Sample records for windy great escape

  1. Big Windy (Great Escape Restaurant Turbine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBig Windy (Great

  2. A Hamiltonian system of three degrees of freedom with eight channels of escape: The Great Escape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we try to shed some light to the nature of orbits in a three-dimensional potential of a perturbed harmonic oscillator with eight possible channels of escape, which was chosen as an interesting example of open three-dimensional Hamiltonian systems. In particular, we conduct a thorough numerical investigation distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering unbounded motion for several values of the energy. In an attempt to discriminate safely and with certainty between ordered and chaotic motion, we use the Smaller ALingment Index (SALI) detector, computed by integrating numerically the basic equations of motion as well as the variational equations. Of particular interest, is to locate the basins of escape towards the different escape channels and connect them with the corresponding escape periods of the orbits. We split our study into three different cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the test particles. We found, that when the orbits are started very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane the respective grids exhibit a high degree of fractalization, while on the other hand for orbits with relatively high values of $z_0$ several well-formed basins of escape emerge thus, reducing significantly the fractalization of the grids. It was also observed, that for values of energy very close to the escape energy the escape times of orbits are large, while for energy levels much higher than the escape energy the vast majority of orbits escape extremely fast or even immediately to infinity. We hope our outcomes to be useful for a further understanding of the escape process in open 3D Hamiltonian systems.

  3. Vertical Farrning in the Windy City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saniie, Jafar

    vegetable and fish waste into fertilizer and biogas to power a heating, cooling, and 280-kilowatt electricalIIScience News Vertical Farrning in the Windy City In Chicago's meatpacking district, developer

  4. The Windy Prize-Collecting Rural Postman Problem:

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    studied windy ARPs with a single vehicle as particular cases is given by Cor- berán et al ...... In: Varela F, Bourgine P (eds) Toward a Practice of Autonomous.

  5. EA-1610: Windy Hollow Wind Project, Laramie County, Wyoming

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proponent request to interconnect their proposed Windy Hollow Wind Project in Laramie County, Wyoming, to DOE’s Western Area Power Administration’s transmission system.

  6. The Great Gas Hydrate Escape

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and hydrogen pack into gas hydrates could enlighten alternative fuel production and carbon dioxide storage January 25, 2012 | Tags: Carver, Chemistry, Energy Technologies,...

  7. EIS-0370: Windy Gap Firming Project, Colorado | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F,-SA-01:5-SA-01:Draftoftoto Conduct PublicFinalFinal0: Windy

  8. Windy City Renewable Energy LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon:WindPoleWisconsin: EnergyWindy City

  9. An assessment of the available windy land area and wind energy potential in the contiguous United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of land areas with various levels of wind energy resource and resultant wind energy potential have been developed for each state in the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and account for the exclusion of some windy lands as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the amount of wind resource estimated over the contiguous United States is surprisingly large and has the potential to supply a substantial fraction of the nation's energy needs, even with the use of today's wind turbine technology. Although this study shows that, after exclusions, only about 0.6% of the land area in the contiguous United States is characterized by high wind resource (comparable to that found in windy areas of California where wind energy is being cost-effectively developed), the wind electric potential that could be extracted with today's technology from these areas across the United States is equivalent to about 20% of the current US electric consumption. Future advances in wind turbine technology will further enhance the potential of wind energy. As advances in turbine technology allow areas of moderate wind resource to be developed, more than a tenfold increase in the wind energy potential is possible. These areas, which cover large sections of the Great Plains and are widely distributed throughout many other sections of the country, have the potential of producing more than three times the nation's current electric consumption. 9 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

  10. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for interconnection of 250 megawatts (MW) of power to be generated by the proposed Windy Point Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Windy Point Partners, LLC (WPP) propose to construct and operate the proposed Wind Project and has requested interconnection to the FCRTS. The Wind Project will be interconnected at BPA's Rock Creek Substation, which is under construction in Klickitat County, Washington. The Rock Creek Substation will provide transmission access for the Wind Project to BPA's Wautoma-John Day No.1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. BPA's decision to offer terms to interconnect the Wind Project is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 15, 1995). This decision thus is tiered to the BP ROD.

