214

Reduction in Fabrication Costs of Gas Diffusion Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ballard Material Products (BMP) performed a pre-design technical and cost analysis of state of the art production technologies feasible for high volume GDL manufacturing. Based upon criteria that also included environmental health and safety, customer quality requirements, and future needs, BMP selected technologies that can be integrated into its current manufacturing process. These selections included Many-At-A-Time (MAAT) coating and continuous mixing technologies, as well as various on-line process control tools. These processes have allowed BMP to produce high performance GDLs at lower cost for near-term markets, as well as to define the inputs needed to develop a conceptual Greenfield facility to meet the cost targets for automotive volumes of 500,000 vehicles per year.

Jason Morgan; Donald Connors; Michael Hickner

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

Accelerated Testing Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Fuel Cell technical team recommended ASTs were performed on 2 different MEAs (designated P5 and HD6) from Ballard Power Systems. These MEAs were also incorporated into stacks and operated in fuel cell bus modules that were either operated in the field (three P5 buses) in Hamburg, or on an Orange county transit authority drive cycle in the laboratory (HD6 bus module). Qualitative agreement was found in the degradation mechanisms and rates observed in the AST and in the field. The HD6 based MEAs exhibited lower voltage degradation rates (due to catalyst corrosion) and slower membrane degradation rates in the field as reflected by their superior performance in the high potential hold and open-circuit potential AST tests. The quantitative correlation of the degradation rates will have to take into account the various stressors in the field including temperature, relative humidity, start/stops and voltage cycles.

Mukundan, Rangachary; James, Greg; Davey, John; Langlois, David; Torraco, Dennis; Yoon, Wonseok; Weber, Adam Z; Borup, Rodney L.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Optimal fuel cell system design considering functional performance and production costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work the optimization-based, integrated concurrent design method is applied to the modelling, analysis, and design of a transportation fuel cell system. A general optimal design model considering both functional performance and production costs is first introduced. Using the Ballard Mark V Transit Bus fuel cell system as an example, the study explores the intrinsic relations among various fuel cell system performance and cost aspects to provide insights for new cost-effective designs. A joint performance and cost optimization is carried out to demonstrate this new approach. This approach breaks the traditional barrier between design concerning functional performance. and manufacturing concerning production costs., allowing both functional performance and production costs to

D. Xue A; Z. Dong B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

One size fits all? An assessment tool for solid waste management at local and national levels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Waste management schemes are generally implemented at national or regional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local conditions characteristics and constraints are often neglected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an economic model able to compare multi-level waste management options. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A detailed test case with real economic data and a best-fit scenario is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most efficient schemes combine clear National directives with local level flexibility. - Abstract: As environmental awareness rises, integrated solid waste management (WM) schemes are increasingly being implemented all over the world. The different WM schemes usually address issues such as landfilling restrictions (mainly due to methane emissions and competing land use), packaging directives and compulsory recycling goals. These schemes are, in general, designed at a national or regional level, whereas local conditions and constraints are sometimes neglected. When national WM top-down policies, in addition to setting goals, also dictate the methods by which they are to be achieved, local authorities lose their freedom to optimize their operational WM schemes according to their specific characteristics. There are a myriad of implementation options at the local level, and by carrying out a bottom-up approach the overall national WM system will be optimal on economic and environmental scales. This paper presents a model for optimizing waste strategies at a local level and evaluates this effect at a national level. This is achieved by using a waste assessment model which enables us to compare both the economic viability of several WM options at the local (single municipal authority) level, and aggregated results for regional or national levels. A test case based on various WM approaches in Israel (several implementations of mixed and separated waste) shows that local characteristics significantly influence WM costs, and therefore the optimal scheme is one under which each local authority is able to implement its best-fitting mechanism, given that national guidelines are kept. The main result is that strict national/regional WM policies may be less efficient, unless some type of local flexibility is implemented. Our model is designed both for top-down and bottom-up assessment, and can be easily adapted for a wide range of WM option comparisons at different levels.

Broitman, Dani, E-mail: danib@techunix.technion.ac.il [Department of Natural Resources and Environment Management, Graduate school of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905 (Israel); Ayalon, Ofira [Department of Natural Resources and Environment Management, Graduate school of Management, University of Haifa, Haifa 31905 (Israel); Kan, Iddo [Department of Agricultural Economics and Management, Faculty of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Quality Sciences, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Microsoft PowerPoint - PA CoP.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community of Practice Roger Seitz (Savannah River National Laboratory) David Kosson (CRESP/Vanderbilt University) Martin Letourneau (DOE EM-41) 10 March 2010 WM '10, Phoenix Arizona SRNL-MS-2010-00037-S 2 WM 10, March 10, 2010 Safety Case Concept IAEA, Nuclear Energy Agency and others Reflects use of PA as only one part of a package used to support decisions "The purpose of computing is insight, not numbers" - Richard Hamming PA PA Uncertainty/ Importance Analysis Uncertainty/ Importance Analysis Safety Case Design Design Stakeholder Stakeholder Demonstrations Demonstrations R&D R&D Monitoring Monitoring Documentation Documentation WAC WAC Uncertainties can be managed in many different ways in addition to modeling 3 WM 10, March 10, 2010 Allow Low-level Waste Disposal Facility Federal

219

Communications: NREL PowerPoint Presentation Template with Light Background  

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AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: Moving the White CoolCell ARM Radiative Processes Working Group Analyses by Mary Anderberg & Tom Stoffel March 10, 2008 ACRF Upwelling Irradiances Infrared UIR Shortwave US Pt Reyes, CA Banizoumbou Niger AMF Upwelling Irradiances Warren et al. visits FKB... BCR 01402: Move 7 m before on 10 m Tower AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 14, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 15, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 1, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 5, 2007 UIR US Surface Albedo (AM) Surface Albedo (PM) Radiometer View Factors * * * 90% Irradiance Contribution Height (AGL) Effective Radius 3 m 9 m 10 m 29 m Radiometer Sensitivities Pyranometer +/- 10 Wm -2 vs 0.4% of 200 Wm-2 (0.8 Wm

220

Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference Huizenga Kicks Off Waste Management Conference February 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga speaks during the plenary session of the Waste Management Conference in Phoenix today. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga speaks during the plenary session of the Waste Management Conference in Phoenix today. WM Symposia Board Chairman James Gallagher, left to right, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Member William Ostendorff, Natural Resources Canada Uranium & Radioactive Waste Division Director Dave McCauley, EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and WM Symposia Board Member Fred Sheil gather for a photo at the Waste Management Conference. WM Symposia Board Chairman James Gallagher, left to right, U.S. Nuclear

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221

X:\ARM_19~1\P335-353.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

v v r n r (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 a a Wm 2 r e c r e µ c Wm 2 Wm 2 µ 0 µ 0 µ 1 0 µ 0 µ 0 Session Papers (a) R. Wagener now at Analytical Sciences Division. 341 Comparison of Seasonal and Zonal Patterns of the Direct and Indirect Radiative Forcing of Climate by Aerosols R. Wagener and S. E. Schwartz (a) Environmental Chemistry Division Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Aerosols have a climatically significant influence on the The cloud layer consists of droplets (refractive index 1.33) absorption of shortwave radiant energy in the troposphere, with a narrow size distribution having an effective radius both directly through enhanced scattering of sunlight in the = 8 µm and an optical depth = 6 for the unperturbed absence of clouds and indirectly through their fundamental case and = 7.3 and = 6.6 for the anthropogenically

222

Fossil energy waste management. Technology status report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the current status and recent accomplishments of the Fossil Energy Waste Management (FE WM) projects sponsored by the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goal of the Waste Management Program is to identify and develop optimal strategies to manage solid by-products from advanced coal technologies for the purpose of ensuring the competitiveness of advanced coal technologies as a future energy source. The projects in the Fossil Energy Waste Management Program are divided into three types of activities: Waste Characterization, Disposal Technologies, and Utilization Technologies. This technology status report includes a discussion on barriers to increased use of coal by-products. Also, the major technical and nontechnical challenges currently being addressed by the FE WM program are discussed. A bibliography of 96 citations and a list of project contacts is included if the reader is interested in obtaining additional information about the FE WM program.

Bossart, S.J.; Newman, D.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

In-Situ Measurement of Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Potential-Induced Degradation in Damp Heat Stress Testing for Estimation of Low-Light Power Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of potential-induced degradation of crystalline silicon modules in an environmental chamber is estimated using in-situ dark I-V measurements and applying superposition analysis. The dark I-V curves are shown to correctly give the module power performance at 200, 600 and 1,000 W/m2 irradiance conditions, as verified with a solar simulator. The onset of degradation measured in low light in relation to that under one sun irradiance can be clearly seen in the module design examined; the time to 5% relative degradation measured in low light (200 W/m2) was 28% less than that of full sun (1,000 W/m2 irradiance). The power of modules undergoing potential-induced degradation can therefore be characterized in the chamber, facilitating statistical analyses and lifetime forecasting.

Hacke, P.; Terwilliger, K.; Kurtz, S.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

ERRATUM Energy exchange in an array of vertical-axis wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The calculation of the planform kinetic energy flux in this paper contains an error. The equation stated in the manuscript, Pvert ???Aplanu , is correct. However, a typographical error in the data processing code had the effect of calculating the planform kinetic energy flux using u 2 instead of u. This error caused a quantitative change in the planform kinetic energy flux as can be seen in the revised version of Figure 7. Figure 7. Contours of the power transport due to the planform kinetic energy flux along the centre of the turbine array. The three turbine pairs are indicated as vertical bars. Upon correction, the planform kinetic energy flux is lower than originally stated. In the region in front of the turbine array, it is 2.2 W/m 2 instead of 17 W/m 2. The average planform kinetic energy flux into the turbine array from 2 D downwind of the second turbine pair to 7.5 D downwind of the third sensor pair is 3.4 W/m 2 for the highest sensor position and 0.03 W/m 2 for the lowest sensor position; values of 22 W/m 2 and 0.4 W/m 2, respectively, were stated in the paper. The correction leads to a planform kinetic energy flux of 316 W per turbine pair which is approximately one-third of the power that is extracted by the turbine pair. Furthermore, the corrected results lead to the conclusion that the Frandsen formula gives the better estimate of the planform kinetic energy flux. The Frandsen estimate is off by 76 % while the Lettau is off by a factor of 8.5. While the conclusions of the manuscript are largely unchanged, the corrected data indicate that the planform kinetic energy flux is not sufficient to account for the total power

Matthias Kinzel; Quinn Mulligan; John O. Dabiri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

LCA of local strategies for energy recovery from waste in England, applied to a large municipal flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intense waste management (WM) planning activity is currently undergoing in England to build the infrastructure necessary to treat residual wastes, increase recycling levels and the recovery of energy from waste. From the analyses of local WM strategic and planning documents we have identified the emerging of three different energy recovery strategies: established combustion of residual waste; pre-treatment of residual waste and energy recovery from Solid Recovered Fuel in a dedicated plant, usually assumed to be a gasifier; pre-treatment of residual waste and reliance on the market to accept the 'fuel from waste' so produced. Each energy recovery strategy will result in a different solution in terms of the technology selected; moreover, on the basis of the favoured solution, the total number, scale and location of thermal treatment plants built in England will dramatically change. To support the evaluation and comparison of these three WM strategy in terms of global environmental impacts, energy recovery possibilities and performance with respect to changing 'fuel from waste' market conditions, the LCA comparison of eight alternative WM scenarios for a real case study dealing with a large flow of municipal wastes was performed with the modelling tool WRATE. The large flow of waste modelled allowed to formulate and assess realistic alternative WM scenarios and to design infrastructural systems which are likely to correspond to those submitted for approval to the local authorities. The results show that all alternative scenarios contribute to saving abiotic resources and reducing global warming potential. Particularly relevant to the current English debate, the performance of a scenario was shown to depend not from the thermal treatment technology but from a combination of parameters, among which most relevant are the efficiency of energy recovery processes (both electricity and heat) and the calorific value of residual waste and pre-treated material. The contribution and relative importance of recycling and treatment/recovery processes change with the impact category. The lack of reprocessing plants in the area of the case study has shown the relevance of transport distances for recyclate material in reducing the efficiency of a WM system. Highly relevant to the current English WM infrastructural debate, these results for the first time highlight the risk of a significant reduction in the energy that could be recovered by local WM strategies relying only on the market to dispose of the 'fuel from waste' in a non dedicated plant in the case that the SRF had to be sent to landfill for lack of treatment capacity.

Tunesi, Simonetta, E-mail: s.tunesi@ucl.ac.uk [Environment Institute, University College London, Pearson Building, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT London (United Kingdom)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fluid and Particulate systems 424514 /2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or depletion of a certain component) in1,m m out1,m dt dm m produced 1 ,1 dm m 2 out,produced,in, i i ii m dt ( )zgmd Potential energy g Fluid&Pa 4245 luid&Par ?A424 2 in2 1 wm 2 out2 1 wm um i um t ( ) dt zgmd inQ outQ P P ( ) dt wmd 2 2 1 Thermal energy El t i l januari 2012 ?bo Akademi University - Värme

Zevenhoven, Ron

228

Results of First Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ACP and IRIS are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are unwindowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The first outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from January 28 to February 8, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of IRIS was within 1 W/m2. A difference of 5 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG).

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.; Stoffel, T.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Title On The Importance of Organic Oxygen for Understanding Organic Aerosol Particles Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2006 Authors Pang, Yanbo, B. J. Turpin, and Lara A. Gundel Journal Journal of Aerosol Science and Technology Volume 40 Start Page Chapter Pagination 128-133 Abstract This study shows how aerosol organic oxygen data could provide new and independent information about organic aerosol mass, aqueous solubility of organic aerosols, formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) and the relative contributions of anthropogenic and biogenic sources. For more than two decades atmospheric aerosol organic mass concentration has usually been estimated by multiplying the measured carbon content by an assumed organic mass (OM)-to-organic carbon (OC ) factor of 1.4. However, this factor can vary from 1.0 to 2.5 depending on location. This great uncertainty about aerosol organic mass limits our understanding of the influence of organic aerosol on climate, visibility and health.New examination of organic aerosol speciation data shows that the oxygen content is the key factor responsible for the observed range in the OM-to-OC factor. When organic oxygen content is excluded, the ratio of non-oxygen organic mass to carbon mass varies very little across different environments (1.12 to 1.14). The non-oxygen-OM-to-non-oxygen OC factor for all studied sites (urban and non-urban) is 1.13± 0.02. The uncertainty becomes an order of magnitude smaller than the uncertainty in the best current estimates of organic mass to organic carbon ratios (1.6± 0.2 for urban and 2.1± 0.2 for non-urban areas). When aerosol organic oxygen data become available, organic aerosol mass can be quite accurately estimated using just OC and organic oxygen (OO) without the need to know whether the aerosol is fresh or aged. In addition, aerosol organic oxygen data will aid prediction of water solubility since compounds with OO-to-OC higher than 0.4 have water solubilities higher than 1g per 100 g water

230

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTechs GRAFCELL? resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTIs analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a Best Case Scenario for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this Best Case Scenario including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

RAC Report No. 3-CDC-Task Order 7-2000-FINAL FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. Environmental Protection Agency GE-VNC General Electric ­ Vallecitos Nuclear Center Hanford-RL Hanford Richland (Hanford) Richland RP (Hanford Office of) River Protection SQS Small Quantity Site SRS Savannah River Site Report WIPP Waste Isolation Pilot Plant WM Waste Material WMP Waste Material Parameter WSDT Working Site

232

BAND STRUCTURE CALCULATION FOR QUANTUM DOT SOLAR CELLS USING K.P Som N. Dahal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(lT ) Blackbody radiation function Il Spectral radiation intensity, W/m2 .sr.mm Ib,l Blackbody radiation intensity as blackbody radiation at temperature Tsur. In the case of furnace heating, the surrounding tempera- ture a furnace. Then, the radiative heat flux incident on both sides is the blackbody radiation intensity

Honsberg, Christiana

233

Severe Environment Qualification of SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of WHC-SD-WM-TI-727, Rev. 0 Severe Environment Qualification of SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump is to determine the performance of essential components in the tank waste environment; radiation, thermal, and chemical conditions were evaluated.

SHAW, C.P.

1995-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

234

MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar and circumsolar radiation vs angular distance from the center of the sun)solar radiation (that originating from the disk of the sun)solar constant of 1367 W/m and then corrected for the actual earth-sun

Grether, D.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Oahu Energy Storage Study - Michael Kintner...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impacts of Storage on Feeder 0 250 500 750 1000 6:00 9:00 12:00 15:00 18:00 Direct Normal Solar Radiation (Wm 2 ) Time of Day - July 2, 2011 Data from NREL MIDC Solar Database -...

237

This paper has been downloaded from the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or cooling loads or to installed capacity of equipment, typically expressed as W/m or ft/ton. Although exchanger as well as the highly variable relationship between peak heating and cooling loads and annual heating and cooling loads. The time constant of the ground surrounding a commercial ground heat exchanger

238

2.6: Limiting Climate Change to 450 ppm CO2 Equivalent in the 21st Century  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The EMF 22 subgroup on Transition Scenarios explores a rich suite of potential future worlds in which climate change is limited to a variety of alternative radiative forcing levels. This paper focuses primarily on the requirements to limit radiative forcing from Kyoto gases to 2.6 W/m2. Given that we estimate year 2005 radiative forcing to be 2.4 W/m2, the 2.6 W/m2 limit creates a non-trivial constraint. Allowing radiative forcing to exceed the long-term target level provides greater latitude in achieving the goal, but implies major changes to both global energy and land-use systems in the near term as well as the long term. In addition, delay on the part of major emitting parties creates potential leakage in both energy and land-use. We estimate the challenging near-term and long-term deployment of new wind power, nuclear power and CO2 capture and storage associated with the 2.6 W/m2 limit.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Clarke, Leon E.; Kim, Son H.; Kyle, G. Page; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.; Wise, Marshall A.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

IEEE JOURNAL ON EMERGING AND SELECTED TOPICS IN CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 1, ISSUE 2, SEPTEMBER 2011 1 Design and Performance Analysis of Supercapacitor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011 1 Design and Performance Analysis of Supercapacitor Charging Circuits for Wireless Sensor Nodes of multiple supercapacitors to maximize charging efficiency and minimize voltage-dependent leakage irradiation of 300 W/m2, the boost-up operation of our system enables fully charging the supercapacitors

Shinozuka, Masanobu

240

The United States of America Meets the Planet Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, U.C. Berkeley August 23, 2005, National Press Club #12;We Burn More Than Plants Produce Hydro Inputs Ethanol Energy Fuel Cell Car Hybrid Car Average Car Energy per unit area and unit time, W/m2 Bill 082305 NPC ­ p.6/13 #12;U.S. Ethanol Inflated Car Tires 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal conductivity wall W/(m K) µi Stoichiometry - µ Mean - total Efficiency power plant (electrical that are associated with the Northern German Basin, a geothermal power plant will need to incorporate an Enhanced to reduce the probability of downtime in such geothermal power systems in order to achieve higher plant

Stanford University

242

MAX Phase Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 26, 2009... 50 W/m K with the phonon contribution of Ti3Al(C0.5,N0.5)2 particularly large ... forming a herring-bone like structure, and others in which they were all in ... Andrew R. McGhie2; Chaoying Ni3; Magnus Odn4; Sven Vogel5;...

243

Experimental Results of NWCF Run H4 Calcine Dissolution Studies Performed in FY-98 and -99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolution experiments were performed on actual samples of NWCF Run H-4 radioactive calcine in fiscal years 1998 and 1999. Run H-4 is an aluminum/sodium blend calcine. Typical dissolution data indicates that between 90-95 wt% of H-4 calcine can be dissolved using 1gram of calcine per 10 mLs of 5-8M nitric acid at boiling temperature. Two liquid raffinate solutions composed of a WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend and a WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend were converted into calcine at the NWCF. Calcine made from each blend was collected and transferred to RAL for dissolution studies. The WM-188/aluminum nitrate blend calcine was dissolved with resultant solutions used as feed material for separation treatment experimentation. The WM-185/aluminum nitrate blend calcine dissolution testing was performed to determine compositional analyses of the dissolved solution and generate UDS for solid/liquid separation experiments. Analytical fusion techniques were then used to determine compositions of the solid calcine and UDS from dissolution. The results from each of these analyses were used to calculate elemental material balances around the dissolution process, validating the experimental data. This report contains all experimental data from dissolution experiments performed using both calcine blends.

Garn, Troy Gerry; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Sierra, Tracy Laureena

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Weighted median filters with sigma-delta modulation encoding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Digital decimation filters play a fundamental role in oversampled sigma-delta A/D decoders. In this paper, we first show that weighted median (WM) filtering of a demodulated sequence (at the Nyquist rate) can be implemented concurrently in the A/D decoder. ...

G.R. Arce; N.A. Grabowski; N.C. Gallagher

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Experimental investigation of plastic finned-tube heat exchangers, with emphasis on material thermal conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, two modified types of polypropylene (PP) with high thermal conductivity up to 2.3 W/m K and 16.5 W/m K are used to manufacture the finned-tube heat exchangers, which are prospected to be used in liquid desiccant air conditioning, heat recovery, water source heat pump, sea water desalination, etc. A third plastic heat exchanger is also manufactured with ordinary PP for validation and comparison. Experiments are carried out to determine the thermal performance of the plastic heat exchangers. It is found that the plastic finned-tube heat exchanger with thermal conductivity of 16.5 W/m K can achieve overall heat transfer coefficient of 34 W/m{sup 2} K. The experimental results are compared with calculation and they agree well with each other. Finally, the effect of material thermal conductivity on heat exchanger thermal performance is studied in detail. The results show that there is a threshold value of material thermal conductivity. Below this value improving thermal conductivity can considerably improve the heat exchanger performance while over this value improving thermal conductivity contributes very little to performance enhancement. For the finned-tube heat exchanger designed in this paper, when the plastic thermal conductivity can reach over 15 W/m K, it can achieve more than 95% of the titanium heat exchanger performance and 84% of the aluminum or copper heat exchanger performance with the same dimension. (author)

Chen, Lin; Li, Zhen; Guo, Zeng-Yuan [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the following homes per month: 10,343 286 tons of plastic 95 tons of aluminum 0 KW-Hrs of Electricity from Waste-to-Energy: This provides enough energy to heat and cool at a Waste-to-Energy (WTE) the following homes per month: 10Rutgers Zero Waste Program 2011 Recycling Benefits Through WM's Recycling Program, our company

Delgado, Mauricio

247

Vitae for promotion to 707  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

C.J. Wilson, and S.A. Zimov). 2011. High risk of permafrost thaw. Nature 480:32-33. 6. Garten, Jr., C.T., D.J. Brice, H.F. Castro, R.L. Graham, M.A. Mayes, J.R. Phillips, W.M. Post...

248

WSEAS-HMT'08-Kostic, PAGE 1 of 2 HMT'08-The 5th WSEAS International Conference on HEAT and MASS TRANSFER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It has been applied to measure heat transfer coefficients of water flowing in a round tube k/cPr pµ= (-) exp experimental q& heat flow rate by unit of volume (W.m -3 ) f fluid R radius (m) i, performed in the GRESPI laboratory of Reims, was to estimate heat transfer coefficients between the flowing

Kostic, Milivoje M.

249

Average Sequential Water Molecule Binding Enthalpies of M(H2O)19-124 (M ) Co, Fe,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage Group of the Time and Frequency Division Edited by James C. Bergquist John J. Bollinger Wayne M, Washington, DC 20402-9325 #12;PREFACE This collection of papers represents the work of the Ion Storage Group and Optical Pumping," D.J. Wineland, W.M. Itano, J.C. Bergquist and R.G. Hulet, in Atomic Phvsics 11, ed

Neumark, Daniel M.

250

Are we about to switch to new energy sources? Grandiose plans are being  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy transition. Then, about 85% of the world's total primary energy supply (TPES) came from biomass energy flows could not cover today's worldwide total primary energy supply, even if, economics aside not yet ready for mass utilisation, can deliver more than 20 W/m2 of peak power. The energy supply chain

Smil, Vaclav

251

Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Spatial Decomposition of Climate Feedbacks in the Community1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) feedbacks (ASCF: Figure 2a) and longwave (LW) feedbacks (ALCF:193 Figure 2b) components. Each point.71) and the slope is 0.16 Wm-2 K-2 . When196 compared to ASCF, ALCF has a similar correlation, but a smaller slope. The physical197 interpretation is that ALCF has a tighter fit, but is less important for explaining the mag-198

Gettelman, Andrew

252

NUCLEAR REGULATOR%'-C~fiMls6N REGION I  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

jNrTED ST&ye I ) r P, NUCLEAR REGULATOR%'-CfiMls6N REGION I 63I PIIRK AVENUE Wcs:in;kcse Elecric Coroorrzion ATTiN: 2. F:. jhaw I-- Zivision Piant Manaaer wm.1.1 I SJeszi...

