National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for winter capacity electric

  1. winter_capacity_2010.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 4.B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2010 Actual, 2011-2015 Projected (Megawatts and Percent) Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/2002 2002/2003 2003/2004 2004/2005 2005/2006 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/2009 2009/2010 2010/ 2011 2011/2012E 2012/2013E 2013/2014E 2014/2015E 2015/2016E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 44,196 44,750 45,350

  2. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  3. High current capacity electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bettis, Edward S.; Watts, Harry L.

    1976-01-13

    An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

  4. Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity More Documents & Publications THE VALUE OF ECONOMIC DISPATCH A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1234 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 ...

  5. Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets with Wind Power Title Capacity Adequacy and Revenue Sufficiency in Electricity Markets with Wind Power Publication...

  6. Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, R. L.

    1997-09-03

    In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

  7. United States Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United ... Gases",2256,2313,1995,1932,2700 "Nuclear",100334,100266,100755,101004,10116...

  8. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and includes more sectors than ReEDS. For example, it includes modeling of the natural gas and coal supply markets, and a model of electricity load. The ReEDS model...

  9. Locational electricity capacity markets: Alternatives to restore the missing signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieto, Amparo D.; Fraser, Hamish

    2007-03-15

    In the absence of a properly functioning electricity demand side, well-designed capacity payment mechanisms hold more promise for signaling the value of capacity than non-CPM alternatives. Locational CPMs that rely on market-based principles, such as forward capacity auctions, are superior to cost-based payments directed to specific must-run generators, as CPMs at least provide a meaningful price signal about the economic value of resources to potential investors. (author)

  10. An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 | Department of Energy Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 Cold weather that blanketed much of the Eastern United States in 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 exhibited unique characteristics that prompted different - but related - challenges across heating fuels and electricity markets. In an effort to understand the impacts of

  11. Unbundling the electric capacity price in a deregulated commodity market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Mann, C.

    1995-12-01

    In a deregulated, unbundled market, capacity has value separate from energy. The exact price will reflect the cost of a gas-fired combustion turbine. Energy values alone will not suffice to estimate the firm price for electric power. The lack of quotable, unbundled capacity prices creates uncertainty, especially given the direction taken by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in its March 1995 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on stranded investment and open-access electric transmission. What conclusions can be drawn from the current regime that might paint a picture of tomorrow`s market?

  12. Estimated winter 1980-1981 electric demand and supply, contiguous United States. Staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the most recent data available concerning projected electrical peak demands and available power resouces for the 1980-1981 winter peak period, as reported by electric utilities in the contiguous United States. The data, grouped by Regional Reliability Council areas and by Electrical Regions within the Council areas, was obtained from the Form 12E-2 reports filed by utilities with the Department of Energy on October 15, 1980 (data as of September 30). In some instances the data were revised or verified by telephone. Considerations affecting reliability, arising from Nuclear Regulatory Commission actions based on lessons learned from the forced outage of Three Mile Island Nuclear Unit No. 2, were factored into the report. No widespread large-scale reliability problems are foreseen for electric power supply this winter, on the basis of the supply and demand projections furnished by the electric utilities. Reserve margins could drop in some electric regions to levels considered inadequate for reliable service, if historical forced-outage magnitudes recur.

  13. Water Constraints in an Electric Sector Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, Jordan; Cohen, Stuart; Newmark, Robin; Martinez, Andrew; Sullivan, Patrick; Tidwell, Vince

    2015-07-17

    This analysis provides a description of the first U.S. national electricity capacity expansion model to incorporate water resource availability and costs as a constraint for the future development of the electricity sector. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model was modified to incorporate water resource availability constraints and costs in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions along with differences in costs and efficiencies of cooling systems. Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013b). Scenarios analyzed include a business-as-usual 3 This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. scenario without water constraints as well as four scenarios that include water constraints and allow for different cooling systems and types of water resources to be utilized. This analysis provides insight into where water resource constraints could affect the choice, configuration, or location of new electricity technologies.

  14. Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset | Department of Energy Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 - Dataset Excel file and dataset for Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 fotw#937_web.xlsx (17.8 KB) More Documents &

  15. Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 | Department of Energy Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 Fact #937: August 8, 2016 Total Battery Capacity of all Plug-in Electric Vehicles Sold Increased from 2014 to 2015 SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week The number of battery packs sold for plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) declined by 3.4% from 2014 to 2015. However, the total battery capacity for all PEVs sold between

  16. Capacity utilization and fuel consumption in the electric power industry, 1970-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, E.W.

    1982-07-01

    This report updates the 1980 Energy Information Administration (EIA) publication entitled Trends in the Capacity Utilization and Fuel Consumption of Electric Utility Powerplants, 1970-1978, DOE/EIA-184/32. The analysis covers the period from 1970 through 1981, and examines trends during the period prior to the 1973 Arab oil embargo (1970-1973), after the embargo (1974-1977), and during the immediate past (1978-1981). The report also addresses other factors affecting the electric utility industry since the oil embargo: the reduction in foreign oil supplies as a result of the 1979 Iranian crisis, the 1977 drought in the western United States, the 1978 coal strike by the United Mine Workers Union, and the shutdown of nuclear plants in response to the accident at Three Mile Island. Annual data on electric utility generating capacity, net generation, and fuel consumption are provided to identify changes in patterns of power plant capacity utilization and dispatching.

  17. How and why Tampa Electric Company selected IGCC for its next generating capacity addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, D.E. )

    1992-01-01

    As the title indicates, the purpose of this paper is to relate how and why Tampa Electric Company decided to select the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) for their next capacity addition at Polk Power Station, Polk Unit No. 1. For a complete understanding of this process, it is necessary to review the history related to the initial formulation of the IGCC concept as it was proposed to the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Initiative Round Three. Further, it is important to understand the relationship between Tampa Electric Company and TECO Pay Services Corporation (TPS). TECO Energy, Inc. is an energy related holding company with headquarters in Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company is the principal, wholly-owned subsidiary of TECO Energy, Inc. Tampa Electric Company is an investor-owned electric utility with about 3200 MW of generation capacity of which 97% is coal fired. Tampa Electric Company serves about 2,000 square miles and approximately 470,000 customers, in west central Florida, primarily in and around Hillsborough County and Tampa, Florida. Tampa Electric Company generating units consist of coal fired units ranging in size from a 110 MW coal fired cyclone unit installed in 1957 to a 450 MW pulverized coal unit with wet limestone flue gas desulfurization installed in 1985. In addition, Tampa Electric Company has six (6) No. 6 oil fired steam units totaling approximately 220 MW. Five (5) of these units, located at the Hookers Point Station, were installed in the late 1940's and early 1950's. Tampa Electric also has about 150 MW of No. 2 oil fired start-up and peaking combustion turbines. The company also owns a 1966 vintage 12 MW natural gas fired steam plant (Dinner Lake) and two nO. 6 oil fired diesel units with heat recovery equipment built in 1983 (Phillips Plant).

  18. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  19. An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

    2004-06-01

    This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity

  20. Enhanced capacity and stability for the separation of cesium in electrically switched ion exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tawfic, A.F.; Dickson, S.E.; Kim, Y.; Mekky, W.

    2015-03-15

    Electrically switched ion exchange (ESIX) can be used to separate ionic contaminants from industrial wastewater, including that generated by the nuclear industry. The ESIX method involves sequential application of reduction and oxidation potentials to an ion exchange film to induce the respective loading and unloading of cesium. This technology is superior to conventional methods (e.g electrodialysis reversal or reverse osmosis) as it requires very little energy for ionic separation. In previous studies, ESIX films have demonstrated relatively low ion exchange capacities and limited film stabilities over repeated potential applications. In this study, the methodology for the deposition of electro-active films (nickel hexacyanoferrate) on nickel electrodes was modified to improve the ion exchange capacity for cesium removal using ESIX. Cyclic voltammetry was used to investigate the ion exchange capacity and stability. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the modified film surfaces. Additionally, the films were examined for the separation of cesium ions. This modified film preparation technique enhanced the ion exchange capacity and improves the film stability compared to previous methods for the deposition of ESIX films. (authors)

  1. United States Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy Source, 2006 - 2010" "(Megawatts)" "United States" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2274,2214,2229,2382,2405 "Hydro Conventional",77821,77885,77930,78518,78825 "Solar",411,502,536,619,941 "Wind",11329,16515,24651,34296,39135 "Wood/Wood Waste",6372,6704,6864,6939,7037 "MSW/Landfill Gas",3166,3536,3644,3645,3690

  2. Magnitude and Variability of Controllable Charge Capacity Provided by Grid Connected Plug-in Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoffield, Don R; Smart, John; Salisbury, Shawn

    2015-03-01

    As market penetration of plug-in electric vehicles (PEV) increases over time, the number of PEVs charging on the electric grid will also increase. As the number of PEVs increases, their ability to collectively impact the grid increases. The idea of a large body of PEVs connected to the grid presents an intriguing possibility. If utilities can control PEV charging, it is possible that PEVs could act as a distributed resource to provide grid services. The technology required to control charging is available for modern PEVs. However, a system for wide-spread implementation of controllable charging, including robust communication between vehicles and utilities, is not currently present. Therefore, the value of controllable charging must be assessed and weighed against the cost of building and operating such as system. In order to grasp the value of PEV charge control to the utility, the following must be understood: 1. The amount of controllable energy and power capacity available to the utility 2. The variability of the controllable capacity from day to day and as the number of PEVs in the market increases.

  3. Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.11b; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Electricity-Only Plants 9<//td> 1989 296,541,828 77,966,348 119,304,288 364,000 494,176,464 98,160,610 18,094,424 73,579,794

  4. Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44,887,000 0 [5] 18,500,000 13,000 [10] NA NA NA 18,513,000 NA 63,400,000 1950 NA NA NA NA 49,987,000 0 [5] 19,200,000 13,000 [10] NA

  5. Advanced Methods for Incorporating Solar Energy Technologies into Electric Sector Capacity-Expansion Models: Literature Review and Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, P.; Eurek, K.; Margolis, R.

    2014-07-01

    Because solar power is a rapidly growing component of the electricity system, robust representations of solar technologies should be included in capacity-expansion models. This is a challenge because modeling the electricity system--and, in particular, modeling solar integration within that system--is a complex endeavor. This report highlights the major challenges of incorporating solar technologies into capacity-expansion models and shows examples of how specific models address those challenges. These challenges include modeling non-dispatchable technologies, determining which solar technologies to model, choosing a spatial resolution, incorporating a solar resource assessment, and accounting for solar generation variability and uncertainty.

  6. "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand[1] -- Winter"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B Winter net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation" "Region, 2001/2002-2014/2015 actual, 2015-2017 projected" "megawatts and percent" "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand[1] -- Winter" ,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected" ,,"2001/ 2002","2002/ 2003","2003/ 2004","2004/

  7. Winter Storms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Winter Storms Winter has set its sights upon us, just in time to make the holidays bright. Remembering the joy winter brought us when we were children might help us cope with the hazards and inconvenience of the season, but we can't avoid the coping. The basic mechanisms that support summer storms also occur in winter storms. These mechanisms include low-pressure centers, warm fronts, and cold fronts. As winter approaches, the northern branch of the jet stream dips to the south, bringing cold

  8. Scott Winters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scott winters Scott Winters A Fast-Paced Life On and Off the Track Scott Winters checking a deformable mirror Scott Winters checks a NIF deformable mirror. Stereotypes-popular beliefs about "types" of people-are rarely accurate, if ever. For example, some might not think a stereotypical NASCAR driver would be a Ph.D. engineer, or vice versa. But Scott Winters, the associate division leader for LLNL's Laser Systems Engineering and Operations (LSEO) Division supporting NIF, is both of

  9. ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    f. Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2005 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak ...

