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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Electric Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated December 15th, 2010 (3 years ago) Keywords Electric Capacity Electricity Generation New Zealand projections

4

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Agenda, August 15. [6] FERC, Docket No. EL01-63-003,at http://www.pjm.com. [7] FERC, Docket No. ER01-1440-capacity of the others” (FERC, 2001). Therefore, if an LSE

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity Economic Dispatch of Electric Generation Capacity A report to congress and the states pursuant to sections 1234 and 1832 of the...

6

OpenEI - Electric Capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Zealand Energy New Zealand Energy Outlook (2010): Electricity and Generation Capacity http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/357 The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes an annual Energy Outlook, which presents projections of New Zealand's future energy supply, demand, prices and greenhouse gas emissions. The principle aim of these projections is to inform the national energy debate. Included here are the model results for electricity and generation capacity. The spreadsheet provides an interactive tool for selecting which model results to view, and which scenarios to evaluate; full model results for each scenario are also included.

License

7

High current capacity electrical connector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical connector is provided for coupling high current capacity electrical conductors such as copper busses or the like. The connector is arranged in a "sandwiched" configuration in which a conductor plate contacts the busses along major surfaces thereof clamped between two stainless steel backing plates. The conductor plate is provided with a plurality of contact buttons affixed therein in a spaced array such that the caps of the buttons extend above the conductor plate surface to contact the busses. When clamping bolts provided through openings in the sandwiched arrangement are tightened, Belleville springs provided under the rim of each button cap are compressed and resiliently force the caps into contact with the busses' contacting surfaces to maintain a predetermined electrical contact area provided by the button cap tops. The contact area does not change with changing thermal or mechanical stresses applied to the coupled conductors.

Bettis, Edward S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watts, Harry L. (Lake City, TN)

1976-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

Temperature Effects on the Winter Daily Electric Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here we describe the relationship between average daily temperature and winter-daily electric load, as ascertained on the largest electric district in Italy. In particular, it is shown that a sudden 6°C temperature decrease (not a rare event) ...

Paolo Bolzern; Giorgio Fronza; Giuseppe Brusasca

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

10

CSEM WP 124 Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CSEM WP 124 Capacity Markets for Electricity Anna Creti, LEEERNA, University of Toulouse for Electricity Anna Creti LEEERNA, University of Toulouse Natalia Fabra Universidad Carlos III de Madrid February 2004 Abstract The creation of electricity markets has raised the fundamental question as to whether

California at Berkeley. University of

11

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

12

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

13

Capacity withholding in the Electricity Pool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which should be generating will raise energy prices but make the pattern of generation less efficient. This pattern improved significantly after privatisation. Withholding capacity that was not expected to generate would raise the Capacity Payments based on spare capacity. On a multi-year basis, these did not usually exceed “competitive ” levels, the cost of keeping stations open. The evidence for large-scale capacity withholding is weak. Keywords: JEL:

Richard Green; Richard Green

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Title Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand Publication Type Report...

15

EIA - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel (2003-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables...

16

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Capacity Planning submodule  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) is a computer modeling system developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The NEMS produces integrated forecasts for energy markets in the United States by achieving a general equilibrium solution for energy supply and demand. Currently, for each year during the period from 1990 through 2010, the NEMS describes energy supply, conversion, consumption, and pricing. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The supply of electricity is a conversion activity since electricity is produced from other energy sources (e.g., fossil, nuclear, and renewable). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. The EMM consists of four main submodules: Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP), Electricity Fuel Dispatching (EFD), Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP), and Load and Demand-Side Management (LDSM). The ECP evaluates changes in the mix of generating capacity that are necessary to meet future demands for electricity and comply with environmental regulations. The EFD represents dispatching (i.e., operating) decisions and determines how to allocate available capacity to meet the current demand for electricity. Using investment expenditures from the ECP and operating costs from the EFD, the EFP calculates the price of electricity, accounting for state-level regulations involving the allocation of costs. The LDSM translates annual demands for electricity into distributions that describe hourly, seasonal, and time-of-day variations. These distributions are used by the EFD and the ECP to determine the quantity and types of generating capacity that are required to insure reliable and economical supplies of electricity. The EMM also represents nonutility suppliers and interregional and international transmission and trade. These activities are included in the EFD and the ECP.

1994-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

How much electric supply capacity is needed to keep U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy ... tags: capacity demand electricity generation capacity NERC (North American Electric Reliability Corporation)

18

Electrical utilities model for determining electrical distribution capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its simplest form, this model was to obtain meaningful data on the current state of the Site`s electrical transmission and distribution assets, and turn this vast collection of data into useful information. The resulting product is an Electrical Utilities Model for Determining Electrical Distribution Capacity which provides: current state of the electrical transmission and distribution systems; critical Hanford Site needs based on outyear planning documents; decision factor model. This model will enable Electrical Utilities management to improve forecasting requirements for service levels, budget, schedule, scope, and staffing, and recommend the best path forward to satisfy customer demands at the minimum risk and least cost to the government. A dynamic document, the model will be updated annually to reflect changes in Hanford Site activities.

Fritz, R.L., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

19

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generating Capacity by Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual...

20

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The European Electricity Grid System and Winter Peak Load Stress: For how long can the european grid system survive the ever increasing demand during cold winter days?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rich countries of Western Europe and its citizens benefited during at least the last 30 years from an extraordinary stable electricity grid. This stability was achieved by the european grid system and a large flexible and reliable spare power plant capacity. This system allowed a continuous demand growth during the past 10-20 years of up to a few % per year. However, partially due to this overcapacity, no new large power plants have been completed during the past 10-15 years. The obvious consequence is that the reliable spare capacity has been reduced and that a further yearly demand growth of 1-2% for electric energy can only be achieved if new power plants will be constructed soon. Data from various European countries, provided by the UCTE, indicate that the system stress during peak load times and especially during particular cold winter days is much larger than generally assumed. In fact, the latest UCTE data on reliable power capacity indicate that already during the Winter 2007/8 only a few very col...

Dittmar, Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Electrical Generating Capacities of Geothermal Slim Holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations are presented to estimate the electrical generating capacity of the hot fluids discharged from individual geothermal wells using small wellhead generating equipment over a wide range of reservoir and operating conditions. The purpose is to appraise the possibility of employing slim holes (instead of conventional production-size wells) to power such generators for remote off-grid applications such as rural electrification in developing countries. Frequently, the generating capacity desired is less than one megawatt, and can be as low as 100 kilowatts; if slim holes can be usefully employed, overall project costs will be significantly reduced. This report presents the final results of the study. Both self-discharging wells and wells equipped with downhole pumps (either of the ''lineshaft'' or the ''submersible'' type) are examined. Several power plant designs are considered, including conventional single-flash backpressure and condensing steam turbines, binary plants, double-flash steam plants, and steam turbine/binary hybrid designs. Well inside diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm are considered; well depths vary from 300 to 1200 meters. Reservoir temperatures from 100 C to 240 C are examined, as are a variety of reservoir pressures and CO2 contents and well productivity index values.

Pritchett, J.W.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) International Energy Outlook 2009 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2006-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 18 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

24

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) International Energy Outlook 2008 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2005-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 12 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Data Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

25

EIA - Appendix H - Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) International Energy Outlook 2010 Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables (2007-2035) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 18 complete) Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Appendix H. Reference Case Projections for Electricity Capacity and Generation by Fuel Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table H1 World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country Table H1. World Total Installed Generating Capacity by Region and Country. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

26

Open versus closed loop capacity equilibria in electricity markets ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 7, 2012 ... Open versus closed loop capacity equilibria in electricity markets under ... We also present and analyze alternative conjectured price response ...

27

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

28

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

29

Charges on Graupel and Snow Crystals and the Electrical Structure of Winter Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The shape and electric charge on particles in Hokuriku winter cumulus clouds have been measured using videosondes. The sign of the charge on graupel reversed at about ?11°C. Charges on graupel and ice crystals are responsible for the tripole ...

Tsutomu Takahashi; Takuya Tajiri; Yasuo Sonoi

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Natural gas, renewables dominate electric capacity additions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These appear in a separate EIA survey collecting data on net metering and distributed generation. More capacity was added in the first half of 2012 than was retired.

31

AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Capacity Generating Capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

32

Wind turbine cost of electricity and capacity factor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are currently designed to minimize the cost of electricity at the wind turbine (the busbar cost) in a given wind regime, ignoring constraints on the capacity factor (the ratio of the average power output to the maximum power output). The trade-off between these two quantities can be examined in a straightforward fashion; it is found that the capacity factor can be increased by a factor of 30 percent above its value at the cost minimum for a ten percent increase in the busbar cost of electricity. This has important implications for the large-scale integration of wind electricity on utility grids where the cost of transmission may be a significant fraction of the cost of delivered electricity, or where transmission line capacity may be limited.

Cavallo, A.J. [Cavallo (A.J.), Princeton, NJ (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Evaluating the role of uncertainty in electric utility capacity planning  

SciTech Connect

This final report on Evaluating the Role of Uncertainty in Electric Utility Capacity Planning is divided into separate sections addressing demand, supply and the simultaneous consideration of both and describes several mathematical characterizations of the effects of uncertainty on the capacity expansion decision. The basic objective is to develop more robust models which can appropriately include the fundamental uncertainties associated with capacity expansion planning in the electric utility industry. Much of what has been developed in this project has been incorporated into a long-term, computer model for capacity expansion planning. A review is provided of certain deterministic capacity expansion methodologies. The effect of load curve uncertainty on capacity planning is considered and the use of a certain expected load curve to account for uncertainty in demand is proposed. How uncertainty influences the allocation of capital costs among the various load curve realizations is also discussed. The supply side uncertainties of fuel prices and random availability of generating units are considered. In certain cases it is shown that the use of the expected fuel costs will furnish a solution which minimizes the total expected costs. The effect of derating units to account for their random availability is also characterized. A stochastic linear program formulated to examine the simultaneous consideration of fuel cost and demand uncertainties is analyzed. This volume includes the report text one appendix with information on linear programming-based analysis of marginal cost pricing in the electric utility industry.

Soyster, A.L.

1981-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

34

www.ucei.org Capacity Markets for Electricity ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The creation of electricity markets has raised the fundamental question as to whether markets provide the right incentives for the provision of the reserves needed to maintain system reliability, or whether some form of regulation is needed. In some states in the US, electricity retailers have been made responsible for providing such reserves by contracting capacity in excess of their forecasted peak demand. The socalled Installed Capacity Markets (ICAP) provide one means for contracting reserves, and are the subject of this paper. In particular, for given productive and transmission capacities, we identify firms ’ opportunity costs of committing resources in the capacity market, and hence, the costs of inducing full capacity commitment. Regulatory issues such as the optimal choice of the reserve margin and the capacity deficiency rate (which serves as a price-cap) are analyzed. From a welfare view-point, we also compare the desirability of providing reserves either through capacity markets or through the demand side (i.e. power curtailments).

Anna Creti; Natalia Fabra; Iii Madrid; Anna Creti; Natalia Fabra; Iii Madrid

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Spanish Experience in Electric Generation Capacity Turnover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an authoritative review of the recent changes in Spain's electric generation, capacity additions and regulation. Concerns about energy security and environmental performance motivated these changes and the scale is dramatic, certainly on a par with changes that other countries may elicit to reduce CO2 emissions. First motivated to reduce oil use and coal generation, Spain turned to natural gas combustion turbine combined cycle plants. Since this occurred at a time of extraordinary ec...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Natural gas, renewables dominate electric capacity additions in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Of the ten states with the highest levels of capacity additions, most of the new capacity uses natural gas or renewable energy sources.

37

THE IMPACTS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATING CAPACITY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources has increased rapidly in the last decade. For example, Renewable Energy Sources for Electricity (RES-E) generating capacity in the… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Reserve electric generating capacity helps keep the lights on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Texas heat wave in August 2011 led to a supply emergency that illustrates the importance of reserve capacity.

39

Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Optimal Multi-scale Capacity Planning under Hourly Varying Electricity Prices Sumit Mitra Ignacio;2 Motivation of this work · Deregulation of the electricity markets caused electricity prices to be highly? (retrofit) · Challenge: Multi-scale nature of the problem! Hourly varying electricity prices vs. 10-15 years

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

40

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle plants accounted for about 68% of the total natural gas-fired capacity added between 1999 and 2010.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Open versus closed loop capacity equilibria in electricity markets ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first used to represent short-run bidding and production games among power ...... capacity is dispatchable thermal plant and there is no significant storage (e.g.,.

42

Estimating Water Needs to Meet 2025 Electricity Generating Capacity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demand and capacity forecasts from AEO 2006 with representative water withdrawal and consumption estimates to identify regions where water issues could become acute. Future...

43

Most electric generating capacity additions in the last decade ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860 Annual Electric Generator Report, and Form EIA-860M (see Table ES3 in the March 2011 ...

44

Increasing wind capacity requires new approaches to electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electric power generation from wind is increasing rapidly in the United States. Wind power is attractive for its lack of emissions and low operating costs, but its ...

45

Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CMI Working PaperDid English Generators Play Cournot? Capacity withholding in the Electricity Pool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which should be generating will raise energy prices but make the pattern of generation less efficient. This pattern improved significantly after privatisation. Withholding capacity that was not expected to generate would raise the Capacity Payments based on spare capacity. On a multi-year basis, these did not usually exceed “competitive ” levels, the cost of keeping stations open. The evidence for large-scale capacity withholding is weak. Keywords: JEL:

Richard Green; Richard Green

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Did English generators play cournot? : capacity withholding in the electricity pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to increases in its consumption at a higher rate than all but two states (in part because California is the lowest user of electricity per capita and per dollar of gross state product in the west). Annual WSCC consumption increased 64% from 1977 to 1998, but California's consumption grew by only 44

California at Berkeley. University of

49

U.S. Electric Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 Net Summer Capacity, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual net electric summer capacity (in megawatts) for the United States, broken down by renewable energy source (e.g. biomass, solar thermal/pv) and the nonrenewable total. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Electric Capacity geothermal PV solar thermal Summer wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_Net.Summer.Elec_.Capacity_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 11.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2004 - 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

50

Preliminary estimates of electrical generating capacity of slim holes--a theoretical approach  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of using small geothermal generators (< 1 MWe) for off-grid electrical power in remote areas or for rural electrification in developing nations would be enhanced if drilling costs could be reduced. This paper examines the electrical generating capacity of fluids which can be produced from typical slim holes (six-inch diameter or less), both by binary techniques (with downhole pumps) and, for hotter reservoir fluids, by conventional spontaneous-discharge flash-steam methods. Depending mainly on reservoir temperature, electrical capacities from a few hundred kilowatts to over one megawatt per slim hole appear to be possible.

Pritchett, John W.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

51

Solar Power: Using Photovoltaics to Preserve California's Electricity Capacity Reserves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The California Power Authority (CPA) is committed to increasing the use of renewable energy supplies--such as photovoltaics and wind--as a hedge against price fluctuations of electricity and natural gas. The CPA wants to own and operate an adequate supply of reserve generation that: - Can be deployed quickly in response to severe summer peak loads, unexpected loss of base and intermediate generation units, and failure of critical transmission facilities; - Will minimize the reliance on spot market purchases during periods when the State is most vulnerable to price gouging from private generators.

Herig, C..

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Natural gas fired electric generating technology: A key to the adequacy of electric generating capacity in North American Electric Reliability Councils. Topical report, May 1991  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an enhanced modeling system for electricity market analysis is explained. The relevant geographic areas that must be used for accurate supply and demand modeling and analysis are defined. There is no national market for electricity in the United States. Surplus hydroelectric capacity from the Pacific Northwest cannot be made available in Florida. Any model of U.S. electricity consumer and producer interaction that does not differentiate by region would produce misleading results. The expected natural gas-dominated capacity expansion phase in electricity markets is described.

Makovick, L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Breakout of Table 8.11b; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

54

Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

kilowatts. 6 Wood and wood-derived fuels. Notes: - Data are at end of year. - For plants that use multiple sources of energy, capacity is assigned

55

Electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models for energy policy analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes electric utility capacity expansion and energy production models developed for energy policy analysis. The models use the same principles (life cycle cost minimization, least operating cost dispatching, and incorporation of outages and reserve margin) as comprehensive utility capacity planning tools, but are faster and simpler. The models were not designed for detailed utility capacity planning, but they can be used to accurately project trends on a regional level. Because they use the same principles as comprehensive utility capacity expansion planning tools, the models are more realistic than utility modules used in present policy analysis tools. They can be used to help forecast the effects energy policy options will have on future utility power generation capacity expansion trends and to help formulate a sound national energy strategy. The models make renewable energy source competition realistic by giving proper value to intermittent renewable and energy storage technologies, and by competing renewables against each other as well as against conventional technologies.

Aronson, E.; Edenburn, M.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Table 8.11c Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power Sector by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

7 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. Sources: - 1989-1997-U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric

57

Table 8.11b Electric Net Summer Capacity: Electric Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 9: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2: Natural Gas 3: Other Gases 4: Total: Conventional Hydroelectric Power 5 ...