253

Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kWh kilowatt-hour kWm 2 kilowatts per square meter LCC life cycle cost LED light-emitting diode Li lithium Li-air lithium-air LiFePO4 lithium iron phosphate Li-ion lithium-ion...

254

Corrosion Evaluation of Stellite Alloys 12 and 712  

SciTech Connect

The High Level Waste Division requested the Materials Technology Section (MTS) to evaluate the use of Waukesha Metal 88 (WM88) and Stellite alloys 12 (S12) and 712 (S712) as materials of construction for slurry pumps. As candidate materials, WM88 was chosen for the tilt pad column bearings and S12 and S712 were selected for the impeller bearings. The Stellite alloys are cobalt-based alloys typically used for their resistance to both corrosion and wear. WM88 is noted for resistance to galling and seizing. These materials, however, had not been evaluated for use in high level radioactive waste, which have a high pH. A series of electrochemical corrosion tests were performed in support of this evaluation to determine the general corrosion rate and corrosion characteristics of these alloys. The tests were conducted at room temperature in simulated three waste tank environments. For WM88, the test solution was inhibited water, which is commonly used in the tank farm. For S12 and S712, the test solutions were a simulated Tank 8 waste solution and a 3 M sodium hydroxide solution. The general corrosion rates of all alloys in these solutions were less than 0.1 mils per year (mpy). The alloys displayed passive behavior in these solutions due to the protective nature of their oxides.

Mickalonis, J.I.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Participatory approach, acceptability and transparency of waste management LCAs: Case studies of Torino and Cuneo  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Life Cycle Assessment is still not fully operational in waste management at local scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Credibility of WM LCAs is negatively affected by assumptions and lack of transparency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local technical-social-economic constraints are often not reflected by WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A participatory approach can increase acceptability and credibility of WM LCAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of a WM LCA can hardly ever be generalised, thus transparency is essential. - Abstract: The paper summarises the main results obtained from two extensive applications of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to the integrated municipal solid waste management systems of Torino and Cuneo Districts in northern Italy. Scenarios with substantial differences in terms of amount of waste, percentage of separate collection and options for the disposal of residual waste are used to discuss the credibility and acceptability of the LCA results, which are adversely affected by the large influence of methodological assumptions and the local socio-economic constraints. The use of site-specific data on full scale waste treatment facilities and the adoption of a participatory approach for the definition of the most sensible LCA assumptions are used to assist local public administrators and stakeholders showing them that LCA can be operational to waste management at local scale.

Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG - Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission - Joint Research Centre, Via Enrico Fermi 2749, I-21027 Ispra (Italy); Genon, Giuseppe, E-mail: giuseppe.genon@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Zanetti, Maria Chiara, E-mail: mariachiara.zanetti@polito.it [DIATI - Department of Environment, Land and Infrastructures Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Kemiteknik -Vrme-och strmningsteknik Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it with the best possible value for COP which is the COP for a Carnot cycle operating under these conditions.8 W/m2 ·K, respectively. a. If the home is heated electrically and the cost of electricity is $0. The processes are steady. 2. The conduction is one dimensional. 3. There is no internal heat generation. 4

Zevenhoven, Ron

257

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Pennsylvania Act 38/Nutrient Management Program/Technical Manual January 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;[10]. Wu L, Mashego MR, van Dam JC, Proell AM, Vinke JL, Ras C, van Winden WA, van Gulik WM, Heijnen JJ profiling for analysis of yeast stress response during very high gravity ethanol fermentations. Biotechnol]. de Koning W, van Dam K. A method for the determination of changes of glycolytic metabolites in yeast

Guiltinan, Mark

259

Effects of Oilseed Meals on the Germination, Growth, and Survival of Crop and Weed Species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oilseed crops are being widely evaluated for potential biodiesel production. Seed meal (SM) remaining after extracting oil may have use as a bioherbicide or organic fertilizer. Brassicaceae SM often contains glucosinolates that can hydrolyze into biologically active compounds. Jatropha curcas SM does not contain glucosinolates but contains curcin, a known phytotoxin (toxalbumin). A 14-d greenhouse study was conducted to determine how Sinapis alba (white mustard, WM), Brassica juncea (Indian mustard, IM), Camelina sativa (camelina) and Jatropha curcas (jatropha) applied to soil at varying application rates and incubation times affected seed germination and seedling survival of cotton [Gossypium hirsutum (L.)], sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench], Johnsongrass (Sorghum halepense), and redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus). Seed meals were analyzed for the presence of glucosinolates, and were applied at 0, 0.5, 1.0 or 2.5 percent (w/w) to Darco fine sand soil and incubated for 1, 7 or 14 d prior to planting. With the weed species, germination and survival was most reduced by 2.5 percent WM SM incubated 1d for Johnsongrass and 14 d for redroot pigweed. Cotton and sorghum seedlings showed strong negative responses to WM SM applications of 2.5 percent at any incubation time. All crops and weed species were most inhibited by 2.5 percent application with any SM, but incubation days varied. Seed meals of each species showed negative results dependent on the incubation day, but overall, WM and camelina SMs were most detrimental compared to IM and jatropha. A second greenhouse study was conducted to determine the availability of nutrients in SMs (WM and IM) to cotton and sorghum compared to inorganic fertilization. Seed meals were applied at 1.0 and 2.5 percent (w/w) and initially incubated for 35 days prior to planting. Emergence of both species was so poor that treatments were incubated for an additional 21 d and replanted. Application rates of 2.5 percent WM and IM SMs reduced sorghum heights and biomass, but only WM had a negative effect on cotton yield. However, the higher of the SM application rates provided greater levels of nutrients compared to the fertilized treatment and control. Results suggested that the type, rate, and timing of SM applications should be considered before land-applying SMs in organic cropping systems in order to successfully manage weeds while producing a profitable crop.

Rothlisberger, Katie Lynn

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Constraining the Influence of Natural Variability to Improve Estimates of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects in a Nudged Version of the Community Atmosphere Model 5  

SciTech Connect

Natural modes of variability on many timescales influence aerosol particle distributions and cloud properties such that isolating statistically significant differences in cloud radiative forcing due to anthropogenic aerosol perturbations (indirect effects) typically requires integrating over long simulations. For state-of-the-art global climate models (GCM), especially those in which embedded cloud-resolving models replace conventional statistical parameterizations (i.e. multi-scale modeling framework, MMF), the required long integrations can be prohibitively expensive. Here an alternative approach is explored, which implements Newtonian relaxation (nudging) to constrain simulations with both pre-industrial and present-day aerosol emissions toward identical meteorological conditions, thus reducing differences in natural variability and dampening feedback responses in order to isolate radiative forcing. Ten-year GCM simulations with nudging provide a more stable estimate of the global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing than do conventional free-running simulations. The estimates have mean values and 95% confidence intervals of -1.54 0.02 W/m2 and -1.63 0.17 W/m2 for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively. Nudging also substantially increases the fraction of the worlds area in which a statistically significant aerosol indirect effect can be detected (68% and 25% of the Earth's surface for nudged and free-running simulations, respectively). One-year MMF simulations with and without nudging provide global-annual mean aerosol indirect radiative forcing estimates of -0.80 W/m2 and -0.56 W/m2, respectively. The one-year nudged results compare well with previous estimates from three-year free-running simulations (-0.77 W/m2), which showed the aerosol-cloud relationship to be in better agreement with observations and high-resolution models than in the results obtained with conventional parameterizations.

Kooperman, G. J.; Pritchard, M. S.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Somerville, Richard C.; Russell, Lynn

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part B, Dismantlement, Remedial action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 3, Technology evaluation data sheets: Part C, Robotics/automation, Waste management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1, Technology Evaluation; Vol. 2, Technology Logic Diagram and Vol. 3, Technology EvaLuation Data Sheets. Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on the D&D of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TM, an explanation of the problems facing the volume-specific program, a review of identified technologies, and rankings of technologies applicable to the site. Volume 2 (Pts. A. B. and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A. B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. This volume provides the technology evaluation data sheets (TEDS) for ER/WM activities (D&D, RA and WM) that are referenced by a TEDS code number in Vol. 2 of the TLD. Each of these sheets represents a single logic trace across the TLD. These sheets contain more detail than is given for the technologies in Vol. 2.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

All General Counsel Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

97_005_CUMMINS_ENGINE_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf 97_005_CUMMINS_ENGINE_COMPANY_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Fore.pdf July 27, 2011 GC-12_Reorg_Approval.pdf July 27, 2011 Does Nuclear Insurance Protect Us or the Industry? No-fault insurance for the nuclear power industry has never been a hot issue for Nevadans because we have no nuclear power plants in the state. But with the prospect of the nuclear power industry's toxic leftovers coming our way, it is important to take a close look at the Price-Anderson Act. July 27, 2011 WA_05_043_GENERAL_ELECTRIC_COMPANY__Waiver_of_Domestic_and_F.pdf July 27, 2011 WA_04_055_BALLARD_POWER_SYSTEMS_CORP_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_.pdf July 27, 2011 WA_05_048_INTERNATIONAL_BUSINESS_MACHINES_Waiver_of_the_Gove.pdf July 27, 2011 NSRCC(A)WAIVER.pdf July 27, 2011 EXHIBIT B July 27, 2011 WC_1996_006_CLASS_WAIVER_of_the_Governments_US_and_Foreign_.pdf

264

3D Atlas vertical plate oil transmission line field calculations. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of questions regarding current density and inductance estimates of the Atlas oil transmission line in the region where the vertical plates connect to the disk line, calculations using the 3D FE program Flux3d were initiated. Flux3d inductance values are nearly that estimated by D. Scudder. Calculations for three base designs of E. Ballard and D. Pierce were completed where several variations for each base design were used to determine the important parameters affecting inductance and to check inductance consistency. Flux3d showed for the first base design a very high current density of 36MA/m at the connection between the vertical and horizontal ground plates resulting in a magnetic pressure of 120 kpsi. The second base design modified this connection to reduce the current density to 20MA/m and 36 kpsi and for design 3 current density is 17MA/m. Maximum current density on the hot plates is 20MA/m for all 3 designs. These values assumed 1.2MA per VTL or 45.6MA total system current. Electrical fields on the top of the hot plate near the disk line connection is about 50% greater than the nominal value near the center of the vertical plates.

NONE

1997-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Aerosol climate effects and air quality impacts from 1980 to 2030  

SciTech Connect

We investigate aerosol effects on climate for 1980, 1995 (meant to reflect present-day) and 2030 using the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model coupled to an on-line aerosol source and transport model with interactive oxidant and aerosol chemistry. Aerosols simulated include sulfates, organic matter (OM), black carbon (BC), sea-salt and dust and additionally, the amount of tropospheric ozone is calculated, allowing us to estimate both changes to air quality and climate for different time periods and emission amounts. We include both the direct aerosol effect and indirect aerosol effects for liquid-phase clouds. Future changes for the 2030 A1B scenario are examined, focusing on the Arctic and Asia, since changes are pronounced in these regions. Our results for the different time periods include both emission changes and physical climate changes. We find that the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) has a large impact on photochemical processing, decreasing ozone amount and ozone forcing, especially for the future (2030-1995). Ozone forcings increase from 0 to 0.12 Wm{sup -2} and the total aerosol forcing increases from -0.10 Wm{sup -2} to -0.94 Wm{sup -2} (AIE increases from -0.13 to -0.68 Wm{sup -2}) for 1995-1980 versus 2030-1995. Over the Arctic we find that compared to ozone and the direct aerosol effect, the AIE contributes the most to net radiative flux changes. The AIE, calculated for 1995-1980, is positive (1.0 Wm{sup -2}), but the magnitude decreases (-0.3Wm{sup -2}) considerably for the future scenario. Over Asia, we evaluate the role of biofuel and transportation-based emissions (for BC and OM) via a scenario (2030A) that includes a projected increase (factor of two) in biofuel and transport-based emissions for 2030 A1B over Asia. Projected changes from present-day due to the 2030A emissions versus 2030 A1B are a factor of 4 decrease in summertime precipitation in Asia. Our results are sensitive to emissions used. Uncertainty in present-day emissions suggest that future climate projections warrant particular scrutiny.

Menon, Surabi; Menon, Surabi; Unger, Nadine; Koch, Dorothy; Francis, Jennifer; Garrett, Tim; Sednev, Igor; Shindell, Drew; Streets, David

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Anthropogenic Aerosol Radiative Forcing in Asia Derived From Regional Models With Atmospheric and Aerosol Data Assimilation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution estimate of monthly 3D aerosol solar heating rates and surface solar fluxes in Asia from 2001 to 2004 is described here. This product stems from an Asian aerosol assimilation project, in which a) the PNNL regional model bounded by the NCEP reanalyses was used to provide meteorology, b) MODIS and AERONET data were integrated for aerosol observations, c) the Iowa aerosol/chemistry model STEM-2K1 used the PNNL meteorology and assimilated aerosol observations, and d) 3D (X-Y-Z) aerosol simulations from the STEM-2K1 were used in the Scripps Monte-Carlo Aerosol Cloud Radiation (MACR) model to produce total and anthropogenic aerosol direct solar forcing for average cloudy skies. The MACR model and STEM both used the PNNL model resolution of 0.450.4 in the horizontal and of 23 layers in the troposphere. The 20012004 averaged anthropogenic all-sky aerosol forcing is ?1.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +7.3 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?8.6 Wm-2 (surface) averaged in Asia (60?138E & Eq. ?45N). In the absence of AERONET SSA assimilation, absorbing aerosol concentration (especially BC aerosol) is much smaller, giving ?2.3 Wm-2 (TOA), +4.5 Wm-2 (atmosphere) and ?6.8 Wm-2 (surface), averaged in Asia. In the vertical, monthly forcing is mainly concentrated below 600hPa with maxima around 800hPa. Seasonally, low-level forcing is far larger in dry season than in wet season in South Asia, whereas the wet season forcing exceeds the dry season forcing in East Asia. The anthropogenic forcing in the present study is similar to that in Chung et al.s [2005] in overall magnitude but the former offers fine-scale features and simulated vertical profiles. The interannual variability of the computed anthropogenic forcing is significant and extremely large over major emission outflow areas. In view of this, the present studys estimate is within the implicated range of the 1999 INDOEX result. However, NCAR/CCSM3s anthropogenic aerosol forcing is much smaller than the present studys estimate at the surface, and is outside of what the INDOEX findings can support.

Chung, Chul Eddy; Ramanathan, V.; Carmichael, Gregory; Kulkarni, S.; Tang, Youhua; Adhikary, Bhupesh; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Qian, Yun

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

CEPEL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CEPEL CEPEL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual average of the aeolic potential at 50m. Content: wind speed in m/s, power class (7 classes), power density in W/m2 and Weibull k value organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): The thematic map by code of colors permits quick viewing of all the Brazilian territory dataset. That map indicates, for the height of 50m, the annual average, in W/m2, of wind speed, power class, power density and Weibull k value. Source CEPEL (Electric Energy Research Center/Federal University of Rio de Janeiro) - Brazil Date Released August 08th, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated August 08th, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords Brazil CEPEL INPE SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Shapefile (zip, 633.3 KiB) text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 358.1 KiB)

268

Brazil Wind Data (40km) from CEPEL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from CEPEL 40km) from CEPEL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual average of the aeolic potential at 50m. Content: wind speed in m/s, power class (7 classes), power density in W/m2 and Weibull k value organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): The thematic map by code of colors permits quick viewing of all the Brazilian territory dataset. That map indicates, for the height of 50m, the annual average, in W/m2, of wind speed, power class, power density and Weibull k value. (Supplemental Information): The information is organized into cells measuring 10 x 40km. The wind potential maps were calculated from simulations produced by the MesoMap(*) for 360 days, extracted of a period of 15 years of data. The days were chosen by means of random sampling at several heights, so that each month and season be considered in a representative way.

269

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Envkonmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- - 19-10 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Envkonmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist Project/Activity: Drill one exploratory hole on L.T. c-WM-17 by Golden Eagle Uranium A. Brief Project! Activity Descl'iptioll Golden Eagle Uranium (LLC) proposes to drill one 5-inch-diameter exploratory borehole on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lease tract C-WM-17, located in western Montrose County, Colorado. The drilling would be completed by a truck-mounted rotary drill rig capable of boring to 1,000 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs). The proposed location of the drill hole is in a previously disturbed area and is adjacent to a two-track dirt road. Access to the site would be on existing dirt roads. The drilling would be completed dry to an estimated depth of 550 ft bgs. Once data are collected, the hole

270

EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7-SA-01: Supplement Analysis 7-SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0337-SA-01: Supplement Analysis West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management The Department of Energy's (DOE) West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) prepared a final waste management environmental impact statement (WVDP WM ElS) that examined the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed shipment of radioactive wastes that were either in storage or would be generated over a 10-year period (DOE 2003). Since the EIS was issued, new information has become available regarding the volume and type of low level radioactive waste (LLW), and DOE now proposes to use additional disposal locations for LLW waste for which the transportation impacts were not analyzed in the WVDP WM EIS. West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact

271

Geek-Up[12.10.2010]: A New Planet in Another Solar System, Fast-Tracked  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

12.10.2010]: A New Planet in Another Solar System, 12.10.2010]: A New Planet in Another Solar System, Fast-Tracked Drug Treatments and Better Batteries Geek-Up[12.10.2010]: A New Planet in Another Solar System, Fast-Tracked Drug Treatments and Better Batteries December 10, 2010 - 3:46pm Addthis Schematic representation of the HR8799 system compared to our own solar system. | Photo Courtesy of NRC-HIA, Christian Marois and the W.M Keck Observatory Schematic representation of the HR8799 system compared to our own solar system. | Photo Courtesy of NRC-HIA, Christian Marois and the W.M Keck Observatory Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Using high-contrast, near infrared adaptive optics on the Keck II telescope in Hawaii, LLNL astronomers have identified a fourth planet that is part of

272

EIS-0391: DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0391: DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, WA DOE announces the availability of its Final Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391), prepared pursuant NEPA. This Final EIS addresses all public comments on the Draft TC & WM EIS, which was issued in October 2009, and identifies DOE's preferred alternatives. EIS-0391-FEIS-DOENOA-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-387 Energia Renovable S.C., LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 241 - Dec. 14, 2012 EIS-0391: EPA Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact

273

penner-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Cloud/Aerosol Parameterization: Comparison of Model Predictions with ARM Data J. E. Penner Department of Atmospheric Oceanic and Space Sciences Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Berkeley, California C. C. Chuang Atmospheric Sciences Division Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Berkeley, California Introduction Cloud parcel models have been used to parameterize the activation of aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, and these parameterizations have been used in climate models to estimate the indirect forcing by anthropogenic aerosols (Chuang et al. 1997; Penner et al. 1996). Results indicate that the indirect forcing by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols from an increase in droplet number is ~-0.4 Wm -2 to -1.5 Wm -2 with the smaller number more likely because

274

EIS-0200: Record of Decision (August 1998) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Record of Decision (August 1998) Record of Decision (August 1998) EIS-0200: Record of Decision (August 1998) Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment of Non-wastewater Hazardous Waste (August 1998) The Department of Energy's (DOE) Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) (May 1997) analyzed alternatives for the annual treatment of approximately 3,440 metric tons of non-wastewater hazardous waste that is currently being transported to commercial facilities for treatment. DOE has decided to continue to use off-site facilities for the treatment of major portions of the non-wastewater hazardous waste generated at DOE sites, based in part on analyses in the WM PEIS. DOE/EIS-0200, Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment of Non-wastewater Hazardous Waste (August

275

EIS-0391-FEIS-Volume3-Comment_Response_TOC-2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EIS-0391 DOE/EIS-0391 Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington Volume 3, Book 1 Section 1: Overview Section 2: Topics of Interest Section 3: Individual Commentors U.S. Department of Energy November 2012 1 Cover Sheet Responsible Agency: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperating Agencies: Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Title: Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS) (DOE/EIS-0391) Location: Benton County, Washington Contacts: For copies of this Final TC & WM EIS, call toll-free 1-888-829-6347, or contact Mary Beth Burandt at the address below.

276

St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable Community | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable Community St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable Community St. Louis Launches Plan for More Sustainable Community March 1, 2013 - 11:15am Addthis Using money from the Energy Efficiency Block Grant Program, St. Louis installed new LED fixtures in the City Hall parking structure. The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. Using money from the Energy Efficiency Block Grant Program, St. Louis installed new LED fixtures in the City Hall parking structure. The new lights deliver more useful light and use nearly 83 percent less power than the previous lights. | Photo courtesy of John Wm Nagel, Photography. Christina Stowers Communications Specialist in the Office of Weatherization and

277

University of Wisconsin - Madison Space Science and Engineering Center Leslie Moy, Lori Borg, Bob Knuteson, Hank Revercomb, Joel Susskind, and Dave Tobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wisconsin - Madison Wisconsin - Madison Space Science and Engineering Center Leslie Moy, Dave Tobin, Bob Knuteson, Lori Borg, Hank Revercomb (PI), Marty Mlynczak 1 , and Joel Susskind 2 1 NASA Langley, 2 NASA GSFC Assessing ARM Clear Sky BBHRP with CERES and AIRS The RRTM calculations of clear sky OLR agree with CERES observations to ~1 W/m 2 with an uncertainty of ~1 W/m 2 . * True at SGP over 2.5 years, true globally (with some understood regional exceptions) for study day. * True using ARM data as input to RRTM, true using AIRS sounding retrievals as input to RRTM. BBRHP summary report Goal: To assess and improve BBHRP. Approach: Use CERES fluxes & AIRS radiances and retrievals. * SSF CERES is currently a better metric for BBHRP assessment than GOES. * AIRS spectral radiance analysis allows us to evaluate the

278

NREL Improves System Efficiency and Increases Energy Transfer with Wind2H2 Project, Enabling Reduced Cost Electrolysis Production (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 * November 2010 5 * November 2010 Energy transfer improvements from the 10-kW wind turbine tested by NREL. The graph shows successive improvement, including the latest preliminary third generation improvement in the green shaded area. Increased Energy Transfer: NREL continues to improve energy transfer from a 10-kW solar PV array, comparing directly coupling the PV array to the electrolyzer stack with a connection through a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) power electronics package designed at NREL. The experimental testing (above) revealed that direct coupling outperformed power electronics when solar irradiance levels are below 500 W/m 2 while the MPPT power converter delivered more energy to the stacks between 500 and 1,100 W/m 2 . These findings

279

Federal Incentives for Renewable Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20219 20219 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas WD Chvala AE Solana RW Reilly WM Warwick MR Weimar DR Dixon JC States June 2008 PNNL-20219 Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas WD Chvala AE Solana RW Reilly WM Warwick MR Weimar DR Dixon JC States June 2008 Prepared for the U.S. Army Installation Management Command Headquarters under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Related Services Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Executive Summary Energy has become an increasingly expensive component of military operations in the United States and abroad. The Department of Defense (DoD) identified renewable resource options and alternatives for

280

Environmental restoration/waste management-applied technology semiannual report, January--June 1992. Volume 1, No. 1  

SciTech Connect

This is the first issue from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory of The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Semiannual Report, a continuation of the Advanced Processing Technology (APT) Semiannual Report. The name change reflects the consolidation of the APT Program with the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program to form the Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program. The Livermore site mirrors, on a small scale, many of the environmental and waste management problems of the DOE Complex. The six articles in this issue cover incineration- alternative technologies, process development for waste minimization, the proposed Mixed Waste Management Facility, dynamic underground stripping, electrical resistance tomography, and Raman spectroscopy for remote characterization of underground tanks.

Adamson, M.; Kline-Simon, K. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Risk assessment for the off-site transportation of high-level waste for the U.S. Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the human health risk assessment conducted for the transportation of high-level waste (HLW) in support of the US Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The assessment considers risks to collective populations and individuals under both routine and accident transportation conditions for truck and rail shipment modes. The report discusses the scope of the HLW transportation assessment, describes the analytical methods used for the assessment, defines the alternatives considered in the WM PEIS, and details important assessment assumptions. Results are reported for five alternatives. In addition, to aid in the understanding and interpretation of the results, specific areas of uncertainty are described, with an emphasis on how the uncertainties may affect comparisons of the alternatives.

