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1

Winn, Maine: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winn, Maine: Energy Resources Winn, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4856144°, -68.372245° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.4856144,"lon":-68.372245,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Eligibility Residential...

3

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

RushShelby Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RushShelby Energy RushShelby Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name RushShelby Energy Place Indiana Utility Id 17038 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Single Phase Time of Use(Schedule GS-1) Commercial Schedule GD: Grain Drying and Irrigation Service Commercial Schedule GS-1-DG: Distributed Generation Commercial Schedule GS-1: General Service(Single Phase) Commercial Schedule GS-3: General Service(Three Phase) Commercial Schedule IPS: Industrial Power Service Industrial

5

RushShelby Energy - Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

website or call the RushShelby office for more information. Air-Source Heat Pumps: 14 SEER or higher Dual Fuel Heat Pumps: 14 SEER or higher Central Air Conditioning: 14 SEER or...

6

Cherokee Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherokee Electric Coop Cherokee Electric Coop Place Alabama Utility Id 3426 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Power Service Commercial General Power Service(Gin)- Over 15,000 kWh - >50 kW Commercial General Power Service- > 1000 kW Industrial General Power Service- Over 15,000 kWh - >50 kW Commercial Outdoor Lighting Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1160/kWh Commercial: $0.1350/kWh Industrial: $0.0673/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

7

Geology and Thermal Regime of Bert Winn #1 geothermal Test, Franklin County, Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are: (1) Bert Winn No.1 did not encounter high-temperature zones of permeability, except possibly at 5,575 to 5,700 feet, where chloride conductivity indicates saline fluid entry, and where stabilized temperature may be 210-215 F. (2) Structurally, Bert Winn No.1 appears to have penetrated into the horst footwall block, penetrating progressively away from the horst-bounding faults believed to leak hot fluids. (3) Projections based on disequilibrium temperatures taken at 24 and 36 hours suggest a stabilized maximum temperature of about 260-265 F at 7,450. Maximum observed temperature was 243 F. (4) Geochemically, temperatures at depth should be over 300 F. On the basis of observed temperatures and gradients, 400 F might not be encountered until 12,000 feet at this site. (5) C.H. Stocks 1-A, about one mile northwest, appears to be hotter at comparable depths, and to be better located to penetrate the range-front fault set at drillable depth. (6) Bert Winn No.1 was sited principally on a geoelectrical anomaly in an area of high temperature gradients. With the remote exception of the saline interval at 5,575 to 5,700 feet, no evidence was seen in drilling and logging of any feature that could serve as the source of the geoelectrical anomaly.

McIntyre, J.B.; Koenig, J.B.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

RushShelby Energy- Residential and Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RushShelby Energy provides customers with incentives to help offset the cost of installing energy efficient equipment in participating homes and facilities. Rebates are available for energy...

9

Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the First Steps phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribes plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: Develop the Tribes energy goals and objectives Establish the Tribes current energy usage Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives Create an action plan for the selected options

Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio (Utility Company) Ohio (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Shelby Place Ohio Utility Id 17043 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Schedule A Schedule A-D Schedule B- Primary Schedule B- Single Phase Schedule B- Three Phase Schedule C Schedule C- Primary Schedule D Security Light- 1000W Metal Halide Lighting Security Light- 175W Mercury Vapor Lighting Security Light- 400W Metal Halide Lighting Security Lights- 100W High Pressure Sodium Lighting

11

City of Shelby, North Carolina (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Carolina (Utility Company) North Carolina (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Shelby Place North Carolina Utility Id 17037 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Coincident Peak Rate Industrial Customer Generation Credit Rider Industrial Medium and Large General Service Industrial Medium and Large General Service All-Electric Industrial Medium and Large Industrial Service Industrial RECR-1 - Wind and Biomass (10Yrs) Commercial RECR-1 - Wind and Biomass (15Yrs) Commercial

12

FINAL REPORT ANALYSIS of KANSAS CITY, MARMATON, and CHEROKEE GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FINAL REPORT ANALYSIS of KANSAS CITY, MARMATON, and CHEROKEE GROUP COAL and SHALE SAMPLES for GAS gas contents: unit, depth (desorbed gas) · Eudora Shale Member, 242' 0" to 242' 8.5" (no significant gas) · Muncie Creek Shale Member, 438' 4.5" to 439' 4" (no significant gas) · Quivira Shale Member

Peterson, Blake R.

13

Cherokee County Elec Coop Assn | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cherokee County Elec Coop Assn Cherokee County Elec Coop Assn Place Texas Utility Id 3470 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial - Single Phase Commercial Commercial - Three Phase Commercial Large Power Industrial Nonfirm Power From a Qualifying Facility Commercial Optional Large Power Time-of-Use Industrial Residential Residential Security Light Service - 100 HPS Lighting Security Light Service - 250 HPS Lighting Security Light Service - 400 MV Lighting Security Light Service- 175 MV Lighting

14

$1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nation that will exist long after our project is finished. For that reason, we take to heart these values of integrity, professionalism, and excellence." - Cherokee Services Group...

15

$1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and Property Support Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"When CSG undertakes a project, we are not simply representing a brand or evena corporation. We are representing the reputation of anentire nation and culture. The name Cherokee and the...

16

Quality site seasonal report: Cherokee Indian Hospital, SFBP 4058, December 1984 through April 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The active solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) and space heating system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital was designed and constructed as part of the Solar in Federal Buildings Program (SFBP). This retrofitted system is one of eight of the systems in the SFBP selected for quality monitoring. The purpose of this monitoring effort is to document the performance of quality state-of-the-art solar systems in large federal building applications. The hospital serves the Qualla Reservation of the Cherokee Indian Tribe in Cherokee, North Carolina, near the eastern entrance to the Great Smoky Mountain National Park. Solar energy is used to preheat domestic hot water (the cafeteria is the principal load) and for space heating. The hospital is expected to have a normal year-round occupancy of 200 people (patients, medical and maintenance personnel) with some 2775 expected visitors per year. The drainback solar system has 320 Owens-Illinois evacuated-tube collectors with a gross area of 5517 square feet. Solar energy is stored in a 6335-gallon storage tank. Solar energy from storage is supplied to a 700-gallon DHW preheat tank through a heat exchanger in the storage tank, and directly to heat exchangers in the heating ducts. Auxiliary energy is supplied by two large oil-fired boilers. Performance of the system at the Cherokee Indian Hospital during the period December 1984 through April 1985 are reported.

Raymond, M.G.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Cherokee Nation Enterprises Wind Energy Feasibility Study Final Report to U.S. DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CNE has conducted a feasibility study on the Chilocco property in north-central Oklahoma since the grant award on July 20, 2003. This study has concluded that there is sufficient wind for a wind farm and that with the Production Tax Credits and Green Tags, there will be sufficient energy to, not only cover the costs of the Nations energy needs, but to provide a profit. CNE has developed a wind energy team and is working independently and with industry partners to bring its renewable energy resources to the marketplace. We are continuing with the next phase in conducting avian, cultural and transmission studies, as well as continuing to measure the wind with the SoDAR unit. Cherokee Nation Enterprises, Inc. is a wholly-owned corporation under Cherokee Nation and has managed the Department of Energy grant award since July 20, 2003. In summary, we have determined there is sufficient wind for a wind farm at the Chilocco property where Cherokee Nation owns approximately 4,275 acres. The primary goal would be more of a savings in light of the electricity used by Cherokee Nation and its entities which totals an estimated eight million dollars per year. Cherokee Nation Enterprises (CNE), working independently and with industry partners, plans to bring its renewable energy resources into the marketplace through a well-documented understanding of our undeveloped resource. Our plan is to cultivate this resource in a way that will ensure the development and use for our energy will be in an environmentally and culturally acceptable form.

Carol E. Wyatt

2006-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Winn Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

19

Biotelemetry study of spring and summer habitat selection by striped bass in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, 1978. [Morone saxatilis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat selection of 31 adult striped bass was monitored by temperature sensing ultrasonic and radio transmitters in Cherokee Reservoir, Tennessee, from March through October 1978. This study sought to corroborate summer data obtained by Waddle (1979) in 1977 and to examine mechanisms of habitat selection by observing establishment of the summer distribution. During the spring and early summer months the striped bass ranged throughout the study area in the downstream half of the reservoir. Fish stayed near the bottom at the preferred temperatures throughout the whole study, and no individuals were observed in open water. Movement rates of up to 2.6 km/day were estimated, and rates of 1 km/day were common in the spring. By late July they were apparently avoiding low dissolved oxygen (D.O.) concentrations (<3 mg/l) near the bottom of the main reservoir and epilimnion temperatures greater than 22/sup 0/C, and they moved into cool, oxygenated spring or creek channels (refuges). Low movement rates of 0 to 25 m/day within these refuges occurred. The rates of the few migrations between refuges could not be estimated. Tagged fish moved out of the refuges 3 to 4 weeks after the fall overturn when reservoir temperatures approximated 22 to 24/sup 0/C.

Schaich, B.A.; Coutant, C.C.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Biogeochemistry of mercury in a river-reservoir system: impact of an inactive chloralkali plant on the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir, Virginia and Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

Elevated mercury concentrations in fish species from the North Fork of the Holston River were observed in the early 1970's. The source of the mercury was a chloralkali plant which had ceased operation in 1972. Mercury continues to be released to the river from two large (approx. 40-ha) waste disposal ponds at the plant site. This report presents results of a study of the emission of mercury to the environment from the abandoned waste ponds and of the distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota of the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir System in Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

Hildebrand, S. G.; Lindberg, S. E.; Turner, R. R.; Huckabee, J. W.; Strand, R. H.; Lund, J. R.; Andren, A. W.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Winn Parish, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9196124°, -92.6586401° 9196124°, -92.6586401° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.9196124,"lon":-92.6586401,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Shelby, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8814452°, -82.6618424° 8814452°, -82.6618424° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8814452,"lon":-82.6618424,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Shelby Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop, Inc Electric Coop, Inc Place Illinois Utility Id 17040 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Electric Heat Rate for Small Residential Customers Residential Small Single Phase Farm, Residential & Commercial Interruptible Service - Up To 200 Amp Residential Small Single Phase Farm, Residential & Commercial Interruptible Service - Up To 200 Amp Commercial Small Single Phase Farm, Residential, and Commercial Service Residential Small Single Phase Farm, Residential, and Commercial Service Commercial

24

Evaluation of Gas Reburning & Low NOx Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler Performance and Economics Report Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System Cherokee Station Unit 3 Public Service Company of Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NOX reduction (70%) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was performed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado Bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NOX emission level of 0.73 lb/106 Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50%. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NOX in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NOX emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18Y0. Toward the end of the program, a Second Generation gas injection system was installed. Higher injector gas pressures were used that eliminated the need for flue gas recirculation as used in the first generation design. The Second Generation GR resulted in similar NOX reduction performance as that for the First Generation. With an improvement in the LNB performance in combination with the new gas injection system , the reburn gas could be reduced to 12.5% of the total boiler heat input to achieve al 64?40 reduction in NO, emissions. In addition, the OFA injectors were modified to provide for better mixing to lower CO emissions.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Insulation, Central Air conditioners, Doors, Heat pumps, Water Heaters, Windows Active Incentive Yes Implementing Sector Utility Energy Category Energy Efficiency...

26

Shelby County, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

704°, -88.864698° 704°, -88.864698° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.3980704,"lon":-88.864698,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Co-op, Inc Energy Co-op, Inc Place Kentucky Utility Id 17044 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SERC NERC SERC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 Watt Decorative Colonial Light Lighting 100 Watt Security Light Lighting 150 Watt Decorative Acorn Light Lighting 250 Watt Directional Flood and Security and Street Light Lighting 400 Watt Directional Flood and Security and Street Light Lighting General Service - Rate 11 Industrial General Service - Rate 11 - Three Phase Commercial Large Industrial Rate - Schedule B1 Industrial

28

Shelby County, Tennessee: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9.9253233° 9.9253233° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1268552,"lon":-89.9253233,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

29

Shelby County, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2278796° 2278796° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3689335,"lon":-84.2278796,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

30

Shelby County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -94.1513764° °, -94.1513764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.8343021,"lon":-94.1513764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Shelby County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Iowa: Energy Resources County, Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7177667°, -95.3102505° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7177667,"lon":-95.3102505,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Shelby County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8486236° 8486236° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4952877,"lon":-85.8486236,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Shelby County, Missouri: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

92.1057549° 92.1057549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8388716,"lon":-92.1057549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Shelby County, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.2308414° 5.2308414° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.1778076,"lon":-85.2308414,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Shelby County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

86.6611083° 86.6611083° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3039292,"lon":-86.6611083,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

Shelby Doyle, MArch I AP Laura Snowdon, Dean of Students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

royalties and licensing fees generated by UW TechTransfer and the WRF provided a gift of $250,000. The WRF was for WRF to provide a gift to UW TechTransfer to help launch the Technology Gap Innovation Fund (TGIF project to Ram Samudrala, Ph.D. "The value of the WRF gift and funding from the university's TechTransfer

Chou, James

37

Cherokee County, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95.6457951° 95.6457951° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8027756,"lon":-95.6457951,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Cherokee County, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County, Texas: Energy Resources County, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.7981828°, -95.1432068° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.7981828,"lon":-95.1432068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Cherokee County, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0120404°, -81.6035062° 0120404°, -81.6035062° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.0120404,"lon":-81.6035062,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Cherokee County, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6°, -84.4802606° 6°, -84.4802606° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.2514526,"lon":-84.4802606,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cherokee County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

84578° 84578° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1665322,"lon":-85.684578,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Cherokee County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29°, -94.976654° 29°, -94.976654° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.8994729,"lon":-94.976654,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Cherokee County, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

059029° 059029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1134803,"lon":-84.059029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Cherokee County, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4.8105955° 4.8105955° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.1142482,"lon":-94.8105955,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

U.S. CMS - U.S. CMS @ Work - Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

landsberg@hep.brown.edu Fairfield Dave Winn winn@fair1.fairfield.edu Fermilab Dan Green dgreen@fnal.gov Florida International Pete Markowitz markowit@fiu.edu Florida State...