  11. %% file: linux-brief-manual.txt = unix basics for micro$oft windies %% last: Jan 13 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    students ("windie dotties"): http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~rutte101/Students_to_the_DOT_program.html I also have Ubuntu installation recipes at http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~rutte101/Installing_Ubuntu.html and some unix/linux recipes at http://www.staff.science.uu.nl/~rutte101/Assorted_linux.html See also: http

  12. A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia with juvenile bypass systems to keep the smolts out of the turbines. But given the gravity of the [salmon

  13. Narrow escape: how ionizing photons escape from disc galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Arpita; Sharma, Prateek

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we calculate the escape fraction ($f_{\\rm esc}$) of ionizing photons from starburst galaxies. Using 2-D axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, we study superbubbles created by overlapping supernovae in OB associations. We calculate the escape fraction of ionizing photons from the center of the disk along different angles through the superbubble and the gas disk. After convolving with the luminosity function of OB associations, we show that the ionizing photons escape within a cone of $\\sim 40 ^\\circ$, consistent with observations of nearby galaxies. The evolution of the escape fraction with time shows that it falls initially as cold gas is accumulated in a dense shell. After the shell crosses a few scale heights and fragments, the escape fraction through the polar regions rises again. The angle-averaged escape fraction cannot exceed $\\sim [1- \\cos (1 \\, {\\rm radian})] = 0.5$ from geometrical considerations (using the emission cone opening angle). We calculate the dependence of the time- and angl...

  14. Hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions in fluorite associated with the Windy Knoll bitumen deposit, UK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, M.R. (Imperial College, London (United Kingdom) University College, London (United Kingdom)); Rankin, A.H. (Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)); Milledge, H.J. (University College, London (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions in fluorite, associated with an outcropping bitumen deposit at Windy Knoll, Derbyshire, have been analyzed in situ using a combination of microthermometry, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectrometry, and ultraviolet (UV) microscopy. The inclusions in these samples can be considered as a series with two end members: aqueous inclusions containing a low-density vapor phase and inclusions containing liquid oil' with no detectable aqueous phase. The majority of the inclusions are mixed types containing both aqueous and liquid hydrocarbon phases. Although microthermometry distinguishes at least two different aqueous fluids with varying homogenization temperatures and salinities, the oil fraction is cogenetic and trapped together with just one fluid, a low-salinity, low-calcium brine with an average homogenization temperature of 134C. The majority of the liquid hydrocarbon-bearing inclusions fluoresce bright blue under UV illumination with peaks around 475 nm, characteristic of paraffinic oils. The FTIR spectra of these inclusions are dominated by peaks assigned to aliphatic C-H bonding. However, inclusions have also been found which display a fluorescence typical of the red-shift associated with less mature oils. The FTIR spectra display peaks assigned to C{double bond}O, C-O, and O-CH{sub 2} bonding. This study presents new data on the in-situ analysis of hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusion from this important area of natural petroleum seepage and ore mineralization. The results suggest a direct link between the fluid inclusion populations, the outcropping bitumens, and fluorite deposition.

  15. Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the water treatment plant. It may not be obvious, but communities use a lot of energy pumping and treating water and wastewater. We may not see the results show up on our bills...

  16. Photochemical Escape of Oxygen from Early Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Jinjin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photochemical escape is an important process for oxygen escape from present Mars. In this work, a 1-D Monte-Carlo Model is developed to calculate escape rates of energetic oxygen atoms produced from O2+ dissociative recombination reactions (DR) under 1, 3, 10, and 20 times present solar XUV fluxes. We found that although the overall DR rates increase with solar XUV flux almost linearly, oxygen escape rate increases from 1 to 10 times present solar XUV conditions but decreases when increasing solar XUV flux further. Analysis shows that atomic species in the upper thermosphere of early Mars increases more rapidly than O2+ when increasing XUV fluxes. While the latter is the source of energetic O atoms, the former increases the collision probability and thus decreases the escape probability of energetic O. Our results suggest that photochemical escape be a less important escape mechanism than previously thought for the loss of water and/or CO2 from early Mars.

  17. Detecting and escaping infinite loops using Bolt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kling, Michael (Michael W.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis we present Bolt, a novel system for escaping infinite loops. If a user suspects that an executing program is stuck in an infinite loop, the user can use the Bolt user interface, which attaches to the running ...

  18. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harri Mökkönen; Timo Ikonen; Tapio Ala-Nissila; Hannes Jónsson

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  19. The Escape Rate of a Molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Knauf; Markus Krapf

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We show existence and give an implicit formula for the escape rate of the n-centre problem of celestial mechanics for high energies. Furthermore we give precise computable estimates of this rate. This exponential decay rate plays an important role especially in semiclassical scattering theory of n-atomic molecules. Our result shows that the diameter of a molecule is measurable in a (classical) high-energy scattering experiment.