Monette, F.A.; Biwer, B.M.; LePoire, D.J.; Chen, S.Y. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Section 111  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W/m W/m 2 Session Papers 499 The Status of Quality Measurement Experiments in the Microwave, Longwave, and Shortwave P. D. Brown and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts D. D. Turner and T. R. Shippert Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. O. Knuteson, H. E. Revercomb and W. L. Smith University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin Introduction Spectral analyses from the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer/Line-by-Line Radiative Transfer Model (AERI/LBLRTM) Quality Measurement Experiment (QME) have proven critical in the assessment of clear sky radiative transfer modeling capability for general circulation models (GCMs). The QME provides a mechanism for the assessment of the three critical components of the longwave spectral

283

EIS-0391-DEIS-02-2008_Part1.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D-1 D-1 APPENDIX D WASTE INVENTORIES This appendix provides additional information about the inventories that compose the proposed alternatives described in Chapter 2 of this Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC & WM EIS). Information provided in this appendix forms the basis for determining short-term environmental impacts of each alternative, which are described in Chapter 4 of this TC & WM EIS. Each alternative represents a combination of technologies, processes, and facilities that could accomplish the desired outcome for that alternative. Distribution of the radioactive and chemical constituents of the tank waste among the various waste form, storage, and management options depends on the technologies

284

EIS-0391: DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EIS-0391: DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental EIS-0391: DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0391: DOE Notice of Availability of a Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Tank Closure and Waste Management, Richland, WA DOE announces the availability of its Final Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391), prepared pursuant NEPA. This Final EIS addresses all public comments on the Draft TC & WM EIS, which was issued in October 2009, and identifies DOE's preferred alternatives. EIS-0391-FEIS-DOENOA-2012.pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-387 Energia Renovable S.C., LLC: Federal Register Notice, Volume 77, No. 241 - Dec. 14, 2012

285

susy2_s046.dvi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W.-M. W.-M. Yao et al., Journal of Physics G33, 1 (2006) and (URL: http://pdg.lbl.gov/) June 26, 2013 16:47 - 2- In the minimal supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model, the so called MSSM [26,27,11], a supersymmetry transformation pairs bosons with fermions and therefore relates every particle in the SM to a supersymmetric partner with half a unit of spin difference, but otherwise with the same properties and quantum numbers. These are the "sfermions": squarks and sleptons, the "gauginos," and the partners of the Higgs doublets, the "higgsinos." The charged weak gauginos and higgsinos mix to "charginos," and the neutral ones mix to "neutralinos." The fact that such particles are not yet observed leads to the conclusion that, if supersymmetry is realized, it is a broken symmetry. A description of SUSY in the form of an effective

286

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS") Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS") The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy

287

CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

692: Categorical Exclusion Determination 692: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination Drill One Exploratory Hole On Lease Tract C-WM-17 by Golden Eagle Uranium CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management Golden Eagle Uranium (LLC) proposes to drill one 5-inch-diameter exploratory borehole on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lease tract C-WM-17, located in western Montrose County, Colorado. The drilling would be completed by a truck-mounted rotary drill rig capable of boring to 1,000 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs). The proposed location of the drill hole is in a previously disturbed area and is adjacent to a two-track dirt road. Access to the site would be on existing dirt roads. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

288

Section 55  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W/m W/m 2 , H 2 O, CO 2 , O 3 Session Papers 233 Effects of Improved Radiative Transfer Modeling for Climate Simulations M. J. Iacono, E. J. Mlawer and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts Introduction The interaction of shortwave and infrared radiation in the atmosphere with clouds and greenhouse gases represents a complex process that contributes significantly to maintaining earth's climate system. For climate model simulations to become more accurate, it is essential that this process be modeled properly as verified by direct comparisons with observations and with results from a validated line-by-line model. For this purpose, a rapid radiative transfer model (RRTM) has been developed that reproduces the computa- tional accuracy of a more complex line-by-line radiative trans-

289

Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Disposal of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste; Amendment of the Record of Decision for the Nevada Test Site (DOE/EIS-0200) (DOE/EIS-0243) (2/25/00)_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

061 061 Federal Register / Vol. 65, No. 38 / Friday, February 25, 2000 / Notices 1 After the Final WM PEIS was issued in May 1997, DOE issued ''Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure.'' In that document, DOE provided estimates of waste volumes that would result from the planned operations and accelerated cleanup processes at DOE sites. Because some of the estimates differed from those provided in the WM PEIS, DOE examined the LLW and MLLW volumes to determine if the updated volume estimates constitute significant new information relevant to environmental concerns that would warrant preparation of a supplemental EIS or a new PEIS. This examination extended only to LLW and MLLW volumes, because the transuranic, hazardous and high-level waste volume estimates did not change

290

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Longwave Aerosol Direct and Indirect Radiative Effects at Longwave Aerosol Direct and Indirect Radiative Effects at the NSA Site D. Lubin Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California A. Vogelmann Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Aerosol IR Direct Effects Aerosols with large particles, such as dust or sea salt, can exert significant amounts of direct infrared (IR) forcing at the surface. For example, recent observations from Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE)-Asia indicate that the aerosol IR forcing at the surface can be a few Wm -2 up to almost 10 Wm -2 (Vogelmann et al. 2003, Markowicz et al. 2003). Further investigation indicates that the IR forcing pattern tends to correlate with the surface concentrations of submicron Ca ++ , which may serve as a dust indicator. Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) observations of aerosol

291

EIS-0391-FEIS-Volume3-Section_1-2-2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SECTION 1 SECTION 1 OVERVIEW OF THE PUBLIC COMMENT PROCESS 1-1 SECTION 1 OVERVIEW OF THE PUBLIC COMMENT PROCESS This section of this Comment-Response Document (CRD) describes the public comment process for the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Draft TC & WM EIS) and the procedures used to respond to public comments. Section 1.1 summarizes the organization of this CRD. Section 1.2 discusses the public comment process and the means through which comments on the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) were received and addressed. Section 1.3 describes the public hearings on the Draft TC & WM EIS, including hearing locations and dates. Section 1.4 notes the role of the cooperating agencies.

292

EIS-0391: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record of Decision Record of Decision EIS-0391: Record of Decision Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington This is the first in a series of Records of Decision (RODs) that the U.S. Department of Energy intends to issue pursuant to the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (TC&WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391, December 2012). Decisions announced in this ROD pertain to each of the three main areas analyzed in the TC&WM EIS, i.e. tank closure, decommissioning of the Fast Flux Test Facility, and waste management. EIS-0391-ROD#1-2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EIS-0391: Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0391: Final Environmental Impact Statement

293

The 2008 3-Way Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots In R&D, Super X-rays Mark Many Spots A New Gas Loading System for Diamond Anvil Cells at GSECARS Sidorowicz Named "Supervisor of the Year" SESS 2007: The School for Environmental Sciences with Synchrotrons Art and Science APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed The 2008 3-Way Meeting MARCH 25, 2008 Bookmark and Share The assembled 3WM attendees in the Argonne Bldg. 401 atrium. The 2008 Three-Way Meeting (3WM) between the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), the Super Photon Ring-8 GeV (SPring-8), and the Advanced Photon Source (APS) was held at Argonne on March 18-19, 2008, with more than 20 representatives from each facility. Topics discussed at the meeting

294

Appendices for the Basis Document  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A-1 A-1 Appendix A INTEC Tank Farm Facility Closure Supporting Tables and Photographs A-2 Appendix A INTEC Tank Farm Facility Closure Supporting Tables and Photographs In support of the Tank Farm Facility (TFF) closure, inventory tables were generated for all tanks that have been cleaned up to this point; these tables are presented is Section A-1. Inventories at closure for all of the tanks that have been cleaned show that Tank WM-182 contains the highest Ci content. The inventory at closure for Tank WM-182 has been compared to the performance assessment (PA) single tank inventory in Section A-2 to show greater than expected removal of radioactivity in the tanks. Post-decontamination photos of the insides of the tanks are provided in Section A-3 to visually show the

295

High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 6  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) Functional Area includes the programmatic controls associated with the management and operation of the Hanford Tank Farm Facility. The driving management organization implementing the programmatic controls is the Tank Farms Waste Management (WM)organization whose responsibilities are to ensure that performance objectives are established; and that measurable criteria for attaining objectives are defined and reflected in programs, policies and procedures. Objectives for the WM Program include waste minimization, establishment of effective waste segregation methods, waste treatment technology development, radioactive (low-level, high-level) hazardous and mixed waste transfer, treatment, and storage, applicability of a corrective action program, and management and applicability of a decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) program in future years.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

WILLIAMS, J.C.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Site-Specific Plan for Fiscal Year 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a US Department of Energy (DOE) multiprogram laboratory whose primary mission has been to research nuclear technologies. Working with these technologies and conducting other types of research generates waste, including radioactive and/or hazardous wastes. While most of the waste treatment, storage, and disposal practices have been effective, some practices have led to the release of contaminants to the environment. As a result, DOE has developed (1) an Environmental Restoration (ER) Program to identify and, where necessary, cleanup releases from inactive waste sites and (2) a Waste Management (WM) Program to safely treat, store, and dispose of DOE wastes generated from current and future activities in an environmentally sound manner. This document describes the plans for FY 1993 for the INEL`s ER and WM programs as managed by DOE`s Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID).

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Molecular Science Research Center, 1991 annual report  

SciTech Connect

During 1991, the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) experienced solid growth and accomplishment and the Environmental, and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) construction project moved forward. We began with strong programs in chemical structure and dynamics and theory, modeling, and simulation, and both these programs continued to thrive. We also made significant advances in the development of programs in materials and interfaces and macromolecular structure and dynamics, largely as a result of the key staff recruited to lead these efforts. If there was one pervasive activity for the past year, however, it was to strengthen the role of the EMSL in the overall environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) mission at Hanford. These extended activities involved not only MSRC and EMSL staff but all PNL scientific and technical staff engaged in ER/WM programs.

Knotek, M.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Functional Analysis for Double Shell Tank (DST) Subsystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This functional analysis identifies the hierarchy and describes the subsystem functions that support the Double-Shell Tank (DST) System described in HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System. Because of the uncertainty associated with the need for upgrades of the existing catch tanks supporting the Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) mission, catch tank functions are not addressed in this document. The functions identified herein are applicable to the Phase 1 WFD mission only.

SMITH, D.F.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

Operational test report for WESF diesel generator diesel tank installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WESF Backup Generator Underground Diesel Tank 101 has been replaced with a new above ground 1000 gallon diesel tank. Following the tank installation, inspections and tests specified in the Operational Test Procedure, WHC-SD-WM-OTP-155, were performed. Inspections performed by a Quality Control person indicated the installation was leak free and the diesel generator/engine ran as desired. There were no test and inspection exceptions, therefore, the diesel tank installation is operable.

Schwehr, B.A.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Intemdonal Joumal computers &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1221(02)00258-4 #12;1308 It. BRU et aL nuclear fuel of the reactor core. Plant simulators mainly consist of two with the BiCGSTAB, GMRES(k), and TFQMR methods. REFERENCES 1. W.M. Stacey, Jr., Space-Time Nuclear Reactor method for finite element reactor calculations, Nuclear Science and Engineering 91, 34-58, (1985). 6. A

Bru, Rafael

302

Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report : February 2009.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System rogram Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sandia National Laboratories, California Waste Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Waste Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This annual program report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Waste Management (WM) Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

ICPP tank farm closure study. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The disposition of INEEL radioactive wastes is now under a Settlement Agreement between the DOE and the State of Idaho. The Settlement Agreement requires that existing liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW), and other liquid waste inventories be treated by December 31, 2012. This agreement also requires that all HLW, including calcined waste, be disposed or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. Sodium bearing waste (SBW) is produced from decontamination operations and HLW from reprocessing of SNF. SBW and HLW are radioactive and hazardous mixed waste; the radioactive constituents are regulated by DOE and the hazardous constituents are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Calcined waste, a dry granular material, is produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). Two primary waste tank storage locations exist at the ICPP: Tank Farm Facility (TFF) and the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). The TFF has the following underground storage tanks: four 18,400-gallon tanks (WM 100-102, WL 101); four 30,000-gallon tanks (WM 103-106); and eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. This includes nine 300,000-gallon tanks (WM 182-190) and two 318,000 gallon tanks (WM 180-181). This study analyzes the closure and subsequent use of the eleven 300,000+ gallon tanks. The 18,400 and 30,000-gallon tanks were not included in the work scope and will be closed as a separate activity. This study was conducted to support the HLW Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) waste separations options and addresses closure of the 300,000-gallon liquid waste storage tanks and subsequent tank void uses. A figure provides a diagram estimating how the TFF could be used as part of the separations options. Other possible TFF uses are also discussed in this study.

Spaulding, B.C.; Gavalya, R.A.; Dahlmeir, M.M. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

None

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

306

I M E M O R A N D U M T O  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

M E M O R A N D U M T O : FILE D A T E ---w----m-- F R O M :: M1, L A U ---e-e- S W J E C T : gr'm n 'h a + 'o n f l e c o w w n d a + t ' S ITE N A M E : A C...

307

Ben Bierman March 6th, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

courtesy of Ginger Lab at University of Washington 1 TW of plant-based power requires ~1/4th of coastline * 14 kW/m = 0.12 TW Even deployed on this massive scale, wave power could not be the only solution W/m number based on the projected rating of a 50MW 2.1 km x 400 m Pelamis wave energy converter http://www.slideshare.net/sustenergy/wave-power

Kammen, Daniel M.

308

5.8. Treatment of Extreme Operating Conditions As discussed in Chapter 4, the model may encounter conditions not intended by the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of vaporization, kJ/kg hsp Single-phase convective heat transfer coefficient, W/m2 o C htp Flow boiling heat wall heat transfer Nu4 Nusselt number for laminar fully-developed flow for four wall heat transfer Pout be evaluated from Eqs. (4)-(7) with Tc,out replaced by Tsat and hsp by htp, the flow boiling heat transfer

309

Pressure resulting from an ITP waste tank deflagration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SRS waste tanks to be employed with the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process are undergoing a structural evaluation in order to define their response to a hypothetical deflagration accident. At the request of the Waste Management and Environmental Remediation Division (WM&ER -- High Level Waste Programs), a task was initiated to predict the peak gas pressure which would result from a deflagration (Thomas and Hensel 1993a). This report presents the final results of the deflagration peak gas pressure evaluation.

Thomas, J.K.; Hensel, S.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

REFERENCE: The Blue Planet An Introduction to Earth System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by which hot, less dense materials rise upward and are replaced by cold, more dense materials = (2.8 x1023 m2)(1370 W/m2) = 3.8 x 1026 watts 1 watt (W) = J/s #12;The fusion process: Nuclear produces its energy by two fusion reactions: 1. ProtonProton (PP) ­ 88% 2. CarbonNitrogenOxygen (CNO) ­ 12

Gilbes, Fernando

311

Evaluating WRF-Chem multi-scale model in simulating aerosol radiative properties over the tropics A case study over India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We utilized WRF-Chem multi-scale model to simulate the regional distribution of aerosols, optical properties and its effect on radiation over India for a winter month. The model is evaluated using measurements obtained from upper-air soundings, AERONET sun photometers, various satellite instruments, and pyranometers operated by the Indian Meteorological Department. The simulated downward shortwave flux was overestimated when the effect of aerosols on radiation and clouds was neglected. Downward shortwave radiation from a simulation that included aerosol-radiation interaction processes was 5 to 25 Wm{sup -2} closer to the observations, while a simulation that included aerosol-cloud interaction processes were another 1 to 20 Wm{sup -2} closer to the observations. For the few observations available, the model usually underestimated particulate concentration. This is likely due to turbulent mixing, transport errors and the lack of secondary organic aerosol treatment in the model. The model efficiently captured the broad regional hotspots such as high aerosol optical depth over Indo-Gangetic basin as well as the northwestern and southern part of India. The regional distribution of aerosol optical depth compares well with AVHRR aerosol optical depth and the TOMS aerosol index. The magnitude and wavelength-dependence of simulated aerosol optical depth was also similar to the AERONET observations across India. Differences in surface shortwave radiation between simulations that included and neglected aerosol-radiation interactions were as high as -25 Wm{sup -2}, while differences in surface shortwave radiation between simulations that included and neglect aerosol-radiation-cloud interactions were as high as -30 Wm{sup -2}. The spatial variations of these differences were also compared with AVHRR observation. This study suggests that the model is able to qualitatively simulate the impact of aerosols on radiation over India; however, additional measurements of particulate mass and composition are needed to fully evaluate whether the aerosol precursor emissions are adequate when simulating radiative forcing in the region.

Seethala, C.; Pandithurai, G.; Fast, Jerome D.; Polade, Suraj D.; Reddy, M. S.; Peckham, Steven E.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

312

Shallow hydrothermal regime of the East Brawley and Glamis known geothermal resource areas, Salton Trough, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal gradients and thermal conductivities were obtained in real time using an in situ heat-flow technique in 15 shallow (90 to 150 m) wells drilled between Brawley and Glamis in the Imperial Valley, Southern California. The in situ measurements were supplemented by follow-up conventional temperature logs in seven of the wells and by laboratory measurements of thermal conductivity on drill cuttings. The deltaic sedimentary material comprising the upper approx. 100 m of the Salton Trough generally is poorly sorted and high in quartz resulting in quite high thermal conductivities (averaging 2.0 Wm/sup -1/ K/sup -1/ as opposed to 1.2 to 1.7 for typical alluvium). A broad heat-flow anomaly with maximum of about 200 mWm/sup -2/ (approx. 5 HFU) is centered between Glamis and East Brawley and is superimposed on a regional heat-flow high in excess of 100 mWm/sup -2/ (> 2.5 HFU). The heat-flow high corresponds with a gravity maximum and partially with a minimum in electrical resistivity, suggesting the presence of a hydrothermal system at depth in this area.

Mase, C.W.; Sass, J.H.; Brook, C.A.; Munroe, R.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Heat flow in relation to hydrothermal activity in the southern Black Rock Desert, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an investigation of the Gerlach NE KGRA (Known Geothermal Resource Area) a number of heat-flow measurements were made in playa sediments of the southern Black Rock Desert, northwestern Nevada. These data together with additional previously unpublished heat-flow values reveal a complex pattern of heat flow with values ranging between 1.0 to 5.0 HFU (40 to 100 mWm/sup -2/) outside of the hot springs area. The mean heat flow for the 13 reported sites in the southern Black Rock Desert is 1.8 +- 0.15 HFU (75 +- 6 mWm/sup -2/). The complexity of the pattern of heat flow is believed to arise from hydrothermal circulation supporting the numerous hot springs throughout the region. The fact that the lowest observed heat flow occurs in the deepest part of the basin strongly suggests that fluid movement within the basin represents part of the recharge for the hydrothermal system. A thermal balance for the system incorporating both anomalous conductive heat loss and convective heat loss from the spring systems indicate a total energy loss of about 8.0 Mcal/sec or 34 megawatts over an estimated 1000 km/sup 2/ region. Consideration of this additional heat loss yields a mean regional heat flow of 2.5 + HFU (100 + mWm/sup -2/) and warrants inclusion of this region in the Battle Mountain heat-flow high (Lachenbruch and Sass, 1977, 1978).

Sass, J.H.; Zoback, M.L.; Galanis, S.P. Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

SAFETY EVALUATION OF OXALIC ACID WASTE RETRIEVAL IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) 241-C-106  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the safety evaluation of the process of retrieving sludge waste from single-shell tank 241-C-106 using oxalic acid. The results of the HAZOP, safety evaluation, and control allocation/decision are part of the report. This safety evaluation considers the use of oxalic acid to recover residual waste in single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This is an activity not addressed in the current tank farm safety basis. This evaluation has five specific purposes: (1) Identifying the key configuration and operating assumptions needed to evaluate oxalic acid dissolution in SST 241-C-106. (2) Documenting the hazardous conditions identified during the oxalic acid dissolution hazard and operability study (HAZOP). (3) Documenting the comparison of the HAZOP results to the hazardous conditions and associated analyzed accident currently included in the safety basis, as documented in HNF-SD-WM-TI-764, ''Hazard Analysis Database Report''. (4) Documenting the evaluation of the oxalic acid dissolution activity with respect to Accident analyses described in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, ''Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report'' (FSAR). (5)Controls specified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, ''Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements'' (TSR). Documenting the process and results of control decisions as well as the applicability of preventive and/or mitigative controls to each oxalic acid addition hazardous condition.

GOETZ, T.G.

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Waste management programmatic environmental impact statement methodology for estimating human health risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has produced large quantities of radioactive and hazardous waste during years of nuclear weapons production. As a result, a large number of sites across the DOE Complex have become chemically and/or radiologically contaminated. In 1990, the Secretary of Energy charged the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste management (EM) with the task of preparing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS should identify and assess the potential environmental impacts of implementing several integrated Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) alternatives. The determination and integration of appropriate remediation activities and sound waste management practices is vital for ensuring the diminution of adverse human health impacts during site cleanup and waste management programs. This report documents the PEIS risk assessment methodology used to evaluate human health risks posed by WM activities. The methodology presents a programmatic cradle to grave risk assessment for EM program activities. A unit dose approach is used to estimate risks posed by WM activities and is the subject of this document.

Bergenback, B. [Midwest Technical, Inc. (United States); Blaylock, B.P.; Legg, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Possible Influence of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Cirrus Clouds and Anthropogenic Forcing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cirrus clouds have a net warming effect on the atmosphere and cover about 30% of the Earths area. Aerosol particles initiate ice formation in the upper troposphere through modes of action that include homogeneous freezing of solution droplets, heterogeneous nucleation on solid particles immersed in a solution, and deposition nucleation of vapor onto solid particles. Here, we examine the possible change in ice number concentration from anthropogenic soot originating from surface sources of fossil fuel and biomass burning, from anthropogenic sulfate aerosols, and from aircraft that deposit their aerosols directly in the upper troposphere. We find that fossil fuel and biomass burning soot aerosols exert a radiative forcing of -0.68 to 0.01 Wm-2 while anthropogenic sulfate aerosols exert a forcing of -0.01 to 0.18 Wm-2. Our calculations show that the sign of the forcing by aircraft soot depends on the model configuration and can be both positive or negative, ranging from -0.16 to 0.02 Wm-2. The magnitude of the forcing in cirrus clouds can be comparable to the forcing exerted by anthropogenic aerosols on warm clouds, but this forcing has not been included in past assessments of the total anthropogenic radiative forcing of climate.

Penner, Joyce E.; Chen, Yang; Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

319

Preliminary Investigations of Outdoor Meteorological Broadband and Spectral Conditions for Evaluating Photovoltaic Modules and Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, flat-plate photovoltaic (PV) modules have been rated at "peak-output" for power generated under Standard; Reporting Conditions (SRC) of 1000 Watts per square meter W/m2 global irradiance at a standard temperature (25degC) and reference spectral distribution. We examine the direct-normal irradiance, spectral distribution, ambient temperature, and wind speed to be used for evaluating flatplate and concentrator module performance. Our study is based upon the 30-year U.S. National Solar Radiation Data Base for conditions observed when the global irradiance on a 2-axis-tracked surface is 1000 W/m2. Results show commonly-used values for concentrator testing of 850 W/m2 for direct-normal irradiance and 20degC for ambient temperature are appropriate. Wind speed should be increased from 1 m/s to a more frequently observed 4 m/s. Differences between the reference direct-normal spectrum and spectra measured at three sites when broadband direct-normal irradiance and global-normal irradiance are near SRC irradiances suggest revisions to the reference spectra may be needed.

Myers, D. R.; Kurtz, S. R.; Whitaker, C.; Townsend, T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Engineering Basis Document Review Supporting the Double Shell Tank (DST) System Specification Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Double-Shell Tank (DST) System is required to transition from its current storage mission to a storage and retrieval mission supporting the River Protection Project Phase 1 privatization, defined in HNF-SD-WM-MAR-008, Tank Waste Remediation System Mission Analysis Report. Requirements for the DST subsystems are being developed using the top-down systems engineering process outlined in HNF-SD-WM-SEMP-002, Tank Waste Remediation System Systems Engineering Management Plan. This top-down process considers existing designs to the extent that these designs impose unavoidable constraints on the Phase 1 mission. Existing engineering-basis documents were screened, and the unavoidable constraints were identified. The constraints identified herein will be added to the DST System specification (HNF-SD-WM-TRD-007, System Specification for the Double-Shell Tank System). While the letter revisions of the DST System specification were constructed with a less rigorous review of the existing engineering-basis documents, the Revision 0 release of the specification must incorporate the results of the review documented herein. The purpose of this document is to describe the screening process and criteria used to determine which constraints are unavoidable and to document the screening results.

LEONARD, M.W.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Estimation of costs for applications of remediation technologies for the Department of Energy`s Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect

The Programmatic Environmental impact Statement (PEIS) being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) activities expected to be carried out across the DOE`s nationwide complex of facilities is assessing the impacts of removing, transporting, treating, storing, and disposing of waste from these ER and WM activities. Factors being considered include health and safety impacts to the public and to workers, impacts on the environment, costs and socio-economic impacts, and near-term and residual risk during those ER and WM operations. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the methodology developed specifically for the PEIS to estimate costs associated with the deployment and application of individual remediation technologies. These individual costs are used in developing order-of-magnitude cost estimates for the total remediation activities. Costs are developed on a per-unit-of-material-to-be-treated basis (i.e., $/m{sup 3}) to accommodate remediation projects of varying sizes. The primary focus of this cost-estimating effort was the development of capital and operating unit cost factors based on the amount of primary media to be removed, handled, and treated. The unit costs for individual treatment technologies were developed using information from a variety of sources, mainly from periodicals, EPA documentation, handbooks, vendor contacts, and cost models. The unit cost factors for individual technologies were adjusted to 1991 dollars.