  10. ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d. Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 " ,"(Megawatts)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak ...

  11. City of Winter Park Energy Conservation Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Winter Park is now offering rebates to Winter Park electric residential and commercial customers for implementing energy conservation measures.

  12. James L. Winter- Biography

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Jim Winter is the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) Program Lead for the NNSA Office of Environment, Safety and Health (NA-00-10) and has served in various capacities within NNSA and Defense Programs since 1991 regarding nuclear safety and environment, safety and health.

  13. Analysis of Large- Capacity Water Heaters in Electric Thermal Storage Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Alan L.; Anderson, David M.; Winiarski, David W.; Carmichael, Robert T.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Fisher, Andrew R.

    2015-03-17

    This report documents a national impact analysis of large tank heat pump water heaters (HPWH) in electric thermal storage (ETS) programs and conveys the findings related to concerns raised by utilities regarding the ability of large-tank heat pump water heaters to provide electric thermal storage services.

  14. Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-30

    Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013-Winter Fuels.pptx

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    on households. * EIA expects higher prices this winter for homes that heat with natural gas propane and electricity Home heating oil prices natural gas, propane, and electricity. ...

  16. Winter 2014 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Wind The U.S. wind energy industry continued its strong growth in 2015, adding new generating capacity faster than any other source of electricity generation. Get the latest update on the state of the industry in our 2015 Wind Market Reports. The U.S. wind energy industry continued its strong growth in 2015, adding new generating capacity faster than any other source of electricity generation. Get the latest update on the state of the industry in our 2015 Wind Market Reports. The United

  17. Table 8.12a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Electric Noncoincident Peak Load and Capacity Margin: Summer Peak Period, 1986-2011 (Megawatts, Except as Noted) Year Noncoincident Peak Load 1 by North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2 Regional Assessment Area Capacity Margin 21 (percent) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT 4 Western Inter- connection All Inter- connections FRCC 5 NPCC 6 Balance of Eastern Region 3 ECAR 7,8 MAAC 8,9 MAIN 8,10 MAPP 11 MISO 12 MRO 13 PJM 14 RFC 8,15 SERC 16 SPP 17 Subtotal TRE 18 WECC 19 Total 20

  18. Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 8 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 7 Wind Total Wood 5 Waste 6 Commercial Sector 9<//td> 1989 258,193 191,487 578,797 – 1,028,477 [–] – 17,942 13,144 166,392 [–] – – 197,478 – 1,225,955 1990

  19. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924

  20. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MISSION The mission of the Electricity Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in implementing the Energy Policy Act of 2005, executing the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure. ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE GOALS The goals of the Electricity Advisory Committee are to provide advice on: * Electricity policy issues pertaining to the U.S. Department of Energy

  1. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: June 2016 Stocks In June, U.S. coal stockpiles decreased to 185 million tons, down 5.2% from the previous month. As a whole, U.S. coal stockpiles are still at relatively high levels due to the mild winter experienced earlier in the year and also becaue coal continues to lose market share to natural gas in most regions of the country. Days of burn Days of burn by coal rank Capacity by days of burn The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants

  2. Form EIA-411 for 2006",,"WINTER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    WINTER" ,"Released: February 7, 2008" ,"Next Update: October 2008" "Table 5j. Winter (FRCC) Historical and Projected Demand and Capacity, Calendar Year 2006 " "Region","FRCC" "Subregion", "Country","U" ,"WINTER",,"Actual","Projected"

  3. 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Grid Tech Team » Activities/Outreach » GTT Activities » 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting At the 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting, held February 5-8, 2012, the GTT presented a poster and handout of its vision of the future grid. Return to GTT Activities 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting - GTT Handout with Poster (621.69 KB) More Documents & Publications 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit NARUC Vision of the Future Grid Webinar (January 2012) 2012 National Electricity Forum

  4. winter_peak_2003.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ) Form EIA-411 for 2005 Released: February 7, 2008 Next Update: October 2007 Table 2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2003 and Projected 2004 through 2008 (Megawatts and 2003 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP (U.S. NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097

  5. winter_peak_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 and Projected 2005 through 2009 (Megawatts and 2004 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097 30,800 36,551 32,461 21,113 40,545 86,648 38,949 35,815 94,252 1991/1992 485,761

  6. winter_peak_2005.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b . Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 (Megawatts and 2005 Base Year) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Projected Year Base Year FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) RFC SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 2005/2006 626,365 42,657 33,748 46,828 151,600 164,638 31,260 48,141 107,493 Contiguous U.S. Projected FRCC MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.)

  7. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2007 and Projected 2008 through 2012 " ,"(Megawatts and 2007 ...

  8. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2006 and Projected 2007 through 2011 " ,"(Megawatts and 2006 ...

  9. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, " ,"2005 and Projected 2006 through 2010 " ,"(Megawatts and 2005 Base ...

  10. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, " ,"2009 and Projected 2010 through 2014 " ,"(Megawatts and 2009 ...

  11. Table 8.11a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Kilowatts)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Electric Net Summer Capacity: Total (All Sectors), 1949-2011 (Sum of Tables 8.11b and 8.11d; Kilowatts) Year Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Pumped Storage Renewable Energy Other 9 Total Coal 1 Petroleum 2 Natural Gas 3 Other Gases 4 Total Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV 8 Wind Total Wood 6 Waste 7 1949 NA NA NA NA 44,887,000 0 [5] 18,500,000 13,000 [10] NA NA NA 18,513,000 NA 63,400,000 1950 NA NA NA NA 49,987,000 0 [5] 19,200,000 13,000

  12. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights  EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly

  13. Winters fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-27

    The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter`s pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter`s, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year`s STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories.

  14. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting its winter program meeting to work together and define market interventions that increase energy efficiency.

  15. CEE Winter Program Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE) is hosting their Winter Program Meeting, a two-day conference held in Long Beach, California.

  16. EIA Winter Fuels Outlook

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    7, 2014 2 EIA actions to improve winter fuels information * More Detailed Weekly Propane Stock Data - In addition to weekly PADD- level propane stocks, EIA will publish...

  17. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization. A Summary of High-Renewable Modeling Experience for China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, Nate; Zhou, Ella; Getman, Dan; Arent, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    Mathematical and computational models are widely used for the analysis and design of both physical and financial systems. Modeling the electric grid is of particular importance to China for three reasons. First, power-sector assets are expensive and long-lived, and they are critical to any country's development. China's electric load, transmission, and other energy-related infrastructure are expected to continue to grow rapidly; therefore it is crucial to understand and help plan for the future in which those assets will operate (NDRC ERI 2015). Second, China has dramatically increased its deployment of renewable energy (RE), and is likely to continue further accelerating such deployment over the coming decades. Careful planning and assessment of the various aspects (technical, economic, social, and political) of integrating a large amount of renewables on the grid is required. Third, companies need the tools to develop a strategy for their own involvement in the power market China is now developing, and to enable a possible transition to an efficient and high RE future.

  18. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization: A Summary of High-Renewable Modeling Experiences (Chinese Translation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, Nate; Zhou, Ella; Getman, Dan; Arent, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    This is the Chinese translation of NREL/TP-6A20-64831. Mathematical and computational models are widely used for the analysis and design of both physical and financial systems. Modeling the electric grid is of particular importance to China for three reasons. First, power-sector assets are expensive and long-lived, and they are critical to any country's development. China's electric load, transmission, and other energy-related infrastructure are expected to continue to grow rapidly; therefore it is crucial to understand and help plan for the future in which those assets will operate. Second, China has dramatically increased its deployment of renewable energy (RE), and is likely to continue further accelerating such deployment over the coming decades. Careful planning and assessment of the various aspects (technical, economic, social, and political) of integrating a large amount of renewables on the grid is required. Third, companies need the tools to develop a strategy for their own involvement in the power market China is now developing, and to enable a possible transition to an efficient and high RE future.

  19. Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 October 7, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on November 1 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Originally scheduled for October 8, the conference has been

  20. Property:Capacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Capacity Property Type Quantity Description Potential electric energy generation, default units of megawatts. Use this property...

  1. NARUC Winter Committee Meetings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Association of Regulatory Utilities Commissioners (NARUC) Winter Committee Meetings offers its members and attendees the latest information from U.S. federal policymakers, consumer advocates, industry officials, and other stakeholders.

  2. 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the 2012 NARUC Winter Meeting, held February 5-8, 2012, the GTT presented a poster and handout of its vision of the future grid. 

  3. National FCEV Learning Demonstration: Winter 2011 Composite Data Products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes the composite data products produced in Winter 2011 as part of the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2010 Existing Capacity, by Energy Source (GW) Number of Generator Nameplate Net Summer Net Winter Plant Fuel Type Generators Capacity Capacity Capacity Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Pumped Storage Other Total Source(s): EIA, Electric Power Annual 2010, Feb. 2012, Table 1.2. 51 1.0 0.9 0.9 18,150 1,138.6 1,039.1 1,078.7 1,574 5.0 4.4 4.4 151 20.5 22.2 22.1 346 7.9

  5. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  6. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2016 | Release Date: June 22, 2016 | Next Release Date: June 23, 2017 Previous Issues Year: 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 prior issues Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators

  7. Winter Road Closings | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winter Heating Fuels Click on the map to view state specific heating fuels data below | click to reset to U.S. values Click on map above to view state-specific heating fuel data Propane Heating oil Natural gas Electricity For more data on: Heating oil and propane prices - Heating Oil and Propane Update Propane stocks - Weekly Petroleum Status Report Heating oil/distillate stocks - Weekly Petroleum Status Report Natural gas storage - Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Natural gas prices - Natural

  8. Proposed changes to generating capacity 1980-1989 for the contiguous United States: as projected by the Regional Electric Reliability Councils in their April 1, 1980 long-range coordinated planning reports to the Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-12-01

    The changes in generating capacity projected for 1980 to 1989 are summarized. Tabulated data provide summaries to the information on projected generating unit construction, retirements, and changes, in several different categories and groupings. The new generating units to be completed by the end of 1989 total 699, representing 259,490 megawatts. This total includes 10 wind power and one fuel cell installations totaling 48.5 MW to be completed by the end of 1989. There are 321 units totaling 13,222 MW to be retired. There are capacity changes due to upratings and deratings. Summary data are presented for: total requirement for electric energy generation for 1985; hydroelectric energy production for 1985; nuclear energy production for 1985; geothermal and other energy production for 1985; approximate non-fossil generation for 1985; range of fossil energy requirements for 1985; actual fossil energy sources 1974 to 1979; estimated range of fossil fuel requirements for 1985; coal capacity available in 1985; and computation of fuel use in 1985. Power plant capacity factors are presented. Extensive data on proposed generating capacity changes by individual units in the 9 Regional Electric Reliability Councils are presented.

  9. ,"Table 4.B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...44924,44637,44422,44215.557,44353.557 ,,"Balance of Eastern Region",341158,360748,357026,3...2,77155.21552,77850.24952,77706.30352 ,,"Balance of Eastern Region",488418,511642,524995,5...