58

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Statewide Electricity and Demand Capacity Savings from the Implementation of IECC Code in Texas: Analysis for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the statewide electricity and electric demand savings achieved from the adoption of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for single-family residences in Texas and includes the corresponding increase in construction costs over the eight-year period from 2002 through 2009. Using the Energy Systems Laboratory's International Code Compliance Calculator (IC3) simulation tool, the annual statewide electricity savings in 2009 are estimated to be $161 million. The statewide peak electric demand reductions in 2009 are estimated to be 694 MW for the summer and 766 MW for the winter periods. Since 2002, the cumulative statewide electricity and electric demand savings over the eight year period from 2002 to 2009 are $1,803 million ($776 million from electricity savings and $1,027 million from electric demand savings) while the total increased costs are estimated to be $670 million.

Kim, H.; Baltazar, J.C.; Haberl, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A study of electrical generating capacities of self-discharging slim holes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations have been performed to estimate the electrical generating capacities of small-diameter geothermal wells for off-grid rural electrification using wellhead generators. In these applications, generating capacities of interest are typically in the range 100-1000 kWe. The approach amounted to (1) calculating the “wellhead discharge characteristics” (water/steam discharge rates as functions of wellhead pressure) for a variety of hypothetical well and reservoir descriptions, (2) employing a mathematical representation for the net generating capacity of a wellhead powerplant as a function of its operating inlet pressure and steam inlet rate, and (3) varying the wellhead (= turbine inlet) pressure to identify the “optimum” pressure value at which the net electrical power is maximized. Calculations were carried out for well diameters from 75 mm to 300 mm, for well depths from 300 to 1200 meters, for reservoir temperatures from 100°C to 240°C, for piezometric surface depths (related to shut-in reservoir pressure) from zero to 250 meters, and for downhole productivity indices from 2 kg/s/bar to infinity. A few cases were also included in which the CO2 content of the reservoir fluid was non-zero (up to 1% by mass in the brine). Both backpressure and condensing single-flash steam turbine powerplants were considered. The study was restricted to vertical wells of uniform inside diameter and to all-liquid in-situ reservoir fluids. Over fifteen thousand combinations of the above parameters were examined. The results indicate that slim holes as small as 100 mm inside diameter penetrating reservoirs with temperatures as low as 150°C can produce useful amounts of electrical power using condensing wellhead turbines (> 100 kWe). For higher reservoir temperatures, the electrical capacity of such a well can exceed one megawatt.

Pritchett, J.W.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE MISSION The mission of the Electricity Advisory Committee is to provide advice to the U.S. Department of Energy in implementing the Energy Policy Act of 2005, executing the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and modernizing the nation's electricity delivery infrastructure. ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE GOALS The goals of the Electricity Advisory Committee are to provide advice on: * Electricity policy issues pertaining to the U.S. Department of Energy * Recommendations concerning U.S. Department of Energy electricity programs and initiatives * Issues related to current and future capacity of the electricity delivery system (generation, transmission, and distribution, regionally and nationally)

62

Wintering Bees  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wintering Bees Name: Craig Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Where do bees live in the winter? Replies: Bees live in the hive in the winter. They form an undulating...

63

An examination of the costs and critical characteristics of electric utility distribution system capacity enhancement projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report classifies and analyzes the capital and total costs (e.g., income tax, property tax, depreciation, centralized power generation, insurance premiums, and capital financing) associated with 130 electricity distribution system capacity enhancement projects undertaken during 1995-2002 or planned in the 2003-2011 time period by three electric power utilities operating in the Pacific Northwest. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in cooperation with participating utilities, has developed a large database of over 3,000 distribution system projects. The database includes brief project descriptions, capital cost estimates, the stated need for each project, and engineering data. The database was augmented by additional technical (e.g., line loss, existing substation capacities, and forecast peak demand for power in the area served by each project), cost (e.g., operations, maintenance, and centralized power generation costs), and financial (e.g., cost of capital, insurance premiums, depreciations, and tax rates) data. Though there are roughly 3,000 projects in the database, the vast majority were not included in this analysis because they either did not clearly enhance capacity or more information was needed, and not available, to adequately conduct the cost analyses. For the 130 projects identified for this analysis, capital cost frequency distributions were constructed, and expressed in terms of dollars per kVA of additional capacity. The capital cost frequency distributions identify how the projects contained within the database are distributed across a broad cost spectrum. Furthermore, the PNNL Energy Cost Analysis Model (ECAM) was used to determine the full costs (e.g., capital, operations and maintenance, property tax, income tax, depreciation, centralized power generation costs, insurance premiums and capital financing) associated with delivering electricity to customers, once again expressed in terms of costs per kVA of additional capacity. The projects were sorted into eight categories (capacitors, load transfer, new feeder, new line, new substation, new transformer, reconductoring, and substation capacity increase) and descriptive statistics (e.g., mean, total cost, number of observations, and standard deviation) were constructed for each project type. Furthermore, statistical analysis has been performed using ordinary least squares regression analysis to identify how various project variables (e.g., project location, the primary customer served by the project, the type of project, the reason for the upgrade, size of the upgrade) impact the unit cost of the project.

Balducci, Patrick J.; Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; Fathelrahman, Eihab M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reducedpurposes. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts ofFigure 2: Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Winter_letter.qxp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

O O F F I C E O F F O S S I L E N E R G Y T N M T R A P E D O F E N E R G Y E T A T S D E T I N U S O F A M E R I C A E 2009 WINTER NEWS ORMAT UPDATE GEOTHERMAL ELECTRICAL GENERATION HOLDS PROMISE FOR OLDER OIL FIELDS Ormat's Organic Rankine Cycle generator has been running at full capacity since early September at NPR-3. I n October, Rocky Mountain Oilfield TestingCenter (RMOTC) and Ormat Inc. of Reno, Nevada, announced the first successful generation of electricity using geothermal hot water from a producing oil well. This project is unique in its production of on-site renewable power and has the potential to increase the productivity and longevity of existing U.S. oil fields. Harnessing hot water produced during oil production to power the oil field could lead to more economical access to reserves, espe- cially in older, depleted fields.

66

CARBON MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION CAPACITY: A VINTAGE-BASED APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the stock of fossil-fired power generation capacity in the United States within the context of climate change. At present, there are over 1,337 fossil-fired power generating units of at least 100 MW in capacity, that began operating between the early 1940s and today. Together these units provide some 453 GW of electric power. Launching a national program to accelerate the early retirement of this stock or tearing them down and undertaking near-term brownfield redevelopment with advanced power cycle technologies as a means of addressing their greenhouse gas emissions will not be a sensible option for all of these units. Considering a conservative 40-year operating life, there are over 667 existing fossil-fired power plants, representing a capacity of over 291 GW, that have at least a decades worth of productive life remaining. This paper draws upon specialized tools developed by Battelle to analyze the characteristics of this subset of U.S. power generation assets and explore the relationships between plant type, location, emissions, and vintage. It examines the use of retrofit carbon capture technologies, considering criteria such as the proximity of these power plants to geologic reservoirs, to assess the potential that geologic sequestration of CO2 offers these plants for managing their emissions. The average costs for retrofitting these plants and sequestering their CO2 into nearby geologic reservoirs are presented. A discussion of a set of planned U.S. fossil-fired power projects within this context is also included.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook ... March 31) for fossil fuels but not electricity . Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast) Fuel .

68

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyImpacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. MethodologyFigure 3: Commercial electricity demand with and without the

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand changes impact the electric power sector. Figure 2:for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. Thedemand changes impact the electric power sector. We refer to

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

AN OPTIMIZED TWO-CAPACITY ADVANCED ELECTRIC HEAT PUMP S. E. Veyo, Manager, Heat Exchange Systems Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exchanger, comfort. #12;AN OPTIMIZED TWO-CAPACITY ADVANCED ELECTRIC HEAT PUMP S. E. Veyo* ABSTRACT A two constrained optimization procedure was used to select heat exchanger proportions, air flow rates National Laboratory. * S. E. Veyo, Mgr., Heat Exchange Systems, Westinghouse R&D Center, Pittsburgh, PA

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

71

Winter Distillate  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Throughout the summer, gasoline prices have drawn most of the public's attention, but EIA has been concerned over winter heating fuels as well. q Distillate inventories are likely to begin the winter heating season at low levels, which increases the chances of price volatility such as that seen last winter. q Natural gas does not look much better. q Winter Distillate http://www.eia.doe.gov/pub/oil_gas/petroleum/presentati...00/winter_distillate_and_natural_gas_outlook/sld001.htm [8/10/2000 4:35:57 PM] Slide 2 of 25 Notes: Residential heating oil prices on the East Coast (PADD 1) were 39 cents per gallon higher this June than last year (120 v 81 cents per gallon). As many of you already know, the increase is due mainly to increased crude oil prices.

72

Does More international transmission capacity increase competition in the Belgian electricity market?  

SciTech Connect

From a national market perspective, taking transmission capacity into account reduces current concentration measures, although they remain fairly high even after substantial capacity increases. From an international perspective, a more efficient use of current transmission capacity by coupling regional markets can increase competition. That suggests it may not be appropriate to assess market concentration using national market shares. (author)

Kuepper, Gerd; Delarue, Erik; Delvaux, Bram; Meeus, Leonardo; Bekaert, David; Willems, Bert; Proost, Stef; D'haeseleer, William; Deketelaere, Kurt; Belmans, Ronnie

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Subset of Table 8.11a; Kilowatts) Year: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear Electric Power: Hydro-electric Pumped Storage: Renewable Energy: Other 8: Total: Coal 1: Petroleum 2 ...

74

Martin Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Winter Winter Chair for Applied Materials Science for Electrochemical Energy Storage and Conversion (at WWU Münster) Leader, NRW-Competence Centre 'Battery Technology' Scientific Director of the MEET Battery Research CenterInstitute of Physical Chemistry (IPC) at WWU Münster martin.winter@uni-muenster.de This speaker was a visiting speaker who delivered a talk or talks on the date(s) shown at the links below. This speaker is not otherwise associated with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, unless specifically identified as a Berkeley Lab staff member. Prof. Winter's main research interests are in applied electrochemistry, materials electrochemistry and inorganic chemistry and technology. He has been active in the field of batteries and in particular lithium ion

75

How much electric supply capacity is needed to keep U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... Some of the current above-target supply is also the result of a building spurt for natural gas capacity between 1999 and 2003, ...

76

How much electric supply capacity is needed to keep U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar › Energy in Brief ... additions in wind and solar capacity were spurred by both state-level Renewable Portfolio Standards and federal tax incentives.

77

Did English Generators Play Cournot? Capacity Withholding in the Electricity Pool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity withdrawal. In the summer of 2000, however, Ofgem took action when Edison Mission Energy withdrew 480 MW of capacity from the market. Edison was one of the companies that had accepted Ofgem’s short-lived market abuse licence condition... , and the regulator started an investigation into the company’s decision. Ofgem (2000) reported that “on the basis of analysing the avoidable costs of the capacity withdrawn by the company … against spot and forward prices it appears that Edison may be in breach...

Green, Richard J

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

78

BATTERY-POWERED, ELECTRIC-DRIVE VEHICLES PROVIDING BUFFER STORAGE FOR PV CAPACITY VALUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installed over 1.5 MW of rooftop PV [2]. These systems generate value primarily through the energy produced and the intermittent nature of the solar resource create challenges to realizing the capacity value of PV installations

Perez, Richard R.

79

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of capacity projections from AEO2011 and AEO2012.presents a reference case projection of U.S. energy supply,to produce a modified projection. 3. The difference between

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure investment for reducing US gasoline consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost-effectiveness of plug-in hybrid electric vehicle battery capacity and charging infrastructure online 22 October 2012 Keywords: Plug-in hybrid electric vehicle Charging infrastructure Battery size a b for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles as alternate methods to reduce gasoline consumption for cars, trucks

McGaughey, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Table 8.11d Electric Net Summer Capacity: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. ... other biomass. For all years, also includes non-renewable waste ...

82

Minimal petroleum-fired electric capacity has been added in recent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

These data refer to bulk electric power generators connected to the grid; the majority of smaller portable and backup generators in end-use markets do burn oil.

83

How much electric supply capacity is needed to keep U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All Reports ... peak electricity demand and determined that another 117 GW should be available in case of supply outages or extreme weather ...

84

Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption for the end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current yearelectricity consumption for this end-use in the current year

Coughlin, Katie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Capacity Constrained Supply Function Equilibrium Models of Electricity Markets: Stability, Non-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Regulation (POWER). POWER is a program of the University of California Energy Institute of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;Capacity of Texas at Austin William Hogan Center for Business and Government John F. Kennedy School of Government

California at Berkeley. University of

86

EECS 598 Special Topic Electricity Networks and Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and day-ahead markets, energy and capacity markets, bilateral trading, and markets for ancillary services, bilateral trading, energy and capacity markets, ancillary service markets, trading over transmissionEECS 598 Special Topic Electricity Networks and Markets Wednesday and Friday, 9:00-10:30am Winter

Hiskens, Ian A.

87

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

88

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: February 2012 Stocks The unseasonably warm temperatures that the continental United States experienced throughout the winter, coupled with low natural gas prices, caused coal stocks at power plants to increase throughout the winter of 2011 - 2012. During this period, coal stocks usually see a seasonal decline due to the added need for electricity generation from coal plants for spacing heating load. However, it was the sixth straight month that coal stocks increased from the previous month, with this trend likely to continue as the country enters into spring. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current

89

DESIGN STUDY OF A NUCLEAR POWER PLANT FOR 100-KW ELECTRIC AND 400-KW HEAT CAPACITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptional design study was made of a lowpower ''package'' reactor plant for the production of 100 kw of electrical power and 400 kw of heat at remote Arctic installations. The power plant steam generator is proposed to be an unmanned, heterogeneous, boilingtype reactor capable of continuous operation for extended periods. The design is based on data derived from experiments with boiling-type reactors conducted by Argorne at the Reactor Testing Station, Arco, Idaho.

Treshow, M.; Snider, A.R.; Shaftman, D.H.

1955-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

91

Solar Power: Using Photovoltaics to Preserve California's Electricity Capacity Reserves  

SciTech Connect

The California Power Authority (CPA) is committed to increasing the use of renewable energy supplies--such as photovoltaics and wind--as a hedge against price fluctuations of electricity and natural gas. The CPA wants to own and operate an adequate supply of reserve generation that: - Can be deployed quickly in response to severe summer peak loads, unexpected loss of base and intermediate generation units, and failure of critical transmission facilities; - Will minimize the reliance on spot market purchases during periods when the State is most vulnerable to price gouging from private generators.

Herig, C..

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Gas Demand and Electric Generation Capacity Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. power sector natural gas use over the next 10 to 20 years is a topic of significant uncertainty and debate. The industry expects the power sector to be the principal source of growth in national gas demand in the short run; and the manner in which it drives demand and affects the market over the "mid term," to 2020-2030, is an important consideration for planners in both the electric and gas industries. With abundant, relatively low-priced supplies, gas-fired generation can be a strong competito...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

winter_97  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel" on page 2... Diesel" on page 2... See "News Bytes" on page 12... IN THIS ISSUE Coal-Fueled Diesel ..................... 1 Project News Bytes ..................... 1 Large-Scale CFB ........................ 2 Commercial Report ..................... 3 DOE/Industry Seminars .............. 4 NO x Commercial Successes ........ 5 Solid Fuels/Feedstock Program .. 7 International Initiatives ............... 9 International News Bytes .......... 11 Status Bar Chart ........................ 13 Status of Projects ...................... 14 1998 CCT Conference .............. 16 OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY • DOE/FE-0215P-27 ISSUE NO. 27, WINTER 1997 COAL-FUELED DIESEL DEMONSTRATION GIVEN GO-AHEAD FOR ALASKA In August, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) gave final approval to Arthur D. Little to complete

94

Monthly generator capacity factor data now available by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

weather; gasoline; capacity; exports; nuclear; forecast; ... Solar generators—particularly solar thermal—operate at a minimum during winter months, ...