Villegas, A.J.; Hansen, R.I.; Humphreys, K.K.; Paananen, J.M.; Gildea, L.F.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Temporal and Spatial Deployment of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies across the Representative Concentration Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Changes (IPCC) Fifth Assessment (to be published in 2013-2014) will to a significant degree be built around four Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) that are intended to represent four scenarios of future development of greenhouse gas emissions, land use, and concentrations that span the widest range of potential future atmospheric radiative forcing. Under the very stringent climate policy implied by the 2.6 W/m2 overshoot scenario, all electricity is eventually generated from low carbon sources. However, carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies never comprise more than 50% of total electricity generation in that very stringent scenario or in any of the other cases examined here. There are significant differences among the cases studied here in terms of how CCS technologies are used, with the most prominent being is the significant expansion of biomass+CCS as the stringency of the implied climate policy increases. Cumulative CO2 storage across the three cases that imply binding greenhouse gas constraints ranges by nearly an order of magnitude from 170GtCO2 (radiative forcing of 6.0W/m2 in 2100) to 1600GtCO2 (2.6W/m2 in 2100) over the course of this century. This potential demand for deep geologic CO2 storage is well within published estimates of total global CO2 storage capacity.

Dooley, James J.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2011-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

323

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

First limits on the 3-200 keV X-ray spectrum of the quiet Sun using RHESSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first results using the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, RHESSI, to observe solar X-ray emission not associated with active regions, sunspots or flares (the quiet Sun). Using a newly developed chopping technique (fan-beam modulation) during seven periods of offpointing between June 2005 to October 2006, we obtained upper limits over 3-200 keV for the quietest times when the GOES12 1-8A flux fell below $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$. These values are smaller than previous limits in the 17-120 keV range and extend them to both lower and higher energies. The limit in 3-6 keV is consistent with a coronal temperature $\\leq 6$ MK. For quiet Sun periods when the GOES12 1-8A background flux was between $10^{-8}$ Wm$^{-2}$ and $10^{-7}$ Wm$^{-2}$, the RHESSI 3-6 keV flux correlates to this as a power-law, with an index of $1.08 \\pm 0.13$. The power-law correlation for microflares has a steeper index of $1.29 \\pm 0.06$. We also discuss the possibility of observing quiet Sun X-rays due to solar axions and use the RHESSI quiet Sun limits to estimate the axion-to-photon coupling constant for two different axion emission scenarios.

Iain G. Hannah; G. J Hurford; H. S. Hudson; R. P. Lin; K. van Bibber

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

325

Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The durability of PEM fuel cells is a primary requirement for large scale commercialization of these power systems in transportation and stationary market applications that target operational lifetimes of 5,000 hours and 40,000 hours by 2015, respectively. Key degradation modes contributing to fuel cell lifetime limitations have been largely associated with the platinum-based cathode catalyst layer. Furthermore, as fuel cells are driven to low cost materials and lower catalyst loadings in order to meet the cost targets for commercialization, the catalyst durability has become even more important. While over the past few years significant progress has been made in identifying the underlying causes of fuel cell degradation and key parameters that greatly influence the degradation rates, many gaps with respect to knowledge of the driving mechanisms still exist; in particular, the acceleration of the mechanisms due to different structural compositions and under different fuel cell conditions remains an area not well understood. The focus of this project was to address catalyst durability by using a dual path approach that coupled an extensive range of experimental analysis and testing with a multi-scale modeling approach. With this, the major technical areas/issues of catalyst and catalyst layer performance and durability that were addressed are: 1. Catalyst and catalyst layer degradation mechanisms (Pt dissolution, agglomeration, Pt loss, e.g. Pt in the membrane, carbon oxidation and/or corrosion). a. Driving force for the different degradation mechanisms. b. Relationships between MEA performance, catalyst and catalyst layer degradation and operational conditions, catalyst layer composition, and structure. 2. Materials properties a. Changes in catalyst, catalyst layer, and MEA materials properties due to degradation. 3. Catalyst performance a. Relationships between catalyst structural changes and performance. b. Stability of the three-phase boundary and its effect on performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release Stage 2 - Beta Release o The model code repository is opened to the general public on a beta release c

Wessel, Silvia [Ballard Materials Products] [Ballard Materials Products; Harvey, David [Ballard Materials Products] [Ballard Materials Products

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Elevated Transportation Company  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Being stuck in traffic doesnt have to be a way of life. By approving citizens Initiative 53, Seattle voters asked for an alternative to traffic congestion through a new, expanded monorail system that would speed travelers up and over the cars below. The Elevated Transportation Company was asked to plan the new monorail and develop a proposal to build it. This document, the ETC Seattle Popular Monorail Plan, is our response. In it, we call for the creation of a 5-line, 58-mile citywide monorail system, and present a detailed proposal for the first line to be built, the 14-mile Green Line from Ballard and West Seattle to Downtown. The Plan includes a proposed route for the Green Line as well as cost, revenue, and ridership estimates, together with a proposal to fund Green Line construction and start-up. As we present this Plan today, we do so with great enthusiasm for the promise of monorail transportation in 21st century Seattle. A monorail system will give us a fast, elevated alternative to traffic congestion, and seamless mobility between Downtown and the neighborhoods. It will be safe, separated from cars and pedestrians. And it will be good for the environment, with its nonpolluting electric cars running quietly along the guideway beams. Our work has undergone extensive public review and comment as well as rigorous technical analysis from independent experts. The Plan has been refined and strengthened over the months and we are confident that it not only proposes a viable and efficient

Kristina Hill; Board Vice-chair; Donald King; Jeanne Kohl-welles

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Air-Cooled Stack Freeze Tolerance Freeze Failure Modes and Freeze Tolerance Strategies for GenDriveTM Material Handling Application Systems and Stacks Final Scientific Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

Hancock, David, W.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Final Scientific Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air-cooled stack technology offers the potential for a simpler system architecture (versus liquid-cooled) for applications below 4 kilowatts. The combined cooling and cathode air allows for a reduction in part count and hence a lower cost solution. However, efficient heat rejection challenges escalate as power and ambient temperature increase. For applications in ambient temperatures below freezing, the air-cooled approach has additional challenges associated with not overcooling the fuel cell stack. The focus of this project was freeze tolerance while maintaining all other stack and system requirements. Through this project, Plug Power advanced the state of the art in technology for air-cooled PEM fuel cell stacks and related GenDrive material handling application fuel cell systems. This was accomplished through a collaborative work plan to improve freeze tolerance and mitigate freeze-thaw effect failure modes within innovative material handling equipment fuel cell systems designed for use in freezer forklift applications. Freeze tolerance remains an area where additional research and understanding can help fuel cells to become commercially viable. This project evaluated both stack level and system level solutions to improve fuel cell stack freeze tolerance. At this time, the most cost effective solutions are at the system level. The freeze mitigation strategies developed over the course of this project could be used to drive fuel cell commercialization. The fuel cell system studied in this project was Plug Power's commercially available GenDrive platform providing battery replacement for equipment in the material handling industry. The fuel cell stacks were Ballard's commercially available FCvelocity 9SSL (9SSL) liquid-cooled PEM fuel cell stack and FCvelocity 1020ACS (Mk1020) air-cooled PEM fuel cell stack.

Hancock, David, W.

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

SAFETY EVALUATION OF OXALIC ACID WASTE RETRIEVAL IN SINGLE SHELL TANK (SST) 241-C-106  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the safety evaluation of the process of retrieving sludge waste from single-shell tank 241-C-106 using oxalic acid. The results of the HAZOP, safety evaluation, and control allocation/decision are part of the report. This safety evaluation considers the use of oxalic acid to recover residual waste in single-shell tank (SST) 241-C-106. This is an activity not addressed in the current tank farm safety basis. This evaluation has five specific purposes: (1) Identifying the key configuration and operating assumptions needed to evaluate oxalic acid dissolution in SST 241-C-106. (2) Documenting the hazardous conditions identified during the oxalic acid dissolution hazard and operability study (HAZOP). (3) Documenting the comparison of the HAZOP results to the hazardous conditions and associated analyzed accident currently included in the safety basis, as documented in HNF-SD-WM-TI-764, Hazard Analysis Database Report. (4) Documenting the evaluation of the oxalic acid dissolution activity with respect to: (A) Accident analyses described in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), and (B) Controls specified in HNF-SD-WM-TSR-006, Tank Farms Technical Safety Requirements (TSR). (5) Documenting the process and results of control decisions as well as the applicability of preventive and/or mitigative controls to each oxalic acid addition hazardous condition. This safety evaluation is not intended to be a request to authorize the activity. Authorization issues are addressed by the unreviewed safety question (USQ) evaluation process. This report constitutes an accident analysis.

SHULTZ, M.V.

2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Programs Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

331

Indirect radiative forcing by ion-mediated nucleation of aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A clear understanding of particle formation mechanisms is critical for assessing aerosol indirect radiative forcing and associated climate feedback processes. Recent studies reveal the importance of ion-mediated nucleation (IMN) in generating new particles and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the atmosphere. Here we implement for the first time a physically based treatment of IMN into the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. Our simulations show that, compared to globally averaged results based on binary homogeneous nucleation (BHN), the presence of ionization (i.e., IMN) halves H2SO4 column burden, but increases the column integrated nucleation rate by around one order of magnitude, total particle number burden by a factor of ~ 3, CCN burden by ~ 10% (at 0.2% supersaturation) to 65% (at 1.0% supersaturation), and cloud droplet number burden by ~ 18%. Compared to BHN, IMN increases cloud liquid water path by 7.5%, decreases precipitation by 1.1%, and increases total cloud cover by 1.9%. This leads to an increase of total shortwave cloud radiative forcing by 3.67 W/m2 (more negative) and longwave cloud forcing by 1.78 W/m2 (more positive), resulting in a -1.9 W/m2 net change in cloud radiative forcing associated with IMN. The significant impacts of ionization on global aerosol formation, CCN abundance, and cloud radiative forcing may provide an important physical mechanism linking the global energy balance to various processes affecting atmospheric ionization, which should be properly represented in climate models.

Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ma, Xiaoyan; Ghan, Steven J.

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram. Volume 1, Technology Evaluation: Part B, Remedial Action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Technology Logic Diagram (TLD) was developed to provide a decision-support tool that relates environmental restoration (ER) and waste management (WM) problems at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to potential technologies that can remediate these problems. The TLD identifies the research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation needed to develop these technologies to a state that allows technology transfer and application to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remedial action (RA), and WM activities. The TLD consists of three fundamentally separate volumes: Vol. 1 (Technology Evaluation), Vol. 2 (Technology Logic Diagram), and Vol. 3 (Technology Evaluation Data Sheets). Part A of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on D&D. Part B of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on RA of contaminated facilities. Part C of Vols. 1 and 2 focuses on WM. Each part of Vol. 1 contains an overview of the TLD, an explanation of the program-specific responsibilities, a review of identified technologies, and the ranking os remedial technologies. Volume 2 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the logic linkages among EM goals, environmental problems, and the various technologies that have the potential to solve these problems. Volume 3 (Pts. A, B, and C) contains the TLD data sheets. The focus of Vol. 1, Pt. B, is RA, and it has been divided into six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, which defines problems specific to the ER Program for ORNL. Chapter 2 provides a general overview of the TLD. Chapters 3 through 5 are organized into necessary subelement categories: RA, characterization, and robotics and automation. The final chapter contains regulatory compliance information concerning RA.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Dissolution of two NWCF calcines: Extent of dissolution and characterization of undissolved solids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to determine the dissolution characteristics of two NWCF calcine types. A two-way blended calcine made from 4 parts nonradioactive aluminum nitrate and one part WM-102 was studied to determine the extent of dissolution for aluminum-type calcines. A two-way blend of 3.5 parts fluorinel waste from WM-187 and 1 part sodium waste from WM-185 was used to determine the extent of dissolution for zirconium-type calcines. This study was necessary to develop suitable aqueous separation flowsheets for the partitioning of actinides and fission products from ICPP calcines and to determine the disposition of the resulting undissolved solids (UDS). The dissolution flowsheet developed by Herbst was used to dissolve these two NWCF calcine types. Results show that greater than 95 wt% of aluminum and zirconium calcine types were dissolved after a single batch contact with 5 M HNO{sub 3}. A characterization of the UDS indicates that the weight percent of TRU elements in the UDS resulting from both calcine type dissolutions increases by approximately an order of magnitude from their concentrations prior to dissolution. Substantial activities of cesium and strontium are also present in the UDS resulting from the dissolution of both calcine types. Multiple TRU, Cs, and Sr analyses of both UDS types show that these solids are relatively homogeneous. From this study, it is estimated that between 63.5 and 635 cubic meters of UDS will be generated from the dissolution of 3800 M{sub 3} of calcine. The significant actinide and fission product activities in these UDS will preclude their disposal as low-level waste. If the actinide and fission activity resulting from the UDS is the only considered source in the dissolved calcine solutions, an estimated 99.9 to 99.99 percent of the solids must be removed from this solution for it to meet non-TRU Class A low-level waste.

Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fenestration of Today and Tomorrow: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fenestration of Today and Tomorrow: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Fenestration of Today and Tomorrow: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Research Opportunities Title Fenestration of Today and Tomorrow: A State-of-the-Art Review and Future Research Opportunities Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5304E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Jelle, Bjørn Petter, Andrew Hynd, Arlid Gustavsen, Dariush K. Arasteh, Howdy Goudey, and Robert Hart Journal Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells Volume 96 Start Page 1 Pagination 1-28 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords Fenestration, Low-e, Multilayer glazing, Smart window, Solar cell glazing, Vacuum glazing Abstract Fenestration of today is continuously being developed into the fenestration of tomorrow, hence offering a steadily increase of daylight and solar energy utilization and control, and at the same time providing a necessary climate screen with a satisfactory thermal comfort. Within this work a state of the art market review of the best performing fenestration products has been carried out, along with an overview of possible future research opportunities for the fenestration industry. The focus of the market review was low thermal transmittance (U-value). The lowest centre of glass Ug-values found was 0.28 W/(m2K) and 0.30 W/(m2K), which was from a suspended coating glazing product and an aerogel glazing product, respectively. However, the majority of high performance products found were triple glazed. The lowest frame U-value was 0.61 W/(m2K). Vacuum glazing, smart windows, solar cell glazing, window frames, self cleaning glazing, low-emissivity coatings and spacers were also reviewed, thus also representing possibilities for controlling and harvesting the solar radiation energy. Currently, vacuum glazing, new spacer materials and solutions, electrochromic windows and aerogel glazing seem to have the largest potential for improving the thermal performance and daylight and solar properties in fenestration products. Aerogel glazing has the lowest potential U-values, ~ 0.1 W/(m2K), but requires further work to improve the visible transmittance. Electrochromic vaccum glazing and evacuated aerogel glazing are two vacuum related solutions which have a large potential. There may also be opportunities for completely new material innovations which could revolutionize the fenestration industry.

335

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.f ! I I (' ii MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE 5 +/9! ----- ------------- FROM: D. Jxw+ a--------------- SUBJECT: E/;vlr;l~&~- fico -de+& Y&U- c . 6. %qo+y& + 3-r SITE NAME: c- G* ~.&-J&-& 4 fib+< ALTERNATE -------a----- _------------------------ NAME: ---------------------- CITY: &w;-&u; & ----------------------e-w- STATE: /+?# ------ OWNER(S) ---pi;;;- c * c. s&r--&&+ ------------ -- -------- Current: un W&e k Owner contacted 0 yes a no; ---w-------------------m-- if yes, date contacted -----a------- TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- a Research 81 Development 0 Facility Type fl Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production

336

MEMORANDUM DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

DATE DATE :;++, -m--s B-w- -w---m-- SUBJECT: , ::;:: JLLiucd ALTERN&TE e---e---- --------------------------- CITY&da NCIME: ---------------------- - --------------------- J&f STATE: OWNER ( S 1 -----m-e Past 0 Current: ------------------------ Owner contacted 0 -------------------------- 0 yes no; if ye=, date contacted ------w---s-- TYPE OF OPERATION ----w------------ F Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing F Pilot Scale 0 Manufacturing 0 Bench Scale Process 0 University Research 0 Theoretical 0 Organization Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRfiCT a--------------- 0 Prim- 0 Subcontract& s Purchase Order

337

Level maintenance for Tank 101-SY mitigation-by-mixing test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the procedure to be followed to implement the requirements of the Mixer Pump Long-Term Operations Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Mitigation, WHC-SD-WM-PLN-081. The test is divided into 2 distinct sequences, named Single Position Pump Run and Tank Sweep. Instructions for all sequences are defined within the procedure. All safety requirements as defined in LA-UR-92-3196, A Safety Assessment for Proposed Mixing Operations to Mitigate Episodic Gas Releases in Tank 241-101-SY have been implemented into this procedure.

Sobocinski, R.G.

1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Considerations for How to Rate CPV  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) industry is introducing multiple products into the marketplace, but, as yet, the; community has not embraced a unified method for assessing a nameplate rating. The choices of whether to use 850,; 900, or 1000 W/m2 for the direct-normal irradiance and whether to link the rating to ambient or cell temperature will; affect how CPV modules are rated and compared with other technologies. This paper explores the qualitative and; quantitative ramifications of these choices using data from two multi-junction CPV modules and two flat-plate; modules.

Kurtz, S.; Miller, M.; Marion, B.; Emery, K.; McConnell, R.; Surendran, S.; Kimber, A.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Immunophoretic rapid diagnostic tests as a source of immunoglobulins for estimating malaria sero-prevalence and transmission intensity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the University of Copenhagen. The work was supported by a grant to ER, PC and CD from the Wellcome Trust (078925). References 1. Drakeley C, Corran P, Coleman PG, Tongren JE, McDonald S, Car- neiro I, Malima R, Lusingu JPA, Manjurano A, Nkya WM, Lemnge M, Cox J... , Abdulla S, Kachur SP, Bloland PB: Dispensary level pilot implementation of rapid diagnostic tests: an evaluation of RDT acceptance and usage by providers and patients Tanzania, 2005. Malar J 2008, 7:239. 6. Lubell Y, Hopkins H, Whitty CJ, Staedke SG...

Williams, Geoffrey S; Mweya, Clement; Stewart, Laveta; Mtove, George; Reyburn, Hugh T; Cook, Jackie; Corran, Patrick H; Riley, Eleanor M; Drakeley, Chris J

2009-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Aerosol indirect effects general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated in the present study using three satellite datasets. The satellite datasets are taken as reference bearing in mind that cloud and aerosol retrievals include uncertainties. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth (?a) and various cloud and radiation quantities consistently in models and satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (Nd) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over oceans. The relationship between ?a and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. It is shown that this is partly related to representation of the second aerosol indirect effect in terms of autoconversion. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (fcld) and ?a as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong fcld ?a relationship, we find that none is unequivocally confirmed by our results. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between ?a and cloud top temperature and outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - ?a relationship show a strong positive correlation between ?a and cloud fraction. The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of ?a, and parameterisation assumptions such as a lower bound on Nd. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the short-wave total aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.50.5 Wm-2. An alternative estimate obtained by scaling the simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic ?a and satellite-retrieved Nd ?a regression slopes, respectively, yields a global annual mean clear-sky (aerosol direct effect) estimate of -0.40.2 Wm-2 and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.70.5 Wm-2, with a total estimate of -1.20.4 Wm-2.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, T.; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, A.; Lohmann, U.; Bellouin, N.; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, A.; Feingold, G.; Hoose, Corinna; Kristjansson, J. E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Y.; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, P.; Stier, P.; Grandey, B.; Feichter, J.; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, D.; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, A.; Iversen, T.; Seland, O.; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Lamarque, J. F.; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, M.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hydrogen recombiner catalyst test supporting data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a data package supporting the Hydrogen Recombiner Catalyst Performance and Carbon Monoxide Sorption Capacity Test Report, WHC-SD-WM-TRP-211, Rev 0. This report contains 10 appendices which consist of the following: Mass spectrometer analysis reports: HRC samples 93-001 through 93-157; Gas spectrometry analysis reports: HRC samples 93-141 through 93-658; Mass spectrometer procedure PNL-MA-299 ALO-284; Alternate analytical method for ammonia and water vapor; Sample log sheets; Job Safety analysis; Certificate of mixture analysis for feed gases; Flow controller calibration check; Westinghouse Standards Laboratory report on Bois flow calibrator; and Sorption capacity test data, tables, and graphs.

Britton, M.D.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Savannah River Site Waste Management Program Plan, FY 1993. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of the Waste Management Program Plan is to provide an annual report on facilities being used to manage wastes, forces acting to change current waste management (WM) systems, and how operations are conducted. This document also reports on plans for the coming fiscal year and projects activities for several years beyond the coming fiscal year to adequately plan for safe handling and disposal of radioactive wastes generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and for developing technology for improved management of wastes.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Management Operations Roadmap Document  

SciTech Connect

At the direction of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), the DOE Idaho Field Office (DOE-ID) is developing roadmaps for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) activities at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). DOE-ID has convened a select group of contractor personnel from EG&G Idaho, Inc. to assist DOE-ID personnel with the roadmapping project. This document is a report on the initial stages of the first phase of the INEL`s roadmapping efforts.

Bullock, M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 3 Number 2 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Waterloo Lutheran University and University of Waterloo (Canada); presently Professor of Geography, University of Kentucky (USA). NALINAKSHA DUTT Vice-President: Namgyal Institute of Tibeto logy; President: Asiatic Society, Calcutta 1958-60; formerly... ReYiewofIndia, Vo1.22, NO.3, September, 1960, PP34-39 21. For details see P.P. Karan, Nepali: a Cultural and Physical Geooraphy lexington: University of Kentucky Press, 1960, Pp91-95 12. P. P. Karan and W.M. Jenkins, The Himalayan Kinodoms...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

1966-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance throughout the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m2. In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the results of a group of pyrgeometers that were recently calibrated against the World Infrared Standard Group, in the World Radiation Center, Davos/Switzerland.

Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Stoffel, T.; Myers, D.; Forgan, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A global 3D P-velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle for improved event location : SALSA3D.  

SciTech Connect

To test the hypothesis that high quality 3D Earth models will produce seismic event locations which are more accurate and more precise, we are developing a global 3D P wave velocity model of the Earth's crust and mantle using seismic tomography. In this paper, we present the most recent version of our model, SALSA3D version 1.5, and demonstrate its ability to reduce mislocations for a large set of realizations derived from a carefully chosen set of globally-distributed ground truth events. Our model is derived from the latest version of the Ground Truth (GT) catalog of P and Pn travel time picks assembled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. To prevent over-weighting due to ray path redundancy and to reduce the computational burden, we cluster rays to produce representative rays. Reduction in the total number of ray paths is {approx}50%. The model is represented using the triangular tessellation system described by Ballard et al. (2009), which incorporates variable resolution in both the geographic and radial dimensions. For our starting model, we use a simplified two layer crustal model derived from the Crust 2.0 model over a uniform AK135 mantle. Sufficient damping is used to reduce velocity adjustments so that ray path changes between iterations are small. We obtain proper model smoothness by using progressive grid refinement, refining the grid only around areas with significant velocity changes from the starting model. At each grid refinement level except the last one we limit the number of iterations to prevent convergence thereby preserving aspects of broad features resolved at coarser resolutions. Our approach produces a smooth, multi-resolution model with node density appropriate to both ray coverage and the velocity gradients required by the data. This scheme is computationally expensive, so we use a distributed computing framework based on the Java Parallel Processing Framework, providing us with {approx}400 processors. Resolution of our model is assessed using a variation of the standard checkerboard method. We compare the travel-time prediction and location capabilities of SALSA3D to standard 1D models via location tests on a global event set with GT of 5 km or better. These events generally possess hundreds of Pn and P picks from which we generate different realizations of station distributions, yielding a range of azimuthal coverage and ratios of teleseismic to regional arrivals, with which we test the robustness and quality of relocation. The SALSA3D model reduces mislocation over standard 1D ak135 regardless of Pn to P ratio, with the improvement being most pronounced at higher azimuthal gaps.