  10. winter_peak_1990_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    d . Historical Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual by North American Electric Reliability Council Region, 1990 through 2004 (Megawatts) Winter Noncoincident Peak Load Contiguous U.S. Eastern Power Grid Texas Power Grid Western Power Grid Year ECAR FRCC MAAC MAIN MAPP/MRO (U.S.) NPCC (U.S.) SERC SPP ERCOT WECC (U.S.) 1990/1991 484,231 67,097 30,800 36,551 32,461 21,113 40,545 86,648 38,949 35,815 94,252 1991/1992 485,761 71,181 31,153 37,983 33,420 21,432 41,866 88,422 38,759 35,448 86,097

  11. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2014 Stocks Extreme cold throughout the winter continued in February, leading to a 13.4 million ton decline in coal inventories from...

  12. EIS-0171: Pacificorp Capacity Sale

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) EIS assesses the proposed action of providing surplus power from its facilites to PacifiCorp in response to its request for a continued supply of firm capacity. BPA has surplus electrical capacity (peakload energy) that BPA projects will not be required to meet its existing obligations.

  13. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-17

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

  14. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-29

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

  15. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-03

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  16. Refinery Capacity Report - Explanatory Notes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information Administration/Refinery Capacity Report 1 Explanatory Notes Survey Methodology Description of Survey Form The Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report," is the primary source of data in the "Refinery Capacity Report" tables. The form collects data on the consumption of purchased steam, electricity, coal, and natural gas; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; operable capacity for atmospheric crude oil distillation units and downstream

  17. DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 September 26, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This supply and

  18. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-13

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  19. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-27

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysis, and State and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s, as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  20. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-04

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

  1. Winter fuels report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

  2. Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings)...

  3. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cheap price of natural gas reduced coals share of electricity production. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power...

  4. Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Kiliccote, Sila; Dudley, Junqiao H.

    2011-11-11

    There are growing strains on the electric grid as cooling peaks grow and equipment ages. Increased penetration of renewables on the grid is also straining electricity supply systems and the need for flexible demand is growing. This paper summarizes results of a series of field test of automated demand response systems in large buildings in the Pacific Northwest. The objective of the research was two fold. One objective was to evaluate the use demand response automation technologies. A second objective was to evaluate control strategies that could change the electric load shape in both winter and summer conditions. Winter conditions focused on cold winter mornings, a time when the electric grid is often stressed. The summer test evaluated DR strategies in the afternoon. We found that we could automate both winter and summer control strategies with the open automated demand response communication standard. The buildings were able to provide significant demand response in both winter and summer events.

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,392 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,901 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,720 10.1 Solar 20 - Wind 128 - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 5,866 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,085 52.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,705 46.1 Solar - - Wind 379 6.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,180 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 671 16.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 489 11.7 Solar - - Wind 24 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 129 3.1

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,674 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,499 9.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,956 7.1 Solar 35 0.1 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 481 1.7

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 45,575 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,984 4.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 747 1.6 Solar 9 * Wind 696 1.5 Wood/Wood Waste 108 0.2

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 23,982 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,623 6.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,340 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 255 1.1

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,847 13.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,624 12.3 Solar - - Wind 29 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste 185 0.9

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 17,836 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,267 7.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 492 2.8 Solar - - Wind 449 2.5 Wood/Wood Waste 239 1.3

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  20. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service Date","Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits",,"Company Information"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Table 6. Existing and Proposed High-voltage Transmission Line Additions Filed For Calendar Year 2004, by North American Electric Reliability Council, 2004 Through 2009" ,"(Various)",,,,,,,,,,,," " ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service Date","Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits",,"Company

  1. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service Date","Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits",,"Company Information"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Covering Calendar Year 2005, by North American Electric Reliability Council, 2006 Through 2011" ,"(Various)" ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity Rating (MVa)","In-Service Date","Electrical Connection Locations",,"Line Information",,,,"Conductor Characteristics",,,"Circuits",,"Company Information" ,"Country - with Total (T) for sub-regions","NERC Region"," NERC

  2. winter_peak_2006.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    entity that oversee electric reliability. * NERC Regional names may be found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name has changed from Mid-Continent Area Power ...

  3. NNMCAB Newsletter: Winter 2015 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 NNMCAB Newsletter: Winter 2015 Inside This Issue: NNMCAB LANL Tour NNMCAB New Student Farewell to Christina Houston Words from the Vice-Chair NNMCAB Recruiting Volume III, Issue I - Winter 2015 (1.8

  4. An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters of 2013... Before the House Subcommittee on Energy and Power - Committee on Energy and Commerce

  5. Winter Energy Savings from Lower Thermostat Settings

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This discussion provides details on the effect of lowering thermostat settings during the winter heating months of 1997.

  6. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity transactions, reliability Electricity and the environment All electricity data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Capacity and generation Costs, ...

  7. WINTER

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    6b1 Wind Derate On-Peak - - - - 6b2 Solar Derate On-Peak - - - - 6b3 Hydro Derate On-Peak - - - - 6b4 Biomass Derate On-Peak - - - - 6b5 Energy Only 610 1,057 1,111 1,186 6b6 ...

  8. WINTER

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    45042 40846 41411 42367 43080 43813 44928 45872 46837 47874 48984 4a Demand Response used for Reserves - Spinning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4b Demand Response used for ...

  9. WINTER

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    51,703 42,716 43,197 43,801 44,457 45,174 45,882 46,596 47,385 48,233 49,082 4a Demand Response used for Reserves - Spinning 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4b Demand Response used for ...

  10. Heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, and electric resistivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Neel temperature of CePdSn is anomalously large compared with that expected on the basis of de Gennes scaling from the ital Tsub ital N of 14.5 K of isostructural GdPdSn, ...

  11. Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0, 2012 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012 September 12, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials are hosting the 2012 - 2013 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. This important supply and demand forecast event will

  12. Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 2, 2011 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 September 19, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials invite you to participate in the 2011 - 2012 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference. This important supply and demand forecast event will be held on Wednesday, October 12,

  13. Households to pay more than expected to stay warm this winter

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Households to pay more than expected to stay warm this winter Following a colder-than-expected November, U.S. households are forecast to consume more heating fuels than previously expected....resulting in higher heating bills. Homeowners that rely on natural gas will see their total winter expenses rise nearly 13 percent from last winter....while users of electric heat will see a 2.6 percent increase in costs. That's the latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Propane

  14. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2015-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  15. Monthly/Annual Energy Review - electricity section

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2016-01-01

    Monthly and latest annual statistics on electricity generation, capacity, end-use, fuel use and stocks, and retail price.

  16. Property:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Offshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric...

  17. Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from EGS Geothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric...

  18. FAQs about Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or ... Do I have to report storage capacity every month? No, only report storage capacity with ...

  19. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  20. Why Is Static Electricity in Winter More Noticeable? | GE Global...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comment Name Email Submit Comment You Might Also Like lightning bolt We One-Upped Ben Franklin, Catching Lightning in a Bottle and Using it to Start a Car JimmyLopezbiorefineri...

  1. NNMCAB Newsletter: Winter 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 NNMCAB Newsletter: Winter 2013 Inside This Issue: Special thanks to the former NNMCAB Chair Ralph Phelps Meet the new NNMCAB Staff LANL Reading Room EM SSAB Mission Meet the Chair Meet the Vice-Chair Volume I, Issue I - Winter 2013 (427.19 KB

  2. Electric Power Annual 2010

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 1999 through 2010" ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand (MW)[1] -- Summer" ,,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  3. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries by PAD District as of January 1, 2006 PDF 9 Shell Storage Capacity at Operable Refineries by PAD District as of January 1, 2006 PDF 10...

  5. Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

    2009-07-15

    Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 California full profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Colorado Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hawaii Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Idaho Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,990 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,140 78.7 Geothermal 10 0.3 Hydro Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 Wood/Wood Waste 68 1.7 MSW/Landfill

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Illinois Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Indiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s *

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Iowa Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 *

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maine Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Minnesota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 11,421 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,507 13.2 Geothermal 319 2.8 Hydro Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mexico Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 California full profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 67,328 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 16,460 24.4 Geothermal 2,004 3.0 Hydro Conventional 10,141 15.1 Solar 475 0.7 Wind 2,812 4.2 Wood/Wood

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,990 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,140 78.7 Geothermal 10 0.3 Hydro Conventional 2,704 67.8 Solar - - Wind 352 8.8 Wood/Wood Waste 68 1.7 MSW/Landfill

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - -

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s *

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 *

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 11,421 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,507 13.2 Geothermal 319 2.8 Hydro Conventional 1,051 9.2 Solar 137 1.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 39,357 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 6,033 15.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4,314 11.0 Solar - - Wind 1,274 3.2 Wood/Wood Waste 86 0.2

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,497 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 528 7.0 Geothermal 42 0.6 Hydro Conventional 255 3.4 Solar - - Wind 222 3.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 9 0.1

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 30,478 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 23,884 78.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 21,181 69.5 Solar 1 * Wind 2,296 7.5 Wood/Wood Waste 368 1.2

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 United States profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,039,137 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 132,711 12.8 Geothermal 2,405 0.2 Hydro Conventional 78,825 7.6 Solar 941 0.1 Wind 39,135 3.8

  9. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  10. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  11. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  12. Wind Gains ground, hitting 33 GW of installed capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-15

    The U.S. currently has 33 GW of installed wind capacity. Wind continues to gain ground, accounting for 42 percent of new capacity additions in the US in 2008.Globally, there are now 146 GW of wind capacity with an impressive and sustained growth trajectory that promises to dominate new generation capacities in many developing countries. The U.S., however, lags many European countries, with wind providing roughly 2 percent of electricity generation.

  13. Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) ... 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow). ...

  14. 2014 NCAI Executive Council Winter Session

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Executive Council Winter Session is a working conference where members convene for in-depth conversations about policy, legislation, and the future of Indian Country. 

  15. Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2000-01-01

    This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

  16. Winter Heating Fuels - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Winter Heating Fuels Click on the map to view state specific heating fuels data below | click to reset to U.S. values Click on map above to view state-specific heating fuel data ...

  17. Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradbury Science Museum winter hours Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours Museum will be closed on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year's Day (January 1, 2011). December 21, 2010 Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Often called "a window to the Laboratory," the museum annually attracts thousands of visitors from all over the world. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 21, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory's

  18. Finnish Electric Vehicle Technologies FEVT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Offers large capacity electrical energy storage solutions using technology based on lithium-ion batteries and intelligent cell control systems. References: Finnish Electric...

  19. Annual Electric Generator data - EIA-860 data file

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ... date, energy source, heat content, nameplate capacity, summer and winter capability, etc. 860-A (Utility) Data are compressed into a zip file that expands into xls data files and a ...

  20. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

  1. WINDExchange: Potential Wind Capacity

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Potential Wind Capacity Potential wind capacity maps are provided for a 2014 industry standard wind turbine installed on a 110-m tower, which represents plausible current technology options, and a wind turbine on a 140-m tower, which represents near-future technology options. For more detailed information regarding the assumptions and calculations behind the wind potential capacity maps, see the Energy Department's Enabling Wind Power Nationwide report. Enlarge image This map shows the wind

  2. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vacuum State/Refiner/Location Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Barrels per Operating Idle Operating Idle Downstream Charge Capacity Thermal Cracking Delayed Fluid Coking Visbreaking Other/Gas Calendar Day Stream Day Distillation Coking Oil Table 3. Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2016 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) ......................................................... Alabama 131,675 0 140,500 0 47,000 32,000 0 0 0

  3. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels ... Catalytic Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (Barrels per Stream Day) Cracking Thermal ...