95

winter_96  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRIC'S GREENFIELD ELECTRIC'S GREENFIELD IGCC READY FOR DEMONSTRATION Tampa Electric Company (TEC) has reached a major milestone in its goal to bring clean, low-cost energy to the consumer well into the 21st century. Begun with an independent community plant siting effort, TEC in October initiated operation of a 250-MWe (net) Integrated Gasification Combined- Cycle (IGCC) system. This is the first increment of a planned build-out to 1,150 MWe at the new Polk Power Plant in Polk County, Florida. The advanced IGCC system offers high efficiency, extremely low emis- sions, and saleable solids and liquids in lieu of wastes. In addition to using an environmentally advanced power generation technology, the project will convert some 1,500 acres of phosphate mining spoils to useable

96

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

97

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Assessment [19] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (at http://www.pjm.com. [20] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (at http://www.pjm.com. [21] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or to increase the energy price-cap in order to avoid thei.e. K + ? ? 1. A3 : The foreign energy price is higherthan the national energy price-cap, i.e. f > P. If recalled,

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of their forecasted peak demand. The so- called Installedbut not enough to satisfy peak demand in the national energybe enough to satisfy peak demand in the national energy

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentives to respond to real-time prices. This implies thatve minutes and providing real-time price of See Joskow andthe highest prices in the PJM real-time spot market occurred

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prevailing PJM energy market price. The demand in thethe prevailing national energy market price. Last, suppliersraising the national energy market price cap P up to f, in

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Winter Crude Oil and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Notes: While the relatively low stock forecast (although not as low as last winter) adds some extra pressure to prices, the price of crude oil could be the major factor affecting heating oil prices this winter. The current EIA forecast shows residential prices averaging $1.29 this winter, assuming no volatility. The average retail price is about 7 cents less than last winter, but last winter included the price spike in November 2000, December 2000, and January 2001. Underlying crude oil prices are currently expected to be at or below those seen last winter. WTI averaged over $30 per barrel last winter, and is currently forecast to average about $27.50 per barrel this winter. As those of you who watch the markets know, there is tremendous uncertainty in the amount of crude oil supply that will be available this winter. Less

103

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Electric Power Annual 2011  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation B Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region, 2001-2011 Actual, 2012-2016 Projected megawatts and percent Interconnection NERC Regional Assesment Area 2001/ 2002 2002/ 2003 2003/ 2004 2004/ 2005 2005/ 2006 2006/ 2007 2007/ 2008 2008/ 2009 2009/ 2010 2010/ 2011 2011/ 2012 2012/ 2013E 2013/ 2014E 2014/ 2015E 2015/ 2016E 2016/ 2017E FRCC 39,699 42,001 36,229 41,449 42,493 45,993 46,093 45,042 51,703 45,954 39,924 43,558 43,049 44,228 44,790 45,297 NPCC 42,551 45,980 47,850 47,859 46,328 48,394 46,185 47,151 44,864 44,172 43,806 46,224 46,312 46,284 46,246 46,246 Balance of Eastern Region 341,158 360,748 357,026 371,011 375,365 385,887 383,779 384,495 399,204 389,351 385,428 384,172 386,823 394,645 398,806 403,949 ECAR 82,831 84,844 86,332

105

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

heating oil electricity South U.S. total wood kerosene/other/no heating 116 million homes 4 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 8, 2013

106

Regional Profiles: Pipeline Capacity and Service  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Regional Profiles: Pipeline Capacity ... large petrochemical and electric utility industries drawn there ... accounts for large electricity load ...

107

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce operational and capacity expansion costs for electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating the potential of controlled plug-in hybrid electric vehicle charging to reduce quantify the benefits of controlled charging of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Costs are determined expansion Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles Controlled charging Wind power integration a b s t r a c

McGaughey, Alan

108

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

TRANSPORTATIONPHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

109

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights ï‚· EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural gas and propane will increase by 13% and 9%, respectively, this winter heating season (October 1 through March 31) compared with last winter. Projected U.S. household expenditures are 2% higher for electricity and 2% lower for heating oil this winter. Although EIA expects average expenditures for households that heat with natural gas will be significantly higher than last winter, spending for gas heat will still be lower than the previous 5-year average (see EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook slideshow). ï‚· Brent crude oil spot prices fell from a recent peak of $117 per barrel in early September to

110

Winter and Holiday Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons HOME HOME HOME HOME Do not drink and decorate. Inspect, properly set up, and position ladders. Use a step stool instead of furniture. Be mindful of rearranged furniture. Minimize clutter. LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE LUGGAGE Pack light. Use proper lifting techniques. Do not rush when lifting or carrying heavy suitcases or packages. Take care when placing luggage in overhead compartments. WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS WINTER SPORTS Warm up muscles. Wear appropriate protective gear. Know and abide by winter sports rules. Keep equipment in good working condition and use properly. If you or someone else experiences hypothermia, immediately seek shelter and medical attention.

111

City of Winter Park Energy Conservation Rebate Program (Florida) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

City of Winter Park Energy Conservation Rebate Program (Florida) City of Winter Park Energy Conservation Rebate Program (Florida) City of Winter Park Energy Conservation Rebate Program (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Manufacturing Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Solar Water Heating Program Info State Florida Program Type Local Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies based upon technology and eligible sector The City of Winter Park is now offering rebates to Winter Park electric residential and commercial customers for implementing energy conservation measures. Residential customers can qualify for rebates on duct repair, attic

112

Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Jump to: navigation, search Name Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) Place Norwalk, CT Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Incubator Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Steven Winter Associates (Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings) is a company located in Norwalk, CT. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Steven_Winter_Associates_(Consortium_for_Advanced_Residential_Buildings)&oldid=379243" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

113

Winters fuels report  

SciTech Connect

The outlook for distillate fuel oil this winter is for increased demand and a return to normal inventory patterns, assuming a resumption of normal, cooler weather than last winter. With industrial production expected to grow slightly from last winter`s pace, overall consumption is projected to increase 3 percent from last winter, to 3.4 million barrels per day during the heating season (October 1, 1995-March 31, 1996). Much of the supply win come from stock drawdowns and refinery production. Estimates for the winter are from the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) 4th Quarter 1995 Short-Tenn Energy Outlook (STEO) Mid-World Oil Price Case forecast. Inventories in place on September 30, 1995, of 132 million barrels were 9 percent below the unusually high year-earlier level. Inventories of high-sulfur distillate fuel oil, the principal type used for heating, were 13 percent lower than a year earlier. Supply problems are not anticipated because refinery production and the ready availability of imports should be adequate to meet demand. Residential heating off prices are expected to be somewhat higher than last winter`s, as the effects of lower crude oil prices are offset by lower distillate inventories. Heating oil is forecast to average $0.92 per gallon, the highest price since the winter of 1992-93. Diesel fuel (including tax) is predicted to be slightly higher than last year at $1.13 per gallon. This article focuses on the winter assessment for distillate fuel oil, how well last year`s STEO winter outlook compared to actual events, and expectations for the coming winter. Additional analyses include regional low-sulfur and high-sulfur distillate supply, demand, and prices, and recent trends in distillate fuel oil inventories.

1995-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

114

Abstract--One of the major problems for the massive applicability of Electric Vehicles (EVs) is the scarce capacity of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

overcome in many cases using advanced technologies such as fuel cells and high-capacity batteries in a sunny, predictable environment, solar power can become a solution for reducing transport costs. This paper deals with the reach of this approach. Index Terms--Battery Chargers, Photovoltaic Cells, Road

Rudnick, Hugh

115

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: October 2013 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: October 2013 Stocks In October 2013, total coal stocks increased 0.8 percent from the previous month. This follows the normal seasonal pattern for this time of year as the country begins to build up coal stocks to be consumed during the winter months. Compared to last October, coal stocks decreased 17.7 percent. This occurred because coal stocks in October 2012 were at an extremely high level. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The total bituminous supply decreased from 85 days the previous month to 78 days in October 2013, while the total subbituminous supply decreased from 63 days in September 2013 to

116

Focus Article Nuclear winter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Article Nuclear winter Alan Robock Nuclear winter is the term for a theory describing the climatic effects of nuclear war. Smoke from the fires started by nuclear weapons, especially the black, sooty smoke from cities and industrial facilities, would be heated by the Sun, lofted into the upper

Robock, Alan

117

Winter Morning Air Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of temperature measurements, which may be applied to inference of winter temperatures in data-sparse areas, are presented. The morning air temperatures during three winters were measured at 80 places in a 10 km × 30 km area along the ...

A. Hogan; M. Ferrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wildlife's Winter Diet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wildlife's Winter Diet Wildlife's Winter Diet Nature Bulletin No. 659 December 9, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WILDLIFE'S WINTER DIET Anyone who regularly feeds wild birds, and counts up the amount of food that they eat in the course of a winter, often wonders how they could get along without his help. In one day of freezing weather two or three dozen small birds commonly clean up a half pound of food -- suet, sunflower seed, cracked corn or small grain. This does not take into account raids by squirrels and rabbits. Winter in this region is a time of food crisis for all warm-blooded wildlife. Most of our summer song birds, especially the insect eaters, avoid cold by migrating to warm climates until spring. Likewise, most waterfowl and shorebirds go south during the months when our waters are locked in ice.

119

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

capacity capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

122

Winter Weather Uncertainty  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 of 15 5 of 15 Notes: Heating Degree Days (HDDs): The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season, despite the cold spell in the Northeast spanning January/February. This was particularly true in November 1999, February and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal (less HDDs means warmer temperatures). Normal temperatures this coming winter would be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year.

123

Winter Simulation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 2009 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), recognized as the premiere international conference for simulation professionals in discrete and combined discrete-continuous simulation. WSC is always located in exciting and dynamic locations ...

Ann Dunkin; Ricki G. Ingalls

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

National FCEV Learning Demonstration: Winter 2011 Composite Data Products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes the composite data products produced in Winter 2011 as part of the National Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Learning Demonstration.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

TransForum - Volume 10, No. 3 - Winter 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aprf.html Auto X Prize website: www.progressiveautoxprize.org Electric cars at smart grid charging stations outside Argonne's APRF 19 TransForum 8 Winter 2010 10 19 RESEARCH...

126

Trees in the winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trees in the winter Trees in the winter Name: John H Hersey Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do some trees in the winter lose their leaves and some are able to keep their leaves? Replies: John, You can view the leaves on a tree as its food manufacturing factory. For some trees, especially those which live in areas which become cold in the winter, the 'factories' do their work during the normal growing season and are forced to 'shut-down' over the winter months. There are many evergreens which hold their foliage all year, simply dropping some of them periodically as they age and become less efficient to be replaced by new needles. Larches in the area where I live are conifers which lose their needles, which is quite rare. You can see that foliage on a tree presents a problem: water loss from a tree is greatest in its foliage. A tree has to 'decide' (and this has occurred over millennia by evolution) whether to hold its foliage or shed it. If it decides to hold the foliage, then it must provide a means of insuring conservation of water, especially in the winter months when dry cold winds remove water which is not easily replace due to liquid water in the environment being frozen. Many plant's adaptation has been the production of a waxy cuticle to 'seal-off' the leaf from the environment and reduce water loss. You can understand that in the northern latitude's winters, sunlight duration and intensity drops, and for some plants the best solution has involved shedding the leaves for the winter, and growing a new set of 'factories' in the spring.

127

Capacity on Finsler Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here, the concept of electric capacity on Finsler spaces is introduced and the fundamental conformal invariant property is proved, i.e. the capacity of a compact set on a connected non-compact Finsler manifold is conformal invariant. This work enables mathematicians and theoretical physicists to become more familiar with the global Finsler geometry and one of its new applications.

Bidabad, B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Rescheduled for November 1 October 7, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on November 1 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Originally scheduled for October 8, the conference has been rescheduled due to the shutdown of the Federal government. This supply and demand forecast event will address the effects of projected weather and market factors that may affect the supply, distribution and prices of petroleum, natural gas and electricity this winter. For more information and to register for the

129

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

for heating oil, propane, and natural gas, but little change in ... heating oil . electricity . wood . kerosene/other . Howard Gruenspecht, Winter ...

130

Electric  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Average Retail Price of Electricity to ... Period Residential Commercial Industrial ... or usage falling within specified limits by rate ...

131

Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity is an essential part of modern life. The Energy Department is working to create technology solutions that will reduce our energy use and save Americans money.

132

Schedule of Winter Deadlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What's New? UC Online Courses Pilot In upcoming Winter/Spring 2014 terms, the University of California Find-a-Class feature, students are able to search classes and enroll directly from the search page, but it also allows them to enter other mathematics-related fields that require a strong understanding

Williams, Gary A.

133

Exotic electricity options and the valuation of electricity generation and transmission assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: capacity valuation, electricity derivatives, electricity futures contract, exchange option, mean reversion, real options, spark spread

Shi-Jie Deng; Blake Johnson; Aram Sogomonian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Winter Safety Information & Tips  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 1 WINTER TERMINOLOGY It' s important that you understand winter storm terms so that you can prepare adequately, whether you are walking to the store or driving across the state. * Winter Weather Advisory : Issued when snow, sleet, freezing rain, or combination of precipitation types is expected to cause a significant inconvenience but not serious enough to warrant a warning. * Snow Advisory: - 2-4 inches of snow in a 12 hour period * Freezing Rain Advisory: - Ice accumulations of less than 1/4 inch * Ice Storm Warning: - 1/4 inch or more of ice accumulation January 2007 2 WINTER TERMINOLOGY * Winter Storm Watch: Issued when there is the potential for significant and hazardous winter weather within 48 hours. It does not mean that significant and hazardous winter weather will occur...it only means it is possible. - Significant and hazardous winter weather is defined as: * Over 5

135

Winter Fuels Outlook Conference 2010  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This presentation at the 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference in Washington, DC, outlined EIA's current forecast for U.S. crude oil, distillate, natural gas, propane and gasoline supply, demand, and markets over the coming winter season.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Distillate .and Propane Outlook. Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration State Heating Oil and Propane Program August 2000

137

Caterpillar in Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Caterpillar in Winter Caterpillar in Winter Name: Peggy Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I live in northern New York on the shore of Lake Ontario. The temperature today is 20 degrees. Last night it was 10 below. I found a woolly bear caterpillar walking across the snow. My question is should I leave it there or bring it in for the rest of the winter? How do I take care of it if I bring it in? Why would it come out of hibernation on such a cold day? Thank you. Replies: Why would it be out? Who knows, but it was, and was moving, so I suggest (belatedly of course since this was several days ago) leaving it alone. Small creatures have many remarkable characteristics that allow them to survive, most have been around a lot longer than humans and will probably still be around long after we are gone, and all the help they need from us is to be left alone.

138

Refinery Capacity Report 2007  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

Refinery Capacity Report 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

Refinery Capacity Report 2008  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; current and projected capacities for atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, production, and storage capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

Information Center

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Electric Power Annual 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.A. Summer net internal demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Region" "1999 through 2011 actual, 2012-2016 projected"...

142

Abstract--It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical vehicles (EV). The storage capacity of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,000) could be replaced by electrical car by the year 2025 [8]. It is predicted that EVs will make 641 Abstract-- It is expected that a lot of the new light vehicles in the future will be electrical into account. Index Terms-- Electrical vehicle, smart charging, spot electricity price. I. INTRODUCTION HE

Mahat, Pukar

143

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT E-li, ( -,v? Cl -p4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson...

144

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: The outlook for heating oil costs this winter, due to high crude oil costs and tight heating oil supplies, breaks down to an expected increase in heating expenditures for a typical oil-heated household of more than $200 this winter, the result of an 18% increase in the average price and an 11% increase in consumption. The consumption increase is due to the colder than normal temperatures experienced so far this winter and our expectations of normal winter weather for the rest of this heating season. Last winter, Northeast heating oil (and diesel fuel) markets experienced an extremely sharp spike in prices when a severe weather situation developed in late January. It is virtually impossible to gauge the probability of a similar (or worse) price shock recurring this winter,

145

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 Notes: Using the Northeast as a regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming that weather is "normal." The previous three winters were warmer than average and generated below normal consumption rates. Last winter, consumers saw large increases over the very low heating oil prices seen during the winter of 1998-1999 but, outside of the cold period in late January/early February they saw relatively low consumption rates due to generally warm weather. Even without particularly sharp cold weather events this winter, we think consumers are likely to see higher average heating oil prices than were seen last winter. If weather is normal, our projections imply New England heating oil

146

ELECTRIC  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ELECTRIC ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A quantity of at lezst 5 grams would probably be sufficient for our purpose, and this was included in our 3@icntion for license to the Atonic Energy Coskqission.. This license has been approved, 2nd rre would Llp!Jreciate informztion as to how to ?r*oceed to obtain thit: m2teria.l.

147

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission, and Distribution  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

9 9 2009 Peak Load and Capacity Margin, Summer and Winter by NERC Region (MW) NERC Region Capacity Margin Capacity Margin TRE 16.7% 19.1% FRCC 6.0% 2.0% MRO (U.S.) 24.6% 26.8% NPCC (U.S.) 29.1% 43.2% RFC 25.2% 33.3% SERC 24.6% 26.2% SPP 16.4% 34.6% WECC 19.4% 29.6% U.S. TOTAL 22.2% 28.5% Note(s): Source(s): 128,245 109,565 725,958 668,818 1) Summer Demand includes the months of June, July, August, and September. 2) Winter Demand includes December of the previous year and January-March of the current year. 3) Capacity Margin is the amount of unused available capability of an electric power system at peak load as a percentage of net capacity resources. Net Capacity Resources: Utility- and IPP-owned generating capacity that is existing or in various stages of planning or construction, less inoperable capacity, plus planned capacity purchases from other resources, less planned

148

Winter 2011 www.ise.osu.edu (continued on page 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

regarding the interplay of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, electric vehicles, renewable energy, energyWinter 2011 www.ise.osu.edu (continued on page 2) NSF Grant Propels Electric Vehicle Research Electric cars ­ once thought to be a fu- turistic invention ­ are no longer a far- off innovation, but just

149

DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 DOE, EIA, and NASEO Host Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8, 2013 September 26, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Energy Information Administration, and the National Association of State Energy Officials will host the 2013 - 2014 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 8 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. This supply and demand forecast event will address the effects of projected weather and market factors that may affect the supply, distribution and prices of petroleum, natural gas and electricity this winter. For more information and to register for the event, visit the 2013 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference website.

150

Winter fuels report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide consise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; Natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s as well as selected National average prices; Residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; Crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and A 6-10 Day and 30-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree days by city.