46

Economic Impacts of Controlling Soil-Loss from Silviculture Activities: A Case STudy of Cherokee County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Section 208 of the 1972 Amendments to the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (Public Law 92-500) requires the states to develop plans which: (1) contain processes to identify nonpoint sources of pollution, and (2) set forth procedures and methods to control such sources of pollution to the extent feasible. Among the land use activities which are explicitly identified within Section 208 as potential sources of nonpoint pollution problems is silviculture. Texas, since it contains an estimated 12.5 million acres of commercial forest land (Murphy, 1976), has for some time been actively involved in developing the required planning procedures and materials. This document represents one component of this overall planning process. The "extent feasible" clause of Section 208 can be interpreted as recognizing the need to consider economic tradeoffs in reaching a decision as to what level of control, if any, should be exercised to limit nonpoint source pollution from whatever type of activity. This would seem to be a reasonable interpretation since it would be illogical to envision extending controls to the point that their marginal costs would exceed their marginal benefits. Broadly conceived, the purpose of this investigation has been to make a first approximation of the economic tradeoffs that would be associated with any effort to limit the extent of nonpoint pollution resulting from silvicultural activities in Texas. More specifically the study has sought to achieve the following objectives: 1. To develop a methodology For assessing the economic impacts associated with imposing alternative silvicultural nonpoint source controls at varying intensities. 2. To demonstrate how the methodology could be applied to a specific study area to facilitate decision-making about the economic rationality of imposing controls. As the study plan for this project was developed, choices had to be made regarding the range of potential pollutants to consider, the range of alternative control techniques to consider, and the range of economic impacts to consider. Since the nature of these choices represent limitations on the scope of the project, they should be made explicit from the outset. As regards the range of potential pollutants considered, it is recognized that silvicultural nonpoint source pollution can conceivably assume a variety of forms -- nutrients, chemical, thermal, and so on. Nonetheless, in this investigation sediment is the only potential silvicultural pollutant which has been addressed -- and this only indirectly.1 The focal point of the analysis is on the economic impacts of restricting soil loss (i.e. sheet and rill erosion) which is not directly equivalent to sediment yield. Conversion of soil loss figures to sediment yield figures requires knowledge of an appropriate sediment delivery ratio. While this might appear to be a significant limitation of the study, the investigators are of the opinion that it is not. This conclusion rests upon essentially two facts. First, the bulk of the available evidence pertaining to the potential impacts of silvicultural activities on water quality indicates that in those instances where such activities appear to be creating a problem sediment is generally the potential pollutant of greatest importance. Secondly, sediment yields will bear a constant proportional relationship to soil loss. Indeed, if the study unit used in this investigation had been a physical watershed instead of a county, the analysis could have dealt directly with sediment yields rather than soil loss.2 In turn, if actual sediment yields had been estimated, other potential pollutants could have been introduced into the analysis, if so desired, by the use of appropriate loading functions. As regards the range of alternative control techniques that might conceivably be used to limit silvicultural nonpoint source pollution, this investigation specifically considers four possibilities. These are: (1) a countywide limit on allowable soi

Hickman, C.A.; Jackson, B.D.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Alabama | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cherokee Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency Loan Programs Cherokee Electric Coop offers loans to residential customers for making energy efficiency improvements....

48

Gas Mileage of 2012 Vehicles by Jeep  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 Highway 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2WD 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners Gas 17...

49

Gas Mileage of 2013 Vehicles by Jeep  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26 Highway 2013 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2WD 6 cyl, 3.6 L, Automatic 5-spd, Regular Gas or E85 Compare 2013 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2WD View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners Gas 17...

50

Early and sustained interventions which strongly feature mentoring are essential in help-ing Native American and Latino students navigate an unfamiliar academic system that is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Navajo) is the largest, with 170,000 members. Others include the Oglala Sioux, Cherokee Nation, Blackfeet

Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

51

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MI-City-Shelby, Charter Township of MI-City-Shelby, Charter Township of Location: City Shelby, Charter MI Township of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Acquisition of technical services for development of an energy efficiency and conservation strategy and to conduct energy audits on all Township buildings (completed), 2) conduct energy efficiency building retrofits on the Shelby Township Municipal Building envelope (window replacement project), 3) conduct energy efficiency building retrofits to the Township Municipal Building (heating, ventilating, and air conditioning upgrades), 4) conduct energy efficiency building retrofits on township municipal buildings (lighting upgrades-Municipal Building, Detective Building, Parks & Recreation Gas Pump, Nature Center

52

EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project, Shelby,...

53

TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jr. and M. D. Shelby, "Chemicals Identified in Oil Shaleand Shale Oil. list." 1. Preliminary Environmental Mutagenof Trace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Wa- ters", Am.

Kland, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

USGS Mid-America NEHRP Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of faults Memphis AR TN MO 50 km Jonesboro Blytheville Poplar Bluff Sikeston Dyersburg Kennett Page 11. Meeman-Shelby Fault 11 ...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

WISE Home Energy Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The WISE Home Energy Program provides up to 750 in energy efficiency rebates for homeowners in Cullman, Madison, Jefferson, Shelby, Morgan, Limestone and Lawrence counties. A...

56

TREATMENT OF MULTIVARIATE ENVIRONMENTAL AND HEALTH PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH OIL SHALE TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jr. and M. D. Shelby, "Chemicals Identified in Oil Shaleand Shale Oil. list." 1. Preliminary Environmental MutagenTrace Contaminants in Oil Shale Retort Wa- ters", Am. Chern.

Kland, M.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alfred University Kazuo Inamori School of Engineering Viscous GlassComposite SOFC Sealants Scott Misture, James Shelby, co-PIs Mark Naylor, graduate student NYS College of...

58

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gallio-boro-silicates 2 Viscous Silicate SOFC Glass Sealants Mark O. Naylor, James E. Shelby and Scott T. Misture Kazuo Inamori School of Engineering, Alfred University, Alfred,...

59

Microsoft Word - greeneCV.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tuberville, B. S. Metts, J. L. Greene, T. Mills, Y. Leiden, S. Poppy and C. Winne. "The global decline of reptiles, Deja Vu amphibians." BioScience 50: 653-666. 2001 Tucker, A....

60

Windpower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chilocco Wind Park Chilocco Wind Park Cherokee Nation (other nations as well) Cherokee Nation Businesses, LLC And PNE Wind Cherokee Chilocco Wind North Central Oklahoma Location KA W PA W N EE TO NK AW A PO NC A OT OE -M IS S OU RI CH E RO KE E Acr es: 2,633 .348 CH E RO KE E Acr es: 1,641 .687 CHEROKEE NATION Kay County Chilocco Property DATA SOU RC ES: US Census Bureau (T iger Files ) D OQQ's , USGS D RG's, USGS Cherokee Nation Realty D epartment C herokee N ation GeoD ata C enter Date: 12/19/01 e:\project\land\c hilocc o N E W S Tribal Land Chilocco Property Turbine Layout Cherokee Wind Status of Area Tribes: * Ponca - Their land would be a possible site for two turbines but they have not been approached. They previously expressed no interest. * Otoe - Missouri - They have expressed an interest but

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

DOE Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: TRIBAL ENERGY PROGRAM OK Project Title OK-TEP-CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES Location: Tribal CHEROKEE NATION BUSINESSES American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Cherokee Wind Energy Development proposed project is for development, design, and installation of a 127.5 megawatt wind farm to offset Tribal electrical load; sell excess electricity to local, regional, and

62

Secretary Chu Highlights Support for Clean Energy and Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act to provide financial incentives to tribal homeowners to change out old, inefficient household appliances with energy efficient appliances, while the Cherokee Nation is...

63

Kansas Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... is the fifth largest natural gas field in the United States. Minor reserves of bituminous coal are found in the Cherokee basin in the southeastern corner of the ...

64

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... is the fifth largest natural gas field in the United States. Minor reserves of bituminous coal are found in the Cherokee basin in the southeastern corner of the ...

65

Kansas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kansas Geological Survey, University ... Influencing the Emerging Coalbed Gas Play in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins in Eastern Kansas, ... Power Plant Emissions ...

66

Counties with Established Counties without Established  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parmer Pecos Potter Presidio Randall Reagan Refugio Roberts Runnels Schleicher Scurry Shackelford Sherman Somervell Smith Sherman Shelby ShackelfordScurry Schleicher San Saba San Patricio San Jacinto San Augustine

67

CX-007038: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7038: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7038: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007038: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee-County-Shelby CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/12/2011 Location(s): Shelby County, Tennessee Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Establish Office of Sustainability; 2) implementation of recycling component of the Environmental Quality Assessment?purchase recycling roll-off containers; 3) technical consultant services to advise Green Building Task Force on building codes to assist Shelby County to become a leader in green buildings, sustainable development, and adaptive reuse of existing buildings; 4) conduct energy audits on the Codes Enforcement Building and the Visitor?s Center at Shelby Farms and conduct building retrofits which

68

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL-County-Shelby AL-County-Shelby Location: County Shelby AL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Energy efficiency upgrades to the lighting and HVAC systems and building envelope upgrades at the historic Shelby County Courthouse Conditions: Historic preservation clause applies to this application Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

69

carbon management environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shelby TBA N/A 7 10/11/2010 Wind Energy & Microhydro Background Larissa Korach and Antonio Love, CARES Undergraduate Researchers Section 1.4.2 Resource Assessments: Micro-Hydro Section 1.4.3 Resource Assessments

Liley, David

70

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GA-County-Cherokee GA-County-Cherokee Location: County Cherokee GA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire technical consultant, 3) energy efficiency retrofits to include: replace chiller and cooling tower in the Justice Center (1994); replace heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls in the Justice Center; installation of occupancy sensors in the Detention Center (1992); 4) installation of cool roofs on the Justice Center, Historic Courthouse (SHPO approval received), and the TAG Office (approximately 1988); 5) develop an overall energy plan for energy management including audits and for replacement of older inefficient roof-top packaged HVAC equipment

71

April 10, 2012 Student author  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publications Abdul-Razzaq, W., R. Bushey, and G.L. Winn. 2011. Leakage of microwave ovens. Physics Education. Zitney+ . 2011. Steady state simulation and optimization of an integrated gasification combined cycle+ . 2011. Optimal design and integration of an air separation unit (ASU) for an integrated gasification

Mohaghegh, Shahab

72

CSEM WP 117 Vertical Integration in Restructured Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.M., W.A. Williams, P.C. Thornton, K.P. McLaughlin, C.M. Tobalske, B.A. Maxell, D.P. Hendricks, C.M. Hart, J.C. Winne, W.A. Williams, P.C. Thornton, Z. Ma, C.M. Tobalske, M.M. Thornton, K.P. McLaughlin, T

California at Berkeley. University of

73

The George Washington University Solar Institute 609 22nd Street, NW, Suite 301  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reducing demand in Europe. Annual Average Insolation (July 1985-June 2005) #12;its use of nuclear energy in Scientific American in 2008. · Executive Coordinator -- Alexander Winn has been an integral member in coordinating many important projects, including the Annual Symposium, Institute communications

Vertes, Akos

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Jeep - Grand Cherokee 2WD AWD (2014) Fuel: Flex Fuel (E85) (Flexible Fuel) Class: Sport Utility Vehicle Fuel Economy (Gasoline): 17 mpg city, 24 mpg highway Fuel Economy (Flex...

75

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SEPT02CO 1. Comanche Coal Public Service Co of Colorado 2. Craig Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc 3. Fort St Vrain Gas 4. Cherokee 5. Rawhide Platte River Power Authority

76

Data:187d7d91-0288-4089-ae17-8ef0bd7fd498 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d91-0288-4089-ae17-8ef0bd7fd498 d91-0288-4089-ae17-8ef0bd7fd498 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Light- 400W Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

77

Data:67570cf1-109b-45b6-a9ce-ff171cd307dc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cf1-109b-45b6-a9ce-ff171cd307dc cf1-109b-45b6-a9ce-ff171cd307dc No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Light- 1000W Metal Halide Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

78

Data:E7e7361d-32f5-4a83-ab03-7daca23898df | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

32f5-4a83-ab03-7daca23898df 32f5-4a83-ab03-7daca23898df No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B- Single Phase Sector: Description: Delivery Charge: $0.15/kVA Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

79

Data:C1a6a4ef-2d67-491a-a025-cb3d0d87cd94 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ef-2d67-491a-a025-cb3d0d87cd94 ef-2d67-491a-a025-cb3d0d87cd94 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Light- 175W Mercury Vapor Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh):

80

Data:21179d42-d0da-4c68-a43d-196baeec705d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-d0da-4c68-a43d-196baeec705d -d0da-4c68-a43d-196baeec705d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule D Sector: Description: Available for electrical energy used for city-owned and operated facilities. Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CX-001853: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53: Categorical Exclusion Determination 53: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001853: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Shelby, Charter Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Shelby, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for: 1) Acquisition of technical services for development of an energy efficiency and conservation strategy and to conduct energy audits on all Township buildings (completed), 2) conduct energy efficiency building retrofits on the Shelby Township Municipal Building envelope (window replacement project), 3) conduct energy efficiency building retrofits to the Township Municipal Building (heating, ventilating, and air conditioning upgrades), 4) conduct energy efficiency building retrofits on township municipal buildings, and

82

3URJUDP$EVWUDFWV DQG$GMDFHQW0DULQH6\\VWHPV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Officer, Florida Bay Science Program, Key Largo, Florida Beth Miller-Tipton, Director and Shelby Tatlock, Conference Assistant, Office of Conferences and Institutes (OCI), University of Florida, Institute of Food Rickenbacker Causeway, Miami, FL 33149. PH: (305) 361-4388, FAX: (305) 361-4392, E-Mail:

Watson, Craig A.