  4. Electricity Transmission Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  5. Electricity Transmission and Distribution Technologies Available for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  6. Unbundling electricity: Ancillary services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.

    1996-06-01

    The US electricity industry, dominated by vertically integrated, retail-monopoly, regulated utilities, is undergoing enormous changes. The industry, within the next few years, will evolve into a deintegrated, competitive-market dominated, less regulated industry. Part of this process involves unbundling electric generation from transmission, which raises the issue of ancillary services. Since the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) published its March 1995 proposed rule on open-access transmission, ancillary services have been an important topic. Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, transmit, and distribute electricity to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. These services cost US electricity consumers about $12 billion a year. This article examines the functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, transmit, and distribute electricity to support the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery.

  7. Variable capacity gasification burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxon, D.I.

    1985-03-05

    A variable capacity burner that may be used in gasification processes, the burner being adjustable when operating in its intended operating environment to operate at two different flow capacities, with the adjustable parts being dynamically sealed within a statically sealed structural arrangement to prevent dangerous blow-outs of the reactants to the atmosphere.

  8. Liquid heat capacity lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Comaskey, Brian J.; Scheibner, Karl F.; Ault, Earl R.

    2007-05-01

    The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

  9. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Table 5. Refiners' Total Operable Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity as of January 1, 2016 Calendar Day Barrels per CORPORATION / Refiner / Location Calendar Day Barrels per Companies with Capacity Over 100,000 bbl/cd .............................................................................................................................. VALERO ENERGY CORP 2,062,300 Valero Refining Co Texas LP

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cokers Catalytic Crackers Hydrocrackers Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Capacity Inputs Table 8. Capacity and Fresh Feed Input to Selected Downstream Units at U.S. Refineries, 2014 - 2016 (Barrels per Calendar Day) Reformers Capacity Inputs 2014 2,686,917 5,616,015 2,034,689 2,337,425 4,884,975 1,662,603 2,591,992 3,419,407 74,900 475,800 41,500 47,633 407,342 29,849 PADD I 175,036 240,550 520,521 1,213,427 310,950 444,060 1,023,877 267,016 PADD II 645,874 837,754 1,479,496 2,916,764 1,118,239

  11. Knudsen heat capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babac, Gulru; Reese, Jason M.

    2014-05-15

    We present a Knudsen heat capacity as a more appropriate and useful fluid property in micro/nanoscale gas systems than the constant pressure heat capacity. At these scales, different fluid processes come to the fore that are not normally observed at the macroscale. For thermodynamic analyses that include these Knudsen processes, using the Knudsen heat capacity can be more effective and physical. We calculate this heat capacity theoretically for non-ideal monatomic and diatomic gases, in particular, helium, nitrogen, and hydrogen. The quantum modification for para and ortho hydrogen is also considered. We numerically model the Knudsen heat capacity using molecular dynamics simulations for the considered gases, and compare these results with the theoretical ones.

  12. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 32,417 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,855 11.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3,272 10.1 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 583 1.8 MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 152,151 100.0 Total

  13. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,623 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,223 61.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 1,594 44.0 Solar - - Wind 629 17.3 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 10,050 100.0 Total

  14. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  15. Electricity Monthly Update - Energy Information Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rapid growth in photovoltaic capacity. Solar electricity output in June is a good indicator of the recent growth of the solar industry, because June has the highest monthly...

  16. Fail-safe designs for large capacity battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Gi-Heon; Smith, Kandler; Ireland, John; Pesaran, Ahmad A.; Neubauer, Jeremy

    2016-05-17

    Fail-safe systems and design methodologies for large capacity battery systems are disclosed. The disclosed systems and methodologies serve to locate a faulty cell in a large capacity battery, such as a cell having an internal short circuit, determine whether the fault is evolving, and electrically isolate the faulty cell from the rest of the battery, preventing further electrical energy from feeding into the fault.

  17. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected" "megawatts and percent" "Interconnection","NERC Regional Assesment Area","Net Internal Demand (MW)[1] -- Summer" ,,"Actual",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Projected"

  18. Forward capacity market CONEfusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, James F.

    2010-11-15

    In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

  19. Florida's electric industry and solar electric technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camejo, N.

    1983-12-01

    The Florida Electric Industry is in a process of diversifying its generation technology and its fuel mix. This is being done in an effort to reduce oil consumption, which in 1981 accounted for 46.5% of the electric generation by fuel type. This does not compare well with the rest of the nation where oil use is lower. New coal and nuclear units are coming on line, and probably more will be built in the near future. However, eventhough conservation efforts may delay their construction, new power plants will have to be built to accomodate the growing demand for electricity. Other alternatives being considered are renewable energy resources. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a research project in which 10 electric utilities in Florida and the Florida Electric Power Coordinating Group rated six Solar Electric options. The Solar Electric options considered are: 1) Wind, 2) P.V., 3) Solar thermal-electric, 4) OTEC, 5) Ocean current, and 6) Biomass. The questionaire involved rating the economic and technical feasibility, as well as, the potential environmental impact of these options in Florida. It also involved rating the difficulty in overcoming institutional barriers and assessing the status of each option. A copy of the questionaire is included after the references. The combined capacity of the participating utilities represent over 90% of the total generating capacity in Florida. A list of the participating utilities is also included. This research was done in partial fulfillment for the Mater's of Science Degree in Coastal Zone Management. This paper is complementary to another paper (in these condensed conference proceedings) titled COASTAL ZONE ENERGY MANAGEMENT: A multidisciplinary approach for the integration of Solar Electric Systems with Florida's power generation system, which present a summary of the Master's thesis.

  20. High capacity anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lopez, Herman A.; Anguchamy, Yogesh Kumar; Deng, Haixia; Han, Yongbon; Masarapu, Charan; Venkatachalam, Subramanian; Kumar, Suject

    2015-11-19

    High capacity silicon based anode active materials are described for lithium ion batteries. These materials are shown to be effective in combination with high capacity lithium rich cathode active materials. Supplemental lithium is shown to improve the cycling performance and reduce irreversible capacity loss for at least certain silicon based active materials. In particular silicon based active materials can be formed in composites with electrically conductive coatings, such as pyrolytic carbon coatings or metal coatings, and composites can also be formed with other electrically conductive carbon components, such as carbon nanofibers and carbon nanoparticles. Additional alloys with silicon are explored.

  1. National 8a Association 2016 Winter Conference | Department of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National 8a Association 2016 Winter Conference National 8a Association 2016 Winter Conference February 9, 2016 9:00AM EST to February 10, 2016 5:00PM EST National 8(a) Association...

  2. University of Michigan Gets Offshore Wind Ready for Winter on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Michigan Gets Offshore Wind Ready for Winter on Lake Michigan University of Michigan Gets Offshore Wind Ready for Winter on Lake Michigan April 16, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis The ...

  3. National 8A Winter Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Winter Conference National 8A Winter Conference February 9, 2016 9:00AM EST to February 10, 2016 5:00PM EST Orlando, FL More information coming soon....

  4. Geothermal Plant Capacity Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Jay Nathwani; Christopher Richard; Hillary Hanson; Rachel Wood

    2015-01-01

    The capacity factors recently provided by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) indicated this plant performance metric had declined for geothermal power plants since 2008. Though capacity factor is a term commonly used by geothermal stakeholders to express the ability of a plant to produce power, it is a term frequently misunderstood and in some instances incorrectly used. In this paper we discuss how this capacity factor is defined and utilized by the EIA, including discussion on the information that the EIA requests from operations in their 923 and 860 forms that are submitted both monthly and annually by geothermal operators. A discussion is also provided regarding the entities utilizing the information in the EIA reports, and how those entities can misinterpret the data being supplied by the operators. The intent of the paper is to inform the facility operators as the importance of the accuracy of the data that they provide, and the implications of not providing the correct information.

  5. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Robert W.

    1984-01-01

    A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

  6. Dual capacity reciprocating compressor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfe, R.W.

    1984-10-30

    A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

  7. Alaska Energy Pioneer Winter 2016 Newsletter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winter 2016 Newsletter Alaska Energy Pioneer Winter 2016 Newsletter The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy's Alaska Energy Pioneer Winter 2016 newsletter highlights opportunities and actions to accelerate Alaska Native energy development. Alaska Energy Pioneer - Winter 2016 (1.33 MB) More Documents & Publications Office of Indian Energy Alaska Energy Pioneer Spring 2015 Newsletter Alaska Energy Pioneer Fall 2015 Newsletter Alaska Energy Pioneer Spring

  8. Heating Equipment Checklist for Winter Comfort and Efficiency | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Heating Equipment Checklist for Winter Comfort and Efficiency Heating Equipment Checklist for Winter Comfort and Efficiency December 19, 2014 - 10:59am Addthis Using our heating equipment checklist can help you properly maintain your heating system this winter! | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/lionvision Using our heating equipment checklist can help you properly maintain your heating system this winter! | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/lionvision Paige Terlip Paige Terlip

  9. Mid-Winter Check In and Getting Ready for Spring

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Drew Bittner provides energy efficient tips for closing out the winter and preparing for spring savings in the months ahead.

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District and State Production Capacity Alkylates Aromatics Asphalt and Road Oil Isomers Lubricants Marketable Petroleum Coke Sulfur (short tons/day) Hydrogen (MMcfd) Table 2. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2016 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a 83,429 10,111 26,500 92,765 21,045 21,120 69 1,159 PAD District I Delaware 11,729 5,191 0 6,000 0 13,620 40 596 New Jersey 29,200 0 70,000 4,000 12,000 7,500 26 280 Pennsylvania

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Distillation Crude Oil Atmospheric Distillation Vacuum Cracking Thermal Catalytic Cracking Fresh Recycled Catalytic Hydro- Cracking Catalytic Reforming Desulfurization Hydrotreating/ Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Downstream Charge Capacity Table 6. Operable Crude Oil and Downstream Charge Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1987 to (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) January 1, 2016 JAN 1, 1987 16,460 6,935 1,928 5,251 466 1,189 3,805 9,083 230 JAN 1, 1988 16,825 7,198

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil and Lubricants Petroleum Coke (MMcfd) Hydrogen Sulfur (short tons/day) Production Capacity Asphalt Isomers Marketable Table 7. Operable Production Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1987 to January 1, 2016 (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a JAN 1, 1987 974 287 788 326 250 364 2,569 23,806 JAN 1, 1988 993 289 788 465 232 368 2,418 27,639 JAN 1, 1989 1,015 290 823 469 230 333 2,501 28,369 JAN 1, 1990 1,030 290 844 456 232 341 2,607 24,202

  13. Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Winter 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Newsletter: Winter 2012 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Winter 2012 53869_DOE-IE Newsletter_Winter 2012_FINAL_0.pdf (1.05 MB) More Documents & Publications ICEIWG Meeting Agenda: March 14, 2013 Office of Indian Energy Newsletter: Fall 2012

  14. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuelson, Lisa [Auburn University] [Auburn University

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arkansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,754 30 Electric utilities 11,526 23 IPP & CHP 3,227 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,592,137 24 Electric utilities 48,752,895 18 IPP & CHP 12,839,241 28 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,528 15 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 47,048 20 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 37,289 23 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 9 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oregon Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oregon) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,884 27 Electric utilities 11,175 25 IPP & CHP 4,709 19 Net generation (megawatthours) 60,119,907 26 Electric utilities 44,565,239 24 IPP & CHP 15,554,668 21 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,595 39 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 14,313 42 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 8,334 40 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 42 Nitrogen