Not Available

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

Winter fuels report  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the United States and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. 27 figs, 12 tabs.

1990-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

153

`ERICKA' and `ATHENA' Winter Canola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

`ERICKA' and `ATHENA' Winter Canola (Brassica napus L.) `Ericka' and `Athena' winter canola oil seed (canola-quality) cultivar by the Idaho Agricultural Experiment Station, Moscow, ID 83844 consistently produced seed meal glucosinolate content less than the 30 µmol g-1 "canola-quality" requirement

Brown, Jack

154

Winter Fuels Market Assessment 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 13, 2000 September 13, 2000 Winter Fuels Market Assessment 2000 09/14/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Winter Fuels Market Assessment 2000 West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Prices Perspective on Real Monthly World Oil Prices, 1976 - 2000 U.S. Crude Oil Stocks Total OECD Oil Stocks Distillate and Spot Crude Oil Prices Distillate Stocks Expected to Remain Low Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs Natural Gas Prices: Well Above Recent Averages Annual Real Natural Gas Prices by Sector End-of-Month Working Gas in .Underground Storage Residential Prices Do Not Reflect the Volatility Seen in Wellhead Prices Consumer Natural Gas Heating Costs Winter Weather Uncertainty Author: John Cook Email: jcook@eia.doe.gov

155

Design And Simulation Of A Real-time Price Demand Response Program For Electricity Subject To A Capacity Constraint For The Philadelphia Navy Yard.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is based on data from the Philadelphia Navy Yard, which has its own transmission and distribution electric micro-grid and is home for commercial… (more)

Cortes, Mercedes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EEI/DOE Transmission Capacity Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: PRESENT STATUS AND FUTURE PROSPECTS Eric Hirst Consulting in Electric-Industry Restructuring Bellingham, Washington June 2004 Prepared for Energy Delivery Group Edison Electric Institute Washington, DC Russell Tucker, Project Manager and Office of Electric Transmission and Distribution U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC Larry Mansueti, Project Manager ii iii CONTENTS Page SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF ACRONYMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii 1. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2. TRANSMISSION CAPACITY: DATA AND PROJECTIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 HISTORICAL DATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CURRENT CONDITIONS . . . . . . .

157

yale environmental news winter 2008 vol. 13, no. 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standards for Yale projects; the purchase of hybrid vehicles; and the placement of thin film photovoltaicyale environmental news winter 2008 · vol. 13, no. 1 The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History; and achieving a 10% yearly reduction in electricity use in the resi- dential colleges. Yale students and others

158

Winter fuels report  

SciTech Connect

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and state and local governments on the following topics: distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks for all PADD's and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks for Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition, underground storage, and consumption for all PADD's; residential and wholesale pricing data for propane and heating oil for those states participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil price comparisons for the United States and selected cities; and US total heating degree-days by city. This report will be published weekly by the EIA starting the first week in October 1990 and will continue until the first week in April 1991. The data will also be available electronically after 5:00 p.m. on Thursday during the heating season through the EIA Electronic Publication System (EPUB). 12 tabs.

1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

159

Winter fuels report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Fuels Report is intended to provide concise, timely information to the industry, the press, policymakers, consumers, analysts, and State and local governments on the following topics: Distillate fuel oil net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for all Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADD) and product supplied on a US level; propane net production, imports and stocks on a US level and for PADD`s I, II, and III; natural gas supply and disposition and underground storage for the US and consumption for all PADD`s; as well as selected National average prices; residential and wholesale pricing data for heating oil and propane for those States participating in the joint Energy Information Administration (EIA)/State Heating Oil and Propane Program; crude oil and petroleum price comparisons for the US and selected cities; and a 6-10 Day, 30-Day, and 90-Day outlook for temperature and precipitation and US total heating degree-days by city.

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

"Winter is coming"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Those that do not sow care little about such mundane things as equinoxes or planting seasons, or even crop rotation for that matter. Wherever and whenever the reavers reave, the mood is always foul and the nights are never warm or pleasant. For the rest of the good folks of Westeros, however, a decent grasp of the long-term weather forecast is a necessity. Many a maester have tried to play the Game of Weather Patterns and foretell when to plant those last turnip seeds, hoping for a few more years of balmy respite. Tried and failed. For other than the somewhat vague (if not outright meaningless) omens of "Winter is Coming", their meteorological efforts have been worse than useless. To right that appalling wrong, here we attempt to explain the apparently erratic seasonal changes in the world of G.R.R.M. A natural explanation for such phenomena is the unique behavior of a circumbinary planet. Thus, by speculating that the planet under scrutiny is orbiting a pair of stars, we utilize the power of numerical three-...

Kostov, Veselin; Hartman, Nikolaus; Guzewich, Scott; Rogers, Justin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Steam Heat: Winter Fountains in the City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joan Brigham Steam Heat: Winter Fountains int h e City Steam is a phenomenon of the winter city. Iteven when the surging steam temporarily blinds them. When I

Brigham, Joan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

163

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights ... Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity;

164

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report With Data as of January 1, 2013 | Release Date: June 21, 2013 | Next Release Date: June 20, 2014 Previous Issues Year: 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1997 1995 1994 Go Data series include fuel, electricity, and steam purchased for consumption at the refinery; refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation; and current and projected atmospheric crude oil distillation, downstream charge, and production capacities. Respondents are operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shut down during the previous year, located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U.S. possessions.

165

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart...

166

Winter Demand Impacted by Weather  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Notes: Heating oil demand is strongly influenced by weather. The "normal" numbers are the expected values for winter 2000-2001 used in EIA's Short-Term Energy Outlook. The chart indicates the extent to which the last winter exhibited below-normal heating degree-days (and thus below-normal heating demand). Temperatures were consistently warmer than normal throughout the 1999-2000 heating season. This was particularly true in November 1999, February 2001 and March 2001. For the heating season as a whole (October through March), the 1999-2000 winter yielded total HDDs 10.7% below normal. Normal temperatures this coming winter would, then, be expected to bring about 11% higher heating demand than we saw last year. Relative to normal, the 1999-2000 heating season was the warmest in

167

Winter_2009_Index.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * ISSUE NO. 82, WINTER 2009 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION ANNUAL INDEX OF ARTICLES Clean Coal Today...

168

Consumer Winter Heating Oil Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 of 18 Notes: Using the Northeast as an appropriate regional focus for heating oil, the typical oil-heated household consumes about 680 gallons of oil during the winter, assuming...

169

Synoptically Driven Arctic Winter States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dense network of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) observations is used to assess relationships between winter surface and atmospheric variables as the SHEBA site came under the influence of cyclonic and anticyclonic atmospheric ...

Kirstie Stramler; Anthony D. Del Genio; William B. Rossow

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 12, 2011 September 19, 2011 - 4:55pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials invite you to participate in the 2011 - 2012 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference. This important supply and demand forecast event will be held on Wednesday, October 12, 2011, from 7:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. at The Newseum, 555 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20001. Event Information Winter Fuels Conference Site Preliminary Agenda Online Registration Addthis Related Articles Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012

171

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2011WinterFuels_finalv3.pptx [Read-Only]  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sh Sh t T d Wi t F l O tl k EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook f for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) O b 12 2011 | h C October 12, 2011 | Washington, DC by www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Howard Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator Overview * EIA expects higher average fuel bills this winter heating season for heating oil, propane, and natural gas, but little change in electricity bills. y * Higher fuel prices are the main driver - 10% higher heating oil prices (than last winter) g g p ( ) - 7% higher propane prices - 4% higher residential natural gas prices - 1% higher electricity prices * Projected average expenditures for heating oil users are at their highest level ever. 2 Howard Gruenspecht, Winter Fuels Outlook

172

APPROXIMATE YEARLY BUDGET, 20112012 (summer, fall, winter) the table below shows an estimate of the yearly cost per person for studying in montral. all amounts are in Canadian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) immigration (temporary residents) 300 $ arrival from abroad (hotel, meals...) 500 $ winter clothing 800.santeetudiante.com (in french only). 9 these amounts include furniture, utilities (water, electricity, heating

Skorobogatiy, Maksim

173

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

DOE Transmission Capacity Report | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transmission Capacity Report Transmission Capacity Report DOE Transmission Capacity Report DOE Transmission Capacity Report: Transmission lines, substations, circuit breakers, capacitors, and other equipment provide more than just a highway to deliver energy and power from generating units to distribution systems. Transmission systems both complement and substitute for generation. Transmission generally enhances reliability; lowers the cost of electricity delivered to consumers; limits the ability of generators to exercise market power; and provides flexibility to protect against uncertainties about future fuel prices, load growth, generator construction, and other factors affecting the electric system. DOE Transmission Capacity Report More Documents & Publications Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's

175

A Review of Electric Vehicle Cost Studies: Assumptions, Methodologies, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assumptions Battery costs and capacities: Lead acid batteryElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: Lead acidElectricity cost Battery cost and capacity: N i C d

Lipman, Timothy

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Generating capacity of the united power system of Russia and conditions of fuel supply to electric power plants for the period up to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Prospects of development of the energy economy in Russia are considered up to 2020. The proportion of thermal power plants (TPP) in the structure of the generating capacity of Russia amounts to about 70% (147 mln kW). The proportion of gas in the structure of fuel consumed by TPP amounts to 64%. It is predicted that the fraction of high-quality kinds of fuel (gas and fuel oil) will decrease in the considered period due to maximum involvement of coal in the fuel balance and wider use of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies that provide a lower specific consumption of fuel. It is planned to resort to advanced technologies both for reconstructing existing plants and erecting new ones. This paper deals with problems of fuel supply of fossil-fuel-fired thermal power plants in the light of the evolution of the energy economy of Russia. The demand of TPP for different kinds of fossil fuel, i.e., gas, coal, and fuel oil, is estimated for the whole of the country and for its regions according to two variants of development of the generating capacity with planned commissioning of combined-cycle plants with a total output of 32 mln kW and gas-turbine plants with a total output of 61 mln kW in the period of up to 2020. The tasks of the fuel policy to be solved in the considered period are presented.

V.I. Chemodanov; N.V. Bobyleva; N.G. Chelnokova; N.Yu. Sokolova [Energoset'proekt Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook ... for all fossil f elsMarch 31) for all fossil fuels Percent changg()e in fuel bills from last winter (forecast) Fuel bill ...

178

Tree leaves in the winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tree leaves in the winter Tree leaves in the winter Name: ethel Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do leaves fall off of some trees in the winter? Replies: An interesting question, Ethel. Biologists generally try to explain behavior in terms of a response or adaptation to an environmental challenge. The challenge in this example is thought to be snowfall. The idea is that a massive accumulation of snow in a large tree canopy would lead to mechanical damage or breakage of tree limbs or the trunk. Most deciduous trees (those that lose leaves in fall) have broad flat leaves that catch snow quite well. The advantage of this type of leaf is that they also catch the sunlight well in the summer growing season, allowing efficient photosynthesis to support rapid summer growth. The leaves are not needed in the winter because cold temperatures inhibit the enzymes of photosynthesis and prevent significant growth. Another interesting question is how evergreen trees have adapted to similar environmental challenges using a different strategy. Ask me a about it if you are interested.

179

Consumer Natural Gas Winter Heating Costs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 of 26 Notes: Mild weather minimized residential gas consumption over most of the past 3 winters. Our projections for more or less normal winter weather through the remainder of...

180

Climate Model for Winter Wheat Yield Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter wheat yields were simulated by a model requiring climatic data as input for estimating crop evapotranspiration and phenological development. An assumed relationship between the winter wheat yields and the amount and timing of crop water ...

Kenneth G. Hubbard; R. J. Hanks

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Winter Energy Savings from Lower Thermostat Settings  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This discussion provides details on the effect of lowering thermostat settings during the winter heating months of 1997.

Information Center

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

2. Gas Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2. Gas Productive Capacity Gas Capacity to Meet Lower 48 States Requirements The United States has sufficient dry gas productive capacity at the wellhead to meet ...

183

Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2012 0, 2012 Registration Open for Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on October 10, 2012 September 12, 2012 - 11:16am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the National Association of State Energy Officials are hosting the 2012 - 2013 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 in Washington, DC. This important supply and demand forecast event will address global oil supply uncertainty; the effects of projected winter weather on the demand for heating and key transportation fuels; and a range of market factors that may impact the supply, distribution and prices of petroleum, natural gas and electricity this winter. This annual event helps to inform the entire energy policy and business

184

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

185

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

186

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric...

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric...

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric...

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Capacity (megawatts) 36,636 7 Electric Utilities 26,639 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 9,998 11 Net Generation (megawatthours) 137,576,941 8 Electric...

191

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of Northeast Winter Supply  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The weather alone was not enough to cause the price spike. The low The weather alone was not enough to cause the price spike. The low stocks left the area vulnerable to sudden changes in the market, such as the weather change. Why do stocks matter in the Northeast? Stocks are normally an important part of PADD 1 winter distillate supply. Over the last 5 years, PADD 1 stocks provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and February. They are the closest source of supply to the consumer. PADD 1 depends on about 60% of its supply from distant sources such as the Gulf Coast or imports, which can take several weeks to travel to the Northeast. Even product from East Coast refineries, if capacity is available, may take a week before it is produced and delivered to the regions needing new supply. Thus, stocks must be able

192

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alternative Fuels. Includes ... decline during summer and winter as power plants burn through stocks to meet peak electricity demand for heating and cooling, ...

193

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... decline during summer and winter as power plants burn through stocks to meet peak electricity demand for heating and cooling, ... overall heating load in ...

194

WINTER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

49222.4 49709.1 50541.8 50319.8 6a1 Wind Expected On-Peak 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6a2 Solar Expected On-Peak 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6a3 Hydro Expected On-Peak 55 43.5 43.5 43.5...

195

WINTER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

55,087 55,087 55,087 55,087 55,087 6a1 Wind Expected On-Peak 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6a2 Solar Expected On-Peak 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 6a3 Hydro Expected On-Peak 44 44 44 44 44 44 44...

196

WINTER  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

6a and must be < 6a) 54,264 54,264 54,264 54,264 6a1 Wind Expected On-Peak - - - - 6a2 Solar Expected On-Peak - - - - 6a3 Hydro Expected On-Peak 55 55 55 55 6a4 Biomass Expected...

197

Winter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nibbled the tender bark of shrubs, or perhaps where one was chased by a fox or a hunting dog. If it was a fox, his tracks are more pointed and more nearly in a straight line than...

198

NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 1 10 1 NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook Richard Newell, NASEO Winter Fuels Conference, October 2010 2 Overview * EIA expects average heating bills to be 3% higher this winter than last - an increase of $24 to a U.S. average of $986 per household * Due to higher fuel prices forecast this winter compared to last - 2% higher electricity prices - 8% higher heating oil prices - 6% higher residential natural gas prices - 11% higher propane prices * Bill increases are moderated by a warmer winter weather forecast for the South, but little change in the Midwest/West; slightly colder in the Northeast * Inventories of fuel oil and natural gas are currently well above typical levels,

199

Measuring wind plant capacity value  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility planners and wind energy researchers pose a common question: What is the capacity value of a wind plant? Tentative answers, which can be phrased in a variety of ways, are based on widely varying definitions and methods of calculation. From the utility`s point of view, a resource that has no capacity value also has a reduced economic value. Utility planners must be able to quantify the capacity value of a wind plant so that investment in conventional generating capacity can be potentially offset by the capacity value of the wind plant. Utility operations personnel must schedule its conventional resources to ensure adequate generation to meet load. Given a choice between two resources, one that can be counted on and the other that can`t, the utility will avoid the risky resource. This choice will be reflected in the price that the utility will pay for the capacity: higher capacity credits result in higher payments. This issue is therefore also important to the other side of the power purchase transaction -- the wind plant developer. Both the utility and the developer must accurately assess the capacity value of wind. This article summarizes and evaluates some common methods of evaluating capacity credit. During the new era of utility deregulation in the United States, it is clear that many changes will occur in both utility planning and operations. However, it is my judgement that the evaluation of capacity credit for wind plants will continue to play an important part in renewable energy development in the future.

Milligan, M.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

30 A.1 Electrical power capacity from32 B.1 Electrical power capacity: Batterycompressed H 2 . 36 C.1.1 Electrical power

Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Definition: Nameplate Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Nameplate Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Nameplate Capacity The maximum amount of electric energy that a generator can produce under specific conditions, as rated by the manufacturer. Generator nameplate capacity is expressed in some multiple of watts such as megawatts (MW), as indicated on a nameplate that is physically attached to the generator.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Also Known As Capacity Related Terms electricity generation, power References ↑ http://www.nrc.gov/reading-rm/basic-ref/glossary/generator-nameplate-capacity.html Retr LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Nameplate_Capacity&oldid=480378"

202

Definition: Deferred Generation Capacity Investments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Capacity Investments Generation Capacity Investments Utilities and grid operators ensure that generation capacity can serve the maximum amount of load that planning and operations forecasts indicate. The trouble is, this capacity is only required for very short periods each year, when demand peaks. Reducing peak demand and flattening the load curve should reduce the generation capacity required to service load and lead to cheaper electricity for customers.[1] Related Terms load, electricity generation, peak demand, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Deferred_Generation_Capacity_Investments&oldid=50257

203

FAQs about Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

about Storage Capacity about Storage Capacity How do I determine if my tanks are in operation or idle or non-reportable? Refer to the following flowchart. Should idle capacity be included with working capacity? No, only report working capacity of tanks and caverns in operation, but not for idle tanks and caverns. Should working capacity match net available shell in operation/total net available shell capacity? Working capacity should be less than net available shell capacity because working capacity excludes contingency space and tank bottoms. What is the difference between net available shell capacity in operation and total net available shell capacity? Net available shell capacity in operation excludes capacity of idle tanks and caverns. What do you mean by transshipment tanks?