83

fiat luxF A L L 2 0 1 1 N O . 2 1 ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 THE LIBRARY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robinson Furth Dr. Leontina Kelly Gallagher Shelby M. Gans David P. and Sheila S. Gardner Mr.William C Robert C. Herr Bruce and Joan Herriges William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Honorable and Mrs. David M. amd Leslie M. Zomalt HENRY MORSE STEPHENS $500 - $999 Mr.William M. Abbott Nancy and Abraham Adams Mr

California at Berkeley, University of

84

Blog Archive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 28, 2011 September 28, 2011 $1.4 million to Cherokee Services Group for Administrative and Property Support Services "When CSG undertakes a project, we are not simply representing a brand or even a corporation. We are representing the reputation of an entire nation and culture. The name Cherokee and the heritage and people it represents have been around for hundreds of years. We are proud stewards of the name of a nation that will exist long after our project is finished. For that reason, we take to heart these values of integrity, professionalism, and excellence." - Cherokee Services Group September 15, 2011 Honoring Hispanic Heritage Month and Renewing the American Dream Today we kick-off Hispanic Heritage Month, celebrating under the theme of "Renewing the American Dream." The Energy Department joins the rest of the

85

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Title NC-TEP-EASTERN BAND OF THE CHEROKEE Project Title NC-TEP-EASTERN BAND OF THE CHEROKEE Location: Tribal EASTERN BAND OF THE CHEROKEE NC American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Perform energy efficiency retrofits to seven ECBI facilities, e.g., replacement of incandescent bulbs with CFLs, improvement of weather stripping, improvement of insulation, etc. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including DOE and/or Executive Orders; require siting, construction, or major expansion of waste storage, disposal, recovery, or

86

CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Conduct energy audits on the residences of Cherokee Citizens with both privately owned residences and tribal managed housing; 2) develop a comprehensive energy policy that would encompass the Tribal government as well as its business entities; 3) construct Recycling Center Facility (150 feet by 75 feet); 4) locate a compressed natural gas fuel station on an existing, conventional filling station, adjacent to the Cherokee Nation Tribal Office to fuel

87

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes September 6, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.

88

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NEPA NEPA Compliance Officer (as authorized under DOE Order 451.1B), I have determined that the proposed action fits within the specified class(es) of action, the other regulatory requirements set forth above are met, and the proposed action is hereby categorically excluded U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title OK-TRIBE-CHEROKEE NATION, OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- CHEROKEE NATION, OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description

89

PROSPERITY IN SOUTH CAROLINA: AN ANALYSIS OF 46 COUNTIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

95 Horry 114 26 Newberry 95 Jasper 86 27 Clarendon 95 Kershaw 99 28 Saluda 94 Lancaster 97 29Cormick 91 33 McCormick 91 Marion 89 34 Union 91 Marlboro 76 35 Fairfield 90 Newberry 95 36 Marion 89 Oconee Orangeburg 96 Hampton 90 25 Cherokee 95 Horry 112 26 Fairfield 95 Jasper 94 27 Newberry 95 Kershaw 100 28

Bolding, M. Chad

90

Long-range juvenile dispersal and its implication for conservation of reintroduced swift fox Vulpes velox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............12 Blackfeet curriculum honored by Smithsonian..........................14 Water study unites MSU the Blackfeet, Crow, Northern Cheyenne, and Salish tribes, among others. The council meets on campus each fall of their community outreach work. Left to right: Clinton Nomee, Crow; John Wagner, Blackfeet; Jade Watts, Cherokee

Montana, University of

91

Building a Culturally Sensitive portal for Indigenous Nations The eHumanity Project, developed by Indiana University in collaboration with the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quotation actually came from a 21st-century Blackfeet woman working in a high administrative position, Cheyenne. Still others will mention the Blackfeet, Huron, Cherokee, Mohawk, and even Inuit. These names content in terms of their own personal tribal heritage. A member of the Blackfeet tribe pointed out

92

Data:Df29fc68-6cad-401d-9b65-f696e3cbc264 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9fc68-6cad-401d-9b65-f696e3cbc264 9fc68-6cad-401d-9b65-f696e3cbc264 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GS-1-DG: Distributed Generation Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY This Rate Schedule is available to any Member of RushShelby Energy (the "Cooperative") that is currently being billed under the Residential Electric Service Rate who has a qualified distributed generation system ("DG System") of not more than 15 kW and who desire to interconnect such DG System with the Cooperative's distribution system.

93

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 2230 of 28,905 results. 21 - 2230 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006009: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program - Alaska-Tribe Organized Village of Kake CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/01/2011 Location(s): Kake, Alaska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006009-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001853: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Shelby, Charter Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Shelby, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001853-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001857: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montana-Tribe-Fort Peck Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes

94

Mammal Teeth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mammal Teeth Mammal Teeth Name: Shelby Status: student Grade: 6-8 Location: TX Country: USA Date: Spring 2011 Question: Is human teeth the same as dog or cat teeth? Replies: Hi Shelby, That is a good question. Dog, cat and human teeth are all the same in one sense: they are all composed of the same materials organized in the same manner (enamel, dentine, and pulp). The big difference is their shape and they type of foods they are designed to work with. Cats and dogs are typically carnivores and have sharp pointed teeth (canine teeth) used for biting and tearing their food. They also have molars like we have for chewing. Adult dogs have about 40 teeth, cats have about 30 and humans have about 32 teeth. Cats and dogs also lose their baby teeth as their adult teeth erupt like humans.

95

Green Power Transmission Line Given New Life | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Power Transmission Line Given New Life Green Power Transmission Line Given New Life Green Power Transmission Line Given New Life March 11, 2010 - 4:34pm Addthis Poles for the Montana-Alberta Tie Line are unloaded outside Shelby, Mont. | Photo courtesy of Tonbridge Power Poles for the Montana-Alberta Tie Line are unloaded outside Shelby, Mont. | Photo courtesy of Tonbridge Power Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Thanks to funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, construction of a green power transmission line stretching from Lethbridge, Alberta in Canada, down to Great Falls, Mont., was put back on track after a bank failure. Currently under construction, the Montana-Alberta Tie Line, which is owned by Toronto-based Tonbridge Power, will connect the electricity markets of

96

NC State Chemical Engineering Degrees -B and BS Graduation Name NicknamDgr Maj Grad Date H Hometown StateInitial Employer Employer City StateJob Title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Employed Diggs NC Farmer Oliver Max Gardner OMax BS IC 5/27/1903 Shelby NC NC College of A&M Ar Raleigh NC Winborne White BS IC 5/27/1903 Greenville NC Raleigh Hosiery Mill Raleigh NC Dyer Edgar William Gaither BS/30/1906 Halifax NC U. Illinois Urbana IL Assistant William Graham Knox BS IC 5/30/1906 Charlotte NC Northampton

Velev, Orlin D.

97

Data:175de12a-c7bb-4312-8cd7-5013d702e8e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2a-c7bb-4312-8cd7-5013d702e8e6 2a-c7bb-4312-8cd7-5013d702e8e6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B- Three Phase Sector: Description: Delivery Voltages: $0.15/kVA Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

98

Data:1143ddf7-3ad4-416d-97a5-9b2c426096e3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ddf7-3ad4-416d-97a5-9b2c426096e3 ddf7-3ad4-416d-97a5-9b2c426096e3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule B- Primary Sector: Description: All delivery voltages: $0.15/kVA Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

99

Data:0a793459-0c81-42ac-bbd7-9d1a3d0e1f2b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-0c81-42ac-bbd7-9d1a3d0e1f2b -0c81-42ac-bbd7-9d1a3d0e1f2b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Security Lights- 100W High Pressure Sodium Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

100

Data:8ea407aa-aa26-4896-b66d-d4beb9bc673c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa-aa26-4896-b66d-d4beb9bc673c aa-aa26-4896-b66d-d4beb9bc673c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule C- Primary Sector: Description: Available for three-phase electric service over 200 kW capacity through one meter to individual customers. Rates, terms and conditions for service to customers with requirements other than previously stipulated shall be offered only by special contract. All delivery voltages: $0.15/kVa Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Data:3a81caa6-c819-462d-9885-5502c0606d28 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

caa6-c819-462d-9885-5502c0606d28 caa6-c819-462d-9885-5502c0606d28 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule C Sector: Description: Available for three-phase electric service over 200 kW capacity through one meter to individual customers. Rates, terms and conditions for service to customers with requirements other than previously stipulated shall be offered only by special contract. All delivery voltages: $0.15/kVa Source or reference: http://www.amlegal.com/nxt/gateway.dll/Ohio/shelby_oh/parttenstreetsutilitiesandpublicservices/titlefour-utilities/chapter1050electricity?f=templates$fn=default.htm$3.0$vid=amlegal:shelby_oh$anc=JD_1050.02

102

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B5.1 Actions to conserve energy B5.1 Actions to conserve energy The tribe would purchase an estimated 4,102 4-count packages of compact fluorescent light bulbs to distribute to tribal members during an annual Celebration held the first weekend in October. The tribe would also distribute energy efficiency flyers at various events over the course of the Celebration. An estimated 2,051 households, would be reached through this effort. Each household would receive 2 packages of compact fluorescent bulbs. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Oklahoma Dec 14, 2009 Mary Martin Print Form for Records Submit via E-mail Billie Newland Digitally signed by Billie Newland

103

Newsletter Features | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features Newsletter Features Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter. September 6, 2013 The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians had plenty of used vegetable oil and grease on hand and a desire to convert the waste to biofuel to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Tribes participated in a demonstration project with the intent to share their experience and lessons learned so that other Tribes

104

CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Categorical Exclusion Determination 1: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of Oklahoma intends to use $1,484,298 of Recovery Act funds for compressed natural gas (CNG) fueling stations in Cherokee and Adair counties. The Quick Fill facilities will include installation of small equipment semi-enclosures, a paved area and canopy for the CNG pumps, and entrance and exit roads. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001931.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001933: Categorical Exclusion Determination

105

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

71 - 7880 of 31,917 results. 71 - 7880 of 31,917 results. Article Renewing America's Nuclear Power Partnership for Energy Security and Economic Growth Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman http://energy.gov/articles/renewing-americas-nuclear-power-partnership-energy-security-and-economic-growth Download FY 2014 Budget Request Laboratory Table http://energy.gov/downloads/fy-2014-budget-request-laboratory-table Download fac2001-27.pdf http://energy.gov/management/downloads/fac2001-27pdf Download CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia-County-Cherokee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003586-categorical-exclusion-determination

106

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 20300 of 26,764 results. 91 - 20300 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia-County-Cherokee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003586-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002778: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Sterling Heights CX(s) Applied: B2.5, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 06/21/2010 Location(s): Sterling Heights, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002778-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002706: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-Tribe-Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians CX(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 Date: 06/11/2010

107

CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

86: Categorical Exclusion Determination 86: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003586: Categorical Exclusion Determination Georgia-County-Cherokee CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/25/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Georgia Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire technical consultant, 3) energy efficiency retrofits to include: replace chiller and cooling tower in the Justice Center (1994); replace heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls in the Justice Center; installation of occupancy sensors in the Detention Center (1992); 4) installation of cool roofs on the Justice Center, Historic Courthouse (State Historic Preservation Officer approval received), and the TAG Office (approximately

108

Prepared by: Assessment Unit Staff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Blackfeet (2); Delaware (2); Grande Ronde (2); Makah (2); Navajo (2); Brotherton (1); Chickasaw (1 2 4 ASSINIBOINE 1 1 MAKAH 3 4 7 SNOHOMISH 2 2 4 BLACKFEET 1 2 3 MANZANITA 1 1 SNOQUALMIE 1 1 2 AMERIND WHITE 1 1 2 2 ARAPAHO 1 1 1 1 BLACKFEET 1 1 1 1 CANADIAN INDIAN 1 1 1 1 CAYUSE 1 1 1 1 CHEROKEE 3

Hochberg, Michael

109

PROGRAMMATIC AGREEMENT OPERATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Blackfeet (2); Delaware (2); Grande Ronde (2); Makah (2); Navajo (2); Brotherton (1); Chickasaw (1 2 4 ASSINIBOINE 1 1 MAKAH 3 4 7 SNOHOMISH 2 2 4 BLACKFEET 1 2 3 MANZANITA 1 1 SNOQUALMIE 1 1 2 AMERIND WHITE 1 1 2 2 ARAPAHO 1 1 1 1 BLACKFEET 1 1 1 1 CANADIAN INDIAN 1 1 1 1 CAYUSE 1 1 1 1 CHEROKEE 3

US Army Corps of Engineers

110

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 DATE: January 28, 2013 TO: Procurement Directors/Contracting Officers FROM: Director Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division Office of Policy Office of Acquisition and Project Management SUBJECT: Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 SUMMARY: Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012- 07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01. The template revises two subcommittee assignment addresses at the end of the letter. The revision changes The Ranking Member, formerly Thad Cochran, to The Honorable Richard C. Shelby and The Ranking Member, formerly Peter Visclosky, to The Honorable Marcy Kaptur.

111

Energy and water development appropriations for 1984  

SciTech Connect

Part 6 of the hearing record covers appropriations for DOE programs, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). Shelby Brewer, Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy and others from DOE reviewed programs in fission, fusion, waste management, defense, basic energy sciences, and the environment, as well as departmental administration. Chairman Nunzio Palladino and others from NRC reviewed their reduced budget request, its impact on research programs on unsolved safety problems, and the continuing problem of having Agency personnel widely scattered around the Washington area. DOE Secretary Donald Hodel led the discussion on alternative CRBR financing techniques. The testimony contains the budget justifications of 36 witnesses. (DCK)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Proceedings of the 25th Rare Earth Research Conference, June 22-26, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA Journal of Alloys and Compounds 2009, Vol. 488, Iss. 2, pp 491-656  

SciTech Connect

The program of the 25th Rare Earth Research Conference (RERC08) integrated basic and applied multidisciplinary research centered on the f-elements. Leading science was featured in the form of invited oral presentations and contributed posters on topics in f-element chemistry, physics, and material, earth, environmental, and biological sciences. The conference was held in Shelby Hall, located on The University of Alabama?s Tuscaloosa, AL campus. The final program and list of attendees is available at URL http://bama.ua.edu/~rdrogers/RERC08/.