  20. Escape Rates of the Hénon-Heiles System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Zhao; M. L. Du

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle in the H\\'enon-Heiles potential can escape when its energy is above the threshold value $E_{th}={1/6}$. We report a theoretical study on the the escape rates near threshold. We derived an analytic formula for the escape rate as a function of energy by exploring the property of chaos. We also simulated the escaping process by following the motions of a large number of particles. Two algorithms are employed to solve the equations of motion. One is the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg method, and another is a recently proposed fourth order symplectic method. Our simulations show the escape of H$\\mathrm{\\acute{e}}$non-Heiles system follows exponential laws. We extracted the escape rates from the time dependence of particle numbers in the H$\\mathrm{\\acute{e}}$non-Heiles potential. The extracted escape rates agree with the analytic result.

  1. AVTA: 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Quantum Escape PHEV, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  2. AVTA: Ford Escape PHEV Advanced Research Vehicle 2010 Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    results of testing done on a plug-in hybrid electric Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing...

  3. The Great Escape? A Quantitative Evaluation of the Fed's Non-Standard Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    debt, for private assets (through direct purchases of these assets or taking them as collateral). The price of any private security -- be it stock or corporate bond -- depends on what it will pay out

  4. Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences Modeling Atmospheric Escape Workshop - Spring 2012 University are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al

  5. TRANSONIC HYDRODYNAMIC ESCAPE OF HYDROGEN FROM EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Sterck, Hans

    . The model uses a two-dimensional energy depo- sition calculation instead of the single-layer heating planets is investigated using the model. The importance of hydrogen hydrodynamic escape for the longTRANSONIC HYDRODYNAMIC ESCAPE OF HYDROGEN FROM EXTRASOLAR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES Feng Tian,1, 2 Owen

  6. Windy Flats | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to:Flats Jump

  7. WANDERING STARS: AN ORIGIN OF ESCAPED POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teyssier, Maureen; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Pupin Physics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Shara, Michael M. [American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States)

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that stars beyond the virial radii of galaxies may be generated by the gravitational impulse received by a satellite as it passes through the pericenter of its orbit around its parent. These stars may become energetically unbound (escaped stars), or may travel to further than a few virial radii for longer than a few Gyr, but still remain energetically bound to the system (wandering stars). Larger satellites (10%-100% the mass of the parent), and satellites on more radial orbits are responsible for the majority of this ejected population. Wandering stars could be observable on Mpc scales via classical novae, and on 100 Mpc scales via Type Ia supernova. The existence of such stars would imply a corresponding population of barely bound, old, high-velocity stars orbiting the Milky Way, generated by the same physical mechanism during the Galaxy's formation epoch. Sizes and properties of these combined populations should place some constraints on the orbits and masses of the progenitor objects from which they came, providing insight into the merging histories of galaxies in general and the Milky Way in particular.

  8. Comprehensive analysis of escape-cone losses from luminescent waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick, David L.

    the need for solar tracking, the potential for achieving very large concentration factors, and deliv- ery of applications, from solar concentrators to doped fiber amplifiers. Here we report a comprehensive analysis the critical angle with a waveguide surface. For applications such as luminescent solar concentrators, escape

  9. Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands fluids escape from hydrocarbon reservoirs through permeable networks of fractures, injected sands. Within fractures and injected sands, oxidation of chained hydrocarbons supplies bicarbonate to the co

  10. A Right to Escape Poverty? 2008 Dr. Richard B. Splane Lecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pulfrey, David L.

    A Right to Escape Poverty? 2008 Dr. Richard B. Splane Lecture on Social Policy Thursday, October 2 Columbia #12;A Right to Escape Poverty? 2008 Dr. Richard B. Splane Lecture 2 Thank you, Graham [Riches to Escape Poverty?" Let me begin by addressing the question-mark in my title. Am I challenging the view

  11. Great River (1973)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental AssessmentsGeoffrey(SC)Graphite Reactor 'In the- EnergyGreat-River

  12. Revealing the escape mechanism of three-dimensional orbits in a tidally limited star cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Euaggelos E. Zotos

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is to explore the escape process of three-dimensional orbits in a star cluster rotating around its parent galaxy in a circular orbit. The gravitational field of the cluster is represented by a smooth, spherically symmetric Plummer potential, while the tidal approximation was used to model the steady tidal field of the galaxy. We conduct a thorough numerical analysis distinguishing between regular and chaotic orbits as well as between trapped and escaping orbits, considering only unbounded motion for several energy levels. It is of particular interest to locate the escape basins towards the two exit channels and relate them with the corresponding escape times of the orbits. For this purpose, we split our investigation into three cases depending on the initial value of the $z$ coordinate which was used for launching the stars. The most noticeable finding is that the majority of stars initiated very close to the primary $(x,y)$ plane move in chaotic orbits and they remain trapped for vast time intervals, while orbits with relatively high values of $z_0$ on the other hand, form well-defined basins of escape. It was also observed, that for energy levels close to the critical escape energy the escape rates of orbits are large, while for much higher values of energy most of the orbits have low escape periods or they escape immediately to infinity. We hope our outcomes to be useful for a further understanding of the dissolution process and the escape mechanism in open star clusters.