204

PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook PPMCSA Presentation on Winter Distillate Outlook 09/15/2000 Click here to start Table of Contents Winter Distillate Outlook Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil Factors Driving Prices & Forecast First Factor Impacting Distillate Prices: Crude Oil Prices High Crude Prices Go With Low Inventories Second Price Component: Spread Impacted by Distillate Supply/Demand Balance Distillate Stocks are Low – Especially on the East Coast Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of East Coast Winter Supply Winter Demand Impacted by Weather Warm Winters Held Heating Oil Demand Down While Diesel Grew Distillate Demand Strong in December 1999 Dec 1999 & Jan 2000 Production Fell, But Rebounded with Price Higher Yields Can Be Achieved Unusual Net Imports May Only Be Available at a High Price

205

Electricity - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity...

206

Table F9. World installed geothermal generating capacity by region ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2011 259 Reference case projections for electricity capacity and generation by fuel

207

Electric moped  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two electrically powered mopeds were designed and built. These vehicles offer single-person transportation which is convenient, quiet, low-cost, smooth, and pollution-free. The first moped has a 12 volt electrical system. The second has a 24 volt electrical system. They both have top speeds of about 20 miles per hour. They both use transistorized speed controls and deep-discharge, lead-acid batteries. These mopeds were put through a 750 mile test program. In this program, the 12 volt bike had an average range of nine miles. The 24 volt bike, with a smaller battery capacity, had an average range of six miles.

Ferschl, M.S.

1981-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table of Contents. Winter Distillate and Natural Gas Outlook. Distillate Prices Increasing With Crude Oil. Distillate Outlook. When Will Crude Oil Prices Fall?

209

1998-99 Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

with historical data for last winter, ... production during the coming year is always present. ... needed to maintain reservoir pressure and are not a ...

210

EIA Short -Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2008 NASEO 2008/09 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 7, 2008 Washington, DC Howard Gruenspecht Acting ...

211

Property:InstalledCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

InstalledCapacity InstalledCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name InstalledCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Installed Capacity (MW) or also known as Total Generator Nameplate Capacity (Rated Power) Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

212

Electric Power Annual 2011 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity; ... Average power plant operating expenses for major U.S. investor-owned electric utilities XLS:

213

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: March 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: March 2012 Stocks The seasonal winter drawdown of coal stocks was totally negated during the winter months this year due to low natural gas prices and unseasonably warm temperatures throughout the continental United States. In fact, March 2012 was the seventh straight month that coal stockpiles at power plants increased from the previous month. The largest driver of increasing stockpiles has been declining consumption of coal due to unseasonably warm weather and declining natural gas prices. Because much of the coal supplied to electric generators is purchased through long-term contracts, increasing coal stockpiles have proven difficult for electric power plant operators to handle. Some operators have inventories so high that they are refusing

214

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner October 20, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability As temperatures start to drop Americans around the country are pulling out their flannel sheets, putting the storm windows back on, and switching their air conditioning units with heaters. These transformations have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels. Since 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) have held an annual Winter Fuels Outlook Conference to provide the energy community with information on global and

215

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner Winter Fuels Season is Right Around the Corner October 20, 2010 - 10:31am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability As temperatures start to drop Americans around the country are pulling out their flannel sheets, putting the storm windows back on, and switching their air conditioning units with heaters. These transformations have an impact on the way our nation uses our energy resources, particularly heating fuels. Since 1994, the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) have held an annual Winter Fuels Outlook Conference to provide the energy community with information on global and

216

Capacity and Energy Payments to Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to PURPA. Avoided costs are the "incremental costs to an electric utility of electric energy or capacity or both which, but for the purchase from the qualifying facility or...

217

A Winter Weather Index for Estimating Winter Roadway Maintenance Costs in the Midwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter roadway maintenance budget data for the state of Iowa have been combined with available climate data for a 6-yr period to create a winter weather index that provides a useful assessment of winter severity. The weather index can be combined ...

Craig G. Carmichael; William A. Gallus Jr.; Bradley R. Temeyer; Mark K. Bryden

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparison of Productive Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Appendix B Comparison of Productive Capacity Comparisons of base case productive capacities for this and all previous studies were made (Figure B1).

219

Tables - Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tables: 1: Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2009: PDF: 2: Production Capacity of Operable ...

220

Winter Residential Heating Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: Residential heating oil prices reflect a similar pattern to that shown in spot prices. However, like other retail petroleum prices, they tend to lag changes in wholesale prices in both directions, with the result that they don't rise as rapidly or as much, but they take longer to recede. This chart shows the residential heating oil prices collected under the State Heating Oil and Propane Program (SHOPP), which only runs during the heating season, from October through March. The spike in New York Harbor spot prices last winter carried through to residential prices throughout New England and the Central Atlantic states. Though the spike actually lasted only a few weeks, residential prices ended the heating season well above where they had started.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Property:Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capacity Capacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Capacity Property Type Quantity Description Potential electric energy generation, default units of megawatts. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

222

Electric Power Monthly - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary; Sales (consumption), revenue, ... Electric power plants generating capacity;

223

The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2004 North Slope of Alaska 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E. R. Westwater, M. A. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. J. Gasiewski, T. Uttal, and D. A. Hazen National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado D. Cimini Remote Sensing Division, CETEMPS Universita' dell'Aquila L'Aquila, Italy V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Perugia, Italy B. L. Weber and S. Dowlatshahi Science Technology Corporation Boulder, Colorado J. A. Shaw Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

224

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

225

"YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY CODE","UTILITY NAME","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL PHOTOVOLTAIC NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL WIND ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL WIND INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL WIND NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","COMMERCIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL OTHER ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL OTHER INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL OTHER NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY (MWh)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","COMMERCIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","TOTAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY (MW)","RESIDENTIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","COMMERCIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","INDUSTRIAL TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TRANSPORTATION TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","TOTAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT","RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","COMMERCIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","INDUSTRIAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TRANSPORTATION ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","TOTAL ELECTRIC ENERGY SOLD BACK TO THE UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

UTILITYFOR ALL STATES SERVED(MWh)","RESIDENTIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","COMMERCIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INDUSTRIAL INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","TRANSPORTATION INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","INSTALLED NET METERING CAPACITY FOR ALL STATES SERVED(MW)","RESIDENTIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","COMMERCIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","INDUSTRIAL NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","TRANSPORTATION NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED","NET METERING CUSTOMER COUNT FOR ALL STATES SERVED"

226

Property:MeanCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanCapacity MeanCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Mean capacity potential at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

227

Installed Geothermal Capacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Capacity Geothermal Capacity Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Installed Geothermal Capacity International Market Map of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants List of U.S. Geothermal Power Plants Throughout the world geothermal energy is looked at as a potential source of renewable base-load power. As of 2005 there was 8,933 MW of installed power capacity within 24 countries. The International Geothermal Association (IGA) reported 55,709 GWh per year of geothermal electricity. The generation from 2005 to 2010 increased to 67,246 GWh, representing a 20% increase in the 5 year period. The IGA has projected that by 2015 the new installed capacity will reach 18,500 MW, nearly 10,000 MW greater than 2005. [1] Countries with the greatest increase in installed capacity (MW) between

228

Property:PlannedCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PlannedCapacity PlannedCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PlannedCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The total planned capacity for a given area, region or project. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

229

NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator

230

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Short-Term Energy Outlook and Winter Fuels Outlook For NASEO Winter Fuels Outlook Conference November 1, 2013| Washington, DC By Adam Sieminski, Administrator EIA works closely...

231

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels Outlook ... (October 1– March 31) for all fossil fuels Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast) Fuel bill . Base case . forecast :

232

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Winter Fuels Outlook for National Association of State Energy Officials . ... for all fossil fuels Percent change in fuel bills from last winter (forecast)

233

Winter, a valuable cooling energy resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Frigid winters can now be thought of as a valuable energy resource. Ice frozen naturally during the winter could prove to be an energy-saving summertime blessing for cost-conscious owners of buildings or homes in the near future. Modern techniques involve freezing large blocks of ice in insulated storage tanks under or near the building to be cooled. Cooling with winter's ice is an idea whose time has come. The author discusses some methods of growing blocks of ice. These methods under development at various research organizations are heat pipes, layer by layer, earth freezing, and water spray.

Gorski, A.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

235

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Electricty Data Browser (interactive query tool with charting & mapping) Summary Sales (consumption), revenue, prices & customers Generation and thermal output Electric power plants generating capacity Consumption of fuels used to generate electricity Receipts of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation Fossil-fuel stocks for electricity generation Revenue and expense statistics for... Electricity purchases, sales for resale, imports/exports, reliability Demand, capacity resources, and capacity margins Electricity and the environment All Electricity Data Reports Analysis & Projections Most Requested Capacity and Generation Costs, Revenue and Expense Demand

236

Network Routing Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define the routing capacity of a network to be the supremum of all possible fractional message throughputs achievable by routing. We prove that the routing capacity of every network is achievable and rational, we present an algorithm for its computation, and we prove that every non-negative rational number is the routing capacity of some network. We also determine the routing capacity for various example networks. Finally, we discuss the extension of routing capacity to fractional coding solutions and show that the coding capacity of a network is independent of the alphabet used.

Jillian Cannons; Randall Dougherty; Christopher Freiling; Kenneth Zeger

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Electrical engineering Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation Transmission Distribution · Electrical generators · Electric motors · High voltage engineering associated with the systems Electrical engineering · Electric power generation Transmission Distribution The electricity transported to load locations from a power station transmission subsystem The transmission system

Ã?nay, Devrim

238

01_winter-new.p65  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION NEWS BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOEFE-0215P-47 ISSUE NO. 47, WINTER 2001 See...

239

Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the 2012 Winter Simulation Conference (WSC), recognized as the premiere international conference for simulation professionals in discrete and combined discrete-continuous simulation. Our venue of Berlin this year continues the trend of new ...

Oliver Rose; Adelinde M. Uhrmacher

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Infrared Thermometry in Winter Road Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is significant interest among road authorities in measuring pavement conditions to perform appropriate winter road maintenance. The most common monitoring methods are based on pavement-mounted sensors. This study’s hypothesis is that the ...

Patrik Jonsson; Mats Riehm

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Northern Winter Stationary Waves: Theory and Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is provided of stationary wave theory, the theory for the deviations from zonal symmetry of the climate. To help focus the discussion the authors concentrate exclusively on northern winter. Several theoretical issues, including the ...

Isaac M. Held; Mingfang Ting; Hailan Wang

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Report on Winter Snowpack-Augmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud seeding to increase Winter snowpacks over mountainous regions of the western United States have been in existence for almost 40 years. However, our understanding of the physical processes taking place in the clouds in response to this ...

David W. Reynolds

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Fall 2013-Winter 2014 Certificate Program CONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATIONCONTINUING AND PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION #12;About the Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program The new Advanced Chemical Engineering Certificate Program offers professionals in chemi- cal engineering

California at Davis, University of

244

1999-2000 Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

supplies of space-heating fuels are expected to be more than adequate to meet winter demand. ... Residential Heating Oil Prices: Weather Scenarios $0.00 $0.20 $0.40 $ ...

245

Natural Gas Winter Outlook 2000-2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This article is based on the Winter Fuels Outlook published in the 4th Quarter Short-Term Energy Outlook and discusses the supply and demand outlook from October 2000 through March 2001.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Winter Weather FAQs | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

winter weather strikes overnight, these communications channels will be updated by 6 a.m., and as often as necessary thereafter. Those who live far from the laboratory may...

247

Measuring the capacity impacts of demand response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical peak pricing and peak time rebate programs offer benefits by increasing system reliability, and therefore, reducing capacity needs of the electric power system. These benefits, however, decrease substantially as the size of the programs grows relative to the system size. More flexible schemes for deployment of demand response can help address the decreasing returns to scale in capacity value, but more flexible demand response has decreasing returns to scale as well. (author)

Earle, Robert; Kahn, Edward P.; Macan, Edo

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Electricity market module: Electricity fuel dispatch submodule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous Annual Energy Outlooks (AEO), international electricity trade was represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Electricity Market Module (EMM) modeling framework as an exogenous input. The exception to this exogenous treatment was for firm power projections, i.e., new Canadian hydroelectric model builds. The AEO95 implementation of EMM allowed Canadian hydroelectric projects to be selected in the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) submodule on an annual basis and otherwise addressed as any other purchased power commitments. This technical memorandum addresses modifications to the Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule implemented in AEO96 to enhance the treatment of international electricity trade through the representation of economy imports from Canada.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

EIA Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels OutlookWinter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Home heating oil retail price includes taxes. 16 Source: EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2012 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 10, 2012.

250

Wind Gains ground, hitting 33 GW of installed capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. currently has 33 GW of installed wind capacity. Wind continues to gain ground, accounting for 42 percent of new capacity additions in the US in 2008.Globally, there are now 146 GW of wind capacity with an impressive and sustained growth trajectory that promises to dominate new generation capacities in many developing countries. The U.S., however, lags many European countries, with wind providing roughly 2 percent of electricity generation.

NONE

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

251

Electric Vehicle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure JOHN DAVIS: Nearly everyone who owns a plug-in electric vehicle has some capacity to replenish the battery at home, either with a dedicated 220-volt charger, or by...

252

Estimating impacts of warming temperatures on California's electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy infrastructure, including high temperature effects on power plant capacity, transmission lines, substation capacity, and peak electricity demand. End-of-century...

253

ORISE: Capacity Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps government agencies and organizations develop a solid infrastructure through capacity building. Capacity building refers to activities that improve an organization's ability to achieve its mission or a person's ability do his or her job more effectively. For organizations, capacity building may relate to almost any aspect of its work-from leadership and administration to program development and implementation. Strengthening an organizational infrastructure can help agencies and community-based organizations more quickly identify targeted audiences for

254

Property:GeneratingCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeneratingCapacity GeneratingCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GeneratingCapacity Property Type Quantity Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS 0.000001 TW,terawatt,terawatts,Terawatt,Terawatts,TeraWatt,TeraWatts,TERAWATT,TERAWATTS

255

Modeling Capacity Reservation Contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we model a scenario where a chip designer (buyer) buys capacity from chip manufacturers (suppliers) in the presence of demand uncertainty faced by the buyer. We assume that the buyer knows the probability distribution of his demand. The supplier offers the buyer to reserve capacity in advance at a price that is lower than the historical average of the spot price. The supplier’s price (if the buyer reserves capacity in advance) is function of her capacity, demand for her capacity, unit production cost, the average spot market price and the amount of capacity reserved by the buyer. Based on these parameters we derive the price the suppliers will charge. We formulate the problem from the buyer’s perspective. The buyer’s decisions are how much capacity to reserve and from how many suppliers. The optimal solution is obtained numerically. Our model addresses the following issues that are not covered in the current literature on capacity reservation models. In the existing literature the supplier’s price is an exogenous parameter. We model the supplier’s price from relevant parameters mentioned above. This makes our model richer. For example, if the expected capacity utilization for the supplier is likely to be low then the supplier will charge a lower price for capacity reservation. In reality, the buyer sources from multiple suppliers. Most mathematical models on capacity reservation, we are aware of, assumes a single buyer and a single supplier. We generalize this to a single buyer and multiple suppliers.

Jishnu Hazra; B. Mahadevan; Sudhi Seshadri

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The added economic and environmental value of plug-in electric vehicles connected to commercial building microgrids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

building has a peak electricity demand of 373 kW, and yearlyWinter (Nov. – Apr. ) )Electricity electricity demandelectricity demand (US$/kWh) (US$/kW) (US$/kWh) (US $/kW)

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A New East Asian Winter Monsoon Index and Associated Characteristics of the Winter Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new East Asian winter monsoon index, which reflects the 300-hPa meridional wind shear associated with the jet stream, was defined to describe the variability of the winter monsoon in midlatitude East Asia. This index represents very well the ...