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    South Dakota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,948 45 Electric utilities 3,450 36 IPP & CHP 499 48 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,995,240 45 Electric utilities 9,344,872 38 IPP & CHP 1,650,368 48 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 13,852 35 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 10,638 44 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,093 47 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 15

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Washington Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Washington) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,949 10 Electric utilities 27,376 5 IPP & CHP 3,573 26 Net generation (megawatthours) 116,334,363 11 Electric utilities 102,294,256 5 IPP & CHP 14,040,107 24 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 13,716 36 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 18,316 40 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,427 398 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 44

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    West Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (West Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,276 25 Electric utilities 11,981 21 IPP & CHP 4,295 21 Net generation (megawatthours) 81,059,577 19 Electric utilities 63,331,833 15 IPP & CHP 17,727,743 17 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 102,406 12 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 72,995 11 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 73,606 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 14

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,464 48 Electric utilities 2,313 39 IPP & CHP 151 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,042,830 50 Electric utilities 5,509,991 40 IPP & CHP 532,839 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,129 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,281 38 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,558 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Arizona) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 28,249 13 Electric utilities 21,311 11 IPP & CHP 6,938 17 Net generation (megawatthours) 112,257,187 13 Electric utilities 94,847,135 8 IPP & CHP 17,410,053 19 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 22,597 32 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 56,726 17 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 53,684 16 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 41 Nitrogen oxide

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Colorado) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,933 29 Electric utilities 10,204 28 IPP & CHP 4,729 18 Net generation (megawatthours) 53,847,386 30 Electric utilities 43,239,615 26 IPP & CHP 10,607,771 30 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 28,453 30 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 44,349 24 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 38,474 22 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Connecticut) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,832 35 Electric utilities 161 45 IPP & CHP 8,671 12 Net generation (megawatthours) 33,676,980 38 Electric utilities 54,693 45 IPP & CHP 33,622,288 11 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 1,897 47 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,910 45 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,959 41 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 46 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Georgia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 38,250 7 Electric utilities 28,873 3 IPP & CHP 9,377 10 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,837,224 10 Electric utilities 109,523,336 4 IPP & CHP 16,313,888 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 105,998 11 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,144 14 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 62,516 12 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 24 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Hawaii) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Petroleum Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,672 47 Electric utilities 1,732 40 IPP & CHP 939 45 Net generation (megawatthours) 10,204,158 46 Electric utilities 5,517,389 39 IPP & CHP 4,686,769 40 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 21,670 33 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 26,928 31 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 7,313 42 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.2 4 Nitrogen oxide

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Idaho) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Hydroelectric Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,944 42 Electric utilities 3,413 37 IPP & CHP 1,531 39 Net generation (megawatthours) 15,184,417 43 Electric utilities 9,628,016 37 IPP & CHP 5,556,400 39 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 5,777 42 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,301 37 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 1,492 49 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 36 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Illinois) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 44,727 4 Electric utilities 5,263 35 IPP & CHP 39,464 4 Net generation (megawatthours) 202,143,878 4 Electric utilities 10,457,398 36 IPP & CHP 191,686,480 3 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 187,536 6 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 58,076 15 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 96,624 6 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 20 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Indiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 27,499 14 Electric utilities 23,319 7 IPP & CHP 4,180 23 Net generation (megawatthours) 115,395,392 12 Electric utilities 100,983,285 6 IPP & CHP 14,412,107 22 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 332,396 3 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 133,412 3 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 103,391 3 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.8 1 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Iowa) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,507 24 Electric utilities 12,655 20 IPP & CHP 3,852 25 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,853,282 28 Electric utilities 43,021,954 27 IPP & CHP 13,831,328 25 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 74,422 19 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 41,793 25 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 39,312 21 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 13 Nitrogen oxide

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kansas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 14,227 31 Electric utilities 11,468 24 IPP & CHP 2,759 33 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,728,363 31 Electric utilities 39,669,629 29 IPP & CHP 10,058,734 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,550 29 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 29,014 29 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 31,794 29 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Kentucky) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,878 21 Electric utilities 19,473 15 IPP & CHP 1,405 40 Net generation (megawatthours) 90,896,435 17 Electric utilities 90,133,403 10 IPP & CHP 763,032 49 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 204,873 5 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 89,253 7 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 85,795 7 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.5 3 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maryland) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 12,264 33 Electric utilities 85 47 IPP & CHP 12,179 8 Net generation (megawatthours) 37,833,652 35 Electric utilities 20,260 47 IPP & CHP 37,813,392 9 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 41,370 26 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,626 35 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 20,414 34 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 18 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Michigan) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,435 12 Electric utilities 22,260 9 IPP & CHP 8,175 14 Net generation (megawatthours) 106,816,991 14 Electric utilities 84,075,322 12 IPP & CHP 22,741,669 13 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 173,521 7 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,950 9 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 64,062 11 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 7 Nitrogen oxide

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Minnesota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 15,621 28 Electric utilities 11,557 22 IPP & CHP 4,064 24 Net generation (megawatthours) 56,998,330 27 Electric utilities 45,963,271 22 IPP & CHP 11,035,059 29 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 39,272 27 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 38,373 28 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 32,399 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 27 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Missouri) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 21,790 19 Electric utilities 20,538 13 IPP & CHP 1,252 42 Net generation (megawatthours) 87,834,468 18 Electric utilities 85,271,253 11 IPP & CHP 2,563,215 46 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 149,842 9 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 77,749 10 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 75,735 8 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 6 Nitrogen oxide

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Montana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,330 41 Electric utilities 3,209 38 IPP & CHP 3,121 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 30,257,616 41 Electric utilities 12,329,411 35 IPP & CHP 17,928,205 16 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 14,426 34 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 20,538 36 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,678 36 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nebraska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,732 36 Electric utilities 7,913 30 IPP & CHP 819 46 Net generation (megawatthours) 39,431,291 34 Electric utilities 36,560,960 30 IPP & CHP 2,870,331 45 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 63,994 22 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 27,045 30 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 26,348 31 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 8 Nitrogen oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,413 44 Electric utilities 1,121 41 IPP & CHP 3,292 30 Net generation (megawatthours) 19,778,520 42 Electric utilities 2,266,903 41 IPP & CHP 17,511,617 20 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,733 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 5,057 47 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,447 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 45 Nitrogen

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Jersey) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 19,399 22 Electric utilities 544 43 IPP & CHP 18,852 7 Net generation (megawatthours) 68,051,086 23 Electric utilities -117,003 50 IPP & CHP 68,168,089 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,369 44 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 15,615 41 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 17,905 35 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 47 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,072 39 Electric utilities 6,094 33 IPP & CHP 1,978 37 Net generation (megawatthours) 32,306,210 39 Electric utilities 26,422,867 34 IPP & CHP 5,883,343 38 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 12,064 37 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,192 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,712 32 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 37 Nitrogen

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 30,048 12 Electric utilities 26,706 6 IPP & CHP 3,342 29 Net generation (megawatthours) 125,936,293 9 Electric utilities 116,317,050 2 IPP & CHP 9,619,243 31 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 71,293 20 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 62,397 12 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 56,940 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Nitrogen

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Electricity Profile 2013 Table 1. 2013 Summary statistics (North Dakota) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 6,566 40 Electric utilities 5,292 34 IPP & CHP 1,274 41 Net generation (megawatthours) 35,021,673 39 Electric utilities 31,044,374 32 IPP & CHP 3,977,299 42 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 56,854 23 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 48,454 22 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 30,274 28 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 11 Nitrogen oxide

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Ohio) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,507 9 Electric utilities 11,134 26 IPP & CHP 20,372 6 Net generation (megawatthours) 134,476,405 8 Electric utilities 43,290,512 25 IPP & CHP 91,185,893 7 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 355,108 1 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 105,688 4 Carbon dioxide (thousand metrictons) 98,650 5 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.3 2 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,048 17 Electric utilities 17,045 17 IPP & CHP 7,003 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 70,155,504 22 Electric utilities 48,096,026 19 IPP & CHP 22,059,478 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 78,556 18 Nitrogen oxide 44,874 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,994 18 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 17 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 42,723 5 Electric utilities 39 48 IPP & CHP 42,685 3 Net generation (megawatthours) 221,058,365 3 Electric utilities 90,994 44 IPP & CHP 220,967,371 2 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 297,598 4 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 141,486 2 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 101,361 4 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 11 Nitrogen oxide

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (South Carolina) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 22,824 18 Electric utilities 20,836 12 IPP & CHP 1,988 36 Net generation (megawatthours) 97,158,465 16 Electric utilities 93,547,004 9 IPP & CHP 3,611,461 43 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 43,659 25 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 21,592 34 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,083 27 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 35

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Tennessee) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 20,998 20 Electric utilities 20,490 14 IPP & CHP 508 47 Net generation (megawatthours) 79,506,886 20 Electric utilities 76,986,629 13 IPP & CHP 2,520,257 47 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 89,357 16 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,913 33 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 41,405 20 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 16 Nitrogen oxide

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Utah) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,325 38 Electric utilities 7,296 31 IPP & CHP 1,029 44 Net generation (megawatthours) 43,784,526 33 Electric utilities 40,741,425 28 IPP & CHP 3,043,101 44 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 23,646 31 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 57,944 16 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 35,179 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh)

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Vermont) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 650 50 Electric utilities 337 44 IPP & CHP 313 49 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,031,394 48 Electric utilities 868,079 42 IPP & CHP 6,163,315 37 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 71 50 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 737 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 14 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 50 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Virginia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Nuclear Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,292 16 Electric utilities 22,062 10 IPP & CHP 4,231 22 Net generation (megawatthours) 77,137,438 21 Electric utilities 62,966,914 16 IPP & CHP 14,170,524 23 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 68,550 20 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 40,656 26 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,295 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 23 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value Rank Primary Energy Source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 17,166 23 Electric utilities 14,377 18 IPP & CHP 2,788 32 Net generation (megawatthours) 61,064,796 25 Electric utilities 47,301,782 20 IPP & CHP 13,763,014 26 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 81,239 17 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 39,597 27 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,750 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 12 Nitrogen

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Wyoming) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Coal Net summer capacity (megawatts) 8,458 37 Electric utilities 7,233 32 IPP & CHP 1,225 43 Net generation (megawatthours) 49,696,183 32 Electric utilities 45,068,982 23 IPP & CHP 4,627,201 41 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 45,704 24 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 49,638 18 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 47,337 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 22 Nitrogen Oxide

  2. Electric Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This album contains a variety of all-electric, plug-in hybrid electric and fuel cell electric vehicles. For a full list of all electric vehicles visit the EV Everywhere website.