  13. On the Escape of Ionizing Radiation from Starbursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckman, T; Meurer, G; Leitherer, C; Calzetti, D; Martin, C L

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Far-ultraviolet spectra obtained with $FUSE$ show that the strong $CII\\lambda$1036 interstellar absorption-line is essentially black in five of the UV-brightest local starburst galaxies. Since the opacity of the neutral ISM below the Lyman-edge will be significantly larger than in the $CII$ line, these data provide strong constraints on the escape of ionizing radiation from these starbursts. Interpreted as a a uniform absorbing slab, the implied optical depth at the Lyman edge is huge ($\\tau_0 \\geq 10^2$). Alternatively, the areal covering factor of opaque material is typically $\\geq$ 94%. Thus, the fraction of ionizing stellar photons that escape the ISM of each galaxy is small: our conservative estimates typically yield $f_{esc} \\leq 6%$. Inclusion of extinction due to dust will further decrease $f_{esc}$. An analogous analysis of the rest-UV spectrum of the star-forming galaxy $MS 1512-CB58$ at $z$ =2.7 leads to similar constraints on $f_{esc}$. These new results agree with the constraints provided by dire...

  14. EU-California Environmental Agreements: The Role of Trade in Emissions Permits and Escape Clauses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Zhao, Jinhua

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the role of trade in emissions permits and escape clauses. (agreements. Trade in emissions permits has ambiguous and inAlthough trade in emissions permits reduces the aggregate

  15. AVTA: Ford Escape PHEV Advanced Research Vehicle 2010 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a plug-in hybrid electric Ford Escape Advanced Research Vehicle, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  16. Fractal templates in the escape dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms Kevin A. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steck, Daniel A.

    Fractal templates in the escape dynamics of trapped ultracold atoms Kevin A. Mitchell School nonlinear dynamics, we predict that fractal behavior can be seen in experimental escape data. These data can. This fractal pattern is particularly well resolved below the Bose-Einstein transition temperature--a direct

  17. Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs: implications from cold seeps, fractures and injected sands Abstract Fluid escape from reservoirs can take place through (hydraulic) fracturing, sand injection and seepage. Above several Tertiary hydrocarbon reservoirs in the North Sea, substantial amounts of fractures

  18. Escaping Information Poverty through Internet Newsgroups Laura Hasler and Ian Ruthven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    Escaping Information Poverty through Internet Newsgroups Laura Hasler and Ian Ruthven University to escape situations of information poverty. We consider posts from a variety of newsgroups which indicate for those who feel they have no local support available to them. 1. Introduction Information poverty

  19. With Exhaustible Resources, Can A Developing Country Escape From The Poverty Trap?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    With Exhaustible Resources, Can A Developing Country Escape From The Poverty Trap? Cuong Le Van is convex-concave, so that the economy may be locked into a poverty trap. We show that the extent to which the country will escape from the poverty trap depends, besides the interactions between its technology and its

  20. METASTABILITY, LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS, ESCAPE RATES, AND TOPOLOGICAL ENTROPY IN RANDOM DYNAMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froyland, Gary

    METASTABILITY, LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS, ESCAPE RATES, AND TOPOLOGICAL ENTROPY IN RANDOM DYNAMICAL rates of random maps, and on topological entropy of random shifts of finite type. The Lyapunov spectrum, 37B55. Key words and phrases. Random dynamical system, open dynamical system, escape rate, Lyapunov

  1. Windy Dog I | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:Wilson

  2. Windy Flats IIa extension | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to: navigation,

  3. Windy Flats Phase III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to:

  4. National Forest Inventory of Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Forest Inventory of Great Britain Survey Manual #12;2 Remember to Save your Edit Session Regularly, Validate the information and Backup the Data NFI Survey Manual National Forest Inventory Survey in the surveys contributes to the National Forest Inventory (NFI) of Great Britain. With the information from