Jong-Ghap Jhun; Eun-Jeong Lee

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An Expert System to Estimate the Capacity of Harvesting Energy from Biogas and its Capacity in TRNC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In TRNC, the electricity is been obtained from fuel oil, which is most expensive production in the world. The aim of this research is to produce electricity from biogas to reduce the cost of electricity in TRNC. Our researches proved that the potential ... Keywords: Expert system, Biogas, Capacity determination

Hasan H. Onder

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity (Summary)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Salt Caverns Storage Capacity Aquifers Storage Capacity Depleted Fields Storage Capacity Total Working Gas Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Increasing State Capacity Through Clans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their role in increasing state capacity With the decline ofhere focus on state capacity and the associated discussionselements of state capacity during the transition from one

Doyle, Jr, Thomas Martin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bradbury Science Museum winter hours Bradbury Science Museum winter hours Bradbury Science Museum announces winter opening hours Museum will be closed on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year's Day (January 1, 2011). December 21, 2010 Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Often called "a window to the Laboratory," the museum annually attracts thousands of visitors from all over the world. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 21, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum will be closed on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year's Day (January 1, 2011). On all other days, the museum will observe regular opening hours: from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays to Saturdays, and from 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays and Mondays. Often called "a window to the Laboratory," the museum annually attracts

263

Propane Assessment for Winter 1995 - 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Winter Fuels Report Winter Fuels Report Unless otherwise referenced, data in this article are taken from the following: Petroleum Supply Monthly, July 1995, DOE/EIA-0109 (95/09); Petroleum Supply Annual 1994, DOE/EIA-0340, Volumes 1 and 2 and predecessor reports; Petroleum Marketing Annual, July 1994, DOE/EIA-0487 (94); Winter Fuels Report, Week Ending October 6, 1995, DOE/EIA-0538 (95/96-1), and predecessor reports; and Short-Term Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0202 (95/3Q) and predecessor reports. All data through 1994 are considered final and are not subject to further revision. *Michael Burdette, an industry analyst on contract to the Energy Information Administration's Office of Oil and Gas, also contributed to this article. 1 Average level and width of average range based on 3 years of monthly data, January 1992 through December 1994. The significance of the

264

The Effects of Electricity Tariff Structure on Distributed Generation Adoption in New York State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with increasing electricity rates: NiMo shows the leastElectricity Rates..ES 6: Installed DG capacity for volumetric electricity rate

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

ORISE: Capacity Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacity Building Because public health agencies must maintain the resources to respond to public health challenges, critical situations and emergencies, the Oak Ridge Institute...

266

Photovoltaics effective capacity: Interim final report 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors provide solid evidence, based on more than 8 million data points, that regional photovoltaic (PV) effective capacity is largely unrelated to the region`s solar resource. They confirm, however, that effective capacity is strongly related to load-shape characteristics. The load-shape effective-capacity relationship appears to be valid for end-use loads as small as 100 kW, except possibly in the case of electrically heated buildings. This relationship was used as a tool to produce a US map of PV`s effective capacity. The regions of highest effective capacities include (1) the central US from the northern Great Plains to the metropolitan areas of Chicago and Detroit, down to the lower Mississippi Valley, (2) California and western Arizona, and (3) the northeast metropolitan corridor. The features of this map are considerably different from the traditional solar resource maps. They tend to reflect the socio-economic and climatic factors that indirectly drive PV`s effective capacity: e.g., commercial air-conditioning, little use of electric heat, and strong summer heat waves. The map provides a new and significant insight to a comprehensive valuation of the PV resource. The authors assembled preliminary evidence showing that end-use load type may be related to PV`s effective capacity. Highest effective capacities were found for (nonelectrically heated) office buildings, followed by hospitals. Lowest capacities were found for airports and residences. Many more data points are needed, however, to ascertain and characterize these preliminary findings.

Perez, R.; Seals, R. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Energy Information Administration is proposing the following revisions to their electricity survey forms in 2011:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information Administration proposed the following revisions to their electricity Energy Information Administration proposed the following revisions to their electricity survey forms in 2011: F or m E I A -411, " C oor dinated B ulk Power Supply Pr ogr am R epor t." * Change form name to "Coordinated Bulk Power Supply & Demand Program Report;" return to collecting projected reliability data on a 10-year basis as opposed to 5 years. Change "Council" to "Regional Entity" and add submission of Sub-regional level breakout of data. * Return to reporting on capacity and transmission planning for a 10-year horizon, rather than a 5-year horizon. * Adopt the current NERC 2009 Schedule 3 for summer and winter aggregated demand and supply information. Changes are as follows: Demand category additions include

268

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bottling Electricity: Storage as a Strategic Tool for Managing Variability and Capacity Concerns in the Modern Grid - EAC Report (December 2008) Bottling Electricity: Storage as a...

269

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices,...

270

Liquid heat capacity lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The heat capacity laser concept is extended to systems in which the heat capacity lasing media is a liquid. The laser active liquid is circulated from a reservoir (where the bulk of the media and hence waste heat resides) through a channel so configured for both optical pumping of the media for gain and for light amplification from the resulting gain.

Comaskey, Brian J. (Walnut Creek, CA); Scheibner, Karl F. (Tracy, CA); Ault, Earl R. (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Battery capacity indicator  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery capacity indicator for providing a continuous indication of battery capacity for a battery powered device. It comprises means for periodically effecting a first and a second positive discharge rate of the battery; voltage measurement means, for measuring the battery terminal voltage at the first and second positive discharge rates during the operation of the device, and for generating a differential battery voltage value in response thereto; memory means for storing a set of predetermined differential battery voltage values and a set of predetermined battery capacity values, each of the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values defining one of the set of predetermined battery capacity values; comparison means, coupled to the memory means and to the voltage measurement means, for comparing the measured differential battery voltage values with the set of predetermined differential battery voltage values, and for selecting the predetermined battery capacity value corresponding thereto.

Kunznicki, W.J.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

Pushing Capacity Payments Forward: Agent-Based Simulation of Available Capacity Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study demonstrates that agent-based simulation is a useful tool for analyzing existing and proposed design features of electricity markets. The study documents not only how this technology functions, but how it can be used. Experiments using computer-based agents were used to simulate the effects of capacity markets on energy markets, and the project takes a particularly close look at the proposed Available Capacity (ACAP) market of the California independent system operator (CA-ISO). These agents p...

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Warm winter storms in Central Chile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central Chile is a densely populated region along the west coast of subtropical South America (30-36°S) limited to the east by the Andes. Precipitation is concentrated in austral winter mostly associated with the passage of cold fronts. The ...

R. Garreaud

274

Winter Icing and Storms Project (WISP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field studies in support of the Winter Icing and Storms Project (WISP) were conducted in the Colorado Front Range area from 1 February to 31 March 1990(WISP90) and from 15 January to 5 April 1991 (WISP91). The main goals of the project are to ...

Roy Rasmussen; Marcia Politovich; Wayne Sand; Greg Stossmeister; Ben Bernstein; Kim Elmore; John Marwitz; John McGinley; John Smart; Ed Westwater; B. Boba Stankov; Roger Pielke; Steve Rutledge; Doug Wesley; Nick Powell; Don Burrows

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermodynamic and Circulation Characteristics, of Winter Monsoon Tropical Mesoscale Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the December 1978 field phase of the International Winter Monsoon Experiment (Winter MONEX), a regular diurnal cycle of deep convective activity occurred over the South China Sea immediately to the north of Borneo. The convection was ...

Richad H. Johnson; Donald C. Kriete

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Estimating Winter Design Temperatures from Daily Minimum Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology has been developed to estimate winter design temperatures (temperatures exceeded a specific number of hours during the December through February winter season-an important design parameter in building construction) from synthetic ...

Nolan J. Doesken; Thomas B. McKee

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Three-Dimensional VHF Lightning Mapping System for Winter Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional (3D) winter lightning mapping system employing very high frequency (VHF) broadband signals was developed for continuous remote observation in winter. VHF broadband pulses radiated by leader progression are received with three ...

Masahide Nishihashi; Ken-ichi Shimose; Kenichi Kusunoki; Syugo Hayashi; Ken-ichiro Arai; Hanako Y. Inoue; Wataru Mashiko; Masako Kusume; Hiroyuki Morishima

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Hawaiian Winter Rainfall and its Relation to the Southern Oscillation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression analyses revealed significant variability during the winter months in the relationship between Hawaiian winter rainfall and the Southern Oscillation. Examination of daily surface and upper air charts indicated that the variability ...

Gregory E. Taylor

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Winter Fuels Outlook October 2013 1 October 2013 Short-Term Energy and Winter Fuels Outlook (STEO) Highlights EIA projects average U.S. household expenditures for natural...

280

Assessment of Commercial Space Conditioning Technologies: Variable Capacity Rooftop Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Space conditioning in U.S. commercial buildings is commonly performed by a packaged air-source rooftop unit (RTU). In recent years, heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) manufacturers have begun to develop RTUs with higher efficiency through the implementation of variable capacity technology. Variable capacity RTUs potentially offer electric utilities a new resource for achieving energy and peak power reduction. This document aims to serve as a resource for electric utilities in ...

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - AEO2010 - Electricity Demand  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Demand Electricity Demand Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Electricity Demand Figure 69. U.S. electricity demand growth 1950-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 60. Average annual U.S. retail electricity prices in three cases, 1970-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 61. Electricity generation by fuel in three cases, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 62. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, 2008-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 63. Levelized electricity costs for new power plants, 2020 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 64. Electricity generating capacity at U.S. nuclear power plants in three cases, 2008, 2020, and 2035

282

Lateral Capacity Exchange and Its Impact on Capacity Investment Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the problem of capacity exchange between two …rms in anticipation of the mismatch between demand and capacity and its impact on …rm’s capacity investment decisions. For given capacity investment levels of the two …rms, we demonstrate how capacity price may be determined and how much capacity should be exchanged when either manufacturer acts as a Stackelberg leader in the capacity exchange game. By benchmarking against the centralized system, we show that a side payment may be used to coordinate the capacity exchange decisions. We then study the …rms’capacity investment decisions using a biform game framework in which capacity investment decisions are made individually and exchange decisions are made as in a centralized system. We demonstrate the existence and uniqueness of the Nash equilibrium capacity investment levels and study the impact of …rms’share of the capacity exchange surplus on their capacity investment levels.

Amiya K. Chakravartyz; Jun Zhangy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Responses of wintering humpback whales to vessel traffic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responses of humpback whales to vessel traffic were monitored over two winter seasons during 1983–1984 in Maui

Gordon B. Bauer; Joseph R. Mobley; Louis M. Herman

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Wholesale electricity prices are lower during the first half of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A combination of natural gas prices at 10-year lows and the warmest winter on record led to lower on-peak wholesale electricity prices so far in 2012.

285

Coal stockpiles at electric power plants were above average ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased competition between fuels as well as a warm winter 2011-12 led to lower consumption of coal and, thus, higher coal stockpiles at electric power plants in ...

286

Forward capacity market CONEfusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In ISO New England and PJM it was assumed that sponsors of new capacity projects would offer them into the newly established forward centralized capacity markets at prices based on their levelized net cost of new entry, or ''Net CONE.'' But the FCCMs have not operated in the way their proponents had expected. To clear up the CONEfusion, FCCM designs should be reconsidered to adapt them to the changing circumstances and to be grounded in realistic expectations of market conduct. (author)

Wilson, James F.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) - Generation Capacity Addition Topics: 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Generation Capacity Addition Topics report was first published in 2012 and discussed the challenges facing the power industry with regard to capacity addition. This report is intended to be a companion report to the Technical Assessment Guide (TAG®) – Power Generation and Technology Options report (Electric Power Research Institute [EPRI] report 3002001434).BackgroundTAG is widely considered the industry standard and has been ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Electricity - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel Find statistics on electric power plants, capacity, generation, fuel consumption, sales, prices and customers. + EXPAND ALL Summary Additional formats Summary electricity statistics 2001-2011 › XLS Supply and disposition of electricity 2002-2011 › XLS Electricity overview › Generation, retail sales, electricity trade, losses PDF XLS Consumption for electricity generation › Fossil and renewable fuel consumption for electricity generation PDF XLS Generating capacity › Electric net summer capacity by specific energy source more on electricity PDF XLS Monthly electricity overview - back to 1973 CSV PDF XLS Latest month total electric power industry summary statistics › Overview XLS Year-to-date total electric power industry summary statistics ›

289

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make… (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electricity reliability report released; Texas and California ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Anticipated reserves of electric capacity—anticipated supply above expected demand—are expected to be below targeted levels in Texas this summer as they were last ...

291

Global Potential for Wind-Generated Electricity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... free, non-urban areas and operating at as little as 20% of their rated capacity, could supply >40 times current worldwide consumption of electricity ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

292

Wind capacity additions slowed during 2010 - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Growth in wind-powered electric generating capacity slowed in 2010, increasing by 11% from 2009 after increasing 40% on an average annual basis from 2005-2009.

293

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)

294

Vehicle-to-Grid Power: Battery, Hybrid, and Fuel Cell Vehicles as Resources for Distributed Electric Power in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

32 B.1 Electrical power capacity: BatteryB.1 Electrical power capacity: Battery EDVs For the battery-and/or generation capacity of battery, hybrid and fuel cell

Kempton, Willett; Tomic, Jasna; Letendre, Steven; Brooks, Alec; Lipman, Timothy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

296

APPROXIMATE YEARLY BUDGET, 2013-2014 (fall and winter) the table below shows an estimate of the yearly cost per person for studying in Montral. all amounts are in Canadian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) immigration (temporary residents) 300 $ arrival from abroad (hotel, meals...) 500 $ winter clothing 800 at santeetudiante.com. 9 these amounts include furniture, utilities (water, electricity, heating), a telephone land

297

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips October 21, 2013 - 8:44am Addthis Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are free and can be used on a daily basis to increase your savings; others are simple and inexpensive actions you can take to ensure maximum savings through the winter. If you haven't already, conduct an energy assessment to find out where you

298

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips Fall and Winter Energy-Saving Tips October 21, 2013 - 8:44am Addthis Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. Simple and inexpensive actions can help you save energy and money during the cool fall and winter months. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com. This article will help you find strategies to help you save energy during the cool fall and cold winter months. Some of the tips below are free and can be used on a daily basis to increase your savings; others are simple and inexpensive actions you can take to ensure maximum savings through the winter. If you haven't already, conduct an energy assessment to find out where you

299

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Refinery Capacity Report Refinery Capacity Report June 2013 With Data as of January 1, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies. Table 1. Number and Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries by PAD District and State as of January 1, 2013

300

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cylinder compressor particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor rotation is provided with an eccentric cam on a crank pin under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180[degree] apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons whose connecting rods ride on a crank pin without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation. 6 figs.

Wolfe, R.W.

1984-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Dual capacity reciprocating compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multi-cylinder compressor 10 particularly useful in connection with northern climate heat pumps and in which different capacities are available in accordance with reversing motor 16 rotation is provided with an eccentric cam 38 on a crank pin 34 under a fraction of the connecting rods, and arranged for rotation upon the crank pin between opposite positions 180.degree. apart so that with cam rotation on the crank pin such that the crank throw is at its normal maximum value all pistons pump at full capacity, and with rotation of the crank shaft in the opposite direction the cam moves to a circumferential position on the crank pin such that the overall crank throw is zero. Pistons 24 whose connecting rods 30 ride on a crank pin 36 without a cam pump their normal rate with either crank rotational direction. Thus a small clearance volume is provided for any piston that moves when in either capacity mode of operation.

Wolfe, Robert W. (Wilkinsburg, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Seasonal variability of wind electric potential in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seasonal wind electric potential has been estimated for the contiguous United States based on the methods previously used to estimate the annual average wind electric potential. National maps show estimates of the seasonal wind electric potential averaged over the state as a whole, and gridded maps show the distribution of the seasonal wind electric potential within a state. The seasons of winter and spring have highest wind electric potential for most windy areas in the United States. Summer is the season with the least potential for most of the contiguous United States. Wind electric potential patterns in autumn generally resemble the annual average potential map. Excellent matches between seasonal wind electric potential and electric energy use occur during winter for the northern parts of the nation. California has a good match between summer wind potential and electric use.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.; Gower, G.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Winter Infiltration Results from the FRTF Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Florida Winter Infiltration Results from the FRTF Laboratory Building America Stakeholders Meeting Austin, TX March 1-2, 2012 Philip Fairey FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Project Objectives Under side-by-side, in situ controlled conditions: * Measure effectiveness of various energy retrofit improvements * Produce high-quality empirical data set useful for home energy simulation verification. FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida * Two identical side-by-side 1536 ft 2 , concrete block, slab-on-grade residences * Single pane fenestration, evenly distributed * No concrete block wall insulation

304

Quantum Zero-error Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define here a new kind of quantum channel capacity by extending the concept of zero-error capacity for a noisy quantum channel. The necessary requirement for which a quantum channel has zero-error capacity greater than zero is given. Finally, we point out some directions on how to calculate the zero-error capacity of such channels.