Rogers, Robin D.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

113

Publications from Research Conducted at MR | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications from Research Conducted at MR Publications from Research Conducted at MR 2013 Publications Erickson M. J., "Surface and interface effects in nanoscopic metallic spin transport devices", University of Minnesota , (2013). Ji N., Lauter V., Zhang X., Ambaye H., Wang J.-P., "Strain induced giant magnetism in epitaxial Fe16N2 thin film", Applied Physics Letters 102, 072411 (2013). Jiang C. Y., Tong X., Brown D. R., Lee W. T., Ambaye H., Craig J. W., Crow L., Culbertson H., Goyette R., Graves-Brook M. K., Hagen M. E., Kadron B., Lauter V., McCollum L. W., Robertson J. L., Winn B., Vandegrift A. E., "Polarized 3He neutron spin filters at Oak Ridge National Laboratory", Physics Procedia 42, 191-199 (2013). Ke X., Belenky L. J., Lauter V., Ambaye H., Bark C. W., Eom C. B.,

114

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Louisiana Louisiana based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Louisiana and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Louisiana, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 3 Bienville Grant Sabine Bossier Jackson Tensas Caddo La Salle Union Caldwell Lincoln Vernon Catahoula Madison Webster Claiborne Morehouse West Carroll Concordia Natchitoches Winn De Soto Ouachita East Carroll Red River

115

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the FutureGen Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RISK ASSESSMENT REPORT RISK ASSESSMENT REPORT REVISED OCTOBER 2007 5-2 Figure 5-1. Role of the Analog Site Database and Ancillary Databases in the Approach for Conducting the Risk Assessment FINAL RISK ASSESSMENT REPORT REVISED OCTOBER 2007 5-100 Figure 5-6. Area Within Which H 2 S Released from CO 2 Injection Wells Exceeds Chronic Toxicity Criteria (i.e., 0.0014 ppmv H 2 S) at the Tuscola (IL) Site DOE/EIS-0394 FUTUREGEN PROJECT EIS FINAL SUMMARY NOVEMBER 2007 S-10 Figure S-4. Proposed Mattoon Power Plant and Sequestration Site Figure S-5. Proposed Utility Corridors for the Mattoon Power Plant and Sequestration Site Mattoon Power Plant and Sequestration Site Coles County Shelby County Shelby County Moultrie County C a n a d i a n N a t i o n a l R a i l r o a d Lake Shelbyville Lake Paradise C a n a d i a n N a t

116

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B2.5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2010 1, 2010 CX-002096: Categorical Exclusion Determination Texas-City-Richardson CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Richardson, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 21, 2010 CX-001873: Categorical Exclusion Determination Fluorecycle, Inc. CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Ingleside, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office April 21, 2010 CX-001853: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Shelby, Charter Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Shelby, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 21, 2010 CX-001785: Categorical Exclusion Determination Louisiana-City-Shreveport CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1

117

"2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "1. Comanche","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",1426 "2. Craig","Coal","Tri-State G & T Assn, Inc",1304 "3. Fort St Vrain","Gas","Public Service Co of Colorado",969 "4. Cherokee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",717 "5. Rawhide","Coal","Platte River Power Authority",666 "6. Rocky Mountain Energy Center","Gas","Rocky Mountain Energy Ctr LLC",601 "7. Pawnee","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",505 "8. Front Range Power Project","Gas","Colorado Springs City of",462 "9. Hayden","Coal","Public Service Co of Colorado",446

118

Data:91953b94-ea47-46a4-bccf-aa46294425bb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b94-ea47-46a4-bccf-aa46294425bb b94-ea47-46a4-bccf-aa46294425bb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power Service - Rate 2 Sector: Industrial Description: * Additional $0.0275 per kWh for renewable energy Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category:

119

Data:Fe7d98a8-f79f-44cf-93fe-5cf08de07c7d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a8-f79f-44cf-93fe-5cf08de07c7d a8-f79f-44cf-93fe-5cf08de07c7d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Optional T-O-D Demand - Rate 22 Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

120

Data:556d3b50-7e91-4cde-aca5-0bcea74c4498 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-7e91-4cde-aca5-0bcea74c4498 -7e91-4cde-aca5-0bcea74c4498 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 150 Watt Decorative Acorn Light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Data:2a6e86d2-3089-46d6-a0fb-c7804bba67b6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d2-3089-46d6-a0fb-c7804bba67b6 d2-3089-46d6-a0fb-c7804bba67b6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 250 Watt Directional Flood and Security and Street Light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

122

CX-000246: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

246: Categorical Exclusion Determination 246: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000246: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recovery Act: Wind Blade Manufacturing Innovation CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 12/17/2009 Location(s): North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office PPG Industries, Inc will be conducting a materials investigation and fabrication methodology for the enhancement of wind turbine fiberglass materials. They will be conducting project work at their Science & Technology Center laboratories in Shelby, North Carolina. A Research and Development questionnaire was submitted for these locations that thoroughly addresses waste stream, liquid effluent, hazardous waste and personnel safety, all of which comply with Occupational Safety and Health

123

Data:8af16224-e578-4536-b988-4c59a45b2e3a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e578-4536-b988-4c59a45b2e3a e578-4536-b988-4c59a45b2e3a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate - Schedule C1 Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

124

Data:2ec78c69-3086-4fc7-861b-ed318a5481ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-3086-4fc7-861b-ed318a5481ad 9-3086-4fc7-861b-ed318a5481ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2003/07/01 End date if known: Rate name: Renewable Resource Energy (Envirowatts) - Rate 24 Sector: Description: This renewable resource energy is a rider to all current rate schedules. The purpose of this rider is to provide consumers with renewable resource energy that is considered to be environmentally friendly. This type of power is also known as "green power". Flat rate buy is a premium charge This rate is in addition to the regular retail rates for power.

125

Data:2d275077-0f00-45a5-a7bb-8da0a0095759 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-0f00-45a5-a7bb-8da0a0095759 7-0f00-45a5-a7bb-8da0a0095759 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service - Rate 11 Sector: Industrial Description: * Single Phase Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3

126

Data:491cd472-f513-4288-9238-3090b2489bde | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

72-f513-4288-9238-3090b2489bde 72-f513-4288-9238-3090b2489bde No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2004/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate - Schedule B1 Sector: Industrial Description: * Demand Charge Per KW For Billing In Excess Of Contract Demand $8.98 Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service

127

AlabamaWISE Home Energy Program (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AlabamaWISE Home Energy Program (Alabama) AlabamaWISE Home Energy Program (Alabama) AlabamaWISE Home Energy Program (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Manufacturing Maximum Rebate $750 Program Info Funding Source The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act (ARRA) of 2009; Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs Start Date 01/01/2010 State Alabama Program Type Local Rebate Program The WISE Home Energy Program provides up to $750 in energy efficiency rebates for homeowners in Cullman, Madison, Jefferson, Shelby, Morgan, Limestone and Lawrence counties. A $350 rebate is available to homeowners

128

Carsten Farms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carsten Farms Carsten Farms Jump to: navigation, search Name Carsten Farms Facility Carsten Farms Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Location Shelby IA Coordinates 41.4013022°, -94.60524023° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4013022,"lon":-94.60524023,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

129

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 12770 of 28,905 results. 61 - 12770 of 28,905 results. Download CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies atthe Plutonium Finishing... http://energy.gov/hss/downloads/ch2m-hill-plateau-remediation-company Download EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project, Shelby, Toole County, MT http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/ea-1886-draft-environmental-assessment Download Preliminary Notice of Violation, Argonne National Laboratory-East- EA-2001-05 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to the University of Chicago related to the Uncontrolled Release of Radioactive Material at Argonne National

130

Data:0b102c22-ca57-456f-8ecb-a74008c283c4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

02c22-ca57-456f-8ecb-a74008c283c4 02c22-ca57-456f-8ecb-a74008c283c4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt Security Light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> << Previous

131

Data:491c73f1-ddce-4570-83dd-0e85759011b8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ddce-4570-83dd-0e85759011b8 ddce-4570-83dd-0e85759011b8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Residential Service - Rate 12 Sector: Residential Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

132

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FE0010231 FE0010231 Southern Research Institute FE Southern Company, NCCC SCC/Gasification Division 2013-2015/ 3 years Arun C Bose Wilsonville, Shelby County, Alabama Small Scale Coal-Biomass to Liquids Using Highly Selective FT Synthesis At NCCC, a bench-scale (5 lb/hr) reactor skid will be installed, connected to existing syngas (CO+H2) slipstream infrastructure, operated using coal and coal-biomass derived syngas from existing gasifier. Arun Bose Digitally signed by Arun Bose DN: cn=Arun Bose, o=NETL, ou=SCC-Gasification Division, email=arun.bose@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2012.09.12 08:55:34 -04'00' 09 12 2012 john ganz Digitally signed by john ganz DN: cn=john ganz, o=environmental compliance division, ou=office of general counsel, email=john.ganz@netl.doe.gov, c=US

133

Data:33681380-4ddc-4998-9e6e-7f1ee4fd89c4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-4ddc-4998-9e6e-7f1ee4fd89c4 -4ddc-4998-9e6e-7f1ee4fd89c4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate - Schedule C2 Sector: Industrial Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

134

Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Surface based remote sensing of aerosol-cloud interactions Feingold, Graham NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Frisch, Shelby NOAA/Environmental Technology Laboratory Min, Qilong State University of New York at Albany Category: Cloud Properties We will present an analysis of the effect of aerosol on clouds at the Southern Great Plains ARM site. New methods for retrieving cloud droplet effective radius with radar (MMCR), multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR), and microwave radiometer (MWR) will be discussed. Relationships based on adiabatic clouds will be used to constrain retrievals. We will investigate the use of a range of proxies for cloud condensation nuclei, ranging from surface measurements of light scattering and accumulation mode number concentration, to lidar-measured extinction or

135

EPA Notice of Availability of the Federal Draft Environmental Impact Statement and State of Montana Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Montana Alberta Tie Ltd. (MATL) 230-kV Transmission Line (02/08)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Federal Register 9 Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 32 / Friday, February 15, 2008 / Notices counties, UT, Montrose County, CO, and Uinta County, WY. Summary: EPA has environmental concerns about potential water quality impacts and recommends that the final EIS evaluate and compare the environmental impacts by alternative, of removing interim protections from the 86 eligible stream segments. Rating EC1. Final EISs EIS No. 20070530, ERP No. F-COE- E39071-00, Wolf Creek Dam/Lake Cumberland Project, Emergency Measures in Response to Seepage, Mississippi River, South Central Kentucky and Central Tennessee. Summary: EPA continues to have environmental concerns about water quantity and water quality impacts. EIS No. 20070556, ERP No. F-NGB- E11062-MS, Camp Shelby Joint Force

136

Latest Documents and Notices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

24, 2012 24, 2012 EA-1929: Finding of No Significant Impact NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 August 24, 2012 EA-1929: Final Environmental Assessment NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 August 23, 2012 EA-1889: Final Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact Disposal of Decommissioned, Defueled Naval Reactor Plants from USS Enterprise (CVN 65) August 21, 2012 EA-1886: Draft Environmental Assessment Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Kevin Dome Carbon Storage Project, Shelby, Toole County, MT August 17, 2012 EIS-0414: Record of Decision Energia Sierra Juarez Transmission Project August 15, 2012

137

High Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Level Computational Chemistry Approaches Level Computational Chemistry Approaches to the Prediction of the Energetic Properties of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Systems David A. Dixon Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL Cast: Myrna Hernandez-Matus, Daniel Grant, Jackson Switzer, Jacob Batson, Ronita Folkes, Minh Nguyen Anthony J. Arduengo & co-workers Maciej Gutowski (PNNL) Robert Ramsay Chair Fund Shelby Hall Funding provided in part by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy under the Hydrogen Storage Grand Challenge, Solicitation No. DE-PS36- 03GO93013 Chemical H 2 Storage Center of Excellence The Promise of Chemical Hydrogen Storage * Chemical reaction releases H 2 at suitable pressures and temperatures - Reaction thermodynamics dictate max. H 2 pressure as function of T -

138

Policy Flash 2013-22 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 2 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 Policy Flash 2013-22 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 UPDATE: WORD VERISON OF ALL DOCUEMENTS ARE ATTACHED 311 Notice ALERT - EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY Please ensure all of your Contracting Officers are aware of the changes to the template. Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01. The template revises two subcommittee assignment addresses at the end of the letter. The revision changes The Ranking Member, formerly Thad Cochran, to The Honorable Richard C. Shelby and The Ranking Member, formerly Peter Visclosky, to The Honorable Marcy Kaptur. Policy flash 2013-22 Section 311 revised templateJan 24 2013.pdf

139

Data:B12db1d1-b686-4963-87fc-fc240ebce91a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

db1d1-b686-4963-87fc-fc240ebce91a db1d1-b686-4963-87fc-fc240ebce91a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GS-1: General Service(Single Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member of the Cooperative, subject to the established Service Rules and Regulations. TYPE OF SERVICE The type of service rendered under this schedule will be alternating current, sixty (60) hertz, single phase, secondary voltage, of approximately 120/240 volts, 3 wire, or such other voltage as might be mutually agreed upon.