Young, Christopher John; Steck, Lee K. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Phillips, William Scott (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Ballard, Sanford; Chang, Marcus C.; Rowe, Charlotte A. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Encarnacao, Andre Villanova; Begnaud, Michael A. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Hipp, James Richard

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Intergovernmental Advanced Stationary PEM Fuel Cell System Demonstration Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to complete the design, construction and demonstration of a PEMFC system fuelled by Ethanol, LPG or NG for telecom applications was initiated in October 2007. Early in the program the economics for Ethanol were shown to be unfeasible and permission was given by DOE to focus on LPG only. The design and construction of a prototype unit was completed in Jun 2009 using commercially available PEM FC stack from Ballard Power Systems. During the course of testing, the high pressure drop of the stack was shown to be problematic in terms of control and stability of the reformer. Also, due to the power requirements for air compression the overall efficiency of the system was shown to be lower than a similar system using internally developed low pressure drop FC stack. In Q3 2009, the decision was made to change to the Plug power stack and a second prototype was built and tested. Overall net efficiency was shown to be 31.5% at 3 kW output. Total output of the system is 6 kW. Using the new stack hardware, material cost reduction of 63% was achieved over the previous Alpha design. During a November 2009 review meeting Plug Power proposed and was granted permission, to demonstrate the new, commercial version of Plug Power's telecom system at CERL. As this product was also being tested as part of a DOE Topic 7A program, this part of the program was transferred to the Topic 7A program. In Q32008, the scope of work of this program was expanded to include a National Grid demonstration project of a micro-CHP system using hightemperature PEM technology. The Gensys Blue system was cleared for unattended operation, grid connection, and power generation in Aug 2009 at Union College in NY state. The system continues to operate providing power and heat to Beuth House. The system is being continually evaluated and improvements to hardware and controls will be implemented as more is learned about the system's operation. The program is instrumental in improving the efficiency and reducing costs of PEMFC based power systems using LPG fuel and continues to makes steps towards meeting DOE's targets. Plug Power would like to thank DOE for their support of this program.

Rich Chartrand

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

350

postkwonTable2.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: 2, W.M. Post, and K.C. Kwon. 2000. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential. Global Change Biology 6:317-327 http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/postkwon2000/postkwon2000.html Years since Soil sample Rate of change (g m -2 y -1 ) Reference agriculture depth (cm) MAX AVG Cool temperate steppe Cultivated to perennial grass 12 300 110.00 Gebhart et al. (1994) cultivated to abandoned field 50 10 3.10 Burke et al. (1995) cultivated to seeded grass 6 5 0.00 Robles & Burke (1998) cultivated to improved pasture White et al. (1976) russian wildrye 8 7 6.86 crested wheatgrass 8 7 18.87 B-I-ALF (full) 8 7 14.01 B-I-ALF (short) 8 7 34.15 Mine tailing to grass-forb meadow 5 - 80 10 60.00 4.01 Titlyanova et al. (1988) Coal mine spoil to dry grassland 28 - 40

351

Analysis of thermal data from drill holes UE25a-3 and UE25a-1, Calico Hills and Yucca Mountain, Nevada Test Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal data from two sites about 20 km apart in the Nevada Test Site indicate that heat flow both within and below the upper 800 meters is affected significantly by hydrothermal convection. For hole UE25a-1, Yucca Mountain, the apparent heat flow above the water table ({similar_to}470 m) is 54 mWm{sup -2} ({similar_to}1.3 HFU). Below the water table, the temperature profile indicates both upward and downward water movement within the hole and possibly within the formation. Hole UE25a-3, Calico Mountain, is characterized by conductive heat flux averaging 135 mWm{sup -2} ({similar_to}3.2 HFU) to a depth of about 700 meters below which water appears to be moving downward at the rate of nearly 1 ft y{sup -1} (255 mm y{sup -1}). Between 735 and 750 meters, the hole intersected a nearly vertical fault along which water seems to be moving vertically downward. The nearly threefold variation in conductive heat flow over a lateral distance of only 20 km suggests the presence of a more deeply seated hydrothremal convective system with a net upward flow beneath Calico Hills and a net downward flow beneath Yucca Mountain.

Sass, J.H.; Lachenbruch, A.H.; Mase, C.W.

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

2006 Authors in the Review of Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Review of Particle Physics 6 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006) W.-M. Yao, 1 C. Amsler, 2 D. Asner, 3 R.M. Barnett, 1 J. Beringer, 1 P.R. Burchat, 4 C.D. Carone, 5 C. Caso, 6 O. Dahl, 1 G. D'Ambrosio, 7 A. DeGouvea, 8 M. Doser, 9 S. Eidelman, 10 J.L. Feng, 11 T. Gherghetta, 12 M. Goodman, 13 C. Grab, 14 D.E. Groom, 1 A. Gurtu, 15,9 K. Hagiwara, 16 K.G. Hayes, 17 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 18,¶ K. Hikasa, 19 H. Jawahery, 20 C. Kolda, 21 Y. Kwon, 22 M.L. Mangano, 9 A.V. Manohar, 23

353

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol Direct Forcing at TOA and Surface for Clear and Cloudy Conditions Aerosol Direct Forcing at TOA and Surface for Clear and Cloudy Conditions Charlock, T.P.(a), Rose, F.G.(b), Rutan, D.A.(b), Fillmore, D.(c), and Collins, W.(c), NASA Langley Research Center (a), Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. (b), National Center for Atmospheric Research (c) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Direct aerosol forcing can be affected dramatically by cloudiness. For example, with a continental AOT of 0.25 and soot AOT of 0.05 at scale height 2km over the tropical ocean with cosSZA of 0.33, the computed forcing to SW reflection at TOA is 15 Wm-2. If we include a boundary layer cloud with a top at 1km and an optical depth 20, the same TOA forcing then reverses sign and becomes -22 Wm-2. A new CERES Terra Surface and

354

Brazil Wind Data (10km) from CEPEL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10km) from CEPEL 10km) from CEPEL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual average of the aeolic potential at 50m. Content: wind speed in m/s, power class (7 classes), power density in W/m2 and Weibull k value organized into cells with 10km x 10km (Purpose): The thematic map by code of colors permits quick viewing of all the Brazilian territory dataset. That map indicates, for the height of 50m, the annual average, in W/m2, of wind speed, power class, power density and Weibull k value (Supplemental Information): The information is organized into cells measuring 10 x 10km. The wind potential maps were calculated from simulations produced by the MesoMap(*) for 360 days, extracted of a period of 15 years of data. The days were chosen by means of random sampling at several heights, so that each month and season be considered in a representative way. MesoMap(*) for 360 days, extracted of a period of 15 years of data. The days were chosen by means of random sampling at several heights, so that each month and season be considered in a representative way.

355

Environmental restoration program pollution prevention checklist guide for the evaluation of alternatives project phase  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of alternative studies determine what decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) alternatives are presented to regulators for facility and site cleanup. A key consideration in this process is the waste to be generated. Minimizing the volume and toxicity of this waste will ultimately contribute to the selection of the best clean-up option. The purpose of this checklist guide is to assist the user with incorporating pollution prevention/waste minimization (PP/WM) in all Evaluation of Alternatives (EV) phase projects of the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. This guide will assist users with documenting PP/WM activities for technology transfer and reporting requirements. Automated computer screens will be created from the checklist data to help users implement and evaluate waste reduction. Users can then establish numerical performance measures to measure progress in planning, training, self-assessments, field implementation, documentation, and technology transfer. Cost savings result as users train and assess themselves, eliminating expensive process waste assessments and audit teams.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Sodium-Bearing Waste  

SciTech Connect

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirements. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, Jack Douglas; Herbst, Ronald Scott; Todd, Terry Allen; Romanovskiy, V.; Smirnov, I.; Babain, V.; Zaitsev, B.; Esimantovskiy, V.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Environmental Restoration/Waste Management - applied technology. Semiannual report, July 1992--June 1993, Volume 1, Number 2, and Volume 2, Number 1  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Restoration/Waste Management-Applied Technology (ER/WM-AT) Program is developing restoration and waste treatment technologies needed for the ongoing environmental cleanup of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and treatment technologies for wastes generated in the nuclear weapons production complex. These technologies can find application to similar problems nationally and even worldwide. They can be demonstrated at the Livermore site, which mirrors (on a small scale) many of the environmental and waste management problems of the rest of the DOE complex. Their commercialization should speed cleanup, and the scope of the task should make it attractive to US industry. The articles in this semi-annual report cover the following areas: ceramic final forms for residues of mixed waste treatment; treatment of wastes containing sodium nitrate; actinide volatility in thermal oxidation processes; in situ microbial filters for remediating contaminated soils; collaboration with scientists in the former Soviet Union on new ER/WM technologies; and fiber-optic sensors for chlorinated organic solvents.

Murphy, P.W.; Bruner, J.M.; Price, M.E.; Talaber, C.J. [eds.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Demonstration of the UNEX Process for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium, Strontium, and the Actinides from Actual INEEL Tank Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A universal solvent extraction (UNEX) process for the simultaneous separation of cesium, strontium, and the actinides from actual radioactive acidic tank waste was demonstrated at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The waste solution used in the countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was obtained from tank WM-185. The UNEX process uses a tertiary solvent containing 0.08 M chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide, 0.5% polyethylene glycol-400 (PEG-400), and 0.02 M diphenyl-N,N-dibutylcarbamoyl phosphine oxide (Ph2Bu2CMPO) in a diluent consisting of phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone (FS-13). The countercurrent flowsheet demonstration was performed in a shielded cell facility using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors. Removal efficiencies of 99.4%, 99.995%, and 99.96% were obtained for 137Cs, 90Sr, and total alpha, respectively. This is sufficient to reduce the activities of 137Cs, 90Sr, and actinides in the WM-185 waste to below NRC Class A LLW requirement s. Flooding and/or precipitate formation were not observed during testing. Significant amounts of the Zr (87%), Ba (>99%), Pb (98.8%), Fe (8%), Ca (10%), Mo (32%), and K (28%) were also removed from the feed with the universal solvent extraction flowsheet. 99Tc, Al, Hg, and Na were essentially inextractable (<1% extracted).

Law, J.D.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A. (INEEL); Romanovskiy, V.N.; Esimantovskiy, V.M.; Smirnov, I.V.; Babain, V.A.; Zaitsev, B.N. (V. G. Khlopin Radium Institute); Logunov, M.V. (MAYAK Production Association)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, FY 1992--2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide Y-12 the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER program. The D and D Program provides collective management of sites within the Plant which are in need of decontamination and decommissioning efforts, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety, and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D and D Program provides support to identifiable facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the Y-12 facilities currently included in the D and D Program, as well as those planned for future inclusion in the Program, and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2000.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

SOLID WASTE INTEGRATED FORECAST TECHNICAL (SWIFT) REPORT FY2005 THRU FY2035 2005.0 VOLUME 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides up-to-date life cycle information about the radioactive solid waste expected to be managed by Hanford's Waste Management (WM) Project from onsite and offsite generators. It includes: (1) an overview of Hanford-wide solid waste to be managed by the WM Project; (2) multi-level and waste class-specific estimates; (3) background information on waste sources; and (4) comparisons to previous forecasts and other national data sources. The focus of this report is low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), and transuranic waste, both non-mixed and mixed (TRU(M)). Some details on hazardous waste are also provided, however, this information is not considered comprehensive. This report includes data requested in December, 2004 with updates through March 31,2005. The data represent a life cycle forecast covering all reported activities from FY2005 through the end of each program's life cycle and are an update of the previous FY2004.1 data version.

BARCOT, R.A.

2005-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation  

SciTech Connect

Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.260.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

363

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

364

Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing  

SciTech Connect

Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earths atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Savannah River Site`s Site Specific Plan. Environmental restoration and waste management, fiscal year 1992: Executive summary  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) planning process, communicates ER/WM`s philosophy and overall strategy for achieving its compliance and cleanup goals, summarizes multi-year program plans and assesses progress made during the previous year. The FYP goal is to ensure that risks to human health and safety and to the environment posed by the Department`s past, present, and future operations are either eliminated to reduced to safer levels by the year 2019. The SSP applies the overall strategic goals and commitments of the FYP, incorporating site-specific and local public considerations. It will address accomplishments since the FY 1990 plan, document planned activities focused on the upcoming fiscal year (FY 1992) and discuss milestones and objectives based on restricted and nonrestricted budget conditions for FY 1993--1997. The SSP is the primary means of demonstrating the relationship of local cleanup and compliance activities to broad environmental goals set forth in the FYP. The SSP provides an important channel for conveying information to regulators, the public, special interest groups, and other DOE organizations. This summary will briefly review the site`s facilities and missions, current and future program objectives, major accomplishments, funding levels, and major milestones for the five-year period.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) planning process, communicates ER/WM's philosophy and overall strategy for achieving its compliance and cleanup goals, summarizes multi-year program plans and assesses progress made during the previous year. The FYP goal is to ensure that risks to human health and safety and to the environment posed by the Department's past, present, and future operations are either eliminated to reduced to safer levels by the year 2019. The SSP applies the overall strategic goals and commitments of the FYP, incorporating site-specific and local public considerations. It will address accomplishments since the FY 1990 plan, document planned activities focused on the upcoming fiscal year (FY 1992) and discuss milestones and objectives based on restricted and nonrestricted budget conditions for FY 1993--1997. The SSP is the primary means of demonstrating the relationship of local cleanup and compliance activities to broad environmental goals set forth in the FYP. The SSP provides an important channel for conveying information to regulators, the public, special interest groups, and other DOE organizations. This summary will briefly review the site's facilities and missions, current and future program objectives, major accomplishments, funding levels, and major milestones for the five-year period.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Standard Practice for Exposure of Solar Collector Cover Materials to Natural Weathering Under Conditions Simulating Stagnation Mode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice covers a procedure for the exposure of solar collector cover materials to the natural weather environment at elevated temperatures that approximate stagnation conditions in solar collectors having a combined back and edge loss coefficient of less than 1.5 W/(m2 C). 1.2 This practice is suitable for exposure of both glass and plastic solar collector cover materials. Provisions are made for exposure of single and double cover assemblies to accommodate the need for exposure of both inner and outer solar collector cover materials. 1.3 This practice does not apply to cover materials for evacuated collectors, photovoltaic cells, flat-plate collectors having a combined back and edge loss coefficient greater than 1.5 W/(m2 C), or flat-plate collectors whose design incorporates means for limiting temperatures during stagnation. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard t...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Climate policy implications for agricultural water demand  

SciTech Connect

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of two alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy optionsone which taxes terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which only taxes fossil fuel and industrial emissions but places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to almost triple demand for water for agricultural systems across the century even in the absence of climate policy. In general policies to mitigate climate change increase agricultural demands for water still further, though the largest changes occur in the second half of the century, under both policy regimes. The two policies examined profoundly affected both the sources and magnitudes of the increase in irrigation water demands. The largest increases in agricultural irrigation water demand occurred in scenarios where only fossil fuel emissions were priced (but not land-use change emission) and were primarily driven by rapid expansion in bioenergy production. In these scenarios water demands were large relative to present-day total available water, calling into question whether it would be physically possible to produce the associated biomass energy. We explored the potential of improved water delivery and irrigation system efficiencies. These could potentially reduce demands substantially. However, overall demands remained high under our fossil-fuel-only tax policy. In contrast, when all carbon was priced, increases in agricultural water demands were smaller than under the fossil-fuel-only policy and were driven primarily by increased demands for water by non-biomass crops such as rice. Finally we estimate the geospatial pattern of water demands and find that regions such as China, India and other countries in south and east Asia might be expected to experience greatest increases in water demands.?

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Radiative impact of mineral dust on monsoon precipitation variability over West Africa  

SciTech Connect

The radiative forcing of dust and its impact on precipitation over the West Africa monsoon (WAM) region is simulated using a coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model (WRF-Chem). During the monsoon season, dust is a dominant contributor to AOD over West Africa. In the standard simulation, on 24-hour domain average, dust has a cooling effect (-6.11 W/m2) at the surface, a warming effect (6.94 W/m2) in the atmosphere, and a relatively small TOA forcing (0.83 W/m2). Dust modifies the surface energy budget and atmospheric diabatic heating and hence causes lower atmospheric cooling in the daytime but warming in the nighttime. As a result, atmospheric stability is increased in the daytime and reduced in the nighttime, leading to a reduction of late afternoon precipitation by up to 0.14 mm/hour (30%) and an increase of nocturnal and early morning precipitation by up to 0.04 mm/hour (23%) over the WAM region. Dust-induced reduction of diurnal precipitation variation improves the simulated diurnal cycle of precipitation when compared to measurements. However, daily precipitation is only changed by a relatively small amount (-0.14 mm/day or -4%). On the other hand, sensitivity simulations show that, for weaker-to-stronger absorbing dust, dust longwave warming effect in the nighttime surpasses its shortwave cooling effect in the daytime at the surface, leading to a less stable atmosphere associated with more convective precipitation in the nighttime. As a result, the dust-induced change of daily WAM precipitation varies from a significant reduction of -0.40 mm/day (-12%, weaker absorbing dust) to a small increase of 0.05 mm/day (1%, stronger absorbing dust). This variation originates from the competition between dust impact on daytime and nighttime precipitation, which depends on dust shortwave absorption. Dust reduces the diurnal variation of precipitation regardless of its absorptivity, but more reduction is associated with stronger absorbing dust.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hagos, Samson M.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BOX TECHNOLOGIES BOX TECHNOLOGIES Building energy benchmarks and rating tools Joe Huang White Box Technologies Moraga CA USA The first China-US Energy Efficiency Forum Shangri-La Hotel Beijing CHINA May. 26, 2010 WHITE BOX TECHNOLOGIES What are building energy benchmarks and rating tools? * Yardsticks to help us measure how well a building performs, or should perform, in terms of energy use. * Benchmarks establish an energy use intensity (Btus/ft 2 or W/M 2 ) or efficiency level for a type of building in a certain climate region that can be either the average of the building stock, what's required by the building standard, or a target for the future, e.g., a net-zero building. * Rating tools are similar except that they also provide

371

Exposure Values-1991, Cincinnati, Ohio. Atwood, C. L, 1992. StatisticalAnaZysis of Radiological Data from WERF Fly Ash, EGG-SR-I0233.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6. REFERENCES 6. REFERENCES American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH), 1991. Guide to Occupational Exposure Values-1991, Cincinnati, Ohio. Atwood, C. L, 1992. StatisticalAnaZysis of Radiological Data from WERF Fly Ash, EGG-SR-I0233. Berry, W. J. and J. L Petty, 1990. Summary of Available Baseline Environmental Information for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EGG-WM-9063, EG&G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. Bowman et aI., 1984. INEL Environmental Characterization Report, EGG-NPR-6688, EG&G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho. DOE (U.S. Department of Energy), 1980. Final Environmental Impact Statement, U.S. Spent Fuel Policy, DOE/EIS-0015, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy, Washington, D.C.

372

Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

924 924 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142257924 Varnish cache server Wind: wind power density maps at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for Central America from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Central America. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Central America GIS maps NREL SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 2.2 MiB) Quality Metrics

373

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildfire Smoke on SIRS Shortwave Wildfire Smoke on SIRS Shortwave and Longwave Irradiance Tom Stoffel, Mary Anderberg, Pamela Gray-Hann National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado Conclusions Cloud Free Over Study Area GOES-E Images 2 January 2006 11:15 CST SIRS Measurements from 24 January 2006 in Agreement Except Upwelling Shortwave Irradiance Due to Surface Albedo Variations * By comparing SIRS measurements from two sites on 2 January 2006 under cloudless sky conditions, one site effected by wildfire smoke, we find the Net Radiation flux was decreased by as much as 40 W/m 2 due to smoke (see chart). * Clear sky Direct Normal Irradiance was reduced by as much as 20%, comparable to effects of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption and 1989 Yellowstone fires on irradiance measurements

374

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_Stoffel.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/SC-ARM/P-05-011 DOE/SC-ARM/P-05-011 2 Outline * Why the need for longwave data restriction? - Important Considerations and the 12 Wm -2 longwave results problem * What ARM data are effected? - List of station-dates * Can the data be adjusted? - Using available 20-sec data samples * How is ARM addressing pyrgeometer calibration? - In Search of a Measurement Reference * References * Acronyms * Appendix - Fundamentals of pyrgeometer operation and calibration 3 Why a Data Access Restriction? The ARM Program's data quality control measures discovered an unexpected shift in the time series of longwave irradiance data following a change in pyrgeometer calibration procedures for field instruments deployed at all SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD installations beginning in August 2002 and completed in March 2004.

375

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARM_pyrgeometer.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-05-111 ARM-05-111 2 Outline * Why the need for longwave data restriction? - Important Considerations and the 12 Wm -2 longwave results problem * What ARM data are effected? - List of station-dates * Can the data be adjusted? - Using available 20-sec data samples * How is ARM addressing pyrgeometer calibration? - In search of a measurement reference * References * Acronyms * Appendix - Fundamentals of pyrgeometer operation and calibration 3 Why a Data Access Restriction? The ARM Program's data quality control measures discovered an unexpected shift in the time series of longwave irradiance data. This followed a change in pyrgeometer calibration procedures for field instruments deployed at all SIRS, SKYRAD, and GNDRAD installations beginning in August 2002 and completed in March 2004.

376

EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Impact Statement Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: Draft Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program, Richland, Washington DOE needs to provide capabilities to continue, or modify, the way it treats, stores, and/or disposes of existing and anticipated quantities of solid LLW, MLLW, TRU waste, and ILAW at the Hanford Site in order to protect human health and the environment; facilitate cleanup at Hanford and other DOE facilities; take actions consistent with decisions reached by DOE under the WM PEIS; comply with local, State, and federal laws and regulations; and meet other obligations such as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (also referred to as the Tri-Party Agreement, or TPA) (Ecology et al. 1989).

377

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS (EMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ENGINEERING (ENG) ENGINEERING (ENG) OBJECTIVE ENG.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. The safety documentation should characterize the hazards/risks associated with the facility and should identify preventive and mitigating measures (systems, procedures, administrative controls, etc.) that protect workers and the public from those hazards/risks. Safety SSCs are defined, and a system to maintain control over their design and is established. (CR-7) Scope: The K Basins SWS activities will be conducted in accordance with the requirements in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, K Basin Final Safety Analysis Report, Revision 6, and SNF-10823, Package Safety Analysis Assessment for Sludge

378

barr(2)-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequency Interactions to Explain Madden Julian Frequency Interactions to Explain Madden Julian Oscillations and Intra Seasonal Oscillations S. A. Barr-Kumarakulasinghe Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Deep convective activity as seen by outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) (< 180 wm -2 ) is shown to occur at 20 to 60 periods in a more coherent manner during the boreal winters of El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) warm events. The coherent pattern is seen in the spectra of the TWP equatorial region closer to the date line. The frequency interaction of gravity waves, emanating from diurnal or 5- to 6-day convective activity is hypothesized to be the cause of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) global wind pressure oscillations. Introduction The MJO is considered to be a global westward propagating

379

Reviews, Tables, and Plots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Review of Particle Physics 6 Review of Particle Physics Please use this CITATION: W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex) Standalone figures are available for these reviews. Complete list of Reviews in the Particle Listings. Categories: * Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear Properties * Standard Model and Related Topics * Particle Properties * Hypothetical Particles * Astrophysics and Cosmology * Experimental Methods and Colliders * Mathematical Tools * Kinematics, Cross-Section Formulae, and Plots * Authors, Introductory Text, History plots PostScript help file PDF help file Constants, Units, Atomic and Nuclear Properties Physical constants (Rev.) PS PDF (1 page) Astrophysical constants and parameters (Rev.) PS PDF (2 pages) International System of units (SI) PS PDF (2 pages)

380

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination Of Nitrogen Compounds In Atmospheric Air Determination Of Nitrogen Compounds In Atmospheric Air and Aerosol Samples During The First Zvenigorod Winter Cloudiness-Aerosol-Radiation Experiment L. M. Shukhurova, A. S. Elokhov, D. I. Olshansky, A. N. Gruzdev, and G. S. Golitsyn Institute of Atmospheric Physics Russian Academy of Sciences Moscow, Russia Introduction Minor nitrogen constituents are chemically active and therefore can indirectly affect atmospheric radiation processes via influence on ozone content and formation of tropospheric aerosols and clouds (Laaksonen et al. 1997; Makar et al. 1998, Brasseur et al. 1999). Furthermore, large NO 2 contents in the lower troposphere observed during thunderstorms or pollution episodes can result in noticeable absorption of downwelling radiation corresponding to estimated local radiative forcing up to 20 W/m

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

ARM - Field Campaign - IPASRC II Campaign  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsIPASRC II Campaign govCampaignsIPASRC II Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IPASRC II Campaign 2001.03.05 - 2001.03.16 Lead Scientist : Rune Storvold Data Availability All IPASRC II related data will be collected from the different principal investigators at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks, Geophysical Institute. For further information, contact Chris Marty, (907) 474-7360, or Rune Storvold, (907) 474-6639. For data sets, see below. Summary The second IPASRC II was successfully carried out at the NSA-CART site at Barrow from March 5 to March 15, 2001. During most of the time, great weather and clear skies provided measurements of longwave downward irradiances between 130 and 170 Wm-2 and air temperatures between -25 and -35 degrees Celsius. All pyrgeometers were

382

ARM - VAP Product - surfspecalb1mlawer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productssurfspecalbsurfspecalb1mlawer Productssurfspecalbsurfspecalb1mlawer Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1095394 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP Output : SURFSPECALB1MLAWER Surface Spectral Albedo Active Dates 1998.04.07 - 2013.11.04 Originating VAP Process Surface Spectral Albedo : SURFSPECALB Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Best estimate Best measured hemispheric broadband irradiance from mfrsrC1 W/m^2 be_hemisp_broadband_mfrsr ( time )

383

EIS-0200: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

00: Record of Decision 00: Record of Decision EIS-0200: Record of Decision Treatment and Disposal of Low-Level Waste and Mixed Low-Level Waste; Amendment of the Record of Decision for the Nevada Test Site For the management of low- level waste (LLW) analyzed in the Final Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS), the Department of Energy (DOE) has decided to perform minimum treatment at all sites and continue, to the extent practicable, disposal of on- site LLW at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico, the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. In addition, the Department has decided to make the Hanford Site

384

EIS-0286: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0286: Final Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program The Hanford Site Solid (Radioactive and Hazardous) Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement (HSW EIS) provides environmental and technical information concerning U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed waste management practices at the Hanford Site. The HSW EIS updates analyses of environmental consequences from previous documents and provides evaluations for activities that may be implemented consistent with the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS) Records of Decision (RODs). EIS-0286-FEIS-01-2004.pdf EIS-0286-FEIS-02-2004.pdf EIS-0286-FEIS-03-2004.pdf EIS-0286-FEIS-FiguresTables-2004.pdf

385

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001 - 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) 2001 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information, such as global PSP (W/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion of the available data: from August 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011. A separate dataset is available for the period between September 23, 1996 and August 23, 2001.The NWTC website provides up to the day updates to this data, from as early as August 24, 2001 through yesterday, as well as instrument specifications.