Rex A. C. Medeiros; Francisco M. De Assis

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

305

Frostbite Theater - Static Electricity Experiments - Static Electricity and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polar Molecules Polar Molecules Previous Video (Polar Molecules) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (How Does a Van de Graaff Generator Work?) How Does a Van de Graaff Generator Work? Static Electricity and Bubbles! What happens when soap bubbles are blown into the air near a working Van de Graaff generator? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: And this is a Van de Graaff generator! Steve: And these... are bubbles! Joanna: Have you ever noticed that you tend to get shocked less in the summer by static electricity than you do in the winter? That's because usually there's more moisture in the air in the summer than in the winter. Since water molecules are polar, they are attracted to, and carry charge

306

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: January 2012 Stocks Above normal temperatures in January have allowed electric utilities to significantly replinish stockpiles of coal. The upswing in coal stockpiles corresponds to decreasing consumption of coal at electric generators seen in the resource use section across all regions of the country. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. Along with coal stockpiles at electric power plants, the supply of coal significantly increased in January of 2012. Total bituminous coal days of burn increased 10 percent from January 2011 to 87, while subbituminous supply increased nearly 10

307

Load Capacity of Bodies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the stress analysis in a plastic body $\\Omega$, we prove that there exists a maximal positive number $C$, the \\emph{load capacity ratio,} such that the body will not collapse under any external traction field $t$ bounded by $Y_{0}C$, where $Y_0$ is the elastic limit. The load capacity ratio depends only on the geometry of the body and is given by $$ \\frac{1}{C}=\\sup_{w\\in LD(\\Omega)_D} \\frac{\\int_{\\partial\\Omega}|w|dA} {\\int_{\\Omega}|\\epsilon(w)|dV}=\\left\\|\\gamma_D\\right\\|. $$ Here, $LD(\\Omega)_D$ is the space of isochoric vector fields $w$ for which the corresponding stretchings $\\epsilon(w)$ are assumed to be integrable and $\\gamma_D$ is the trace mapping assigning the boundary value $\\gamma_D(w)$ to any $w\\in LD(\\Omega)_D$.

Reuven Segev

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Capacity Value of Solar Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluating the capacity value of renewable energy sources can pose significant challenges due to their variable and uncertain nature. In this paper the capacity value of solar power is investigated. Solar capacity value metrics and their associated calculation methodologies are reviewed and several solar capacity studies are summarized. The differences between wind and solar power are examined, the economic importance of solar capacity value is discussed and other assessments and recommendations are presented.

Duignan, Roisin; Dent, Chris; Mills, Andrew; Samaan, Nader A.; Milligan, Michael; Keane, Andrew; O'Malley, Mark

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

309

Both Distillate Supply and Demand Reached Extraordinary Levels This Winter  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: This chart shows some critical differences in distillate supply and demand during this winter heating season, in comparison to the past two winters. Typically, distillate demand peaks during the winter months, but "new supply" (refinery production and net imports) cannot increase as much, so the remaining supply needed is drawn from inventories. This pattern is evident in each of the past two winter heating seasons. This winter, however, the pattern was very different, for several reasons: With inventories entering the season at extremely low levels, a "typical" winter stockdraw would have been nearly impossible, particularly in the Northeast, the region most dependent on heating oil. Demand reached near-record levels in December, as colder-than-normal

310

Refinery Capacity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 14 10 4 1,617,500 1,205,000 412,500 1,708,500 1,273,500 435,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 0 1 182,200 0 182,200 190,200 0 190,200 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

311

Aspen Winter Conferences on High Energy  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Particle Physics was held at the Aspen Center for Physics from February 12 to February 18, 2011. Ninety-four participants from ten countries, and several universities and national labs attended the workshop titled, ?New Data From the Energy Frontier.? There were 54 formal talks, and a considerable number of informal discussions held during the week. The week?s events included a public lecture (?The Hunt for the Elusive Higgs Boson? given by Ben Kilminster from Ohio State University) and attended by 119 members of the public, and a physics caf? geared for high schoolers that is a discussion with physicists. The 2011 Aspen Winter Conference on Astroparticle physics held at the Aspen Center for Physics was ?Indirect and Direct Detection of Dark Matter.? It was held from February 6 to February 12, 2011. The 70 participants came from 7 countries and attended 53 talks over five days. Late mornings through the afternoon are reserved for informal discussions. In feedback received from participants, it is often these unplanned chats that produce the most excitement due to working through problems with fellow physicists from other institutions and countries or due to incipient collaborations. In addition, Blas Cabrera of Stanford University gave a public lecture titled ?What Makes Up Dark Matter.? There were 183 members of the general public in attendance. Before the lecture, 45 people attended the physics caf? to discuss dark matter. This report provides the attendee lists, programs, and announcement posters for each event.

multiple speakers, presenters listed on link below

2011-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

312

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) ISO New England Forward Capacity Market (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Developer Industrial State/Provincial Govt Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Under the Forward Capacity Market (FCM), ISO New England projects the capacity needs of the region's power system three years in advance and then holds an annual auction to purchase the power resources that will satisfy those future regional requirements. Resources that clear in the auction are obligated to provide power or curtail demand when called upon by the ISO. The Forward Capacity Market was developed by ISO New England, the six New

313

Property:PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOnshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Onshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

314

Property:PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerSolidCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from solid biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

315

Property:PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialEGSGeothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from EGS Geothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

316

Property:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Offshore Wind for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

317

Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Geothermal Hydrothermal for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

318

Property:PotentialHydropowerCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialHydropowerCapacity PotentialHydropowerCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialHydropowerCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from Hydropower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

319

Property:PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PotentialBiopowerGaseousCapacity Property Type Quantity Description The nameplate capacity technical potential from gaseous biopower for a particular place. Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS 0.001 GW,gigawatt,gigawatts,Gigawatt,Gigawatts,GigaWatt,GigaWatts,GIGAWATT,GIGAWATTS

320

Total Natural Gas Underground Storage Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Working Gas Capacity of Salt Caverns Working Gas Capacity of Aquifers Working Gas Capacity of Depleted Fields Total Number of Existing Fields Number of Existing Salt...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

cctoday_winter_2005_02-06-06.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BYTES OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY * DOEFE-0699 * ISSUE NO. 65, WINTER 2005 A NEWSLETTER ABOUT INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES FOR COAL UTILIZATION A NEWSLETTER...

322

2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan Building...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trade Center More Documents & Publications Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities 2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan...

323

Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for Both Winter and Summer Events in Large Buildings in the Pacific Northwest Title Field Demonstration of Automated Demand Response for...

324

Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Washington, DC, October 12, 2011 Source: EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2011 History : Heating Oil Howard Gruenspecht, Winter Fuels Outlook 14

326

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Washington, DC, October 21, 2011 . EIA expects gasoline prices will track the cost of crude oil, with regular gasoline prices this winter averaging about 34 cents per

327

NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

10/13/2010: NASEO 2010 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference October 13, 2010 Washington, DC Richard Newell, Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration

328

Summer and Winter Precipitation in England and Wales: 1874 -...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Wales: 1874 - 2009 This dataset, made available by the UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), presents summer and winter precipitation for England and Wales, and...

329

Consumer Winter Propane Costs - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The average homeowner in the Midwest can expect their winter bill (from October through March) to be about $50 higher this year over last if normal weather occurs.

330

EIA - Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Electricity Market  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2009 Electricity Market Module figure 6. Electricity Market Model Supply Regions. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand electricity, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2009, DOE/EIA-M068(2009). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules

331

'81-'82 peakshaving capacity is gas industry's best ever  

SciTech Connect

During the 1981-82 winter, the US gas industry expected to draw its peakshaving supplies from (1) 58.40 billion CF of underground storage, (2) 5.21 billion CF of propane-air, (3) 8.99 billion CF of LNG, and (4) 0.27 billion CF of other sources. The industry's top peak-day sendout could reach 80-88 billion CF in a single 24-hr period. During 1981, underground-storage capacity continued its rising trend, while LNG-plant deliverability remained static and propane-air plant additions tapered off.

Hale, D.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

FOR ELECTRIC POWER TRANSMISSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A contract network extends the concept of a contract path to address the problem of loop flow and congestion in electric power transmission systems. A contract network option provides a well defined, internally consistent framework for assigning long-term capacity rights to a complicated electric transmission network. The contract network respects the special conditions induced by Kirchoff's Laws; accommodates thermal, voltage and contingency constraints on transmission capacity; and can be adopted without disturbing existing methods for achieving an economic power dispatch subject to these constraints. By design, a contract network would maintain short-run efficiency through optimal spot price determination of transmission prices. Through payment of congestion rentals, the contract network makes a long-term capacityright holder indifferent between delivery of the power or receipt of payments in a settlement system. And the contract network framework can support allocation of transmission capacity rights through a competitive bidding process. CONTRACT NETWORKS

William W. Hogan; William W. Hogan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Capacities associated with scalar signed Riesz kernels, and analytic capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The real and imaginari parts of the Cauchy kernel in the plane are scalar Riesz kernels of homogeneity -1. One can associate with each of them a natural notion of capacity related to bounded potentials. The main result of the paper asserts that these capacities are comparable to classical analytic capacity, thus stressing the real variables nature of analytic capacity. Higher dimensional versions of this result are also considered.

Mateu, Joan; Verdera, Joan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Duct Leakage Impacts on Airtightness, Infiltration, and Peak Electrical Demand in Florida Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for duct leakage was done in 155 homes. Tracer gas tests found that infiltration rates were three times greater when the air handler was operating than when it was off. Infiltration averaged 0.85 air changes per hour (ach) with the air handler (AH) operating continuously and 0.29 ach with the AH off. Return leaks were found to average 10.3% of AH total flow. House airtightness, in 90 of these homes, determined by blower door testing, averaged 12.58 air changes per hour at 50 Pascals (ACHSO). When the duct registers were sealed, ACHSO decreased to 11.04, indicating that 12.2% of the house leaks were in the duct system. Duct leaks have a dramatic impact upon peak electrical demand. Based on theoretical analysis, a fifteen percent return leak from the attic can increase cooling electrical demand by 100%. Duct repairs in a typical. electrically heated Florida home reduce winter peak demand by about 1.6 kW per house at about one-sixth the cost of building new electrical generation capacity.

Cummings, J. B.; Tooley, J. J.; Moyer, N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Steven Winters Associates Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Steven Winters Associates Inc Address 307 7th Avenue Place New York, New York Zip 10001 Sector Buildings Product Research, design and consulting for high performance buildings Website http://www.swinter.com/ Coordinates 40.746817°, -73.993158° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.746817,"lon":-73.993158,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

Last Winter's Price Spike Limited to Northeast  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Notes: This chart shows the day-to-day volatility in spot crude and heating oil prices, and clearly shows the regional nature of the price spike that occurred last winter. Due to a combination of extreme cold weather, low inventories, and refinery and transportation problems, New York Harbor spot prices shot up as high as $1.77 per gallon in a brief period in late January and early February. In June of this year, distillate spreads had dropped to 2.5 cents per gallon as a result of crude oil prices increasing faster than product prices. But by August spreads had strengthened to about 15 cents, and were as high as 21 cents on average in November 2000, which is almost 15 cents above average -- reflecting continued low stocks and the lack of even a normal summer/autumn build in inventories.

337

ENERGY UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES IN THE COAL-ELECTRIC CYCLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam-Electric Units TypicalAnnual Heat Rates for Baseload Steam- Electric Units. * Btuare calculated for both baseload operation (65% capacity

Ferrell, G.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Motor gasolines, winter 1982-83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical data for 1330 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 28 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R + M/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R + M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.3 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.5 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 89.1 for leaded below 93.0, and no data was reported in this report for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above. 21 figures, 5 tables.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Electric Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery.

340

FEMP Focus: Winter/Spring 2005 Issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

agencies reported purchasing almost 552 gigawatt-hours of green power, enough renewable electricity to service more than 54,000 average households a year. * More than 150 federal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Multipath Channels of Unbounded Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The capacity of discrete-time, noncoherent, multipath fading channels is considered. It is shown that if the variances of the path gains decay faster than exponentially, then capacity is unbounded in the transmit power.

Koch, Tobias

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporation (NERC): Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid. NERC develops and enforces Reliability Standards; assesses adequacy annually via a ten-year forcast and winter and summer forecasts; monitors the bulk power systems; and educates, trains, and certifies industry personnel. North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC): Reliability Considerations from the Integration of Smart Grid More Documents & Publications Re: DOE Request for Information - Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to

343

The Energy Balance of the Winter Boreal Landscape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the winter of 1993/94 a study to quantify the winter energy balance of the main cover types of the boreal landscape took place. The study was based on the southern edge of boreal forest in Canada. Measurements were made over a mature jack ...

R. J. Harding; J. W. Pomeroy

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Safety and Mobility Impacts of Winter Weather Phase I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a Maintenance Decision Support System (MDSS), many state DOTs, such as the Indiana DOT (INDOT) and the Colorado technologically-enhanced winter maintenance systems (such as RWIS and an MDSS) are clearly beneficial Management and Site Identification While performance assessment is a crucial part of any winter maintenance

Beresnev, Igor

345

Seasonal Winter Weather Forecast for UK December 2000 -February 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Winter Weather Forecast for UK December 2000 - February 2001 Summary and Verification of Authors' Seasonal Forecasts Issued: 23rd March, 2001 by Mark Saunders, Tony Hamilton, and Steve George and less windy winter than average. Forecasts proved successful for temperature and rainfall but windiness

Saunders, Mark

346

Aerial Surveys to Estimate Abundance of Wintering Waterfowl in Mississippi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Aerial Surveys to Estimate Abundance of Wintering Waterfowl in Mississippi Aaron Pearse, Rick Kaminski, Steve Dinsmore, and Ken Reinecke Monitoring Waterfowl · Banding program · Breeding-ground survey(s) · Hunter surveys · Wintering waterfowl surveys Objectives Design Evaluate Application 1) Sampling 2

Gray, Matthew

347

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: September 2011 Stocks Electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in October, though stockpile levels remain well below 2010 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from October 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 12 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plant's current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was generally flat in October 2011 compared to September of this year. The summer of 2011 saw significant declines in total U.S. stockpile levels, which were replenished in the

348

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: November 2011 Stocks As discussed in this month's feature story, electric power sector coal stocks continued to replenish after the summer burn in November, though stockpile levels remain below 2010 and 2009 levels. All coal stockpile levels declined from November 2010, with bituminous coal stockpile levels 9 percent lower than the same month of 2010. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants dropped slightly from last month and remained below levels seen in November of 2010 or 2009. While

349

Electricity Monthly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2011 Electric Power Sector Coal Stocks: December 2011 Stocks Temperate weather throughout the fall has allowed electric power sector coal stocks to replenish from the summer burn. All coal stockpile levels were essentially flat when compared to December 2010 and were a mostly up year-to-date. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power plants is a forward looking estimate of coal supply given a power plantâ€(tm)s current stockpile and past consumption patterns. The average number of days of burn held on hand at electric power plants was essentially flat compared to last month and remained below levels seen in December of 2010 or 2009. While stockpile levels have recovered from summer lows, the increasing

350

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Heat capacities of elastic solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work function is embedded in the equation describing the relationship between the constant volume and constant pressure heat capacities. The modification of the work function results that the relationship between these quantities must be changed accordingly. Using the newly derived work functions of elastic solids the description of the heat capacities and the relationship between the heat capacities are given for solid phase.

Garai, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Symmetrical Symplectic Capacity with Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first introduce the concept of symmetrical symplectic capacity for symmetrical symplectic manifolds, and by using this symmetrical symplectic capacity theory we prove that there exists at least one symmetric closed characteristic (brake orbit and $S$-invariant brake orbit are two examples) on prescribed symmetric energy surface which has a compact neighborhood with finite symmetrical symplectic capacity.

Liu, Chungen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! Winter Is Coming. Get Busy Saving Energy! October 18, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Drew Bittner Web Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy It's been a long, hot summer in Washington, D.C., but we're finally starting to slide into autumn and cooler weather. You might have noticed that we've already changed our seasonal tips page over to "Stay Warm, Save Money," so now is a good time to look at your house and car and think about winter. For instance, in summertime, you want to reduce or eliminate the heat that comes from sunlight; in winter, you want to maximize that heat. Solar heat gain can reduce the amount of heat your furnace has to produce; open the curtains during the day and you can save yourself some bucks.

355

Distillate Fuel Oil Assessment for Winter 1996-1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

following Energy Information Administration sources: Weekly following Energy Information Administration sources: Weekly Petroleum Status Report, DOE/EIA-0208(96-39); Petroleum Supply Monthly, September 1996, DOE/EIA-0109(96/09); Petroleum Supply Annual 1995, DOE/EIA-0340(95); Petroleum Marketing Monthly, September 1996, DOE/EIA-0380(96/09); Short-Term Energy Outlook, DOE/EIA-0202(96/4Q) and 4th Quarter 1996 Short-Term Integrated Forecasting System; and an address by EIA Administrator Jay E. Hakes on the Fall 1996 Heating Fuel Assessment before the National Association of State Energy Officials, September 16, 1996. Table FE1. Distillate Fuel Oil Demand and Supply Factors, Winter (October - March) 1993-94 Through 1996-97 History STEO Mid Case Factor Winter Winter Winter Winter 1993-94

356

ARM - Field Campaign - Winter Single Column Model IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsWinter Single Column Model IOP govCampaignsWinter Single Column Model IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Winter Single Column Model IOP 1999.01.19 - 1999.02.08 Lead Scientist : David Randall Data Availability Actual data files for a number of past SCM IOPs are available from the ARM Archive under IOPs/UAV. Cloud and Radiation Products Derived from Satellite Data Colorado State's Single Column Modeling Home Page For data sets, see below. Description A second winter SCM IOP was conducted (1/19 - 2/8/99) to provide additional sampling of winter weather conditions. This was the first SCM IOP where AERIs and ceilometers were installed at the boundary facilities to give retrievals of temperature and moisture to supplement the sounding data. A

357

Modeling of Plug-in Electric Vehicles Interactions with a Sustainable Community Grid in the Azores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stored electricity) Battery capacity (each vehicle) 16 kWhcan use this additional battery capacity to lower its energyto 21h. This stationary battery capacity is fully charged by

Mendes, Goncalo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics July 30, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Text Version Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery. The electricity powers the vehicle's wheels via an electric motor. EVs have limited energy storage capacity, which must be replenished by plugging into an electrical source. In an electric vehicle, a battery or other energy storage device is used to store the electricity that powers the motor. EV batteries must be replenished by plugging the vehicle to a power source. Some EVs have onboard chargers; others plug into a charger located outside the vehicle. Both types use electricity that comes from the power grid. Although

359

Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The Local Winter Storm Scale: A Measure of the Intrinsic Ability of Winter Storms to Disrupt Society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A local winter storm scale (LWSS) is developed to categorize the disruption caused by winter storms using archived surface weather observations from a single location along the U.S. East Coast. Development of LWSS is motivated by the recognition that the ...