  3. Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are

  4. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 9 9 0 1,277,500 1,245,500 32,000 1,353,000 1,318,000 35,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0

  5. CSTI high capacity power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winter, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    The SP-100 program was established in 1983 by DOD, DOE, and NASA as a joint program to develop the technology necessary for space nuclear power systems for military and civil application. During FY86 and 87, the NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology Program was devised to maintain the momentum of promising technology advancement efforts started during Phase I of SP-100 and to strengthen, in key areas, the chances for successful development and growth capability of space nuclear reactor power systems for future space applications. In FY88, the Advanced Technology Program was incorporated into NASA`s new Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The CSTI Program was established to provide the foundation for technology development in automation and robotics, information, propulsion, and power. The CSTI High Capacity Power Program builds on the technology efforts of the SP-100 program, incorporates the previous NASA SP-100 Advanced Technology project, and provides a bridge to NASA Project Pathfinder. The elements of CSTI High Capacity Power development include Conversion Systems, Thermal Management, Power Management, System Diagnostics, and Environmental Interactions. Technology advancement in all areas, including materials, is required to assure the high reliability and 7 to 10 year lifetime demanded for future space nuclear power systems. The overall program will develop and demonstrate the technology base required to provide a wide range of modular power systems as well as allowing mission independence from solar and orbital attitude requirements. Several recent advancements in CSTI High Capacity power development will be discussed.

  6. ESH&S Newsletter - Winter 2015 | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESH&S Newsletter - Winter 2015 Publication File: PDF icon ESH&S Newsletter - Winter

  7. winter_schedule3_2004.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 2300 1995 1995 1967 1928 2317 2255 2584 2704 2637 11a Full Responsibility Sales 1999 1947 1827 1827 1762 1758 2058 2058 2058 2058 2058 12 Net Capacity Resources (9+10-11) ...

  8. North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid | Department of Energy (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid. NERC develops and enforces Reliability Standards; assesses adequacy annually via a ten-year forcast and winter and

  9. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Bath County","Pumped storage","Virginia Electric & Power Co",3003 2,"North Anna","Nuclear","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1893 3,"Possum Point","Natural gas","Virginia Electric & Power Co",1733 4,"Surry","Nuclear","Virginia Electric

  10. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Capacity Report June 2016 With Data as of January 1, 2016 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be

  11. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Former Corporation/Refiner Total Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity (bbl/cd) New Corporation/Refiner Date of Sale Table 12. Refinery Sales During 2015 CHS Inc./CHS McPherson Refinery Inc. CHS Inc./NCRA 9/15 McPherson, KS 86,000 PBF Energy Co LLC/Chalmette Refining LLC Chalmette Refining LLC 11/15 Chalmette, LA 192,500 bbl/cd= Barrels per calendar day Sources: Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report" and Form EIA-820, "Annual Refinery

  12. Refinery Capacity Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    State/Refiner/Location Alkylates Aromatics Isobutane Lubricants Isomers Isopentane and Isohexane Asphalt and Road Oil Marketable Petroleum Coke Hydrogen (MMcfd) Sulfur (short tons per day) Table 4. Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by State as of January 1, 2016 (Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) Isooctane a ..................................................................... Alabama 0 0 15,000 1,150 4,200 0 7,120 40 228 0 Hunt Refining Co 0 0 15,000 0 4,200 0 7,120

  13. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  14. Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. Electrical Energy Storage A DOE ENERGY FRONTIER RESEARCH CENTER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense statistics for...

  17. Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price 2011 - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricity Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Capacity of electric power plants Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Cost, revenue and expense

  18. Winter Heating Fuels - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Click on map above to view state-specific heating fuel data Propane Heating oil Natural gas Electricity For more data on: Heating oil and propane prices - Heating Oil and Propane ...

  19. Prepare for Winter with Energy Department Resources | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Public Affairs Winter is coming As temperatures drop and trees change color -- and people around the country prepare their homes for the cold weather ahead -- the...

  20. FUPWG Winter 2014 Meeting Agenda, Report, and Presentations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Agenda and presentations from the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group's Winter 2014 meeting held January 14-15, 2014 in Golden, Colorado.

  1. Winter Hydroelectric Dam Feasibility Assessment: The Lac Courte...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    WINTER HYDROELECTRIC DAM FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT THE LAC COURTE OREILLES BAND OF LAKE ... IN 1920 AND COMPLETED BY 1923 THE HYDROELECTRIC FACILITY WAS BUILT IN 1988. ISSUES ...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Winter 2015/2016 Quarterly Analysis...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The QAR comprises a glimpse at the transportation energy ecosystem within which VTO operates. This is the Winter 20152016 presentation of the QAR. VTO Analysis staff members ...

  3. Winter Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district and Florida's 24th congressional district.12 Registered Energy Companies in Winter Park, Florida Iosil Energy Corporation References US Census Bureau Incorporated...

  4. Winter Beach, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Winter Beach, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 27.7191964, -80.4206071 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  5. Quality Assurance Exchange Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance

  6. Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Household heating bills expected to be lower this winter U.S. consumers are expected to pay less this winter on their home heating bills because of lower oil and natural gas prices and projected milder temperatures than last winter. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said households that rely on heating oil which are mainly located in the Northeast will pay the lowest heating expenditures in 9 years down 25% from last winter as consumers are expected to save about

  7. Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) | Department of Energy Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) The objectives of this report are to provide the Secretary of Energy with the Electricity Advisory Committee's

  8. Motor gasolines, winter 1981-1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, E M

    1982-07-01

    Analytical data for 905 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 30 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 88.9 for leaded below 93.0. Only one sample was reported as 93.0 for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above.

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,953 8 Electric utilities 23,050 8 IPP & CHP 8,903 11 Net generation (megawatthours) 149,340,447 6 Electric utilities 112,340,555 3 IPP & CHP 36,999,892 10 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 152,225 8 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 61,909 13 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 67,635 10 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 19 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  10. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10 0.2 Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 34,740 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation 6,150

  11. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1 Other Biomass 2 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 143,598 100.0 Total Renewable

  12. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 72,251 100.0 Total Renewable Net Generation

  13. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,261 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,684 74.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 8,425 59.1 Solar - - Wind 2,004 14.1 Wood/Wood Waste 221 1.6 MSW/Landfill Gas 31 0.2 Other Biomass 3 * Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 55,127 100.0

  14. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 24 1.3 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  15. Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    The current and future projected cost and performance characteristics of new electric generating capacity are a critical input into the development of energy projections and analyses.

  16. Hybrid Wind and Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the storage capacity must be large enough to supply electrical needs during non-charging periods. Battery banks ... Small stand-alone home energy systems Links Federal tax ...

  17. Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and the environment All electricity data reports Analysis & Projections Major Topics Most popular Capacity and generation Costs, revenue and expense Demand Environment Fuel use...

  18. Battery and Electric Drive Awardee List from American Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Awardee List from American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding Battery and Electric ... and their components and to expand battery recycling capacity 500 million in grants ...

  19. North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    will continue to experience rotating outages due to generating capacity availability. North American Electric Reliability Council Power Outage Update (48.2 KB) More Documents & ...

  20. South Korean energy outlook: Coal and electricity focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, E.M.; Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

    1995-03-01

    This paper concisely outlines the capacity for Korea to generate electricity by using coal. Resources (native and imported) as well as facilities are reviewed.

  1. Electricity - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Operating coal-fired generating capacity has declined 15% since 2011 in response to low ... Crescent Dunes concentrating solar plant begins producing electricity ...

  2. 2014 Data Book Shows Increased Use of Renewable Electricity ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Book shows that U.S. renewable electricity grew to 15.5 percent of total installed capacity and 13.5 percent of total electricity generation. Published annually by the National...

  3. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",147,122,122,122,122 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","...

  4. Arizona Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",2720,2720,2720,2720,2720 "Solar",9,9,9,11,20 "Wind","-","-","-",63,128 ...

  5. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional","-","-","-","-","-" "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-",2 ...

  6. Indiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",60,60,60,60,60 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-",131,1037,1340 ...

  7. Alaska Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",397,397,400,414,414 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",3,3,3,7,7 "WoodWood ...

  8. California Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",2032,1940,1940,2004,2004 "Hydro Conventional",10083,10041,10122,10144,10141 "Solar",402,404,416,450,475 ...

  9. Florida Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",55,55,55,55,55 "Solar","-","-","-",25,123 "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "Wood...

  10. Colorado Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",652,665,666,666,662 "Solar","-",8,11,14,41 "Wind",289,1063,1063,1238,1294 ...

  11. Arkansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",1389,1321,1321,1337,1341 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-"...

  12. Georgia Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",2027,2032,2041,2046,2052 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-",...

  13. Illinois Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",33,33,34,34,34 "Solar","-","-","-",9,9 "Wind",105,740,962,1596,1946 "Wood...

  14. Kentucky Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",815,817,824,824,824 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  15. Hawaii Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",31,31,31,31,31 "Hydro Conventional",24,24,24,24,24 "Solar","-","-",1,1,2 "Wind",43,64,64,64,62 "WoodWood ...

  16. Idaho Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-",10,7,10 "Hydro Conventional",2378,2367,2346,2682,2704 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",75,75,117,146,352 ...

  17. Delaware Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",3367,3350,3344,3355,3379 " ... "Renewables",7,7,7,7,10 "Pumped Storage","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  18. Connecticut Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",5498,5361,5466,5582,5845 " ... "Renewables",316,285,287,287,281 "Pumped Storage",4,29,29,29,29 "Other",27,27,27,27,27 ...

  19. Tennessee Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",2638,2635,2639,2614,2624 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",29,29,29,29,29 ...

  20. Tennessee Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",13051,12974,12999,12982,13517 ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",3398,3397,3397,3401,3401 ...

  1. Missouri Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",18197,18099,18126,18101,18861 ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",1190,1190,1190,1190,1190 ...

  2. Virginia Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",14968,15080,15543,15740,15880 ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",3432,3404,3404,3404,3501 ...

  3. Wyoming Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",6105,6065,6150,6147,6253 " ... " Other Gases",92,92,92,92,92 "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  4. New Jersey Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",14363,13741,13771,13759,13676 " ... " Other Gases",44,44,44,44,44 "Nuclear",3984,3984,4108,4108,4108 ...

  5. Wisconsin Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",14000,13926,15015,14928,14964 ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",1582,1582,1582,1583,1584 ...

  6. Utah Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",6398,6830,6819,6897,6969 " ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  7. Nebraska Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",5478,5423,5459,6123,6169 " ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",1238,1240,1252,1252,1245 ...

  8. Washington Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",4436,4343,5130,5145,5183 " ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",1131,1131,1131,1131,1097 ...

  9. Vermont Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",108,101,101,100,100 " ... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear",620,620,620,620,620 ...

  10. Texas Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",92088,91494,91450,87547,92136 " ... " Other Gases",287,308,187,184,306 "Nuclear",4860,4860,4927,4927,4966 ...

  11. West Virginia Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",16113,15769,15756,15766,1... " Other Gases","-","-","-","-","-" "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  12. Mississippi Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",15125,14707,14454,14340,142... " Other Gases",4,4,4,4,4 "Nuclear",1266,1268,1259,1251,1251 ...

  13. Montana Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",2671,2671,2682,2701,2782 " ... " Other Gases","-","-",2,2,2 "Nuclear","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  14. Kansas Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",3,3,3,3,3 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",363,363,812,1011,1072 "WoodWood ...

  15. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" "WoodWood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSWLandfill Gas",170,163,166,166,159 "Other ...

  16. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...l","-","-","-","-","-" "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-",2 "WoodWood Waste","-","-","-","-","-" "MSWLandfill Gas",7,7,7,7,8 "Other Biomass","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  17. ,"Geographic Area",,,"Voltage",,,"Capacity ","In-Service",,"Electrical...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...S","TRE","ERCOT","AC","300-399",,,3,2013,"Tesla","Edith Clarke",110.4,"OH",,,...3278,"AE...S","TRE","ERCOT","AC","300-399",,,6,2013,"Tesla","Riley",131.2,"OH",,,...3278,"AEP...