140

Western New York Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York Energy LLC New York Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Western New York Energy LLC Place Medina, New York Zip 14103 Product Developed a 50m gallon ethanol plant in Shelby, New York. Coordinates 43.174659°, -89.082003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.174659,"lon":-89.082003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "winn cherokee shelby" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Data:550b6bb9-703e-4359-9728-2ac4be56af10 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bb9-703e-4359-9728-2ac4be56af10 bb9-703e-4359-9728-2ac4be56af10 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 1997/06/04 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate - Schedule B2 Sector: Industrial Description: Demand Charge Per KW For Billing Demand In Excess Of Contract Demand $8.98 Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

142

Step-by-Step Instructions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alabama Alabama based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Alabama and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Alabama, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 3 Autauga Coosa Jackson Pickens Barbour Covington Jefferson Pike Bibb Crenshaw Lamar Randolph Blount Cullman Lauderdale Russell Bullock Dale Lawrence Shelby Butler Dallas Lee St. Clair Calhoun De Kalb Limestone Sumter

143

Microsoft PowerPoint - ARMSTM2008_pdf.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measures of aerosol-cloud interactions and their uncertainties: A Measures of aerosol-cloud interactions and their uncertainties: A case study from the AMF Pt. Reyes deployment Allison McComiskey, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science, University of Colorado, Boulder / NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Graham Feingold, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Boulder, CO, Shelby Frisch, Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State University / NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Qilong Min, Atmospheric Sciences Research Center, State University of New York, Albany 1. Introduction 1. Introduction Measures of aerosol-cloud interactions (ACI), derived from a range of instruments and platforms, vary widely. As these measures are used in GCM parameterizations, understanding the causes and nature of this variability is essential to understanding

144

Policy Flash 2013-22 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 22 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 Policy Flash 2013-22 Section 311 Revised Template January 24 2013 UPDATE: WORD VERISON OF ALL DOCUEMENTS ARE ATTACHED 311 Notice ALERT - EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY Please ensure all of your Contracting Officers are aware of the changes to the template. Attached are 3 revised templates for sending the Section 311 notices to Congress as prescribed in Acquisition Letter (AL) 2012-07 and Financial Assistance Letter (FAL) 2012-01. The template revises two subcommittee assignment addresses at the end of the letter. The revision changes The Ranking Member, formerly Thad Cochran, to The Honorable Richard C. Shelby and The Ranking Member, formerly Peter Visclosky, to The Honorable Marcy Kaptur. Policy flash 2013-22 Section 311 revised templateJan 24 2013.pdf

145

Wind Energy Myths | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Myths Wind Energy Myths Jump to: navigation, search Glacier Wind Project is located 10 miles west of Shelby, Montana, 2 miles south of Ethridge, in Glacier and Toole Counties, and is the largest wind farm in Montana. This project is comprised of 71 machines in phase 1 and 69 machines in phase 2 for a total of 140 Acciona AW-1500, capable of producing 210 MW at full capacity. Photo from Todd Spink, NREL 16521 U.S. Department of Energy. (July 10, 2011). Myths and Benefits of Wind Energy Wind Powering America hosted this webinar featuring speakers Ian Baring-Gould (National Renewable Energy Laboratory), Ed DeMeo, and Ben Hoen (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Wind_Energy_Myths&oldid=700129"

146

Data:25e995d7-e626-45e7-9021-691f0fb80c34 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d7-e626-45e7-9021-691f0fb80c34 d7-e626-45e7-9021-691f0fb80c34 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 100 Watt Decorative Colonial Light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

147

Data:D115397b-594b-4ab9-a0ed-2d1572cdcbb4 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7b-594b-4ab9-a0ed-2d1572cdcbb4 7b-594b-4ab9-a0ed-2d1572cdcbb4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service - Rate 11 - Three Phase Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous 1 2 3 Next >>

148

Dover Textiles - A Case History on Retrofitting Factories with a Boiler System Fueled on Coal, Wood and Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shortage of affordable gas and oil boiler fuels and the recent Iran/Iraq war underscores the urgent need for the American industrial system to convert to domestically controlled fuels and particularly coal, wood, and waste. More talk than action has been present. However, Dover Textiles, Shelby, North Carolina, is a major textile concern which has aggressively addressed the high cost and vulnerability of oil, as well as the increasing cost of natural gas, for their boiler system by purchasing a coal, wood, and waste fired boiler system to serve two plants. This case history will document payback periods of less than three years; return on investments of 20% plus; benefits of North Carolina and federal investment tax credits; EPA considerations, which in this case required no additional capital investment; fuel supply; material handling; ash removal; and other design considerations.

Pincelli, R. D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Executive roundtable on coal-fired generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power Engineering magazine invited six industry executives from the coal-fired sector to discuss issues affecting current and future prospects of coal-fired generation. The executives are Tim Curran, head of Alstom Power for the USA and Senior Vice President and General Manager of Boilers North America; Ray Kowalik, President and General Manager of Burns and McDonnell Energy Group; Jeff Holmstead, head of Environmental Strategies for the Bracewell Giuliani law firm; Jim Mackey, Vice President, Fluor Power Group's Solid Fuel business line; Tom Shelby, President Kiewit Power Inc., and David Wilks, President of Energy Supply for Excel Energy Group. Steve Blankinship, the magazine's Associate Editor, was the moderator. 6 photos.

NONE

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

ANALYTIC DESCRIPTION OF THE ROSSITER-MCLAUGHLIN EFFECT FOR TRANSITING EXOPLANETS: CROSS-CORRELATION METHOD AND COMPARISON WITH SIMULATED DATA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We obtain analytical expressions for the velocity anomaly due to the Rossiter-McLaughlin (RM) effect, for the case when the anomalous radial velocity is obtained by cross-correlation with a stellar template spectrum. In the limit of vanishing width of the stellar absorption lines, our result reduces to the formula derived by Ohta et al., which is based on the first moment of distorted stellar lines. Our new formula contains a term dependent on the stellar line width, which becomes important when rotational line broadening is appreciable. We generate mock transit spectra for four existing exoplanetary systems (HD 17156, TrES-2, TrES-4, and HD 209458) following the procedure of Winn et al., and find that the new formula is in better agreement with the velocity anomaly extracted from the mock data. Thus, our result provides a more reliable analytical description of the velocity anomaly due to the RM effect, and explains the previously observed dependence of the velocity anomaly on the stellar rotation velocity.

Hirano, Teruyuki; Suto, Yasushi; Taruya, Atsushi [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Narita, Norio [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Sato, Bun'ei [Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-21-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Johnson, John Asher [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17 Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Winn, Joshua N., E-mail: hirano@utap.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Subject: CAISO LCR Study Advisory Group Sue Mara RTO Advisors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gary Tarplee SCE (final selection pending) Carolyn Winn SDG&E (final selection pending) Mike Jaske CEC (final selection pending) Tom Flynn CPUC (final selection pending) Tony Braun Northern CAISO Municipal (final selection pending) WECC Reliability Subcommittee Representative (final selection pending) Gary DeShazo- CAISO (LSAG Chair) To All: On behalf of the California ISO, I am pleased to welcome you as a member of the 2008 LCR Study Advisory Group ("LSAG"). Over the coming couple of months, we will collaborate on a review of the assumptions and criteria for this important study. I want to thank you in advance for your investment of time and thought. As you know, over the last 18 months, the CAISO has been working with stakeholders to determine the locational capacity requirements across the California ISO Controlled Grid in a manner that is consistent with the California Public Utility Commissions ("CPUC") implementation of Resource Adequacy. Earlier this year the CPUC adopted the CAISO's LCR results for 2007. At the same time, the CPUC indicated its desire for

Cc Doughty; Thomas Dukes; Ali Amirali; Ls Power; Chifong Thomas Pg

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality 2012 National Tribal Forum on Air Quality May 22, 2012 8:00AM CDT to May 24, 2012 4:30PM CDT Tulsa, Oklahoma The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) and the National Tribal Air Association (NTAA) would like to invite you to attend their joint air quality conference, the National Tribal Forum on Air Quality (NTF) to be held at the Cherokee Nation's Hard Rock Hotel and Casino in Tulsa, Oklahoma. All interested tribal environmental professionals, US EPA representatives, and members of national or local organizations with links to Indian Country are encouraged to attend. This conference is designed to allow attendees a venue to share with and learn from one another. Conference highlights include: Virgil Masayesva Environmental Excellence Awards Ceremony

153

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11, 2010 11, 2010 CX-001935: Categorical Exclusion Determination Deployment of Innovative Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy - Residential Buildings CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/11/2010 Location(s): Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 10, 2010 CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 10, 2010 CX-006361: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee-City-Johnson City CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Johnson City, Tennessee

154

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Storm of December 2007 at the SGP Ice Storm of December 2007 at the SGP Daniel Hartsock 1 , Dan J. Rusk 2 , Brad W. Orr 3 , Peter Lamb 1 1 University of Oklahoma CIMMS, 2 Cherokee Nation Industries/Atmospheric Technology Services, 3 Argonne National Laboratory 9-11 December 2007 Oklahoma and Kansas experienced a severe ice storm on December 8-11 2007 and a near miss on February 16 2008. The SGP's instrument suite can provide rare and important looks at storm evolution and can be used for forecasting and case studies. The storm's effects were widespread in Central and Eastern Oklahoma, with over 600,000 customers without power, some for weeks. Ice began in Oklahoma on the 8 th and lasted at many locations through the 10 h with ice layers that often exceeded 3/4". By contrast, the storm in February had little or no

155

Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Van de Graaff Picture Van de Graaff Picture Short Biography Of Robert Jemison Van de Graaff Robert Jemison Van de Graaff was born on December 20, 1901 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. His mother was Minnie Cherokee Hargrove and his father was Adrian Sebastian Van de Graaff. Robert attended the Tuscaloosa public schools and then attended the University of Alabama where he received a BS degree in 1922 and an MS degree in 1923. Both degrees were in mechanical engineering. After graduating from college he worked for the Alabama Power Company for a year as a research assistant. He studied at the Sorbonne in Paris from 1924 to 1925 and while there, attended lectures by Marie Curie on radiation. In 1925 he went to Oxford University in England as a Rhodes Scholar. At Oxford he received a BS in physics in 1926 and a Ph.D. in physics in 1928. While

156

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 20450 of 26,764 results. 41 - 20450 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003871: Categorical Exclusion Determination Greenhouse Gas to Energy Project - Wilkes County CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/07/2010 Location(s): Wilkes County, North Carolina Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003871-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003655-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002195: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install a Test Cover at Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site

157

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deployment of an Infrared Thermometer Network at the Deployment of an Infrared Thermometer Network at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains Climate Research Facility V.R. Morris and C.N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. Nelson Cherokee Nation Distributors Stilwell, Oklahoma Introduction To infer information about vertical distribution and character of cloudiness across the Southern Great Plains (SGP) domain, downwelling infrared thermometers are being deployed at the SGP extended facilities. The sky brightness temperature measurements are sampled at a rate of 5 Hz to capture the inherent variability under cloudy and partly cloudy conditions. Conditional sampling of these data detect periods of clear-sky and opaque clouds. A methodology was produced to account for the

158

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A11 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2010 21, 2010 CX-003190: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cherokee Nation Businesses CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 07/21/2010 Location(s): Kay County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy July 20, 2010 CX-003605: Categorical Exclusion Determination Competitive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Awards CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Fayette County, Pennsylvania Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office July 20, 2010 CX-003603: Categorical Exclusion Determination Competitive Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Awards - Oregon Coast Regional Transit Program CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Columbia County, Oregon Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office

159

CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The tribe would purchase an estimated 4,102 4-count packages of compact fluorescent light bulbs to distribute to tribal members during an annual Celebration held the first weekend in October. The tribe would also distribute energy efficiency flyers at various events over the course of the Celebration. An estimated 2,051 households, would be reached through this effort. Each household would receive 2 packages of compact fluorescent bulbs.

160

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: American Recovery and Reinvestment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, 2010 3, 2010 CX-002085: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribal Energy Program-Iowa Tribe of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 13, 2010 CX-002082: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribal Energy Program-Chickasaw Nation CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Chickasaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 13, 2010 CX-002080: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 04/13/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 13, 2010 CX-002078: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-Tribal Energy Program-Eastern Band of the Cherokee

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161

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rio Grande Rio Grande Embayment Texas- Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Uinta Basin Appa lachia n Basin Utica Marcellus Devonian (Ohio) Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Woodford- Caney Pearsall- Eagle Ford Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Maverick Sub-Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley and Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest City Basin Piceance Basin Shale Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles ± Source: Energy Information Administration based on data from various published studies

162

Orr 2009 ARM STM poster2.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status: Design, testing and implementation has been begun at SGP Status: Design, testing and implementation has been begun at SGP A U.S. Department of Energy laboratory managed by UChicago-Argonne, LLC Accomplishments and Status of SGP During 2008 Brad W. Orr 1 Dan J. Rusk 2 John Schatz 2 David Breedlove 2 Richard Eagan 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK INSTRUMENTS GENERAL STATISTICS * Instrument Availability - Averaged over 95% during 2008. * Electronic Repair Lab - $20,000 in savings * Calibrations - Over 140 instruments calibrated * Guest Instruments Supported - 40 * Site visitors - Over 100 visits by scientists and guests at the Central Facility. * Field Campaigns - 18 Campaigns supported last year. Acknowledgments We would like to thank the entire SGP staff for another year of excellence and for their continued support of all aspects of operations. This

163

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Oklahoma | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 10, 2010 March 10, 2010 CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office March 10, 2010 CX-001142: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean Cities Refueling Infrastructure for Alternative Fuels CX(s) Applied: A1, A9 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Tulsa, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory March 10, 2010 CX-001930: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) Systems/Revolving Loan

164

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

41 - 17850 of 26,764 results. 41 - 17850 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003985: Categorical Exclusion Determination Regional Biomass Feedstock Partnership CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B5.1 Date: 09/22/2010 Location(s): Onaway, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003985-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-001931: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma State Energy Program (SEP) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - New Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Stations CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 03/10/2010 Location(s): Cherokee County, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-001931-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006181: Categorical Exclusion Determination

165

Storm Lake II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II Wind Farm II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Storm Lake II Wind Farm Facility Storm Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AES Corp. Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser Alliant/IES Utilities Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.655334°, -95.383651° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.655334,"lon":-95.383651,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