386

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Illinois | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 21, 2010 April 21, 2010 CX-001779: Categorical Exclusion Determination Illinois-City-Joliet CX(s) Applied: B1.32, B3.6, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Joliet, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 21, 2010 CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Milam Landfill, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 20, 2010 CX-001913: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wind Power Project - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/20/2010 Location(s): Peru, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 20, 2010 CX-001909: Categorical Exclusion Determination

387

Heat flow in the northern Basin and Range province | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the northern Basin and Range province in the northern Basin and Range province Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Heat flow in the northern Basin and Range province Abstract The heat flow in the Basin and Range province of northern Nevada is extremely complex. It is a product of superposition of the regional effects of extension and volcanism /intrusion modified by the local conductive effects of thermal refraction (complicated structural settings),variations in radioactive heat production, erosion and sedimentation. In addition to these conductive effects,groundwater flow, both on a local and a regional basis,affects heat-flow measurements. Typical heat -flow values for the Basin and Range province average 85 +/- 10 mWm-2. The higher estimates are

388

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers By Ibrahim Reda, Julian Gröbner * , Tom Stoffel, Daryl Myers, and Bruce Forgan ** Eighteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Science Team Meeting *Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) ** Bureau of Meteorology, Australia Abstract Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance through out the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m 2 . In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our

389

Microsoft Word - Riverbend BAASA.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2010 , 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Russell Paulsrude Public Utilities Specialist - TSES-TPP-2 Proposed Action: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and WM Renewable Energy, LLC (WRE) are entering into a Balancing Authority Area Service Agreement (BAASA). WRE's Riverbend Landfill Generation Project will be dynamically scheduled to Seattle City Light's Balancing Authority (BAA) but interconnected to BPA's BAA. BPA will install metering equipement at BPA's McMinnville 115-kV Substation. Budget Information: Work Order 00004866 and Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.1 Establishment and implementation of contracts, marketing plans, policies, allocation plans, or acquisition of

390

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 4, 2010 August 4, 2010 CX-003201: Categorical Exclusion Determination Baseload Nitrate Salt Central Receiver Power Plant Design CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 08/04/2010 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 30, 2010 CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management July 30, 2010 CX-003331: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects on Slick Rock Lease Tract C-SR-II, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): San Miguel County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management July 30, 2010 CX-003333: Categorical Exclusion Determination

391

DOE/ID-Number FCRD-USED-2011-000184  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Preliminary Report on Preliminary Report on Dual-Purpose Canister Disposal Alternatives (FY13) Prepared for : U.S. Department of Energy Office of Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition E.L. Hardin and D.J. Clayton, Sandia National Laboratories R.L. Howard, J.M. Scaglione, E. Pierce and K. Banerjee, Oak Ridge National Laboratory M.D. Voegele, Complex Systems Group, LLC H.R. Greenberg, J. Wen and T.A. Buscheck, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory J.T. Carter and T. Severynse, Savannah River National Laboratory W.M. Nutt, Argonne National Laboratory December, 2013 FCRD-UFD-2013-000171 Rev. 1 Preliminary Report on Dual-Purpose Canister Disposal Alternatives (FY13) November, 2013 ii Revision History Revision Description FCRD-UFD-2013-000171 Rev. 0 Initial issue, assigned Sandia number SAND2013-7251P.

392

charlock-98.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Computed and Measured Cloudy-Sky Comparison of Computed and Measured Cloudy-Sky Shortwave (SW) in the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) T. P. Charlock NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia F. G. Rose and T. L. Alberta Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia G. D. Considine NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction Discrepancies between computed and measured shortwave (SW) are shown for full-sky and clear-sky conditions. We then focus on a single case (1749 UTC, October 31, 1995) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) wherein the cloudy sky appears to absorb ~100 W/m 2 more SW than is computed with theory. The discrepancy in this case is much larger than was commonly found for April 1994 or Fall 1995. For this case, we test various batteries of inputs for

393

Section 85  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i i ' -ln I i I 0 i *µ%c i µ, c i Wm &2 c i NO 2 O 3 NO 2 c i c i NO 2 Session Papers 379 (1) Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth, Aerosol Size Distribution Parameters, Ozone and Nitrogen Dioxide Column Amounts from Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data M. Alexandrov, A. A. Lacis, B. E. Carlson and B. Cairns National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction The MultiFilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) (Harrison and Michalsky 1994a, 1994b) measures atmospheric column extinction of the direct solar beam and the diffuse radiation intensity at six wavelengths. Located at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City, the instrument has six spectral channels at 415, 501, 616, 672, 870, and 940

394

Central America | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central America Central America Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Central America. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated October 30th, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords Central America GIS maps NREL SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 2.2 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2004 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

395

Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7018 7018 Varnish cache server Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution for Ghana from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS data, exported as BIL file, 50 m wind power density for Ghana. Note: BIL files can be converted to raster data in ArcInfo using the IMAGEGRID command. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in Ghana. Values range from 0 to 620 meters. (Supplemental Information):***** Spatial Reference Information (Beg) *****Projection ParametersCoordinate System:Projection Transverse MercatorZunits W/m2Units MetersSpheroid: WGS84ParametersScale factor at central meridian: 1.0000Longitude of central meridian: -1 0 0.0Latitude of origin: 8 0 0.0False easting: 0False northing: 0Spatial InformationRaster:Number of Columns:

396

X:\ARM_19~1\P245-258.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.5 .5 S latitude, 152 E longitude). 4.7Wm 2 sr 1 Session Papers 245 The Optical Properties of Equatorial Cirrus in the Pilot Radiation Observation Experiment C. M. R. Platt, S. A. Young, P. Manson, G. R. Patterson, and S. Marsden CSIRO, Division of Atmospheric Research Aspendale, Victoria, Australia Introduction The development of a sensitive filter radiometer for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has been reported by Platt et al. (1994, 1995). The aim was to develop a reliable and fast instrument that could be used alongside a lidar to obtain near realtime optical properties of clouds, particularly high ice clouds, as they drifted over an ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site allowing calculation of the radiation divergence in the atmosphere over the site. Obtaining cloud optical

397

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generic Deep Geologic Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign G. Freeze, M. Voegele, P. Vaughn, J. Prouty, W.M. Nutt, E. Hardin, S.D. Sevougian Sandia National Laboratories Argonne National Laboratory August 2013 Revision 1 FCRD-UFD-2012-000146 SAND2013-0974P Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

398

Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Minimization Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Mission The team supports efforts that promote a more sustainable environment and implements pollution prevention activities in accordance with Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and EO 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, as approved by LM. The WM/P2 Team advocates environmentally sound waste minimization and pollution prevention practices. Scope Inventory the waste stream. Prevent or reduce pollution and waste at their source. Recycle. Use recycled-content products. Use less toxic or nontoxic products. Key Expectations Monitor and track progress on metrics. Maintain/implement a plan that integrates waste minimization and

399

; United States Government  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Don F 1328.8 Don F 1328.8 . . .449J ' Em wm ; United States Government , % - memorandum L c*m Al.)G 2 9 a34 yz;; EM-421 (If. A. Willlams, 427-1719) lq,iMAL Department of Energy m5 MA, \i& SUBJECT: Elimination of the Sites from the Formerly Utllized Sites Remedial A&Ion Prograa ' a The File In 1990, with the assistance of Hr. Doug Tonkay and Ms. Htchelle L&is, I reviewed a number of sites that had fomerly provided goods and/or services to the Fernald faclllty as subcontractors. For 24 of.these sites, recoarwndations were ude to eliainate thm from further consideratton under Formerly Utilized Sites Reaedial Actlon Progrm (FUSRAP). In each case, I made or revlewed the evaluation, and, in each case, a handwritten evaluation was prepared. This is to provide a more

400

Microsoft Word - 12361  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado Appendix F, Page 1 WM2012 Conference, February 26 - March 1, 2012, Phoenix, Arizona, USA 1 Solar-Powered Air Stripping at the Rocky Flats Site, Colorado - 12361 John A. Boylan* *S.M. Stoller Corporation, Rocky Flats Site, 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, Colorado 80021 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Site (the Site), near Denver, Colorado, is a former nuclear weapons facility that was constructed beginning in 1951. With the end of the Cold War, the Site was cleaned up and closed in 2005. Four gravity-driven groundwater treatment systems were installed during cleanup, and their continued operation was incorporated into the final remedy for the Site. All utilities, including electrical power, were removed as part of this closure,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

HEl'lORANDUtl TO: FILE DATE& ALTERNATE Ya NAnE~---  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

^I ,, ".. , ,' a . . _- HEl'lORANDUtl TO: FILE DATE& ALTERNATE Ya NAnE~--- Owner ccntacted TYPE OF OPERATION ----------_--____ 0 Research 81 Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 81 Analysis -'* x Production 0 Disposal/Storage Ivp_E~EJx!!IEecI 0 Prim0 0 Subcontract& )rq Purchase Oider J4 .~ Facility Type M Manuiacturi 0 University 0 Research Or 0 Government 0 Other ----- cl Other informat + fixed fer, u f b%wm!s 6, -_---_-------- co --------- Q anitation ponsored Facility -------_---_--_ on (i.e., cost it price, . et=) __---__ -----__---__ CONTRACTING PERIOD: ----------------_- --dLzk~ --------------------------- OWNERSHIP: AEC/r.?XD FIECfMED GCSJT GOVT CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR

402

PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old 2 ':  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old 2 ': PRODUCTIOR"OF TRORI~JW~IETALIWES PROCESS F6R RB)IJCIRO T&Old 2 ': am wm ..,. :I.::. ? ; \: :.:, .,, : ,. / 1. ..ri:,:,.:, :/ I 8yblBOLa PPaJPT i: >. ,,;.;~:,,; ,;.. !,., ,ip; ,,,:. ;., -. , ^ , . . 3 '>) ! .,:<;:,,..,. ; : :..,, ,,.+ -../ ,:,; I,:;?: ..: : ,, ,,: ; !. (' '; ::, Durine,~~~v%eit'to Amae &8Htate~Coliegd on Mar6h 4 and 2 to dl&ni& prinalpally~~asl~~prd~ess~~~1 also r&&&d wltlvDii 8. Wilhelm and Dr. D. Peterson of An~?e Iowa State College their ?xperimantal work on%hC14yt~ep,yp6n,,~ 'iti eotl,m ~th.~gxtssiun t6 tborlum metal.- ;:'..?a: :. ( : ; ;2,& : '. .' ; '; :: !,%. :: '.. , 2. * BumDary. y2, ,, vii,:;,. ,:,, r: '.,;.','. ,;I ,' .,._..I :, . .._., 7::: 1 ::.! "j:. *.,,: ,,,, ::':?;.: :,,;,

403

ARM - Datastreams - rad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsrad Datastreamsrad Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RAD Radiation measurements at AMF/Niamey, Niger/S1 Active Dates 2006.01.13 - 2008.12.13 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Radiation Measurements at AMF (RAD) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance Downwelling Longwave Hemispheric Irradiance, Pyrgeometer W/m^2 down_long_hemisp ( time ) Downwelling Pyrgeometer Case Thermistor Resistance Kohms down_long_hemisp_case_resist ( time )

404

Wind Resources in Alaska | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources in Alaska Resources in Alaska Dataset Summary Description Wind resource data for Alaska and southeast Alaska, both high resolution wind resource maps and gridded wind parameters. The two high resolution wind maps are comprised of a grid of cells each containing a single value of average wind speed (m/s) at a hub height of 30, 50, 70, and 100 meters and wind power density (W/m^2) at a hub height of 50 meters for a 40,000 square meter area. The additional gridded wind parameter data includes data for points spaced 2 kilometers apart, and include: predicted wind speed frequency distribution as well as speed and energy in 16 directions (the information needed to produce a wind rose image at a given point). Data included here as .kml files (for viewing in Google Earth). GIS shape files available for the gridded wind parameters datasets from AEDI (http://akenergyinventory.org/data.shtml).

405

Microsoft Word - 12189a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LM activities LM activities consist of records management and stakeholder support. At other sites, some residual contamination may remain after remediation and some land uses must be restricted. In these instances, DOE will conduct more "active" LTS&M activities, such as managing institutional controls and performing site inspections or environmental monitoring, to allow the highest beneficial land use while ensuring protectiveness. WM2012 Conference, February 26 - March 1, 2012, Phoenix, Arizona, USA 2 Figure 1. FUSRAP sites. FUSRAP HISTORY Legacy Activities: 1942-1973 In August 1942, the U.S. Army directed MED to manage the development of the technology and production facilities for the first atomic weapons. In August 1946, President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act [1],

406

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Aerosol Indirect Effect During the the Aerosol Indirect Effect During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's March 2003 Aerosol Intensive Operational Period at the Southern Great Plains: Sensitivity Tests H. Guo and JE Penner Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Clouds and their related physical processes present perhaps the most complicated and perplexing problems in the study of climate change and weather forecasting (Stephens 2005). One important cloud- related process is the aerosol-cloud-radiation interaction, or the so-called aerosol indirect effect (AIE). The AIE is estimated to vary from 0.0 to -4.8 W/m 2 in state-of-the-art global climate models (Penner et al. 2001). The uncertainty in this estimation has stimulated substantial research in recent years. Most

407

Definition: Irradiance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Irradiance Irradiance Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Irradiance The direct, diffuse, and reflected solar radiation that strikes a surface. Usually expressed in kilowatts per square meter. Irradiance multiplied by time equals insolation.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Irradiance is the power of electromagnetic radiation per unit area incident on a surface. Radiant emittance or radiant exitance is the power per unit area radiated by a surface. The SI units for all of these quantities are watts per square meter (W/m), while the cgs units are ergs per square centimeter per second (erg·cm·s, often used in astronomy). These quantities are sometimes called intensity, but this usage leads to confusion with radiant intensity, which has different units. All of these

408

Wind: wind power density maps at 50 m above ground and 400m resolution for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

400m resolution for 400m resolution for Sri Lanka from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Sri Lanka (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka, with supplemental information on political boundaries, transmission lines, roads, and terrain relief. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS maps NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 799.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

409

CX-002682: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2682: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2682: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002682: Categorical Exclusion Determination Landfill Gas Utilization Project CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 06/08/2010 Location(s): Madison County, New York Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The County of Madison, New York proposes to use Department of Energy funding to offset costs associated with all phases of a recently completed landfill gas (LFG) conservation and renewable energy pilot project which converts readily available landfill gas to electricity at the WM Renewable Energy LLC (WMRE) facility in Madison, New York. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-002682.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001900: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002822: Categorical Exclusion Determination

410

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

411

Microsoft Word - 12189a.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LMactivities LMactivities consist of records management and stakeholder support. At other sites, some residual contamination may remain after remediation and some land uses must be restricted. In these instances, DOE will conduct more "active" LTS&M activities, such as managing institutional controls and performing site inspections or environmental monitoring, to allow the highest beneficial land use while ensuring protectiveness. WM2012 Conference, February 26 - March 1, 2012, Phoenix, Arizona, USA 2 Figure 1. FUSRAP sites. FUSRAP HISTORY Legacy Activities: 1942-1973 In August 1942, the U.S. Army directed MED to manage the development of the technology and production facilities for the first atomic weapons. In August 1946, President Truman signed the Atomic Energy Act [1],

412

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Investigation of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of the impact of aerosols on clouds during the 2003 Aerosol Investigation of the impact of aerosols on clouds during the 2003 Aerosol IOP at the SGP Guo, Huan University of Michigan Aerosol-cloud interaction, that is, the aerosol indirect effect (AIE), is one of the largest uncertainties in the estimation of the aerosol radiative forcing. IPCC (2001) estimated the aerosol forcing ranging from 0 to -4.8W/m^2. So it is very important to investigate and understand the impact of the aerosol on the cloud optical, microphysical and macrophysical properties. The Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM) is used as a cloud resolving model to examine the effect of aerosols on clouds. In the simulation of the Second Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2), ATHAM was generally able to reproduce the observed cloud

413

Research Highlight  

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Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR Wm-2) signals in the tropics averaged between 10°S and 10°N from (a) a regional simulation with moisture constrained by observations and (b) NOAA-CPC satellite observations. The lines mark the eastward MJO propagation speed of 4 m/s. The constrained model is able to reproduce the key OLR features in the observations. Originating over the Indian Ocean, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an equatorial planetary-scale envelope of complex multi-scale cloud systems

414

PowerPoint Presentation  

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c Improvements in the Blackbody Calibration of Pyrgeometers Ibrahim Reda 1 Julian Gröbner 2 Tom Stoffel 1 Daryl Myers 1 Bruce Forgan 3 1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2. Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center (PMOD/WRC) 3. Bureau of Meteorology, Australia Abstract Pyrgeometers are used to measure the atmospheric longwave irradiance through out the ARM program sites. Previous calibrations of pyrgeometers using ARM/Eppley/NREL blackbody were consistent, but introduced a difference in the historical clear sky measured irradiance. This difference was believed to be in the order of 12 W/m 2 . In this poster we show the improvements to the blackbody and calibration methodology by comparing our results to the

415

I  

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Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Highly Insulating Glazing Systems using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers Dariush Arasteh, Howdy Goudey, and Christian Kohler Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory ABSTRACT Three layer insulating glass units with two low-e coatings and an effective gas fill are known to be highly insulating, with center-of-glass U-factors as low as 0.57 W/m 2 -K (0.10 Btu/h-ft 2 -°F). Such units have historically been built with center layers of glass or plastic which extend all the way through the spacer system. This paper shows that triple glazing systems with non-structural center layers which do not create a hermetic seal at the edge have the potential to be as thermally efficient as standard designs, while potentially removing some of the production and product integration issues that have

416

National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office  

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DCARTER at 3:47 pm, Jan 11, 2008 DCARTER at 3:47 pm, Jan 11, 2008 c Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office P. 0. Box 30030 Amarillo, TX 791 20 MhdWswQAtwbWM JAN 3 2008 MEMORANDUM FOR: Dennis Huddleston, EP&O, B&W Pantex LLC FROM: & Site Engineering Programs SUBJECT: Interagency Agreement (LQG) for the Pantex Superfund Site (Pantex or Pantex Site) Please reference the attached Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) letter dated December 1 1,2007, subject as above. Subject letter was informally transmitted to B&W Pantex's Regulatory Compliance Department on December 19,2007, to expedite any subsequent requirements by the Pantex Site. The enclosed IAG identifies specific review and response times for each of the participating agencies

417

Notices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Register Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 5 / Friday, January 8, 2010 / Notices Dated: January 5, 2010. Daniel T. Madzelan, Director, Forecasting and Policy Analysis. [FR Doc. 2010-137 Filed 1-7-10; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 4000-01-P DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice of Public Hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, WA AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of Public Hearings. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) announces the public hearings on the Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (DOE/EIS-0391) (Draft TC&WM EIS or Draft EIS). This Draft EIS was prepared in accordance with the implementing regulations

418

EIS-0200-SA-01: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-SA-01: Supplement Analysis -SA-01: Supplement Analysis EIS-0200-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) DOE is proposing to revise the "where to prepare" decision that was based on the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement, DOE/EIS-0200-F, May 1997 (WM PEIS). The proposed change, as described more fully below, is to create a centralized capability at WIPP that would be used to characterize annually up to 1,250 cubic meters of DOE's contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste out of about 7,000 cubic meters expected to be received annually for disposal at WIPP. DOE/EIS-0200, Supplement Analysis and Determination for the Proposed Characterization for Disposal of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste at the

419

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 22760 of 28,905 results. 51 - 22760 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination Drill One Exploratory Hole On Lease Tract C-WM-17 by Golden Eagle Uranium CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002692-categorical-exclusion-determination Article Powerpedia Turns Two The Energy Department, inspired by the idea of creating a centralized hub for collaboration and information, launched its own internal wiki - Powerpedia - two years ago today. http://energy.gov/cio/articles/powerpedia-turns-two Article Help Build a Better Energy Information Administration Website The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is launching a beta website that encourages the public, researchers, analysts and others to

420

SAFARI 2000 Special Issue  

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INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19) INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19) OCTOBER 10, 2005 Privette JL, Roy DP. Southern Africa as a remote sensing test bed: the SAFARI 2000 Special Issue overview. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19): 4141-4158. Eckardt FD, Kuring N. SeaWiFS identifies dust sources in the Namib Desert. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19): 4159-4167. Hao WM, Ward DE, Susott RA, et al. Comparison of aerosol optical thickness measurements by MODIS, AERONET sun photometers, and Forest Service handheld sun photometers in southern Africa during the SAFARI 2000 campaign. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING 26 (19): 4169-4183. Sa ACL, Pereira JMC, Silva JMN. Estimation of combustion completeness based on fire-induced spectral reflectance changes in a dambo grassland (Western Province, Zambia).

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421

Sri Lanka | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sri Lanka Sri Lanka Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Sri Lanka (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka, with supplemental information on political boundaries, transmission lines, roads, and terrain relief. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS maps NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 799.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

422

maps | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

maps maps Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Sri Lanka (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential within Sri Lanka, with supplemental information on political boundaries, transmission lines, roads, and terrain relief. Source NREL Date Released June 30th, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated November 01st, 2007 (7 years ago) Keywords GEF GIS maps NREL Sri Lanka SWERA UNEP wind Data application/zip icon Download Maps (zip, 799.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

423

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Second ARM Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance Comparison Fall 2003 The Second ARM Diffuse Horizontal Irradiance Comparison Fall 2003 Michalsky, J.J.(a), Dolce, R.(b), Dutton, E.G.(c), Long, C.N.(d), Jeffries, W.Q.(e), McArthur, L.J.B.(f), Philipona, R.(g), Reda, I.(h), and Stoffel, T.L.(h), State University of New York at Albany (a), Kipp & Zonen, Inc. (b), Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory, NOAA (c), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (d), Yankee Environmental Systems, Inc. (e), Meteorological Service of Canada (f), World Radiation Center (g), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (h) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The first diffuse horizontal irradiance comparison in the Fall 2001 revealed a consistency near the 2 W/m2 level among more than half of the pyranometers that participated. In planning for this second comparison the

424

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

/I // /s 3 /I // /s 3 ------------------- FROM: D. I&+ ---------------- SUBJECT: 5;le r 3-&-F.. SITE /+yNJs l3 ALTERNATE NAME: -w---- -SF ------------------------------ NAME: CITY: c ;A< ;,+,ZJ+ ------------,-L-----,,,,,, STATE: OH --w-w- OWNER(S) -w---s-- past: /" ' A--F5 ---w-m- -e----v-------- Current: 0~. A-+A.~~ -------------------------- Owner contacted 0 yes 0 no; if yes, date contacted ------------- TYPE OF OPERATION -------e--------w 0 Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample 84 Analysis x Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- B Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT

425

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Absorption of NIR Solar Radiation by Precipitation The Absorption of NIR Solar Radiation by Precipitation Evans, W.F.J.(a) and Puckrin, E.(b), Physics Department, Trent University (a), DRDC,Canada (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting It has recently been shown by Ackerman (Physics Today; 2003) that good radiation codes can model the absorption of up to 100 W/m2 of short wave by clouds. However, spectral measurements of the transmission of solar infrared radiation through clear and cloudy skies with FTIR spectroscopy have indicated that still are certain clouds which absorb unexpectedly large amounts of near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The amounts are unexpected in the sense that radiation codes, including sophisticated algorithms such as MODTRAN4, do not model this strong NIR absorption effect. The absorption

426

File:Central America 50m Wind Power.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

America 50m Wind Power.pdf America 50m Wind Power.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Central America - 50m Wind Power Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 1.54 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Title Central America - 50m Wind Power Description Central America - 50m Wind Power Sources NREL Related Technologies Wind Creation Date 2004/10/22 Extent International Countries Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua UN Region Central America Coordinates 13.846614265322°, -85.703613460064° 50 m wind power density (W/m2) maps of Central America provide information on the wind resource potential within the following countries in Central America: Belize, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua.