Brian J. Cerruti; Steven G. Decker

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An Assessment of Railway Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we review the main concepts and methods to perform capacity analyses, and we present an automated tool that is able to perform several capacity analyses. Capacity is extremely dependent on infrastructure, traffic, and operating parameters. Therefore, an in-depth study of the main factors that influence railway capacity is performed on several Spanish railway infrastructures. The results show how the capacity varies according to factors such as train speed, commercial stops, train heterogeneity, distance between railway signals, and timetable robustness.

M. Abril; F. Barber; A L. Ingolotti; A M. A. Salido; P. Tormos; B A. Lova

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Power production, generating capacity data for 1972--1977  

SciTech Connect

Statistics on trends in electric power production, generating capacity, and consumption of fossil fuels over the past six-year period are reported. Included are monthly production by fuel, fuel consumption and stocks for the past six years, installed capacity, and net generation by type of prime mover and class of ownership. Most data are by State for the past year. A narrative section discusses the highlights and trends supported by the tables. This document continues the annual series on power production and generating capacity previously published by the Federal Power Commission. This publication was discontinued with this issue. 8 tables.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Property:NetProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NetProdCapacity NetProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NetProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property SummerPeakNetCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

364

Property:GrossProdCapacity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GrossProdCapacity GrossProdCapacity Jump to: navigation, search Property Name GrossProdCapacity Property Type Quantity Description Sum of the property AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty for all Energy Generation Facilities with properties: Sector: Geothermal Energy InGeothermalResourceArea: set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS 1000000000 mW,milliwatt,milliwatts,MILLIWATT,MILLIWATTS

365

NREL: Energy Analysis - Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors Utility-Scale Energy Technology Capacity Factors This chart indicates the range of recent capacity factor estimates for utility-scale renewable energy technologies. The dots indicate the average, and the vertical lines represent the range: Average +1 standard deviation and average -1 standard deviation. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update) Operations & Maintenance (September 2013 Update) Utility-Scale Capacity Factors Useful Life Land Use by System Technology LCOE Calculator Capacity factor for energy technologies. For more information, please download supporting data for energy technology costs.

366

Entangling capacity with local ancilla  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the entangling capacity of a dynamical operation with access to local ancilla. A comparison is made between the entangling capacity with and without the assistance of prior entanglement. An analytic solution is found for the log-negativity entangling capacity of two-qubit gates, which equals the entanglement of the Choi matrix isomorphic to the unitary operator. Surprisingly, the availability of prior entanglement does not affect this result; a property we call resource independence of the entangling capacity. We prove several useful upper-bounds on the entangling capacity that hold for general qudit dynamical operations, and for a whole family of entanglement measures including log-negativity and log-robustness. The log-robustness entangling capacity is shown to be resource independent for general dynamics. We provide numerical results supporting a conjecture that the log-negativity entangling capacity is resource independence for all two-qudit unitaries.

Campbell, Earl T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Online mechanism design for electric vehicle charging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles are expected to place a considerable strain on local electricity distribution networks, requiring charging to be coordinated in order to accommodate capacity constraints. We design a novel online auction protocol for ... Keywords: electric vehicle, mechanism design, pricing

Enrico H. Gerding; Valentin Robu; Sebastian Stein; David C. Parkes; Alex Rogers; Nicholas R. Jennings

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2002 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2002, DOE/EIA- M068(2002) January 2002. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

369

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Market Module Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules—electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, load and demand-side management, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2001, DOE/EIA- M068(2001) January 2001. Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most economical way to supply electricity, within environmental and operational constraints. There are

370

Meteorological and Electrical Conditions Associated with Positive Cloud-to-Ground Lightning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meteorological and electrical conditions associated with the occurrence of positive cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning (i.e., lightning that lowers positive charge to ground) are examined. Results from case studies in winter and summer storms reveal ...

Cynthia D. Engholm; Earle R. Williams; Randall M. Dole

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

EIA Short-Term and Winter Fuels Outlook - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Richard Newell, NASEO Winter Fuels Conference, October 2010 2 Overview • EIA expects average heating bills to be 3% higher this winter than last

372

Property:CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name CoolingTowerWaterUseWinterConsumed Property Type Number Description Cooling Tower Water use (winter average) (afday) Consumed. Retrieved from "http:...

373

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 10 Winterization and Fractionation from the book ...

374

Hawaii electric system reliability.  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability "worth" and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Decentralized capacity management and internal pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Goex, R. (2002). Capacity planning and pricing undermanufacturing on innovation, capacity and pro?tability.Mieghem, V. J. (2003). Capacity management, investment and

Dutta, Sunil; Reichelstein, Stefan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Capacity consideration of wireless ad hoc networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capacity ProblemCurrent Research on Capacity of Wireless Ad HocChapter 3 Upper Bound on the Capacity of Wireless Ad Hoc

Tan, Yusong

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Are there capacity limitations in symmetry perception?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980). The demonstration of capacity limitation. Cognitive1972). Visual processing capacity and attentional control.J. (1996). Goodness of CAPACITY LIMIT OF SYMMETRY PERCEPTION

Huang, L Q; Pashler, Harold; Junge, J A

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Ergodic Capacity of Interference Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Jafar, “The ergodic capacity of interference networks,”Gupta and P. R. Kumar, “The capacity of wireless networks,”cooperation achieves optimal capacity scaling in ad hoc

Jafar, Syed A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Mapping Individual Variations in Learning Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in working memory capacity. Integrative Physiological andVariations in Learning Capacity Eduardo Mercado IIIdifferences in learning capacity are evident in humans and

Mercado III, Eduardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Definition: Capacity Emergency | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emergency Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Capacity Emergency A capacity emergency exists when a Balancing Authority Area's operating capacity, plus firm purchases from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

382

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

383

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

384

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

385

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

386

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

387

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

388

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

389

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

390

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

391

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

392

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

393

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

394

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

395

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

396

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

397

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

398

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

399

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

400

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

402

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

403

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

404

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

405

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

406

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

407

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

408

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

409

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

410

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

411

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

412

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

413

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

414

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

415

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

416

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

417

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

418

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

419

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

420

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

422

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

423

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

424

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

425

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

426

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

427

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

428

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

429

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

430

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

431

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

432

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

433

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

434

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

435

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

436

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

437

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

438

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

439

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

440

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

442

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

443

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

444

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

445

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

446

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

447

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

448

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

449

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

450

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

451

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

452

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

453

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

454

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

455

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

456

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

457

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

458

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

459

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

460

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

462

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

463

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

464

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

465

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

466

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

467

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

468

Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Title: Figure 79. Electricity sales and power sector generating capacity, 1949-2040 (index, 1949 = 1.0) Subject: Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Author

469

Optimization Online - A stochastic multiscale model for electricity ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 30, 2011 ... A stochastic multiscale model for electricity generation capacity expansion. Panos Parpas(pparpas ***at*** mit.edu) Mort Webster(mort ***at*** ...

470

Electricity resource planners credit only a fraction of potential ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The percentages reflect the assessment of the capacity value of wind at the time of peak electric demand ... Some planners also derate demand response ...

471

Electricity - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Generation and thermal output; Electric power plants generating capacity; ... Phase I mostly affects power plants that are the largest sources of SO2 and NOx .

472

South Korean energy outlook: Coal and electricity focus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper concisely outlines the capacity for Korea to generate electricity by using coal. Resources (native and imported) as well as facilities are reviewed.

Young, E.M. [ed.; Johnson, C.J.; Li, B.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region...

474

EIA - State Electricity Profiles - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

More Tables on Oregon's Electricity Profile: Formats; Table 2. Ten Largest Plants by Generation Capacity, 2010: Table 3. Top Five Retailers of ...

475

Adaptive capacity and its assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the concept of adaptive capacity and various approaches to assessing it, particularly with respect to climate variability and change. I find that adaptive capacity is a relatively under-researched topic within the sustainability science and global change communities, particularly since it is uniquely positioned to improve linkages between vulnerability and resilience research. I identify opportunities for advancing the measurement and characterization of adaptive capacity by combining insights from both vulnerability and resilience frameworks, and I suggest several assessment approaches for possible future development that draw from both frameworks and focus on analyzing the governance, institutions, and management that have helped foster adaptive capacity in light of recent climatic events.

Engle, Nathan L.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Solar and Daytime Infrared Irradiance during Winter Chinooks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chinook winds bring unseasonably warm temperatures to southern Alberta in the winter. They also melt the snow and evaporate, the surface and near surface soil water. Hitherto, the warmth of the wind had almost exclusively been linked to the ...

Lawrence C. Nkemdirim

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Vortex–Vortex Interactions in the Winter Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the interaction of oppositely signed vortices in the compressible (non-Boussinesq) quasigeostrophic system, with a view to understanding vortex interactions in the polar winter stratosphere. A series of simplifying ...

R. K. Scott; D. G. Dritschel

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Winter North Atlantic Oscillation Hindcast Skill: 1900–2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent proposed seasonal hindcast skill estimates for the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) are derived from different lagged predictors, NAO indices, skill assessment periods, and skill validation methodologies. This creates confusion ...

Christopher G. Fletcher; Mark A. Saunders

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Oscillating relationship between the East Asian winter monsoon and ENSO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work investigates the interdecadal variations of the relationship between the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM); further explores possible mechanisms and finally considers a recent switch in the ENSO-...

Shengping He; Huijun Wang

480

Energy-Efficient Cooking for Winter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooking for Winter Cooking for Winter Energy-Efficient Cooking for Winter September 30, 2008 - 4:06pm Addthis Jen Carter What does this mean for me? Use your kitchen more efficiently when the seasons turn cold to help save energy and money at home. When I was growing up, the most poignant harbinger of winter wasn't the smell of fallen leaves or the slowly shortening days; it was the first time I came home from school to find a pot of my mother's homemade chicken soup simmering gently on the stove. That pot would be the first of many. As long as the thermometer outside the kitchen window hovered around freezing, my mother's weekly pot of soup remained a household staple. I've noticed much the same seasonal shift in my own kitchen. When summer's heat starts to make cooking oppressive, I turn off the oven and embrace the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winter capacity electric" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho EA-1894: Albeni Falls Flexible Winter Lake Operations, Bonner, Idaho Summary DOE's Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as co-lead Federal agencies, prepared this EA to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to operate Albeni Falls dam during the winter months (approximately December 15th to March 31st) and determine whether the existing Columbia River System Operation Review EIS (DOE/EIS-0170) is adequate or a supplemental or new EIS is required. For more information about this project, see: http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/AFD-FWPO/ http://efw.bpa.gov/environmental_services/Document_Library/System_Operation/ (Link

482

Aircraft Icing Measurements in East Coast Winter Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of the aircraft icing environments of East Coast winter storms have been made from 3 1 flights duringthe second Canadian Atlantic Storms Program. Microphysical parameters have been summarized and are compared to common icing intensity ...

Stewart G. Cober; George A. Isaac; J. W. Strapp

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Distinct Modes of the East Asian Winter Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two distinct modes of the East Asian winter monsoon (EAWM) have been identified, and they correspond to real and imaginary parts of the leading mode of the EAWM, respectively. Analyses of these modes used the National Centers for Environment ...

Bingyi Wu; Renhe Zhang; Rosanne D’Arrigo

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Band Formation in a New England Winter Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study addresses mechanisms of band formation in a New England winter storm. The structure of the bands and their environment are documented with synoptic observations, radar data, and analyses of instrumented aircraft flights through ...

Dawn G. Wolfsberg; Kerry A. Emanuel; Richard E. Passarelli

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Heat Budget of the Siberian High and the Winter Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat budget of the Siberian high is investigated by using a compositing method. Ninteen cases of strong Siberian highs that moved over China from the northwest were selected from datasets covering five winters (December through February of ...

Yihui Ding; T. N. Krishnamurti

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Rossby Wave Propagation and Teleconnection Patterns in the Austral Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational evidence of and theoretical support for the Northern and Southern Hemisphere teleconnection patterns in the austral (Southern Hemisphere) winter are examined through an upper troposphere streamfunction teleconnectivity map and time-...

Tércio Ambrizzi; Brian J. Hoskins; Huang-Hsiung Hsu

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

The Zonal Asymmetry of the Southern Hemisphere Winter Storm Track  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric general circulation model experiments have been performed to investigate how the significant zonal asymmetry in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) winter storm track is forced by sea surface temperature (SST) and orography. An experiment ...

Masaru Inatsu; Brian J. Hoskins

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Understanding Utah Winter Storms: The Intermountain Precipitation Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter storms and their prediction are of increasing importance throughout the region of the United States with the fastest growing population, the Intermountain West. Such storms can produce heavy orographic snowfall, lake-effect snowbands, and ...

David M. Schultz; W. James Steenburgh; R. Jeffrey Trapp; John Horel; David E. Kingsmill; Lawrence B. Dunn; W. David Rust; Linda Cheng; Aaron Bansemer; Justin Cox; John Daugherty; David P. Jorgensen; José Meitín; Les Showell; Bradley F. Smull; Keli Tarp; Marilu Trainor

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

A Further Study of Spectral Energetics in the Winter Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contributions of standing (time-mean) and transient (time-departure) waves to the atmospheric spectral energetics are analyzed using the NMC (National Meteorological Center) data of winter 1976–1977. It is found that the standing long waves ...

Tsing-Chang Chen

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Atmospheric Ice Crystals over the Antarctic Plateau in Winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Falling ice crystals were collected daily on a gridded glass slide at South Pole Station, Antarctica, during the Antarctic winter of 1992 and were photographed through a microscope. Nine types of ice crystals are identified, which fall into three ...

Von P. Walden; Stephen G. Warren; Elizabeth Tuttle

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Precipitation Types in the Transition Region of Winter Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winter storms often produce snow, freezing rain, and ice pellets. The characteristics and formation of these forms of precipitation as well as their location within storms are reviewed. Phenomena such as accretion and fog can be related to this ...

Ronald E. Stewart

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Proceedings of the 40th Conference on Winter Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) is recognized as the premiere international conference for simulation professionals in discrete and combined discrete-continuous simulation. WSC is always located in stimulating locations, and in 2008 we are delighted ...

Thomas Jefferson; John W. Fowler; Ricki G. Ingalls; Scott Mason; Ray Hill; Lars Mönch; Oliver Rose

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Proceedings of the 38th conference on Winter simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Winter Simulation Conference (WSC) is recognized as the premiere international conference for simulation professionals in discrete and combined discrete-continuous simulation; WSC is always located in stimulating locations, in 2006 we are delighted ...

L. Felipe Perrone; Barry G. Lawson; Jason Liu; Frederick P. Wieland; David Nicol; Richard Fujimoto

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Australian Winter Mountain Storm Clouds: Precipitation Augmentation Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Australian winter mountain storm field research projects were conducted by the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation Division of Atmospheric Research and the Desert Research Institute Atmospheric Sciences Center in the ...

Alexis B. Long; Elizabeth J. Carter

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Using Wind Anomalies to Forecast East Coast Winter Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Forecasting major winter storms is a critical function for all weather services. Conventional model-derived fields from numerical weather prediction models most frequently utilized by operational forecasters, such as pressure level geopotential ...

Neil A. Stuart; Richard H. Grumm

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Distillate Stocks Are Important Part of Northeast Winter Supply  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... PADD 1 stocks provided about 15% of supply during the peak winter months of January and ... the Northeast saw the unusual heating oil and diesel price surges as a ...

497

A Climatic Classification for Citrus Winter Survival in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The citrus tree is susceptible to frost damage. Winter injury to citrus from freezing weather is the major meteorological problem in the northern pail of citrus growing regions in China. Based on meteorological data collected at 120 stations in ...

Huang Shou Bo

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013-Winter Fuels.pptx  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DC www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Overview Wi t F l O tl k f h h ld * Winter Fuels Outlook focuses on households. * EIA...

499

Modeling the Winter Urban Heat Island Over Christchurch, New Zealand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy balance model is presented and tested against surface temperature fields observed over Christchurch under clear winter conditions. The fit between observed and simulated fields is shown to be close by night and slightly less so by day. ...

N. J. Tapper; P. D. Tyson; I. F. Owens; W. J. Hastie

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Propagating Atmospheric Patterns Associated with Midwest Winter Precipitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For winters over eastern North America, complex Hilbert empirical orthogonal function (HEOF) analysis was used to objectively identify propagating patterns in four atmospheric fields that have potential relevance to precipitation: jet stream–level ...

Courtenay Strong; Jessica Liptak

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z