166

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

167

Remote/New sites: Many Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote/New sites: Many Field Remote/New sites: Many Field Campaigns require temporary installations on non-ACRF sites. This requires identification of landowners, negotiation of leases, and infrastructure logistics for electrical and internet connectivity. Argonne National Laboratory is managed by UChicago-Argonne LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy SGP Field Campaigns: The Other Side of Operations Brad W. Orr 1 Dan J. Rusk 2 John Schatz 2 Dan Nelson 2 David Breedlove 2 Douglas L. Sisterson 1 1 Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 2 ACRF/SGP, Cherokee Nation Distributors, Stilwell, OK Background Implementation All departments must work closely together to implement a campaign. In addition they must have the flexibility to adapt to new and unique instrument deployments. The

168

The University of Tennessee - Knoxville | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ayres Hall on UT Knoxville campus Ayres Hall on UT Knoxville campus Research Office of Research Research Centers & Institutes Cherokee Farm Office of Undergraduate Research The University of Tennessee Health Science Center DOE Office of Science Research Awards DOE Research Results Experts Guide The Bredesen Center for Interdisciplinary Research & Graduate Education brings together extensive complementary resources at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to advance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics research of global significance. Energy Science and Engineering (ESE) Ph.D. program Distinguished Graduate Fellowship (DGF) Ph.D. program Search this site: Search UT is where world-class researchers, brilliant students, and corporate and

169

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, 2009 4, 2009 CX-006676: Categorical Exclusion Determination Geothermal Technologies Program CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B5.1, B5.2 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC December 14, 2009 CX-000127: Categorical Exclusion Determination United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians Energy Efficiency and Conservation Program CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 14, 2009 CX-000126: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cold Springs Rancheria of Mono Indians Community Center Energy Efficiency Audit CX(s) Applied: B5.1, A9, A11 Date: 12/14/2009 Location(s): California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 11, 2009 CX-000817: Categorical Exclusion Determination Closure of Septic Tanks 607-12G, -31G and -32G

170

Diesel Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Diesel Vehicles and Manufacturers Audi A3 (TDI models) A6 (TDI models) A7 (TDI models) A8 L (TDI model) Q5 (TDI models) Q7 (TDI models) BMW 328d Sedan 328d xDrive Sedan 328d xDrive Sports Wagon 535d Sedan 535d xDrive Sedan Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel Mercedes-Benz E250 BlueTEC GL350 BlueTEC GLK250 BlueTEC ML350 BlueTEC Porsche Cayenne Diesel Volkswagen Beetle (TDI models) Beetle Convertible (TDI models) Golf (TDI models) Jetta (TDI models) Jetta Sportwagen (TDI models) Passat (TDI models) Touareg (TDI models) Diesel-Related Information

171

Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 July 18, 2013 Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Department of Energy's (Department) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program received $3.2 billion to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use and fossil fuel emissions. The Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy allocated about $2.7 billion of the funds using a population-driven formula to over 2,000 entities including states and territories, cities and counties, and Native American tribes. The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA), the Cherokee Nation, Muscogee Creek Nation, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and Chickasaw Nation received the

172

U.S. Department of Energy Southwestern Power Admin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Admin Admin istration Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Proposed Action Title: Moodys Radio Tower Land Acquisition Program or Field Office: Southwestern Power Administration Location(s) (City/County/State): Moodys, Cherokee County, Oklahoma Proposed Action Description: Southwestern Power Administration proposes to obtain title, in fee, for a portion of land at the Southwestern Power Administration Moody Radio Tower site. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: I 0 CFR 1021, Appendix B to Subpart D, Part B 1.24- Transfer, lease, disposition, or acquisition of interests in personal property or real property. For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of 10 CFR Part 1021

173

Southwestern Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southwestern Duty Locations Southwestern Duty Locations The City of Gore, Oklahoma, established in 1903 at the southern edge of the Cherokee Nation in eastern Oklahoma, is known as the "Trout Capital of Oklahoma" owing to its location near many pristine lakes and rivers. In addition to year-round fishing, the area offers camping, hunting, scuba diving, and many other outdoor activities. The city itself boasts a number of antique stores and sponsors annual events such as car shows, arts and crafts festivals, and music festivals. With a population of approximately 1,000, Gore offers country living within easy highway driving of the larger cities of Tulsa, Oklahoma (74 miles) and Fort Smith, Arkansas (45 miles). back to top The City of Jonesboro, Arkansas, established in 1859, is the farming,

174

Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant Tri-State Smart Grid Investment Grant 1 Tri-State's service area includes parts of Fannin County, Georgia; Polk County, Tennessee; and Cherokee County, North Carolina. Smarter Meters Help Customers Budget Electric Service Costs Tri-State Electric Membership Cooperative (Tri-State) is a distribution rural electric cooperative that primarily serves more than 12,000 rural customers, many of whom have low-incomes living at or near poverty level across a multi-state region (see map). Under their smart grid project, Tri-State has replaced conventional electromechanical meters with solid-state smart meters and implemented advanced electricity service programs in order to give customers greater control over their energy use and costs.

175

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

176

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near-term. Quarterly report, April 1 - June 30, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites, Stewart Field, and Savonburg Field, operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. General topics to be addressed are: (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization; and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. For the Stewart Field project, work is summarized for the last quarter on waterflood operations and reservoir management. For the Savonburg Field project, work on water plant development, and pattern changes and wellbore cleanup are briefly described.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Novel Bacterial Diversity in an Anchialine Blue Hole on Abaco Island, Bahamas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Anchialine blue holes found in the interior of the Bahama Islands have distinct fresh and salt water layers, with vertical mixing, and dysoxic to anoxic conditions below the halocline. Scientific cave diving exploration and microbiological investigations of Cherokee Road Extension Blue Hole on Abaco Island have provided detailed information about the water chemistry of the vertically stratified water column. Hydrologic parameters measured suggest that circulation of seawater is occurring deep within the platform. Dense microbial assemblages which occurred as mats on the cave walls below the halocline were investigated through construction of 16S rRNA clone libraries, finding representatives across several bacterial lineages including Chlorobium and OP8. In many blue holes, microbial metabolism of organic matter in the presence of seawater sulfate leads to anoxic and sulfidic conditions at or below halocline. Sunlight penetrating this sulfidic layer allows for in situ primary production to be dominated by bacterial anoxygenic phototrophs. Although water column chemistry and molecular genetic diversity of microbial mats in Cherokee Road Extension Blue Hole were investigated in this study, the full scope of the biogeochemistry of inland blue holes throughout the Bahamas Archipelago is complex and poorly understood. However, these microbial communities are clearly influenced by several factors including solar insolation, terrestrial and marine inputs of oxygen, carbon, and nutrients, water residence times, depth to the halo/chemocline, and cave passage geometry. The biogeochemistry of inland blue holes throughout the Bahamas is so distinctive which makes Abaco Island and the rest of the archipelago valuable as natural experiments, repositories of microbial diversity, and analogs for stratified and sulfidic oceans present early in Earth's history.

Gonzalez, Brett Christopher

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

179

Data:731a68af-13dd-4c79-aad5-9f4523ff1b6e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

af-13dd-4c79-aad5-9f4523ff1b6e af-13dd-4c79-aad5-9f4523ff1b6e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2004/07/09 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate - Schedule B3 Sector: Industrial Description: Consumer Charge... Transformer Size of 10,000-14,999 kVa $3,421.59 Transformer Size of 15,000 kVa and greater $5,430.92 Demand Charge Per KW For Billing Demand In Excess Of Contract Demand $8.98 Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW):

180

Data:8c0fa4e8-0a5f-478e-bb8e-ecb41ad5c16b | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

e8-0a5f-478e-bb8e-ecb41ad5c16b e8-0a5f-478e-bb8e-ecb41ad5c16b No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: 400 Watt Directional Flood and Security and Street Light Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

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181

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 2690 of 28,905 results. 81 - 2690 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006103: Categorical Exclusion Determination California-City-San Clemente CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): San Clemente, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006103-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006334: Categorical Exclusion Determination Michigan-City-Novi CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 03/05/2010 Location(s): Novi, Michigan Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006334-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007038: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tennessee-County-Shelby CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/12/2011

182

Data:99cd348c-0cd0-477b-be64-e6166b2c3fe1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cd348c-0cd0-477b-be64-e6166b2c3fe1 cd348c-0cd0-477b-be64-e6166b2c3fe1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule IPS: Industrial Power Service Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY Available in all territory served by the Cooperative, subject to the Cooperative's Service Rules and Regulations. APPLICABILITY Applicable to consumers supplied at a single location who meet the following requirements for service: 1. The consumer's monthly maximum demands must be at least 500 kW. 2. The consumer takes service directly from a Hoosier Energy supplied transmission-to-distribution substation.

183

State Standards Reform and Student Achievement ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proponents of the recent and widely adopted Common Core State Standards argue that high quality curricular standards are critical to students educational success. Little clear evidence exists, however, linking the quality of such standards to student achievement. I remedy this by connecting data on state-level student achievement from 1994-2011 with measures of the quality of states curricular standards as judged by two independent organizations at three different moments in time. I show that, within states, changes in the quality of standards have little impact on overall student achievement. Improved standards do, however, raise achievement of 8th graders in low-scoring states, particularly for low-scoring students. Given the known weaknesses of U.S. middle schools, this result suggests that standards may be beneficial in settings where pedagogy would otherwise be poor. For their very helpful comments, I am grateful to Paul Peterson, Martin West and Antonio Wendland, as well as participants in the PEPG July 2012 Conference. Heather Sarsons and Shelby Lin provided outstanding research Over the last couple of decades, policymakers and educators have increasingly turned to standardsbased

Joshua Goodman; Joshua Goodman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Data:C2338710-2b2c-4f6f-b49e-cdd48e548a1d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10-2b2c-4f6f-b49e-cdd48e548a1d 10-2b2c-4f6f-b49e-cdd48e548a1d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GS-3: General Service(Three Phase) Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member of the Cooperative for service with one hundred (100) kva or less of required transformer capacity, located within its service area and along Cooperative multi-phase lines that are adequate and suitable for supplying required service. TYPE OF SERVICE The type of service rendered under this schedule will be alternating current, sixty (60) hertz, three phase, secondary voltage, of either 208 volts, 240 volts, 277 volts, or 480 volts, as requested.

185

Data:61fdb651-9a0d-4449-901a-362cfa2cf1ab | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fdb651-9a0d-4449-901a-362cfa2cf1ab fdb651-9a0d-4449-901a-362cfa2cf1ab No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2010/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SL: Security Lighting Service 176 watt or higher Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member of the Cooperative where 120 volt service exists ahead of the meter loop for the use of Security Lighting. CHARACTER OF SERVICE Dusk-to-dawn lighting service, using photo-electrically controlled equipment, mast arm, street light type luminaire with lamp. Maintenance of the complete assembly and the cost of its electrical operation are included in this service. Any additional investment required by the extension of secondary lines or hanging of a transformer or installation of poles, for the sole purpose of this service will require a contribution by the member.

186

Data:7306780c-3f7f-484c-ab99-7a35e5422166 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

780c-3f7f-484c-ab99-7a35e5422166 780c-3f7f-484c-ab99-7a35e5422166 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2010/04/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule SL: Security Lighting Service 175 watt or lower Sector: Lighting Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member of the Cooperative where 120 volt service exists ahead of the meter loop for the use of Security Lighting. CHARACTER OF SERVICE Dusk-to-dawn lighting service, using photo-electrically controlled equipment, mast arm, street light type luminaire with lamp. Maintenance of the complete assembly and the cost of its electrical operation are included in this service. Any additional investment required by the extension of secondary lines or hanging of a transformer or installation of poles, for the sole purpose of this service will require a contribution by the member.

187

American Tower Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Company Company Jump to: navigation, search Name American Tower Company Address P.O. Box 29 Place Shelby, Ohio Zip 44875 Sector Wind energy Product Agriculture;Business and legal services; Energy audits/weatherization; Engineering/architectural/design; Manufacturing; Retail product sales and distribution Phone number 419-347-1185 Website http://www.amertower.com Coordinates 40.8814452°, -82.6618424° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8814452,"lon":-82.6618424,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

188

Data:F8b27121-7c0e-4e1e-891b-cb9605c4a045 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b27121-7c0e-4e1e-891b-cb9605c4a045 b27121-7c0e-4e1e-891b-cb9605c4a045 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule LGS-OP-1:Large General Service(Off Peak Rate) Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member of the Cooperative located on or near its multi-phase lines and willing to participate in voluntary control of demand at system peak demand. TYPE OF SERVICE Alternating current, 60-cycle, multi-phase, 240 volts, 480 volts or other industry standard voltage mutually agreeable to the member and the Cooperative.

189

Data:5f738eaf-90d1-473e-8f3b-3e50da3cdbfb | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

eaf-90d1-473e-8f3b-3e50da3cdbfb eaf-90d1-473e-8f3b-3e50da3cdbfb No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule LP: Large Power Service Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member for service requiring in excess of one hundred (100) kva of transformer capacity and is located in the Cooperative's service area and located adjacent to an electric distribution line of the Cooperative's that is adequate and suitable for supplying required service. TYPE OF SERVICE Single phase, alternating current sixty (60) hertz at approximately 120/240 volts, 3-wire. Multi-phase, sixty (60) hertz, approximately 120/208 volts, 4-wire; 277/480 volts, 4-wire; or other voltages as may be mutually agreeable.

190

Data:0f1c79ca-9b02-4b6a-87b7-b4dd681dbb4f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c79ca-9b02-4b6a-87b7-b4dd681dbb4f c79ca-9b02-4b6a-87b7-b4dd681dbb4f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule GD: Grain Drying and Irrigation Service Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Available to any member of the Cooperative, using the service for farm-related services such as grain drying, grain handling, irrigation and/or other farm-related services. The service is subject to the established service rules and regulations of the Cooperative. TYPE OF SERVICE The type of service rendered under this schedule shall be alternating current, sixty (60) hertz, single and multi-phase, secondary voltages of either 120 volts, 208 volts, 240 volts, 277 volts, or 480 volts, or other voltages as may be mutually agreeable. This rate is subject to Power cost Adjustment charge.