  18. Nevada Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal",188,189,215,306,319 "Hydro Conventional",1047,1048,1051,1051,1051 "Solar","-",79,89,89,137 "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  19. Massachusetts Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",259,259,258,261,262 "Solar","-","-","s","s",4 "Wind","-",2,2,5,10 ...

  20. Minnesota Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",175,176,194,194,193 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",827,1139,1460,1615,...

  1. Montana Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-",22,"-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",2604,2620,2660,2692,2705 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",145,149,255,369,3...

  2. Nebraska Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",272,273,278,278,278 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",73,25,25,105,154 ...

  3. Maine Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity,...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",719,718,730,738,738 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-",42,47,170,263 ...

  4. New Jersey Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",5,4,4,6,4 "Solar","-",2,4,13,28 "Wind",8,8,8,8,8 "WoodWood ...

  5. Louisiana Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",192,192,192,192,192 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","-" ...

  6. Mississippi Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional","-","-","-","-","-" "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-","-","-","...

  7. New Mexico Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",82,82,82,82,82 "Solar","-","-","-","-",30 "Wind",494,494,496,597,700 "Wood...

  8. Maryland Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",566,590,590,590,590 "Solar","-","-","-","-",1 "Wind","-","-","-","-",70 ...

  9. Michigan Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",257,249,250,251,237 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",2,2,124,143,163 ...

  10. Missouri Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",552,552,566,564,564 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-",57,163,309,459 ...

  11. Illinois Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",30626,30435,30662,30795,30554 " Coal",15731,15582,15653,15852,15551 " Petroleum",1143,1097,1099,1090,1106 " Natural ...

  12. Iowa Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",131,131,142,144,144 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind",921,1170,2635,3352,3569 ...

  13. Florida Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",48044,50280,50166,53733,53791 " Coal",10333,10297,10265,10261,9975 " Petroleum",11677,11671,13128,12602,12033 " Natural ...

  14. Arizona Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",18784,18756,18942,19351,19338 " Coal",5830,5818,5818,6227,6233 " Petroleum",90,93,93,93,93 " Natural ...

  15. Alabama Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",21804,21784,22372,22540,23519 " Coal",11557,11544,11506,11486,11441 " Petroleum",43,43,43,43,43 " Natural ...

  16. Iowa Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",9496,10391,10340,10467,10263 " Coal",6097,6967,6928,7107,6956 " Petroleum",1027,1023,1017,1014,1007 " Natural ...

  17. Arkansas Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arkansas" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",10965,11807,11756,11753,12451 " Coal",3846,3846,3861,3864,4535 " Petroleum",23,22,22,22,22 " Natural ...

  18. Delaware Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",3367,3350,3344,3355,3379 " Coal",1083,1083,1083,1074,1054 " Petroleum",695,698,557,557,563 " Natural ...

  19. Indiana Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",26899,26922,26850,26808,26186 " Coal",19718,19759,19721,19757,19096 " Petroleum",503,503,503,503,504 " Natural ...

  20. Alaska Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",1485,1561,1593,1591,1618 " Coal",105,105,112,111,111 " Petroleum",575,622,643,644,663 " Natural Gas",805,834,838,836,845 " ...

  1. California Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",39351,39961,39950,41443,42654 " Coal",389,389,367,367,374 " Petroleum",789,754,752,734,701 " Natural ...

  2. Idaho Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by Energy...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",667,667,828,834,834 " Coal",17,17,17,17,17 " Petroleum",5,5,5,5,5 " Natural Gas",645,645,805,812,812 " Other ...

  3. Colorado Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",9644,9979,10229,10545,11204 " Coal",4939,4961,4965,5010,5702 " Petroleum",181,182,184,178,178 " Natural ...

  4. Connecticut Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",5498,5361,5466,5582,5845 " Coal",551,551,553,564,564 " Petroleum",2926,2709,2741,2749,2989 " Natural ...

  5. Hawaii Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",2208,2209,2208,2223,2196 " Coal",180,180,180,180,180 " Petroleum",2019,2020,2019,2034,2007 " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-",...

  6. Georgia Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity, by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",28238,28096,28078,28103,28087 " Coal",13438,13275,13256,13211,13230 " Petroleum",2182,2169,2187,2188,2189 " Natural ...

  7. New Hampshire Renewable Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Geothermal","-","-","-","-","-" "Hydro Conventional",512,494,500,498,489 "Solar","-","-","-","-","-" "Wind","-","-",24,24,24 ...

  8. New Hampshire Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Hampshire" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",2411,2371,2235,2226,2262 " Coal",528,528,528,528,546 " Petroleum",529,503,503,501,501 " Natural ...

  9. New Mexico Total Electric Power Industry Net Summer Capacity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Energy Source",2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Fossil",6520,6620,7366,7308,7312 " Coal",3957,3957,3957,3977,3990 " Petroleum",28,28,28,28,24 " Natural Gas",2535,2634,3381,3302,3...

  10. High capacity oil burner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedrosa, O.A. Jr.; Couto, N.C.; Fanqueiro, R.C.C.

    1983-11-01

    The present invention relates to a high capacity oil burner comprising a cylindrical atomizer completely surrounded by a protective cylindrical housing having a diameter from 2 to 3 times greater than the diameter of said atomizer; liquid fuels being injected under pressure into said atomizer and accumulating within said atomizer in a chamber for the accumulation of liquid fuels, and compressed air being injected into a chamber for the accumulation of air; cylindrical holes communicating said chamber for the accumulation of liquid fuels with the outside and cylindrical holes communicating said chamber for the accumulation of air with said cylindrical holes communicating the chamber for the accumulation of liquids with the outside so that the injection of compressed air into said liquid fuel discharge holes atomizes said fuel which is expelled to the outside through the end portions of said discharge holes which are circumferentially positioned to be burnt by a pilot flame; said protecting cylindrical housing having at its ends perforated circular rings into which water is injected under pressure to form a protecting fan-like water curtain at the rear end of the housing and a fan-like water curtain at the flame to reduce the formation of soot; the burning efficiency of said burner being superior to 30 barrels of liquid fuel per day/kg of the apparatus.

  11. Annual Energy Outlook 2014 Electricity Working Group Meeting

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    : Electricity Working Group Meeting September 25, 2013 Electricity Analysis Team Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis Office of Energy Analysis WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Key Modeling updates from AEO2013 * Revised Reserve Margin and Capacity Market Methodology - Explicit Reserve Margin, Explicit Capacity Payment - Results in 3-5 mill higher electric prices * Operating/Spinning reserve

  12. Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

    1994-02-01

    Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

  13. Farmington Electric Utility System- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmington Electric, a municipal utility, offers net metering to residential customers with systems up to 10 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. This option is available for photovoltaic (PV), wind, hydro...

  14. CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer Software

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-11-30

    The CHP Installed Capacity Optimizer is a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet application that determines the most economic amount of capacity of distributed generation and thermal utilization equipment (e.g., absorption chillers) to install for any user-defined set of load and cost data. Installing the optimum amount of capacity is critical to the life-cycle economic viability of a distributed generation/cooling heat and power (CHP) application. Using advanced optimization algorithms, the software accesses the loads, utility tariffs, equipment costs,more » etc., and provides to the user the most economic amount of system capacity to install.« less

  15. Adaptive capacity and its assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engle, Nathan L.

    2011-04-20

    This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

  16. Property:USGSMeanCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USGSMeanCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name USGSMeanCapacity Property Type String Description Mean capacity potential at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal...

  17. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of capacity that may understate the amount that can actually be stored. Working Gas Design Capacity: This measure estimates a natural gas facility's working gas capacity, as...

  18. The status of electric industry restructuring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morey, M.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation discusses current electric utility regulatory reform with a focus on the impacts of competition in the Midwest marketplace. Information and data are presented through 14 figures and 30 tables. Regulatory issues at the state and Federal levels are very briefly outlined, including reciprocity, unbundling, stranded cost recovery, and independent system operation. Graphical data on energy capacity by source, capacity additions, wholesale markets, electricity prices, and market development are also presented.

  19. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2013 Meetings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2013 Meetings Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - 2013 Meetings MARCH 6 & 7, 2013 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE This meeting was cancelled due to an expected winter storm. Date: Wednesday, March 6, 2013 12:45 p.m. - 5:45 p.m. EDT Date: Thursday, March 7, 2013 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. EDT Location: National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA), 4301 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 22203 JUNE 5 & 6, 2013 MEETING OF THE ELECTRICITY

  20. NREL Hosts Free Workshop on Winterizing Your Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Winterizing Your Home For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., Sept. 28, 1999 — Media are invited to attend the workshop. We also can arrange interviews ahead of time with the researchers leading the workshop. What: Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will describe ways to cut your utility bills this winter at a free workshop Oct. 6 on "Energy Efficient Ways to Winterize Your Home." NREL energy experts

  1. Natural gas inventories end the winter at a record high

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas inventories end the winter at a record high U.S. natural gas inventories finished the winter heating season at their highest level ever. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said natural gas stocks at the end of March stood at 2.478 trillion cubic feet. That's slightly above the previous end-of- winter record set in 2012. This year's natural gas inventories are 67% above their 2015 levels and 53% higher than the five- year average for this time of

  2. Physicist Peter Winter wins Department of Energy Early Career Award |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Physicist Peter Winter wins Department of Energy Early Career Award By Jared Sagoff * May 19, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint High-energy physicist Peter Winter of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory has received a DOE Early Career Award, a prestigious five-year research grant totaling $2.5 million. The grant will help to fund Winter's contributions to the muon g-2 ("g minus 2") experiment currently being assembled at Fermi National

  3. Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    gTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (winter average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  4. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011WinterFuels_finalv3.pptx [Read-Only...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    winter heating season for heating oil, propane, and natural gas, but little change in ... (than last winter) g g p ( ) - 7% higher propane prices - 4% higher residential natural ...

  5. Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Hydrotreating NaphthaReformer Feed Charge Cap (BSD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (BSD) Catalytic Hydrotreating...

  6. Energy-Efficient Cooking for Winter | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Before long, I've got my mother's soup recipe out and my own stock pot on the burner. I'm not alone in my love of hot and hearty fare on cold winter evenings. As the weather cools, ...

  7. Prepare for Winter with Energy Department Resources | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A homeowner installs a programmable thermostat, which could save him an estimated 10% per ... Energy has got you covered with tips for saving energy and keeping cozy all winter long. ...

  8. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 and Projected 2004 through 2008 " ,"(Megawatts and 2003 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power Grid","Western ...

  9. ,"Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak Load, Actual and Projected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 and Projected 2005 through 2009 " ,"(Megawatts and 2004 Base Year)" ,"Winter Noncoincident Peak Load",,"Contiguous U.S. ","Eastern Power Grid",,,..."Texas Power Grid","Western ...

  10. Lower oil prices also cutting winter heating oil and propane...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    see even lower natural gas and heating oil bills this winter than previously expected ... said the average household heating with oil will experience a 41% drop in heating oil ...

  11. Energy Department Releases Better Buildings Alliance 2016 Winter Progress Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy today released the annual Better Buildings Alliance 2016 Winter Progress Update featuring new partners, recent reports and resources, and upcoming priorities identified in the coming year.