427

Definition: Power density | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

density density Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Power density The rate of energy flow (power) per unit volume, area or mass. Common metrics include: horsepower per cubic inch, watts per square meter and watts per kilogram.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Power density (or volume power density or volume specific power) is the amount of power (time rate of energy transfer) per unit volume. In energy transformers like batteries, fuel cells, motors, etc. but also power supply units or similar, power density refers to a volume. It is then also called volume power density which is expressed as W/m. Volume power density is sometimes an important consideration where space is constrained. In reciprocated internal combustion engines, power density- power per swept

428

ARM - VAP Product - 30baebbr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Productsbaebbr30baebbr Productsbaebbr30baebbr Documentation Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) Citation DOI: 10.5439/1027268 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Example 30baebbr Data Plot Example 30baebbr data plot VAP Output : 30BAEBBR EBBR: bulk aerodynamic estimates of sensible & latent heat fluxes, 30-min Active Dates 1993.07.04 - 2013.12.31 Originating VAP Process Best-Estimate Fluxes From EBBR Measurements and Bulk Aerodynamics Calculations : BAEBBR Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Aerodynamic latent heat flux W/m^2 aerodynamic_latent_heat_flux ( time )

429

Astronomers capture first images of newly-discovered solar system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Imaging of Multiple Planets Orbiting the Star HR 8799, Science Express Nov. 13, 2008 Direct Imaging of Multiple Planets Orbiting the Star HR 8799, Science Express Nov. 13, 2008 Extending the search for extrasolar planets Science & Technology Review, March/April 2008 (PDF) International team discovers new solar system with scaled-down version of Jupiter and Saturn, LLNL news release, Feb. 14, 2008 Adaptive optics provide a clearer view, Science & Technology Review, June 2006 Adaptive optics leads the way to supermassive black holes, LLNL news release, May 17, 2007 Lab optics will clear the way to search for giant planets, LLNL news release, Sept. 23, 2005 W.M. Keck Observatory Gemini Observatory Gemini Planet Imager Lowell Observatory Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics Ben Zuckerman-UCLA Social Media Logos Follow LLNL on YouTube Subscribe to LLNL's RSS feed Follow LLNL on Facebook Follow LLNL on Twitter Follow LLNL on Flickr

430

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploration of Statistical Angular Radiance Closure in Cloudy Skies Exploration of Statistical Angular Radiance Closure in Cloudy Skies Evans, K.F.(a) and Wiscombe, W.J.(b), University of Colorado (a), NASA/Goddard (b) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Most ARM cloudy sky radiation closure experiments have been performed with broadband fluxes. However, it is difficult to understand the causes of the inevitable discrepencies between the modeled and observed broadband fluxes in those closure experiments because the fluxes are extensively integrated over angle and wavelength. For example, knowing that a particular comparison disagrees by 50 W/m^2 is not particularly helpful in discovering which aspects of cloud remote sensing, radiative transfer, or measurements might be in error. Angular radiance closure compares the measured and

431

Microsoft Word - Haeffelin-MP.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Measurements of the Diffuse and Global Solar Improved Measurements of the Diffuse and Global Solar Irradiances at the Surface of the Earth M. P. Haeffelin and B. C. Dominguez Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University Blacksburg, Virginia K. Rutledge Analytical Services and Materials Hampton, Virginia S. Kato Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction In recent years, studies have shown significant discrepancies between irradiances measured by pyranometers and those computed using atmospheric radiative transfer models (Kato et al. 1997 and Kato et al. 1999). Questions have been raised about the uncertainty in pyranometer measurements because observed diffuse irradiances sometimes are below pure molecular atmosphere values and because the instruments often produce non-zero signals at nights ranging between -5 and -10 W/m

432

EIS-0200: Revision to the Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Energy (DOE) is revising the Record of Decision (ROD) for of Energy (DOE) is revising the Record of Decision (ROD) for its Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic Waste prepared pursuant to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS, DOE/EIS-0200-F, May 1997). This present revision, based on consideration of new information, confirms DOE's September 6, 2002, decision to ship its transuranic (TRU) waste from the Battelle West Jefferson North Site (West Jefferson Site) in Columbus, Ohio, to the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington, for storage, processing, and certification, pending disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. DOE/EIS-0200, Revision to the Record of Decision for the Department of Energy's Waste Management Program: Treatment and Storage of Transuranic

433

ARM - Datastreams - sebs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamssebs Datastreamssebs Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025274 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : SEBS Surface Energy Balance System Active Dates 2010.10.01 - 2014.01.03 Measurement Categories Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Albedo fraction albedo ( time ) Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Battery voltage V battery_voltage ( time ) Soil heat flow 1, corrected for soil moisture W/m^2 corr_soil_heat_flow_1 ( time )

434

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Flux Closure Experiments at Nauru Shortwave Flux Closure Experiments at Nauru S. A. McFarlane and K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. J. Mlawer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts E. E. Clothiaux The Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania Introduction The absorption and distribution of shortwave radiation in the atmosphere is one of the main drivers of the climate system. Through extensive satellite studies the Earth radiation budget has been well characterized and general circulation model (GCM) simulations of top of the atmosphere fluxes generally agree well with observations (Li et al. 1997). However, measurements and model estimates of the amount of shortwave radiation absorbed in the atmosphere differ by up to 30 W/m

435

X:\ARM_19~1\P283-315.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 10 W m 2 ±5% ±20 W m 2 . 5 10Wm 2 Session Papers 301 Aspects of the Quality of Data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) Site Broadband Radiation Sensors M. E. Splitt University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma M. L. Wesely Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois A systematic evaluation of the performance of broadband In this paper, suggested uncertainty values correspond to radiometers at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site is needed to estimate the uncertainties of the irradiance observations. Here, net radiation observed with the net radiometer in the energy balance Bowen ratio (EBBR) station at the central facility is compared with the net radiation computed as the sum of component irradiances recorded by nearby pyranometers

436

I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

z z 0 * I - - n a 00 \o OI 7 W I I - - t ; a Y I n 0 7 W z + = . 4 Z FIRST WEEK - SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITIES AND LINACS Chairman: H.A. SCHWETTMAN, Stanford University The Summer Study began with a week on applications of superconducting surfaces a t radio frequencies. Under the able leadership of Alan Schwettman, an easy and informal atmosphere was rapidly achieved and soon a free and vigorous interchange of informa- tion was in progress between exponents of various techniques and representatives of the manufacturers whose technology will be essential t o progress i n this field. The session was dominated by the energetic Stanford group who continually amazed the audience with the scope and daring of their plans. Chairman H. Alan Schwettman with W.M. Fairbank and E. Jones, all of Stanford. G.A. Loew and R.B. Neal of SLAC. In the background is H.J. Halama of Brookhaven.

437

NREL: PVWatts - How to Change Parameters  

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Change Parameters Change Parameters The PVWattsTM calculator allows users to substitute its default input parameters with custom values. Learn how to change the PVWatts parameters for: DC rating DC-to-AC derate factor Array type Tilt angle Azimuth angle Electricity cost DC Rating The size of a photovoltaic (PV) system is its nameplate DC power rating. This is determined by adding the PV module power listed on the nameplates of the PV modules in watts and then dividing the sum by 1,000 to convert it to kilowatts (kW). PV module power ratings are for standard test conditions (STC) of 1,000 W/m2 solar irradiance and 25°C PV module temperature. The default PV system size is 4 kW. This corresponds to a PV array area of approximately 35 m2 (377 ft2). Caution: For correct results, the DC rating input must be the nameplate DC

438

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B5.1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-001882: Categorical Exclusion Determination Columbus City American Recovery and Reinvestment Act - Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (S) Act 5-Business Energy Efficiency Revolving Loan Program CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Columbus, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 21, 2010 CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Milam Landfill, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 21, 2010 CX-001876: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (S) CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

439

CX-000604: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

604: Categorical Exclusion Determination 604: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000604: Categorical Exclusion Determination Riverbend Balancing Authority Area Service Agreement (BAASA) CX(s) Applied: B4.1, B4.6 Date: 02/01/2010 Location(s): Yamhill, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and WM Renewable Energy, LLC (WRE) are intering into a Balancing Authority Area Service Agreement. WRE's Riverbend Landfill Generation Project will be dynamically scheduled to Seattle City Light's Balancing Authority (BAA) but interconnected to BPA's BAA. BPA will install metering equipment at BPA's McMinnville 115-kilovolt Substation. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000604.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-008702: Categorical Exclusion Determination

440

Microsoft Word - CX-Bell-Boundary_Well_FY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2011 4, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-AMPN-2 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Mari Rosales Realty Specialist - TERR-Bell-1 Proposed Action: Decommission ground water monitoring well located on Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) fee-owned property. PP&A Project No.: 2163 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B3.1 Site characterization and environmental monitoring Location: Section 27; Township 40N; Range 43E; WM; Pend Oreille, WA Proposed by: BPA Description of the Proposed Action: BPA proposes to allow Seattle City Light access to a BPA fee-owned right-of-way (ROW) for the purpose of decommissioning a Seattle City Light- owned well. Seattle City Light historically installed ground water monitoring wells as part of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

26-10 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist Project/Activity: Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing Program A. BriefProject/Activity Description The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes several minor reclamation activities related to abandoned mines and mine features that pose a public safety concern. In 2007, LM inherited abandoned mines as a result of re-aligning lease tract boundaries.1pdependent contractors associated with the lessee (Golden Eagle Uranium) and under the supervision of uranium leasing program personnel would complete the work, and all projects would be completed within approximately 2 days. The Wedding Bell Mountain Lease

442

Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cuba from NREL Cuba from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS data, exported as BIL file, 50 m wind power density for Cuba. Note: BIL files can be converted to raster data in ArcInfo using the IMAGEGRID command. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in Cuba. Values range from 0 to 547. (Supplemental Information): ***** Spatial Reference Information (Beg) *****Projection ParametersCoordinate System:Projection CylindricalZunits W/m2Units MetersSpheroid: SphereParametersProjection Type 1Longitude of central meridian: -79 32 40.2Latitude of standard parallel: 21 33 21.6Spatial InformationRaster:Number of Columns: 1360Number of Rows: 628Pixel Resolution (m): 1000Data Type: integer***** Spatial Reference Information (End) *****

443

Argonne Physics Division - Theory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seminars held in the year 2008-2009 Seminars held in the year 2008-2009 Click on a title to read an abstract, if available (underlined). 23 July 2009 Ulrich Mosel University of Giessen Ulrich.Mosel@theo.physik.uni-giessen.de Hadrons in Medium 4 June 2009 Arnoldas Deltuva University of Lisbon deltuva@cii.fc.ul.pt Three- and four-body nuclear reactions 2 June 2009 Special Day: Tuesday Yasuyuki Suzuki Niigata University suzuki@nt.sc.niigata-u.ac.jp Phase-shift calculation using continuum-discretized states 13 May 2009 Special Day: Wednesday William Detmold College of William & Mary and Jefferson Lab wdetmold@wm.edu Many-body lattice QCD 23 April 2009 Shalom Shlomo Cyclotron Institut Texas A&M University, College Station shlomo@comp.tamu.edu Modern energy density functional for nuclei and the nuclear matter Equation of State

444

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on the order of 1.5 W/m 2 AERI - (Pre-ARM Model) AERI - (Model in 2003) 1 RU = 1 mW / (m 2 sr cm -1 ) Excellent Agreement in Clear Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer Between Obs and Calcs Shortwave Flux Bias (Solid) Shortwave Flux RMS (Hatched) W m -2 * Comparison of shortwave radiative flux at the surface

445

Final_Tech_Session_Schedule_and_Location.xls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Long Modeling Long Modeling Long - - Term Soil Organic Carbon Term Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics as Affected by Management and Dynamics as Affected by Management and Water Erosion Water Erosion RC Izaurralde, JR Williams, WM Post, AM Thomson, WB McGill, LB Owens, and R Lal 4 th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture & Sequestration May 2 - 5, 2004 Alexandria Mark Center Alexandria, Virginia 2 Objectives Objectives Review current hypotheses regarding the fate of eroded C from managed ecosystems Present modeling results of three long- term experiments documenting changes in soil C as affected by management and water erosion 3 Global Carbon Cycle (Pg C) (Schlesinger 2003) 6.3 60 120 60 Soils 1500 Plants 560 Oceans 38,000 Atmosphere 750 Rivers 0.4 1.6 92.3 90 Burial 0.1 Fossil Fuel Emissions

446

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 3930 of 26,777 results. 21 - 3930 of 26,777 results. Article Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement From the Office of River Protection Nuclear Waste Program: Richland, WA - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing its Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site, Richland, Washington" (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391), prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology are cooperating agencies on this Final EIS, which analyzes alternatives for three programmatic areas relevant to future cleanup of the Hanford Site. http://energy.gov/em/articles/issuance-final-tank-closure-and-waste-management-environmental-impact

447

1  

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Aerosols and the Residual Clear-Sky Aerosols and the Residual Clear-Sky Insolation Discrepancy T. P. Charlock National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia F. G. Rose and D. A. Rutan Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia Abstract The "clear-sky insolation discrepancy" surfaced a few years ago: several well-regarded theoretical simulations (sound radiative transfer codes and carefully measured inputs for them) produced values for clear-sky shortwave (SW) insolation that exceeded measurements from 20 to 30 Wm -2 . Now, by both carefully screening (Long-Ackerman) the radiometer observations and including the record of the newly installed Eppley Black and White (B&W) pyranometer, we find theory exceeding observations by

448

Analyzing Surface Solar Flux Data in Oregon for Changes Due to Aerosols Laura D. Riihimaki1, Frank E. Vignola1, Charles N. Long2, James A. Coakley Jr.3 1 University of Oregon Solar Radiation Monitoring Lab 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 Oregon State University, College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences  

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76 76 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 100 150 200 250 Direct Normal Irradiance (W/m 2 ) Eugene Hermiston Burns 3. All-sky direct normal irradiance increases 5% per decade Eppley NIP Conclusions Annual average all-sky total and direct normal irradiance measurements show an overall increase in Oregon between 1980 and 2007. Two measurement sites show statistically significant increases in clear- sky direct normal irradiance in background periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo [6] (1987- 2008), consistent with the hypothesis that a reduction in anthropogenic aerosols may contribute to the increase in surface irradiance. References 1. Long, C.N. and T. P. Ackerman, 2000: J. Geophys. Res., 105(D12), 15,609-15,626. 2. Long, C.N., and K.L. Gaustad, 2004: Atmospheric Radiation

449

nab-ARM_land2_v5.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corresponding result can be seen in the corresponding result can be seen in the top-of-atmosphere long-wave flux. Figure 3 shows the modelled OLR and that measured by the ARG product. The difference is postulated to be because the AMF ground measurements are not representative of the area within the ARG pixel. Figure 4 shows the SEVIRI 10.8μm-derived skin temperatures: over the region, the temperature variations can account for an upwelling flux variation of 70 Wm -2 . At the AMF, Niamey airport site itself, the November-averaged skin temperature is ~319K. Figure 2: 0.6μm SEVIRI radiances. Mean of all times during November 2006 without cloud-cover. The dark band is the Niger river. Figure 1: TOA SW fluxes via two products from satellite measurements: ARG and HR. Figure 5: Daily-averaged down-welling LW flux, from AMF

450

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 27830 of 28,904 results. 21 - 27830 of 28,904 results. Download CX-002030: Categorical Exclusion Determination Solar Array and Charging Stations - Administration Building/Cathcart CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/22/2010 Location(s): Snohomish County, Washington Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002030-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005736: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vermont Biofuels Initiative: Otter Creek Biofuels CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 04/14/2011 Location(s): Vermont Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005736-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001879: Categorical Exclusion Determination WM Renewable Energy, LLC - Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II

451

U.S DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGE M ENT CEN TER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY DEPARTlIIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGE M ENT CEN TER NEPA DETERllIINATION RECIPIENT:lllinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity PROJECT TITLE: WM Renewable Energy, LLC; Milam Landfill Gas to Energy Plant II Page 1 of2 STATE: IL funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instr ument Number NEPA Control Number CIO Number DE-FOA-OOOOO52 EEOOOO119 GFO-1D-363 EE119 Based on my uview or the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description : 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conselVation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not increase lhe indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

452

EIS-0391-FEIS-DOENOA-2012.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74473 Federal Register 74473 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 241 / Friday, December 14, 2012 / Notices Additional information on the Final TC & WM EIS is also available through the Hanford Web site at http:// www.hanford.gov/. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State along the Columbia River, is approximately 586 square miles in size. Hanford's mission from the early 1940s to approximately 1989 included defense-related nuclear research, development, and weapons production activities. These activities created a wide variety of chemical and radioactive wastes. Hanford's mission now is focused on the cleanup of those wastes and ultimate closure of the Site. An important part of the mission includes the retrieval and treatment of

453

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of the Impact of Aerosols on Clouds During Investigation of the Impact of Aerosols on Clouds During the May 2003 Intensive Operational Period at the Southern Great Plains H. Guo, J.E. Penner, and M. Herzog Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction The effect of aerosols on the clouds, or the so-called aerosol indirect effect (AIE), is highly uncertain (Penner et al. 2001). The estimation of the AIE can vary from 0.0 to -4.8 W/m 2 in global climate models (GCM). Therefore, it is very important to investigate these interactions and cloud-related physical processes further. The Aerosol Intensive Operational Period (AIOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in May 2003 dedicated some effort towards the measurement of the Cloud Condensation Nucleus concentration (CCN)

454

Transpired Solar Collector at NREL's Waste Handling Facility Uses Solar Energy to Heat Ventilation Air (Fact Sheet) (Revised), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

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Highlights Highlights System Size 300 ft 2 transpired solar collector Energy Production About 125 Btu/hr/ft 2 (400 W/m 2 ) of heat delivery under ideal conditions (full sun) Installation Date 1990 Motivation Provide solar-heated ventilation air to offset some of the heating with conventional electric resistance heaters Annual Savings 14,310 kWh (49 million Btu/yr) or about 26% of the energy required to heat the facility's ventilation air System Details Components Black, 300 ft 2 corrugated aluminum transpired solar collector with a porosity of 2%; bypass damper; two-speed 3000 CFM vane axial supply fan; electric duct heater; thermostat controller Storage None Loads 188 million Btu/year (55,038 kWh/year) winter average to heat 1,300 ft 2 Waste Handling Facility

455

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Edition and 2007 Web Update 6 Edition and 2007 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors New authors of 2007 Web Update M. Antonelli, 102 H. Baer, 64 G. Bernardi, 103 M. Carena, 51 M.-C. Chen, 11 B. Dobrescu, 51 J.-F. Grivaz, 104 T. Gutsche, 105 J. Huston, 45 T. Junk, 51 C.-J. Lin, 1 H. Mahlke, 106 P. Mohr, 107 P. Nevski, 75 S. Rolli, 108 A. Romaniouk, 109 B. Seligman, 110 M. Shaevitz, 111 B. Taylor, 107 M. Titov, 56,112 G. Weiglein, 78 A. Wheeler, 69 Authors of the 2006 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006)

456

X:\ARM_19~1\P139-154.WPD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dA dA / dN C N k ( 1 to 2 W/m 2 ) 40 3 (2 km) 3 Session Papers 147 (1) Evaluating Aerosol Indirect Effect Through Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Z. N. Kogan, Y. L. Kogan, and D. K. Lilly Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Introduction During the last decade much attention has been focused on anthropogenic aerosols and their radiative influence on the global climate. Charlson et al. (1992) and Penner et al. (1994) have demonstrated that tropospheric aerosols and particularly anthropogenic sulfate aerosols may significantly contribute to the radiative forcing exerting a cooling influence on climate which is comparable in magnitude to greenhouse forcing, but opposite in sign. Aerosol particles affect the earth's radiative budget either

457

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 600 of 28,905 results. 91 - 600 of 28,905 results. Download Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS") The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing... http://energy.gov/em/downloads/memorandum-understanding-between-united-states-department-energy-and Download Vegetation Cover Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites in Utah and Arizona Using Hyperspectral Remote Sensing January 17, 2012Jungho Im, John R. Jensen, Ryan R. Jensen, John Gladden, Jody Waugh andMike Serrato

458

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interaction: A Comparison of GCM Results versus Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation Interaction: A Comparison of GCM Results versus Surface Observations Liepert, B.G., Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University; Lohmann, U., Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The change in cloud properties due to increased anthropogenic emissions of aerosols and their precursor gases is referred to as "indirect aerosol effect." Estimates with general circulation models (GCMs) assumed that an increase in aerosol concentration would lead to a cooling effect of about -1Wm2. To evaluate the anthropogenic indirect aerosol effect, we compared two ECHAM GCM experiments with long-term surface observations covering the United States and Germany. The model prognosticates the number of cloud

459

EIS-0391: Notice of Preferred Alternative | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notice of Preferred Alternative Notice of Preferred Alternative EIS-0391: Notice of Preferred Alternative DOE's Preferred Alternative for Certain Tanks Evaluated in the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is announcing its preferred alternative for wastes contained in underground radioactive waste storage tanks evaluated in the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391, December 2012). With regard to those wastes that, in the future, may be properly and legally classified as mixed transuranic waste (mixed TRU waste). DOE's preferred alternative is to retrieve, treat,

460

Wind: wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and 1km resolution  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

China from NREL China from NREL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Raster GIS data, exported as BIL file, 50 m wind power density for eastern China. (Purpose): To provide information on the wind resource potential in eastern China. Values range from 0 to 3079 W/m2. (Supplemental Information): The modeling regions do not completely cover eastern China. Projection Parameters Projection LAMBERT_AZIMUTHAL Datum WGS84 Zunits METERS Units METERS Spheroid DEFINED Major Axis 6370997.00000 Minor Axis 0.00000 Parameters: radius of the sphere of reference 6370997.00000 Continue? longitude of center of projection 119 0 0.00 latitude of center of projection 33 30 0.000 false easting (meters) 0.00000 false northing (meters) 0.00000 Spatial Information Raster: Number of Columns: 2658 Number of Rows: 3926 Pixel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wm turpin ballard" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, March 1998 Welcome to the first quarter FY 1998 Quarterly Report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. Articles in this issue include: Managing Progress on the Repository EIS Richland EA: Public Involvement and Classified Information WIPP and WM RODs Issued DOE-wide NEPA Contracts Update Early NEPA Review Saves Resources Technical Assistance from Core Technical Group Recent NEPA Guidance EPA Proposes Changes to Voluntary EIS Policy Anticipating the Discovery of Unknown Waste DOE Planning Summaries Provide NEPA Forecasts Recent EIS Milestones NAEP Identifies Accepted NEPA Practices Environmental Restoration's NCO Describes His Role Richlands NEPA Process Game Enlivens Training Transitions

462

ScienceSlidesHJW2009.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physics: Lattice QCD Physics: Lattice QCD 4 PIs: M. Savage (U. Wash.), W. Detmold (JLab, College of W&M) Phys Rev Lett, (2009) Color Screening by Pions Contribution to the radial quark-antiquark force at two pion densities. The attractive force is found to be reduced by the pion screening. This is a first step toward a more systematic exploration of hadronic effects with lattice QCD. Objective: Understand strong interactions that bind quarks and gluons together. Accomplishments: Cited by DOE in 2010 Congressional Budget Request as one of 3 major accomplishments in Theoretical Nuclear Physics in 2008/9. * First ever QCD calculations of: * Three-body force between hadrons. * Screening of color forces between quarks by a background of hadrons. * a three-baryon system.