191

Data:528520ea-0e93-4f72-b6b1-526ffdd3e578 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0e93-4f72-b6b1-526ffdd3e578 0e93-4f72-b6b1-526ffdd3e578 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: City of Shelby, Ohio (Utility Company) Effective date: End date if known: Rate name: Schedule A-D Sector: Description: Available for single phase electric service at 225 amps capacity (120-240 volts), maximum, through one meter to individual customers. In addition, customers under Schedule A-D must meet age, income and other prerequisites as determined by the Director of Public Service, subject to the approval of the City Council. Rates under this schedule for distribution charge and all riders, excluding customer charge and kWh taxes shall be reduced by 10% to eligible customers.

192

Data:D176602e-bd21-47c3-b4b2-5a67fb731350 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

76602e-bd21-47c3-b4b2-5a67fb731350 76602e-bd21-47c3-b4b2-5a67fb731350 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: General Service Single Phase Time of Use(Schedule GS-1) Sector: Commercial Description: AVAILABILITY Available as an optional rate to any member of the Cooperative, subject to the established Service Rules and Regulations. TYPE OF SERVICE The type of service rendered under this schedule will be alternating current, sixty (60) hertz, single phase, secondary voltage, of approximately 120/240 volts, 3 wire, or such other voltage as might be mutually agreed upon.

193

Data:C32b10ed-1323-4a4b-8944-4921d13f2b9c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b10ed-1323-4a4b-8944-4921d13f2b9c b10ed-1323-4a4b-8944-4921d13f2b9c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: RushShelby Energy Effective date: 2012/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: Schedule IPT: Industrial Power Tariff Sector: Industrial Description: AVAILABILITY Available in all territory served by the Cooperative, subject to the Cooperative's Service Rules and Regulations. APPLICABILITY Applicable to consumers supplied at a single location who meet the following requirements for service: 1. The consumer's monthly maximum demands must be at least 5,000 kW. 2. The consumer takes service directly from a Hoosier Energy supplied transmission-to-distribution substation.

194

Data:53571235-fb0a-4b45-a0d5-a40f1499b5be | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-fb0a-4b45-a0d5-a40f1499b5be 5-fb0a-4b45-a0d5-a40f1499b5be No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 2011/06/01 End date if known: Rate name: Large Industrial Rate - Schedule C3 Sector: Industrial Description: Consumer Charge ... Transformer Size of 10,000-14,999 kVa $3,421.59 Transformer Size of 15,000 kVa and greater $5,430.92 Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months):

195

Data:F72c850a-ac7c-4ca0-b4d3-5fe74e6ef5ad | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0a-ac7c-4ca0-b4d3-5fe74e6ef5ad 0a-ac7c-4ca0-b4d3-5fe74e6ef5ad No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Shelby Energy Co-op, Inc Effective date: 1997/06/04 End date if known: Rate name: Rate ETS - OFF-PEAK RETAIL MARKETING SERVICE Sector: Commercial Description: Source or reference: http://www.shelbyenergy.com/yourelectricrate.html Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V): Character of Service Voltage Category: Phase Wiring: << Previous

196

Operation Redwing. Project 2. 52. Neutron-induced soil radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples were exposed to neutron radiation from Shot Cherokee to help establish the importance of neutron-induced residual gamma radiation. After exposure and recovery, the samples had no detectable activity because the slant range to the nearest sample was nearly 3.5 miles, due to an error in bomb drop. After this failure, an experiment was designed in the field for Shot Yuma in order that induced-activity data could be obtained for a soil other than Nevada Test Site soil. Samples of sodium, manganese, and coral sand from Site Sally were exposed above and below the surface at a slant range of 120 yards. The difference between the effects of pure fission and fission-fusion neutron spectra on induced activity in soil was not measured, since the soil samples on Shot Cehrokee were not activated. However, a method for predicting neutron-induced gamma-radiation intensities was tested for coral soil on Shot Yuma. Predicted values were within + or - 50% of induced dose rates inferred from field measurements.

Cowan, M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Jump to: navigation, search Logo: FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Name FastMeasure Distance Measuring Tools Address 2890 Cherokee Lane Place Riverwoods, Illinois Zip 60015 Sector Vehicles Product Distance Measuring Instrument Year founded 2008 Number of employees 11-50 Phone number (888) 876-6050 Website http://www.fast-measure.com Coordinates 42.181686°, -87.898862° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.181686,"lon":-87.898862,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

198

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler - Project Brief [PDF-252KB] Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Denver, CO PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: Performance and Economics Report, Gas Reburning-Low NOx Burner System, Cherokee Station Unit No. 3, Final Report [PDF-17.2MB] (July 1998) CCT Reports: Project Performance Summaries, Post-Project Assessments, & Topical Reports Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler: A DOE Assessment [PDF-309KB] (Feb 2001) Reburning Technologies for the Control of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from Coal-Fired Boilers, Topical Report No.14 [PDF-1.2MB] ((May 1999) Reduction of NOx and SO2 Using Gas Reburning, Sorbent Injection, and Integrated Technologies, Topical Report No. 3 [PDF-1MB] ((Sept 1993)

199

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 7840 of 29,416 results. 31 - 7840 of 29,416 results. Download CX-003655: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma - Tribe - Cherokee Nation, Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.15, B2.5, B4.12, B5.1 Date: 09/03/2010 Location(s): Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003655-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006709: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dig ditch from 24-51-STX-1 0 to 24-AX-10 and reinstall electrical wire CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B5.2 Date: 01/13/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006709-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CONCEPTUAL DESIGN REPORT http://energy.gov/management/downloads/conceptual-design-report Download 10/2008 http://energy.gov/downloads/102008

200

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

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201

Storm Lake I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storm Lake I Wind Farm Storm Lake I Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Storm Lake I Wind Farm Facility Storm Lake I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer GE Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Buena Vista and Cherokee Counties IA Coordinates 42.57215°, -95.340693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.57215,"lon":-95.340693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

202

Classifying forest productivity at different scales  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Spatial scale is an important consideration when evaluating, using, or constructing forest productivity classifications. First, the factors which dominate spatial variability in forest productivity are scale dependent. For example, within a stand, spatial variability in productivity is dominated by microsite differences; within a national forest such as the Cherokee National Forest, spatial variability is dominated by topography and land-use history (e.g., years since harvest); within a large region such as the southeast, spatial variability is dominated by climatic patterns. Second, classifications developed at different spatial scales are often used for different purposes. For example, stand-level classifications are often keys or rules used in the field to judge the quality or potential of a site. National-forest classifications are often presented as maps or tables and may be used in forest land planning. Regional classifications may be maps or tables and may be used to quantify or predict resource availability. These scale-related differences in controlling factors and purposes will affect both the methods and the data used to develop classifications. In this paper, I will illustrate these points by describing and comparing three forest productivity classifications, each developed for a specific purpose at a specific scale. My objective is not to argue for or against any of these particular classifications but rather to heighten awareness of the critical role that spatial scale plays in the use and development of forest productivity classifications. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Graham, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near term. Quarterly report, June 30--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation; (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress is described for the Stewart field on the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress for the Savonburg Field includes: water plant development; profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); field operations; and technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1998-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- Near-term. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. Progress in the Stewart field project is described for the following tasks: design/construct waterflood plant; design/construct injection system; design/construct battery consolidation and gathering system; waterflood operations and reservoir management; and technology transfer. Progress in the Savonburg field project is described for the following tasks: profile modification treatments; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; reservoir development (polymer flooding); and technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; McCune, D.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. To date, the lead geologists have defined the initial geographic extents of Oklahoma`s FDD plays, and compiled known information about those plays. Nine plays have been defined, all of them Pennsylvanian in age and most from the Cherokee Group. A bibliographic database has been developed to record the literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. The project team is working with the Oklahoma Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association to update oil field boundary definitions in the project area. Also, team members are working with several private companies to develop demonstration reservoirs for the reservoir characterization and simulation activities. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of gas reburning and low NO{sub x} burners on a wall-fired boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An evaluation of Gas Reburning (GR) and Low NO{sub x}, Burners (LNB) has been completed at Public Service Company of Colorado`s Cherokee Station Unit 3. The goal of the demonstration, which was carried out in a US DOE Clean Coal Technology Round 3 Program, was to reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 70%. The reduction was to be achieved from the pre-project level, prior to LNB retrofit. The GR system was supplied by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) and the LNBs were supplied by the Foster Wheeler Energy Corporation. The project was carried out in three phases in which EER designed the GR system and obtained necessary permits (Phase 1), constructed the system and completed start-up tasks (Phase 2), and evaluated its performance with both Optimization Tests and a Long-Term Demonstration (Phase 3). As directed by the cooperative agreement, environmental monitoring was conducted in each phase. Measurements were taken by plant personnel and an EER Field Testing Team and were divided into two types. ``Compliance Monitoring`` was conducted by plant personnel to satisfy requirements of regulatory agencies, while ``Supplemental Monitoring`` was conducted by EER personnel to develop a database of environmental impacts of the technology and to ensure environmental acceptability of the project. This document presents environmental monitoring data obtained during the Long-Term Testing period, April 27, 1993 to January 27, 1995. During this period, ten months of testing of the GR-LNB system was followed by a modification into a ``second-generation`` GR-LNB system, which was evaluated for six months. Compliance Monitoring was conducted primarily in two areas, air emissions and aqueous discharges.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Midcontinent region (Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility/constraints of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers a select area of the United States. The Midcontinent (Kansas, Nssouri, Oklahoma) has produced significant oil, but contrary to early reports, the area does not contain the huge volumes of heavy oil that, along with the development of steam and in situ combustion as oil production technologies, sparked the area`s oil boom of the 1960s. Recovery of this heavy oil has proven economically unfeasible for most operators due to the geology of the formations rather than the technology applied to recover the oil. The geology of the southern Midcontinent, as well as results of field projects using thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) methods to produce the heavy oil, was examined based on analysis of data from secondary sources. Analysis of the performance of these projects showed that the technology recovered additional heavy oil above what was produced from primary production from the consolidated, compartmentalized, fluvial dominated deltaic sandstone formations in the Cherokee and Forest City basins. The only projects producing significant economic and environmentally acceptable heavy oil in the Midcontinent are in higher permeability, unconsolidated or friable, thick sands such as those found in south-central Oklahoma. There are domestic heavy oil reservoirs in other sedimentary basins that are in younger formations, are less consolidated, have higher permeability and can be economically produced with current TEOR technology. Heavy oil production from the carbonates of central and wester Kansas has not been adequately tested, but oil production is anticipated to remain low. Significant expansion of Midcontinent heavy oil production is not anticipated because the economics of oil production and processing are not favorable.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low-NOx Burners on a Wall-Fired Boiler; a DOE Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results from the GR-LNB technology demonstrated by EER at Cherokee Station approached, but did not meet, the CCT project's performance objectives. Acceptable unit operability was achieved with both the GR and the LNB components. The gas reburning component of the process appears to be broadly applicable for retrofit NO{sub x} control to most utility boilers and, in particular, to wet-bottom cyclone boilers, which are high NO{sub x} emitters and are difficult to control (LNB technology is not applicable to cyclone boilers). GR-LNB can reduce NO{sub x} to mandated emissions levels under Title IV of the CAAA without significant, adverse boiler impacts. The GR-LNB process may be applicable to boilers significantly larger than the demonstration unit, provided there is adequate dispersion and mixing of injected natural gas. Major results of the demonstration project are summarized as follows: NO{sub x}-emissions reductions averaging 64% were achieved with 12.5% gas heat input in long-term tests on a 158-MWe (net) wall-fired unit. The target reduction level of 70% was achieved only on a short-term basis with higher gas consumption. The thermal performance of coal-fired boilers is not significantly affected by GR-LNB. Convective section steam temperatures can be controlled within acceptable limits. Thermal efficiency is decreased by a small amount (about 0.8%), because of increased dry gas loss and higher moisture in the flue gas as a result of the GR process. Furnace slagging and convective section fouling can be adequately controlled. Because of the higher hydrogen/carbon (H/C) ratio of natural gas compared with coal, use of the GR process results in a modest reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions are reduced in direct proportion to the fraction of heat supplied by natural gas.

National Energy Technology Laboratory

2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Development of directional capabilities to an ultradeep water dynamic kill simulator and simulations runs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is dependent on the production of oil and gas, and every day the demand increases. Technologies have to keep up with the demand of this resource to keep the world running. Since hydrocarbons are finite and will eventually run out, the increasing demand of oil and gas is the impetus to search for oil in more difficult and challenging areas. One challenging area is offshore in ultradeep water, with water depths greater than 5000 ft. This is the new arena for drilling technology. Unfortunately with greater challenges there are greater risks of losing control and blowing out a well. A dynamic kill simulator was developed in late 2004 to model initial conditions of a blowout in ultradeep water and to calculate the minimum kill rate required to kill a blowing well using the dynamic kill method. The simulator was simple and efficient, but had limitations; only vertical wells could be simulated. To keep up with technology, modifications were made to the simulator to model directional wells. COMASim (Cherokee, Offshore Technology Research Center, Minerals Management Service, Texas A&M Simulator) is the name of the dynamic kill simulator. The new version, COMASim1.0, has the ability to model almost any type of wellbore geometry when provided the measured and vertical depths of the well. Eighteen models with varying wellbore geometry were simulated to examine the effects of wellbore geometry on the minimum kill rate requirement. The main observation was that lower kill rate requirement was needed in wells with larger measured depth. COMASim 1.0 cannot determine whether the inputs provided by the user are practical; COMASim 1.0 can only determine if the inputs are incorrect, inconsistent or cannot be computed. If unreasonable drilling scenarios are input, unreasonable outputs will result. COMASim1.0 adds greater functionality to the previous version while maintaining the original framework and simplicity of calculations and usage.