  12. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  13. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  14. Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retirements | Department of Energy 5: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements Fact #885: August 10, 2015 Electricity Generation - Planned Additions and Retirements SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week Between April 2015 and March 2016, there is a cumulative total of 88,953 megawatts of new electric utility capacity planned. This new capacity will add to the current U.S. capacity of about 1,071,000 megawatts. Over half (53%) of the new capacity that is planned

  15. Main trends in electricity markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pariente-Davied, S.

    1998-07-01

    Liberalization and restructuring of electricity markets are leading to a globalization of the industry. The electricity sector is moving from state dominance to private participation, from monopoly structures to competition. Greenfield investments in generation capacity are increasingly dominated by private operators; 53% of the 780 GW global capacity additions needed by 2007 will be independent power facilities. Existing power generation assets are changing hands, either through privatization or utility divestitures; 250 GW of capacity is expected to be privatized by 2007 and 310 GW of utility spin-offs are anticipated in the US. The structure of the industry will evolve from fragmentation, with many players operating in national markets, to a few global players operating across borders.

  16. Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries.pdf (2,324 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are a promising candidate for energy storage of electric drive vehicles due to their high power and energy density. The total electric

  17. National Electric Transmission Congestion Studies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Section 216(a) of the Federal Power Act, as amended by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, directs the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to conduct a study every three years on electric transmission congestion and constraints within the Eastern and Western Interconnections. The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) further directed the Secretary to include in the 2009 Congestion Study an analysis of significant potential sources of renewable energy that are constrained by lack of adequate transmission capacity. Based on this study, and comments concerning it from states and other stakeholders, the Secretary of Energy may designate any geographic area experiencing electric transmission capacity constraints or congestion as a national interest electric transmission corridor (National Corridor).

  18. Electric Power Annual 2011

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region 1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012E 2013E 2014E 2015E 2016E FRCC 27,162 27,773 28,898 29,435 30,537 31,649 31,868 32,874 34,562 34,832 35,666 38,932 37,951 40,387 42,243 45,950

  19. COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    COMMUNITY CAPACITY BUILDING THROUGH TECHNOLOGY Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Prepared by Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice Program Manager, U.S. Department of Energy MAR 06 MARCH 2006 Since 1999, the Department of Energy has worked with the National Urban Internet and others to create community capacity through technology.  Empowering Communities in the Age of E-Government Table of Contents Message from the Environmental Justice Program Manager . . . . . . . . 3

  20. Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Northeast United States - November 2013 | Department of Energy Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 Assessment of the Adequacy of Natural Gas Pipeline Capacity in the Northeast United States - November 2013 In 2005-06, the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) conducted a study on the adequacy of interstate natural gas pipeline capacity serving the northeastern United States to meet natural gas demand

  1. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  2. Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transmission Field Services is responsible for field switching operation and maintenance of Bonneville Power Administration's high-voltage electrical transmission system to provide safe, reliable,...

  3. Electrical Safety

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Handbook that was originally issued in 1998, and revised in 2004. DOE handbooks are ... the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70, the National Electrical Code (NEC), ...

  4. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  5. Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt Caverns Number of Existing Aquifers Number of Depleted Fields Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data

  6. Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

    1982-02-01

    The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

  7. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

  8. On the heat capacity of Ce{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Durgesh Samatham, S. Shanmukharao Venkateshwarlu, D. Gangrade, Mohan Ganesan, V.

    2014-04-24

    Electrical resistivity and heat capacity measurements on Cerium based dense Kondo compound Ce{sub 3}Al have been reported. Clear signatures of first order structural transition at 108K, followed by a Kondo minimum and coherence are clearly seen in resistivity. The structural transition is robust and is not affected by magnetic fields. Heat capacity measurements reveal an anomalous enhancement in the heavy fermion character upon magnetic fields. Vollhardt invariance in specific heat C(T.H) curves have been observed at T=3.7K and at H ≈ 6T.

  9. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  10. Alabama Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",32417,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",3855,11.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",3272,10.1 "

  11. New York Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",39357,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",6033,15.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",4314,11 "

  12. North Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",27674,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2499,9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1956,7.1 "

  13. North Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",6188,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1941,31.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",508,8.2 "

  14. Ohio Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",33071,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",231,0.7 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",101,0.3 "

  15. Oklahoma Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Wind" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Wind" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",21022,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2412,11.5 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",858,4.1 " Solar","-","-"

  16. Oregon Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",14261,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",10684,74.9 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",8425,59.1 "

  17. Pennsylvania Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",45575,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1984,4.4 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",747,1.6 "

  18. Rhode Island Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",1782,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",28,1.6 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro

  19. South Carolina Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",23982,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",1623,6.8 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1340,5.6 "

  20. South Dakota Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source","Hydro Conventional" "Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source","Hydro Conventional" "Capacity (megawatts)","Value","Percent of State Total" "Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity",3623,100 "Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity",2223,61.3 " Geothermal","-","-" " Hydro Conventional",1594,44 "

  1. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  2. Electric avenues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, P.; Chang, A.

    1994-12-31

    Highly efficient electric drive technology developed originally for defense applications is being applied to the development of all electric shuttle buses for the San Jose International Airport. An innovative opportunity charging system using induction chargers will be incorporated to extend operation hours. The project, if successful, is expected to reduce pollution at the airport and generate jobs for displaced defense workers.

  3. Next Update: December 2011 Table 2b. Noncoincident Winter Peak...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    found on the EIA web page for electric reliability. * Regional name and function has changed from Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) to Texas Reliability Entity (TRE). ...

  4. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Beluga","Natural gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344.4 2,"George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Natural gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",248.1 3,"Southcentral Power Project","Natural gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",169.7 4,"North

  5. Table 2. Ten largest plants by generation capacity, 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Northeastern","Coal","Public Service Co of Oklahoma",1830 2,"Redbud Power Plant","Natural gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1784.3 3,"Seminole (OK)","Natural gas","Oklahoma Gas & Electric Co",1506.5 4,"Muskogee","Coal","Oklahoma Gas &

  6. Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - Archived Meetings 2008 - 2015 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (EAC) - Archived Meetings 2008 - 2015 Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) - Archived Meetings 2008 - 2015 Past meetings of the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) 2015 Meetings: March 26 & 27, 2015 June 29 & 30, 2015 September 29 & 30, 2015 2014 Meetings: January 24, 2014 - Teleconference March 12 & 13, 2014 June 16 & 17, 2014 September 24 & 25, 2014 2013 Meetings: March 6 & 7, 2013 - Cancelled due to expected winter storm June 5 & 6,

  7. An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Assessment of Heating Fuels And Electricity Markets During the Winters of 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 October 2015 This page intentionally blank For Further Information This report was prepared under the auspices of the Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis (EIMA) division of the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE). OE's vision is a U.S. energy delivery system that is reliable in the face of all hazards and resilient to disruptions, supports U.S. economic

  8. SAS Output

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9.B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2013 Actual, 2014-2018 Projected Net...

  9. Winter fuels report. Week ending, October 21, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitomer, M.; Griffith, A.; Zyren, J.

    1994-10-01

    Demand for distillate fuel oil is expected to show a slight decline this winter (October 1, 1994-March 31, 1995) from last, according to the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1994 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. EIA projects winter demand to decline one percent to 3.3 million barrels per day, assuming normal weather conditions. The effects of expected moderate growth in the economy and industrial production will likely be offset by much warmer temperatures than those a year ago. EIA projects prices for both residential heating oil and diesel fuel to be moderately higher than prices last winter. Increases are likely, primarily because crude oil prices are expected to be higher than they were a year earlier (Table FE5).

  10. Spray dryer capacity stretched 50%

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paraskevas, J.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes plant equipment modifications which has resulted in a 50% increase in spray drying capacity. The installation of a new atomizer and screening system in NL Chemicals' Newberry Springs plant which produces natural clays for use as rheological additives in industrial coatings, cosmetics and other products, resulted in a 50% increase in spray drying capacity. Energy consumption per pound of product was reduced by 7%, and product quality improved. This was achieved in less than three months at an investment of less than 10% of what an additional spray dryer would have cost.

  11. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsArctic Winter Water Vapor IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Arctic Winter Water Vapor IOP 2004.03.09 - 2004.04.09 Lead Scientist : Ed Westwater Data Availability http://www.etl.noaa.gov/programs/2004/wviop/data will contain quicklooks of all of the data. For data sets, see below. Summary During the IOP, the Ground-based Scanning Radiometer of NOAA/ETL, and the ARM MicroWave

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - Winter 1994 Single Column Model IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsWinter 1994 Single Column Model IOP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Winter 1994 Single Column Model IOP 1994.01.01 - 1994.01.31 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Data Plots from Colorado State University Data Plots from Livermore National Laboratory Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive. For data sets, see below.

  14. Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! October 18, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Drew Bittner Writer/Editor, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy It's been a long, hot summer in Washington, D.C., but we're finally starting to slide into autumn and cooler weather. You might have noticed that we've already changed our seasonal tips page over to "Stay Warm, Save Money," so now is a good time to look at your house and car and think about

  15. Walkin' in a Winter Wonderland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Walkin' in a Winter Wonderland Walkin' in a Winter Wonderland December 6, 2011 - 4:24pm Addthis Drew Bittner Writer/Editor, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy It's that time again. It's "X shopping days until Christmas," you're maybe a touch stressed from trying to get a lot of work done despite holiday parties and shopping trips, and, to top it off, it's cold out. If you're reading this, you're probably familiar with our Stay Warm Save Money seasonal campaign. We've been

  16. CBFO and WIPP Volunteerism Helps Little Ones This Winter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CBFO and WIPP Volunteerism Helps Little Ones This Winter CARLSBAD, N.M., November 25, 2014 -- November's winter chill started early in New Mexico; however, children in the Carlsbad area should be able to keep warm while outdoors thanks in part to the actions of the Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) team of employees. "This is the third year we've held the 'Karing for Kids Koat Drive,' which is on-going from October through the end of

  17. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 States, 1980 through 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to analyze monthly natural gas wellhead productive capacity in the lower 48 States from 1980 through 1992 and project this capacity from 1993 through 1995. For decades, natural gas supplies and productive capacity have been adequate to meet demand. In the 1970`s the capacity surplus was small because of market structure (split between interstate and intrastate), increasing demand, and insufficient drilling. In the early 1980`s, lower demand, together with increased drilling, led to a large surplus capacity as new productive capacity came on line. After 1986, this large surplus began to decline as demand for gas increased, gas prices fell, and gas well completions dropped sharply. In late December 1989, the decline in this surplus, accompanied by exceptionally high demand and temporary weather-related production losses, led to concerns about the adequacy of monthly productive capacity for natural gas. These concerns should have been moderated by the gas system`s performance during the unusually severe winter weather in March 1993 and January 1994. The declining trend in wellhead productive capacity is expected to be reversed in 1994 if natural gas prices and drilling meet or exceed the base case assumption. This study indicates that in the low, base, and high drilling cases, monthly productive capacity should be able to meet normal production demands through 1995 in the lower 48 States (Figure ES1). Exceptionally high peak-day or peak-week production demand might not be met because of physical limitations such as pipeline capacity. Beyond 1995, as the capacity of currently producing wells declines, a sufficient number of wells and/or imports must be added each year in order to ensure an adequate gas supply.

  18. Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-09-01

    This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

  19. Optimizing areal capacities through understanding the limitations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Optimizing areal capacities through understanding the limitations of lithium-ion electrodes Increasing the areal capacity or electrode thickness in lithium ion batteries is ...

  20. Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Capacity Peak Underground Working Natural Gas Storage Capacity Released: September 3, 2010 for data as of April 2010 Next Release: August 2011 References Methodology Definitions...