463

Section 9  

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&58)((0.25(1365)/(971)'&20 &58)((0.25(1365)/(971)'&20 Session Papers 37 (1) Application of CAGEX for the Evaluation of Shortwave Codes and for the Testing of CERES TRMM Algorithms T. P. Charlock NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T. L. Alberta, F. G. Rose, and D. A. Rutan Analytical Services and Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Enhanced (TOA) insolation in W/m** corresponds to the available Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) currently addresses the sample for computing the TOA net bias as calculated (from problem of the absorption of shortwave (SW) by the the Fu-Liou code) and measured (from the Minnis et al. 1995, atmosphere on a local scale with aircraft and ground-based conversion of the narrowband Geostationary Operational

464

Section 56  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Deficient Model Absorption W. O'Hirok and C. Gautier Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California, Santa Barbara Santa Barbara, California Recent studies have shown a discrepancy of more than similar to the PP mode, except that calculations are made for 25-35 Wm (diurnal average) between observations of the each cloud element individually, rather than for the ensemble -2 absorption of solar radiation in the atmosphere in the presence average. The 3D mode uses the same field as the IP mode, of clouds and estimates from standard radiative transfer but allows for the horizontal diffusion of photons. models. The differences have been attributed to errors in measurement methodologies, unresolved problems in understanding of cloud microphysics, and the portrayal of

465

CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Categorical Exclusion Determination 2: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003332: Categorical Exclusion Determination Reclamation Projects on Wedding Bell Mountain Lease Tract C-WM-17, Uranium Leasing Program CX(s) Applied: B1.28 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes several minor reclamation activities related to abandoned mines and mine features that pose a public safety concern. In 2007, LM inherited abandoned mines as a result of re-aligning lease tract boundaries. Independent contractors associated with the lessee (Golden Eagle Uranium) and under the supervision of uranium leasing program personnel would complete the work, and all projects would be completed within approximately

466

Microsoft Word - CX-SouthTacomaSubstationOlympicPipelineFenceUpgrade_WEB.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2011 7, 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Timothy Wicks Realty Specialist - TERR-Covington Proposed Action: Grant the Olympic Pipeline Company permission to upgrade an existing fence along the northern property line of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) South Tacoma Substation to enhance security. PP&A Project No.: PP&A-2054 Budget Information: N/A Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.11 Fencing, no adverse effect on wildlife movement/surface water flow. Installation of fencing, including that for border marking that will not adversely affect wildlife movements or surface water flow. Location: S36 T9N R3E WM, in Pierce County, Washington. BPA Parcel #STAC-SS-SY

467

Recent News from the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15, 2010 15, 2010 Strengthening Today's Science Talent to Become Tomorrow's Science Leaders Find out more about the 13 PECASE winners tied together by a common thread: A commitment to imagination, to inspiration and to achievement, to the relentless quest for understanding for the betterment of us all. December 15, 2010 Watch a Rare Earth Elements Event Live This Morning From 9:30am to noon ET today you can tune into a live discussion rare earth materialsmthat are critical to the production of clean energy technologies. December 14, 2010 Nanotechnology: Small Materials Making a Big Impact A look at how breakthroughs in nanotechnology are poised to transform the energy landscape. December 10, 2010 Schematic representation of the HR8799 system compared to our own solar system. | Photo Courtesy of NRC-HIA, Christian Marois and the W.M Keck Observatory

468

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for GCM Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, Development and Evaluation of RRTMG_SW, a Shortwave Radiative Transfer Model for General Circulation Model Applications M. J. Iacono, J. S. Delamere, E. J. Mlawer, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Massachusetts J.-J. Morcrette European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Reading, United Kingdom Y.-T. Hou National Centers for Environmental Prediction Camp Springs, Maryland Introduction The k-distribution shortwave radiation model developed for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, RRTM_SW_V2.4 (Clough et al. 2004), utilizes the discrete ordinates radiative transfer model, DISORT, for scattering calculations and 16 g-points in each of its 16 spectral bands. DISORT provides agreement with line-by-line flux calculations to within 1 Wm

469

Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Program Update: 1st Quarter 2012 Inside this Update: Interagency Working Group Collaborates on Codisposal of Uranium Mine and Mill Tailings Waste in New Mexico; Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Benchmarking Visit to the LMBC; LM Creates Cooperative Agreement with the Northern Arapaho Tribe; LM Participates in 2012 WM Conference; M Partners with Diné Environmental Institute on Remediation of Uranium Processing Sites; LM Stakeholder Survey 2012 Update; LM: LEEDing the Way; Yucca Mountain Transition Progress - Congressional Interest; and more. The Program Update newsletter is produced every quarter and highlights major activities and events that occurred across the DOE complex during that period of time. Office of Legacy Management (LM) Program Update, January-March 2012

470

Microsoft Word - ICP-11-005webpost.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 SECTION A. Project Title: INTEC - Tank Farm Closure Project SECTION B. Project Description The proposed action will continue to clean and close underground storage tanks located in the Tank Farm Facility (TFF) within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The closure actions are part of approved Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (HWMA/RCRA) Closure Plans. The TFF has been closed in phases based on available funding. The final phase is addressed in this document and is scheduled to be completed in October of 2015. The remaining scope includes decontaminating and grouting tanks, vaults, and some piping including the remaining cooling coils. The remaining four 300,000-gallon tanks (VES-WM-187, -188, -189, and -190) will be decontaminated and grouted. The tanks will be

471

MEMORANDUfl J: FILE DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J: FILE DATE J: FILE DATE // //r /so -----------w------m FROM: 9. 34oyc -w--------v----- SUBJECT: D3 Bo;s CL&;C J mL-;+J; - Rcc cap 049 /'A :j$: &336;s L-.fh~ w-f L-1 ALE"nirTE __ ------------- --- ---_------------------ CITY: &u+M- - &. -w---v------ ---B-------w STATE: 0 h' -a---- OWNER(S) --pi::;- l>cl, b af.5 CA.-*>J CD Current: Gr;W i- ~U~&;P~ -------------,,' ,-,,,,-, Owner contacted 0 yes jg no; -------------------------- if yes, date contacted ------m------ TYPE OF OPERATION --w--w----------- & Research & Development a Facility Type 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies w Sample & Analysis 0 Manufacturing 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility

472

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2 2 --' . ' ~vmw tL DATE ,$j& j? /q $:' ---- f ---i--,,,,,, SUBJECT: ALTERNATE . NAME: OWNER(S) ----m-m- Paut 3 Owner contacted 0 yes Current: -------------------------- if yes, drtr contacted --w--m------- TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- F Research b Development H Facility Type 0 Production scale testing jZ Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis w Manufacturing 0 University 0 Researc' h Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ---------------- f3 Prime g Subcontract& &pflti& 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time 81 material, l tc) ---B--w ----------------w-----v-----

473

M'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

M' M' i. l-2 C-CT NO. AT(30-1)4405, hi. lo. 9 SUPPLEMENTALAGRE?WM THIS SUPPLEMENTAL AGREXUENT , entered into theloth day of February 195Lr by and between TEE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA'~lnafter referred & as the 'Government"), ar represented by the UNITED STATES ATOMIC l!3l8GY CQ4MISSfON (hereinafter referred to as the Wmmi~el~ri@), and BUDGW(RT BRASS COMPANY (hereinafter referred to ae the Qmtractor"); UITHESSETH THAT: WHERElls, the Governmen t and the Contractor entered Into Contract No. AT(30-1)-14050 effective the 26th day of Jum, 1932, for the performance of certain research work; and WHEREAS, the parties hereto desire to modify safd Contract, ae herein- after provided; and UHEZBAS, the Comiseion certifies that this Supplemental Agreement is

474

'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I- i. I- i. : ' . .a \ ' .. .,a. : - . . . . ' -. a ' . ,i ..' - 3/q, f k/A e _ ' ,!,Y.' .' .. yy,.. ' ; ,' 8 8 A GLINO~C~~~ nada of df&ntlirr& oparations at Metsl'Hydrides, Ino*, 0 2. J. Zlc33ur, ~J>llcntlonq Bract ,' , . . . .\ Dh B, 5, \Yo' rs, ?i?,T),, 33diod Eirectcr L " ', ' ' &y' ,' ,' l .l,CT;IT' TY nr?zxT - ~%SIx? J.22~. 8 !X J.IY. I.& ( -.. . /&x,f.- 11 3Y . - _, \. ., ' . ._' .: . -' ;yT;, ' \. 5 ., . ..: :' .<, ..;.- ".~' .,' ,..",..-. i.., ,;.. ,-": ,; ~ . : _ ' 1.' . I ., ..-' . ;. ' . ;,. i - .:- -' . - . . .' . D- -. iklZ ~3 >!rr Eisonbud visitch Dr. &thou, Dlrestor of the Ketiorhg t .?wm.rr;~ Ifra 1gjk-I kb3ratix-y ct Cixinnnti, &io iid' ooxultod with him on cothods of .. _ _' a.nnIyni~ fc~'baryll',urr, aosts of analgaia, dss?p,cmi 1quut of Ia-

475

EBIS Project Status Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2012 4, 2012 Electron Lens 2 E-Lens Magnet, Tooling Magnet * Cold mass, cryostat drawing work continues (SP/PK/SS) * Yoke NLE Restraint Cylinder - 1 more rework for leads (RC/SP) * Part orders being prioritized, released; bellows, cryo valve, heat shield, etc. (SRP) Tooling * Testing Top Hat assembly complete (RM/SD/DC/WM etc.) * Cryostatting, pressure test fixture Mods in CS (PK) - supporting schedule * Magnetic Needle Tooling - COMPLETE 3 Main Solenoid Coils 2 nd main solenoid * CS machining complete * Stainless steel support machining complete 4 AFF, FF Solenoid coils * FF coil #1 - FF coil #4 * Mods complete to ID to fit to main support tube * AFF #3 Final electrical tests complete (DI) * AFF #4 overwrap & cure, Final electrical tests complete (DI) 5 eLens - Cold Test Assembly Magnet #1:

476

NREL: News - NREL Reports 31.1% Efficiency for III-V Solar Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

913 913 NREL Reports 31.1% Efficiency for III-V Solar Cell Conversion-efficiency mark is a world record for a two-junction solar cell measured under one-sun illumination June 24, 2013 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Lab has announced a world record of 31.1% conversion efficiency for a two-junction solar cell under one sun of illumination. NREL Scientist Myles Steiner announced the new record June 19 at the 39th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference in Tampa, Fla. The previous record of 30.8% efficiency was held by Alta Devices. The tandem cell was made of a gallium indium phosphide cell atop a gallium arsenide cell, has an area of about 0.25 square centimeters and was measured under the AM1.5 global spectrum at 1,000 W/m2. It was grown inverted, similar to the NREL-developed inverted metamorphic multi-junction

477

Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Issuance of the Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement December 5, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Carrie Meyer, DOE (509) 376-0810 Carrie_C_Meyer@orp.doe.gov Erika Holmes, Ecology (509) 372-7880 Erika.Holmes@ecy.wa.gov Richland, WA - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing its Final Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement Hanford Site, Richland, Washington" (Final TC & WM EIS, DOE/EIS-0391), prepared in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology are cooperating agencies on this Final EIS, which analyzes

478

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of selected aspects of the 105-KW Basin Final Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. HSS's review of the K-West Basin FSAR found it to be generally adequate with respect to the scope of this review. However, some aspects of the FSAR accident analyses of two events may warrant further review: MCO transport cask drop into the K-Basin, and the fire accident event involving the cask

479

Analysis of vehicle fuel release resulting in waste tank fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reevaluates several aspects of the in-tank vehicle fuel fire/deflagration accident formally documented as an independent accident (representative accident [rep acc] 2). This reevaluation includes frequencies for the accidents and incorporates the behavior of gasoline and diesel fuel in more detail than previous analysis. This reevaluation uses data from RPP-13121, ''Historical Summary of Occurrences from the Tank Farm Safety Analysis Report'', Table B-1, ''Tank Farm Events, Off-Normal and Critiques,'' and B-2, ''Summary of Occurrences,'' and from the River Protection Project--Occurrence Reporting & Processing System (ORPS) reports as a basis for changing some of the conclusions formally reported in HNF-SD-WM-CN-037, ''Frequency Analysis of Vehicle Fuel Releases Resulting in Waste Tank Fire''. This calculation note will demonstrate that the in-tank vehicle fuel fire/deflagration accident event may be relocated to other, more bounding accidents.

STEPHENS, L.S.

2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

480

Modularization and nuclear power. Report by the Technology Transfer Modularization Task Team  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of the work performed by the Technology Transfer Task Team on Modularization. This work was performed as part of the Technology Transfer work being performed under Department of Energy Contract 54-7WM-335406, between December, 1984 and February, 1985. The purpose of this task team effort was to briefly survey the current use of modularization in the nuclear and non-nuclear industries and to assess and evaluate the techniques available for potential application to nuclear power. A key conclusion of the evaluation was that there was a need for a study to establish guidelines for the future development of Light Water Reactor, High Temperature Gas Reactor and Liquid Metal Reactor plants. The guidelines should identify how modularization can improve construction, maintenance, life extension and decommissioning.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project, Design, Construction and Start-up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) was awarded to BNG America in December of 1996. In 2005, following discussions between the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE) and the United Kingdom (UK) Department of Trade and Industry (DTi) the DOE purchased the facilities. DOE awarded Bechtel B and W Idaho (BBWI) a contract to operate the facilities for one year, commencing 1 May 2005. The hand-over of AMWTP included the facility to repackage and super-compact waste (Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility) and the retrieval, characterization, storage and Transuranic Package Transporter (TRUPACT) loading facility. This poster updates the progress of AMWTP from the previous presentations to Waste Management (WM) [1 and 2] to completion of the transition to BBWI in May 2005. (authors)

Dobson, A. [BNG America, 2345 Stevens Drive Suite no. 240, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Harrop, G.; Holmes, R.G.G. [BNG America, 1920 E. 17th Street Suite no. 200, Idaho Falls, ID 83404 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A Linear Parabolic Trough Solar Collector Performance Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A performance model has been programmed for solar thermal collector based on a linear, tracking parabolic trough reflector focused on a surface-treated metallic pipe receiver enclosed in an evacuated transparent tube: a Parabolic Trough Solar Collector (PTSC). This steady state, single dimensional model comprises the fundamental radiative and convective heat transfer and mass and energy balance relations programmed in the Engineering Equation Solver, EES. It considers the effects of solar intensity and incident angle, collector dimensions, material properties, fluid properties, ambient conditions, and operating conditions on the performance of the collector: the PTSC. Typical performance calculations show that when hot-water at 165C flows through a 6m by 2.3m PTSC with 900 w/m^2 solar insulation and 0 incident angle, the estimated collector efficiency is about 55% The model predictions will be confirmed by the operation of PTSCs now being installed at Carnegie Mellon.

Qu, M.; Archer, D.; Masson, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Aerosol indirect effects ? general circulation model intercomparison and evaluation with satellite data  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects continue to constitute one of the most important uncertainties for anthropogenic climate perturbations. Within the international AEROCOM initiative, the representation of aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions in ten different general circulation models (GCMs) is evaluated using three satellite datasets. The focus is on stratiform liquid water clouds since most GCMs do not include ice nucleation effects, and none of the model explicitly parameterises aerosol effects on convective clouds. We compute statistical relationships between aerosol optical depth ({tau}{sub a}) and various cloud and radiation quantities in a manner that is consistent between the models and the satellite data. It is found that the model-simulated influence of aerosols on cloud droplet number concentration (N{sub d}) compares relatively well to the satellite data at least over the ocean. The relationship between {tau}{sub a} and liquid water path is simulated much too strongly by the models. This suggests that the implementation of the second aerosol indirect effect mainly in terms of an autoconversion parameterisation has to be revisited in the GCMs. A positive relationship between total cloud fraction (f{sub cld}) and {tau}{sub a} as found in the satellite data is simulated by the majority of the models, albeit less strongly than that in the satellite data in most of them. In a discussion of the hypotheses proposed in the literature to explain the satellite-derived strong f{sub cld} - {tau}{sub a} relationship, our results indicate that none can be identified as a unique explanation. Relationships similar to the ones found in satellite data between {tau}{sub a} and cloud top temperature or outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) are simulated by only a few GCMs. The GCMs that simulate a negative OLR - {tau}{sub a} relationship show a strong positive correlation between {tau}{sub a} and f{sub cld} The short-wave total aerosol radiative forcing as simulated by the GCMs is strongly influenced by the simulated anthropogenic fraction of {tau}{sub a}, and parameterization assumptions such as a lower bound on N{sub d}. Nevertheless, the strengths of the statistical relationships are good predictors for the aerosol forcings in the models. An estimate of the total short-wave aerosol forcing inferred from the combination of these predictors for the modelled forcings with the satellite-derived statistical relationships yields a global annual mean value of -1.5 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}. In an alternative approach, the radiative flux perturbation due to anthropogenic aerosols can be broken down into a component over the cloud-free portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol direct effect) and a component over the cloudy portion of the globe (approximately the aerosol indirect effect). An estimate obtained by scaling these simulated clear- and cloudy-sky forcings with estimates of anthropogenic {tau}{sub a} and satellite-retrieved Nd - {tau}{sub a} regression slopes, respectively, yields a global, annual-mean aerosol direct effect estimate of -0.4 {+-} 0.2 Wm{sup -2} and a cloudy-sky (aerosol indirect effect) estimate of -0.7 {+-} 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, with a total estimate of -1.2 {+-} 0.4 Wm{sup -2}.

Quaas, Johannes; Ming, Yi; Menon, Surabi; Takemura, Toshihiko; Wang, Minghuai; Penner, Joyce E.; Gettelman, Andrew; Lohmann, Ulrike; Bellouin, Nicolas; Boucher, Olivier; Sayer, Andrew M.; Thomas, Gareth E.; McComiskey, Allison; Feingold, Graham; Hoose, Corinna; Kristansson, Jon Egill; Liu, Xiaohong; Balkanski, Yves; Donner, Leo J.; Ginoux, Paul A.; Stier, Philip; Grandey, Benjamin; Feichter, Johann; Sednev, Igor; Bauer, Susanne E.; Koch, Dorothy; Grainger, Roy G.; Kirkevag, Alf; Iversen, Trond; Seland, Oyvind; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steven J.; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Iacono, Michael J.; Kinne, Stefan; Schulz, Michael

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

484

Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES  

SciTech Connect

One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Research on Thermal Properties in a Phase Change Wallboard Room Based on Air Conditioning Cold Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After comparing the thermal performance parameters of an ordinary wall room to a phase change wall (PCW) room, we learn that phase change wallboard affects the fluctuation of temperature in air-conditioning room in the summer. We built a PCW room and an ordinary wall room, which are cooled by an air-conditioner. We used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to test the temperature field and heat flow fluctuation in these rooms. Through analyzing the data tested, we found that the mean temperature of PCW is lower than that of ordinary wall room by 1 to 2?, and PCW can lower the heat flow by 4.6W/m2. Combining phase change material with the building envelope can lower the indoor temperature, make the room thermally comfortable, and cut down the turn-on-and-off frequency of the air-conditioner and the primary investment and operating costs. It alleviates the urgent need for electricity.

Feng, G.; Li, W.; Chen, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Effect of Mo Back Contact on Na Out-Diffusion and Device Performance of Mo/Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS/ZnO Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the molybdenum thin films that were deposited on soda lime glass (SLG) substrates using direct-current planar magnetron sputtering, with a sputtering power density of 1.2 W/cm2. The working gas (Ar) pressure was varied from 0.6 to 16 mtorr to induce changes in the Mo films' morphology and microstructure. Thin films of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) were deposited on the Mo-coated glass using the 3-stage co-evaporation process. The morphology of both the Mo-coated SLG and the CIGS thin films grown on it was examined using high-resolution scanning electron microscopy. Na was depth profiled in the Mo and CIGS films by secondary ion mass spectrometry. The device performance was evaluated under standard conditions of 1000 W/m2 and 25 C. Optimum device performance is found for an intermediate Mo sputtering pressure.

Al-Thani, H. A.; Hasoon, F. S.; Young, M.; Asher, S.; Alleman, J. L.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Williamson, D. L.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Photoresponses of a Photovoltaic Cell Prepared by CuSCN Electrodepositing C60 on Mesoporous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photovoltaic responses of a solid-state photovoltaic cell with structure TiO2/C60/CuSCN/, by electro-depositing C60 onto glass substrates comprised of nanocrystalline TiO2 films and subsequently chemically depositing CuSCN on to the above C60 film, were investigated. The device delivered a short-circuit photocurrent of 225 A cm ?2 with an open circuit voltage of 350 mV under an irradiance of 260 Wm ?2. The charge transferring mechanism is described as the formation of a C60 anion from the excited C60 molecule by donating a hole to CuCNS and then, injecting the electron from the C60 anions into the conduction band of TiO2. PACS numbers: 72.80.Rj, 73.50.Pz, 71.20.Tx I.

G. K. R. Senadeera; V. P. S. Perera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Cooling Strings of Superconducting Devices below 2 K the Helium II Bayonet Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-energy particle accelerators and colliders contain long strings of superconducting devices - acceleration RF cavities and magnets - operating at high field, which may require cooling in helium II below 2 K. In order to maintain adequate operating conditions, the applied or generated heat loads must be extracted and transported with minimum temperature difference. Conventional cooling schemes based on conductive or convective heat transport in pressurized helium II very soon reach their intrinsic limits of thermal impedance over extended lengths. We present the concept of helium II bayonet heat exchanger, which has been developed at CERN for the magnet cooling scheme of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and describe its specific advantages as a slim, quasi-isothermal heat sink. Experimental results obtained on several test set-ups, and a prototype magnet string have permitted to validate its performance and sizing rules, for transporting linear heat loads in the W.m-1 range over distances of several tens o...

Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Van Weelderen, R

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

FY 95 engineering work plan for the design reconstitution implementation action plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design reconstitution work is to be performed as part of an overall effort to upgrade Configuration Management (CM) at TWRS. WHC policy is to implement a program that is compliant with DOE-STD-1073-93, Guide for Operational Configuration Management Program. DOE-STD-1073 requires an adjunct program for reconstituting design information. WHC-SD-WM-CM-009, Design Reconstitution Program Plan for Waste Tank Farms and 242-A Evaporator of Tank Waste Remediation System, is the TWRS plan for meeting DOE-STD-1073 design reconstitution requirements. The design reconstitution plan is complex requiring significant time and effort for implementation. In order to control costs, and integrate the work into other TWRS activities, a Design Reconstitution Implementation Action Plan (DR IAP) will be developed, and approved by those organizations having ownership or functional interest in this activity.

Bigbee, J.D.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

490

End effectors and attachments for buried waste excavation equipment  

SciTech Connect

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Their efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER&WM) Department`s needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex-situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment, and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. This report presents a literature search on the state-of-the-art in end effectors and attachments in support of excavator of buried transuranic waste. Included in the report are excavator platforms and a discussion of the various attachments. Also included is it list of vendors and specifications.

King, R.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Comparison of Hybrid Electric Vehicle Power Electronics Cooling Options  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study quantifies the heat dissipation potential of three inverter package configurations over a range of control factors. These factors include coolant temperature, number of sides available for cooling, effective heat transfer coefficient, maximum semiconductor junction temperature, and interface material thermal resistance. Heat dissipation potentials are examined in contrast to a research goal to use 105..deg..C coolant and dissipate 200 W/cm2 heat across the insulated gate bipolar transistor and diode silicon area. Advanced double-sided cooling configurations with aggressive heat transfer coefficients show the possibility of meeting these targets for a 125..deg..C maximum junction temperature, but further investigation is needed. Even with maximum tolerable junction temperatures of 200..deg..C, effective heat transfer coefficients of 5,000 to 10,000 W/m2-K will be needed for coolant temperatures of 105..deg..C or higher.

O'Keefe, M.; Bennion, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Performance of the Keck Observatory adaptive optics system  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, the adaptive optics (AO) system at the W.M. Keck Observatory is characterized. The authors calculate the error budget of the Keck AO system operating in natural guide star mode with a near infrared imaging camera. By modeling the control loops and recording residual centroids, the measurement noise and band-width errors are obtained. The error budget is consistent with the images obtained. Results of sky performance tests are presented: the AO system is shown to deliver images with average Strehl ratios of up to 0.37 at 1.58 {micro}m using a bright guide star and 0.19 for a magnitude 12 star.

van Dam, M A; Mignant, D L; Macintosh, B A

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

493

Quantifying Turbulence for Tidal Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

Using newly collected data from a tidal power site in Puget Sound, WA, metrics for turbulence quantification are assessed and discussed. The quality of raw ping Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data for turbulence studies is evaluated against Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) data at a point. Removal of Doppler noise from the raw ping data is shown to be a crucial step in turbulence quantification. Excluding periods of slack tide, the turbulent intensity estimates at a height of 4.6 m above the seabed are 8% and 11% from the ADCP and ADV, respectively. Estimates of the turbulent dissipation rate are more variable, from 10e-3 to 10e-1