Meier, Hector Ulysses

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

212

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas, Near-term. Third quarterly report, January 1, 1994--April 1, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflooding on both field demonstration sites. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: engineering and geological analysis; water plant development; pattern changes and wellbore cleanup; field operations; laboratory testing; and utilization.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Seventh quarterly report, February 1, 1995--April 1, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process, possibly polymer augmented waterflood: on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas -- near-term. Eighth quarterly report, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas and in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company General topics to be addressed will be (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration, of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. The reservoir management portion of the project will involve performance evaluation and will include such work as (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. The waterflood optimization portion of the project involves only the Nelson Lease. It will be based on the performance evaluation and will involve (1) design and implementation of a water cleanup system for the waterflood, (2) application of well remedial work such as polymer gel treatments to improve vertical sweep efficiency, and (3) changes in waterflood patterns to increase sweep efficiency. Finally, it is planned to implement an improved recovery process on both field demonstration sites.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

216

Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+{trademark} Design Certification Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW{sub t} (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Impact of seismic code provisions in the central U.S.: a performance evaluation of a reinforced concrete building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The close proximity to the New Madrid Seismic Zone and the significant population and infrastructure presents a potentially substantial risk for central U.S. cities such as Memphis, Tennessee. However, seismic provisions in currently adopted Memphis building codes for non-essential structures have a lower seismic design intensity level than the 2003 International Building Code (IBC) with broader acceptance nationally. As such, it is important to evaluate structures designed with these local seismic provisions to determine whether they will perform adequately during two different design-level earthquakes in this region. A four-story reinforced concrete (RC) moment frame with wide-module pan joists was designed according to current building codes relevant to the central U.S.: the 2003 IBC, the City of Memphis and Shelby County locally amended version of the 2003 IBC, and the 1999 Standard Building Code (SBC). Special moment frames (SMFs) were required for the IBC and SBC designs, but lower design forces in the amended IBC case study permitted an intermediate moment frame (IMF). However, the margin by which a SMF was required was very small for the SBC design. For slightly different conditions IMFs could be used. Nonlinear push-over and dynamic analyses using synthetic ground motions developed for Memphis for 2% and 10% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years were conducted for each of the three designs. The FEMA 356 recommended Basic Safety Objective (BSO) is to dually achieve Life Safety (LS) for the 10% in 50 years earthquake and Collapse Prevention (CP) for the 2% in 50 years earthquake. For the member-level evaluation, the SMF designs met the LS performance objective, but none of the designs met the CP performance objective or the BSO. However, the margin by which the SMF buildings exceeded CP performance was relatively small compared to that of the IMF building. Fragility curves were also developed to provide an estimate of the probability of exceeding various performance levels and quantitative performance limits. These relationships further emphasize the benefits of using an SMF as required by the IBC and, in this case, the SBC.

Kueht, Erin

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler NOX emissions and to a lesser degree, due to coal replacement, SO2 emissions. The project involved combining Gas Reburning with Low NOX Burners (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired electric utility boiler to determine if high levels of NO, reduction (70VO) could be achieved. Sponsors of the project included the U.S. Depatiment of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation. The GR-LNB demonstration was petformed on Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit #3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW~ wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal. It had a baseline NO, emission level of 0.73 lb/1 OG Btu using conventional burners. Low NOX burners are designed to yield lower NOX emissions than conventional burners. However, the NOX control achieved with this technique is limited to 30-50Y0. Also, with LNBs, CO emissions can increase to above acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce NO, in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. This technology involves the introduction of' natural gas into the hot furnace flue gas stream. When combined, GR and LNBs minimize NOX emissions and maintain acceptable levels of CO emissions. A comprehensive test program was completed, operating over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved, providing substantial data. Measurements were taken to quantify reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability and factors influencing costs. The GR-LNB technology achieved good NO, emission reductions and the goals of the project were achieved. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 18%. The performance goal of 70/40 reduction was met on many test runs, but at a higher reburn gas heat input. S02 emissions, based on coal replacement, were reduced by 18%.

None

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Ultrapdeep water blowouts: COMASim dynamic kill simulator validation and best practices recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum industry is in a constant state of change. Few industries have advanced as far technologically as the petroleum industry has in its relatively brief existence. The produced products in the oil and gas industry are finite. As such, the easier to find and produce hydrocarbons are exploited first. This forces the industry to enter new areas and environments to continue supplying the world's hydrocarbons. Many of these new frontiers are in what is considered ultradeep waters, 5000 feet or more of water. While all areas of the oil and gas industry have advanced their ultradeep water technology, one area has had to remain at the forefront: drilling. Unfortunately, while drilling as a whole may be advancing to keep up with these environments, some segments lag behind. Blowout control is one of these areas developed as an afterthought. This lax attitude towards blowouts does not mean they are not a major concern. A blowout can mean injury or loss of life for rig personnel, as well as large economic losses, environmental damage and damage to the oil or gas reservoir itself. Obviously, up-to-date technology and techniques for the prevention and control of ultradeep water blowouts would be an invaluable part of any oil and gas company's exploration planning and technology suite. To further the development of blowout prevention and control, COMASim Cherokee Offshore, MMS, Texas A&M Simulator) was developed. COMASim simulates the planning and execution of a dynamic kill delivered to a blowout. Through a series of over 800 simulation runs, we were able to find several key trends in both the initial conditions as well as the kill requirements. The final phase of this study included a brief review of current industry deepwater well control best practices and how the COMASim results fit in with them. Overall, this study resulted in a better understanding of ultradeep water blowouts and what takes to control them dynamically. In addition to this understanding of blowouts, COMASim's strengths and weaknesses have now been exposed in order to further develop this simulator for industry use.

Noynaert, Samuel F.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluation of Gas Reburning and Low N0x Burners on a Wall Fired Boiler  

SciTech Connect

Under the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Program (Round 3), a project was completed to demonstrate control of boiler emissions that comprise acid rain precursors, especially NOX. The project involved operating gas reburning technology combined with low NO, burner technology (GR-LNB) on a coal-fired utility boiler. Low NOX burners are designed to create less NOX than conventional burners. However, the NO, control achieved is in the range of 30-60-40, and typically 50%. At the higher NO, reduction levels, CO emissions tend to be higher than acceptable standards. Gas Reburning (GR) is designed to reduce the level of NO. in the flue gas by staged fuel combustion. When combined, GR and LNBs work in harmony to both minimize NOX emissions and maintain an acceptable level of CO emissions. The demonstration was performed at Public Service Company of Colorado's (PSCO) Cherokee Unit 3, located in Denver, Colorado. This unit is a 172 MW. wall-fired boiler that uses Colorado bituminous, low-sulfur coal and had a pre GR-LNB baseline NOX emission of 0.73 lb/1 Oe Btu. The target for the project was a reduction of 70 percent in NOX emissions. Project sponsors included the U.S. Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, Public Service Company of Colorado, Colorado Interstate Gas, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER). EER conducted a comprehensive test demonstration program over a wide range of boiler conditions. Over 4,000 hours of operation were achieved. Intensive measurements were taken to quantify the reductions in NOX emissions, the impact on boiler equipment and operability, and all factors influencing costs. The results showed that GR-LNB technology achieved excellent emission reductions. Although the performance of the low NOX burners (supplied by others) was somewhat less than expected, a NOX reduction of 65% was achieved at an average gas heat input of 180A. The performance goal of 70% reduction was met on many test runs, but at higher gas heat inputs. The impact on boiler equipment was determined to be very minimal. Toward the end of the testing, the flue gas recirculation (used to enhance gas penetration into the furnace) system was removed and new high pressure gas injectors were installed. Further, the low NOX burners were modified and gave better NO. reduction performance. These modifications resulted in a similar NO, reduction performance (64%) at a reduced level of gas heat input (-13Yo). In addition, the OFA injectors were re-designed to provide for better control of CO emissions. Although not a part of this project, the use of natural gas as the primary fuel with gas reburning was also tested. The gas/gas reburning tests demonstrated a reduction in NOX emissions of 43% (0.30 lb/1 OG Btu reduced to 0.17 lb/1 OG Btu) using 7% gas heat input. Economics are a key issue affecting technology development. Application of GR-LNB requires modifications to existing power plant equipment and as a result, the capital and operating costs depend largely on site-specific factors such as: gas availability at the site, gas to coal delivered price differential, sulfur dioxide removal requirements, windbox pressure, existing burner throat diameters, and reburn zone residence time available. Based on the results of this CCT project, EER expects that most GR-LNB installations will achieve at least 60% NOX control when firing 10-15% gas. The capital cost estimate for installing a GR-LNB system on a 300 MW, unit is approximately $25/kW. plus the cost of a gas pipeline (if required). Operating costs are almost entirely related to the differential cost of the natural gas compared to coal.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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221

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribes energy vision. The overarching goals of the first steps project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the best fit energy options. Based on the request of Pawnee Nations Energy Task Force the research team, consisting Tribal personnel and Summit Blue Consulting, focused on a review of renewable energy resource development potential, funding sources and utility organizational along with energy savings options. Elements of the energy demand forecasting and characterization and demand side options review remained in the scope of work, but were only addressed at a high level. Description of Activities Performed Renewable Energy Resource Development Potential The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Energy Efficiency Options While this was not a major focus of the project, the research team highlighted common strategies for reducing energy use in buildings. The team also discussed the benefits of adopting a building energy code and introduced two model energy codes Pawnee Nation should consider for adoption. Summary of Current and Expected Future Electricity Usage The research team provided a summary overview of electricity usage patterns in current buildings and included discussion of known plans for new construction. Utility Options Review Pawnee Nation electric utility options were analyzed through a four-phase process, which included: 1) summarizing the relevant utility background information; 2) gathering relevant utility assessment data; 3) developing a set of realistic Pawnee electric utility service options, and 4) analyzing the various Pawnee electric utility service options for the Pawnee Energy Teams consideration. III. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribes main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Pawnee Nation Energy Option Analyses  

SciTech Connect

Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma Energy Option Analyses In 2003, the Pawnee Nation leadership identified the need for the tribe to comprehensively address its energy issues. During a strategic energy planning workshop a general framework was laid out and the Pawnee Nation Energy Task Force was created to work toward further development of the tribes energy vision. The overarching goals of the first steps project were to identify the most appropriate focus for its strategic energy initiatives going forward, and to provide information necessary to take the next steps in pursuit of the best fit energy options. Description of Activities Performed The research team reviewed existing data pertaining to the availability of biomass (focusing on woody biomass, agricultural biomass/bio-energy crops, and methane capture), solar, wind and hydropower resources on the Pawnee-owned lands. Using these data, combined with assumptions about costs and revenue streams, the research team performed preliminary feasibility assessments for each resource category. The research team also reviewed available funding resources and made recommendations to Pawnee Nation highlighting those resources with the greatest potential for financially-viable development, both in the near-term and over a longer time horizon. Findings and Recommendations Due to a lack of financial incentives for renewable energy, particularly at the state level, combined mediocre renewable energy resources, renewable energy development opportunities are limited for Pawnee Nation. However, near-term potential exists for development of solar hot water at the gym, and an exterior wood-fired boiler system at the tribes main administrative building. Pawnee Nation should also explore options for developing LFGTE resources in collaboration with the City of Pawnee. Significant potential may also exist for development of bio-energy resources within the next decade. Pawnee Nation representatives should closely monitor market developments in the bio-energy industry, establish contacts with research institutions with which the tribe could potentially partner in grant-funded research initiatives. In addition, a substantial effort by the Kaw and Cherokee tribes is underway to pursue wind development at the Chilocco School Site in northern Oklahoma where Pawnee is a joint landowner. Pawnee Nation representatives should become actively involved in these development discussions and should explore the potential for joint investment in wind development at the Chilocco site. Financial incentives for project development are generally structured to provide tribes with access to conventional financing mechanisms. Grant funding for project construction is currently difficult to obtain. Substantial new opportunities for bio-fuel development may exist in the next few years with passage of the 2007 Farm Bill, and through opportunities made available through Oklahomas new Bio-energy Center. A review of potential alternatives to Pawnee Nations current electricity supply scenario revealed that a range of options could be viable. These include the following scenarios: business as usual, alternative supply, negotiate lower rates with City of Pawnee, focus on reducing energy usage, develop electric utility organization. Under any circumstances, Pawnee Nation should purse strategies to reduce energy usage, as this is the simplest means of reducing electric costs and environmental impacts. The research team also recommends that Pawnee Nation initiate some focused discussions with the City of Pawnee, with GRDA, and with IEC to discuss its wholesale supply purchase options. These discussions will better inform the Pawnee Energy Team of the specific pros and cons of its wholesale power supply options, and will assist the Teams broader decision-making on utility-related issues. The ultimate path chosen by Pawnee Nation will depend on further consideration of priorities and potential barriers by Pawnee Nations Energy Team.

Matlock, M.; Kersey, K.; Riding In, C.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

223

TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were (1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, (2) design and construction of a water injection system, (3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, (4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and (5) technology transfer. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) waterplant optimization, (3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and (4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were (1) waterplant development, (2) profile modification treatments, (3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, (4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), (5) field operations, and (6) technology transfer.

Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1997-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were 1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, 2) design and construction of a water injection system, 3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, 4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and 5) technology transfer. Tasks 1-3 have been completed and water injection began in October 1995. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) identification of operational problems, 3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, 4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) waterplant optimization, 3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and 4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period is subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were 1) waterplant development, 2) profile modification treatments, 3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, 4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), 5) field operations, and 6) technology transfer.

A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

1997-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

227

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

228

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

229

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

230

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

231

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

232

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

233

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

234

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

235

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

236

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

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form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

237

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

238

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

239

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.