  5. Escape of the martian protoatmosphere and initial water inventory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erkaev, N V; Elkins-Tanton, L; Stökl, A; Odert, P; Marcq, E; Dorfi, E A; Kislyakova, K G; Kulikov, Yu N; Leitzinger, M; Güdel, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Latest research in planet formation indicate that Mars formed within a few million years (Myr) and remained a planetary embryo that never grew to a more massive planet. It can also be expected from dynamical models, that most of Mars' building blocks consisted of material that formed in orbital locations just beyond the ice line which could have contained ~0.1-0.2 wt. % of H2O. By using these constraints, we estimate the nebula-captured and catastrophically outgassed volatile contents during the solidification of Mars' magma ocean and apply a hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model for the study of the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) driven thermal escape of the martian protoatmosphere during the early active epoch of the young Sun. The amount of gas that has been captured from the protoplanetary disk into the planetary atmosphere is calculated by solving the hydrostatic structure equations in the protoplanetary nebula. Depending on nebular properties such as the dust grain depletion factor, planetesimal...

  6. Peeping at chaos: Nondestructive monitoring of chaotic systems by measuring long-time escape rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. Bunimovich; C. P. Dettmann

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more small holes provide non-destructive windows to observe corresponding closed systems, for example by measuring long time escape rates of particles as a function of hole sizes and positions. To leading order the escape rate of chaotic systems is proportional to the hole size and independent of position. Here we give exact formulas for the subsequent terms, as sums of correlation functions; these depend on hole size and position, hence yield information on the closed system dynamics. Conversely, the theory can be readily applied to experimental design, for example to control escape rates.

  7. Shetland and the Great War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riddell, Linda Katherine

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great War was an enormous global cataclysm affecting the lives of all inhabitants of the combatant countries and many others. The effects were not uniform, however, and, by assessing the experience of the people of ...

  8. Rocky Great Mountains Southwest Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocky Great Mountains Southwest Plains Research Note RM.502 January 1991 USDA Forest Service Rocky),Carbondale, IL.2 Propellant is now solely available through Winn- Star, Inc. (WSI),Marion, IL.,2which also

  9. Escaping the poverty trap: modeling the interplay between economic growth and the ecology of infectious disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goerg, Georg M; Hébert-Dufresne, Laurent; Althouse, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of economies and infectious disease are inexorably linked: economic well-being influences health (sanitation, nutrition, treatment capacity, etc.) and health influences economic well-being (labor productivity lost to sickness and disease). Often societies are locked into ``poverty traps'' of poor health and poor economy. Here, using a simplified coupled disease-economic model with endogenous capital growth we demonstrate the formation of poverty traps, as well as ways to escape them. We suggest two possible mechanisms of escape both motivated by empirical data: one, through an influx of capital (development aid), and another through changing the percentage of GDP spent on healthcare. We find that a large influx of capital is successful in escaping the poverty trap, but increasing health spending alone is not. Our results demonstrate that escape from a poverty trap may be possible, and carry important policy implications in the world-wide distribution of aid and within-country healthcare spending.

  10. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washtenaw Avenue Ann Arbor, Michigan48104 #12;Mention of a commercial company or product does-atmosphere- sediment system of the areas in and around the Great Lakesand coastal and estuarinewaters and the many activities. GLERL'smultidisciplinaryprogram reflectsthe needfor improved understanding, prediction

  11. Review: The Great Lead Water Pipe Disaster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karalus, Daniel E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Review: The Great Lead Water Pipe Disaster By WernerUSA Troesken, Werner. The Great Lead Water Pipe Disaster.paper. Alkaline paper. Lead poisoning usually conjures

  12. The First Billion Years Project: The escape fraction of ionising photons in the epoch of reionisation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paardekooper, Jan-Pieter; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proto-galaxies forming in low-mass dark matter haloes are thought to provide the majority of ionising photons needed to reionise the Universe, due to their high escape fractions of ionising photons. We study how the escape fraction in high-redshift galaxies relates to the physical properties of the halo in which the galaxies form by computing escape fractions for 75801 haloes between redshifts 27 and 6 that were extracted from the FiBY project, high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy formation. We find that the main constraint on the escape fraction is the presence of dense gas within 10 pc of the young sources that emit the majority of the ionising photons produced over the lifetime of the stellar population. This results in a strong mass dependence of the escape fraction. The lower potential well in haloes with virial mass below 10^8 solar mass results in lower column densities close to the sources that can be penetrated by the radiation from young, massive stars. In general only a ...

  13. Great Lakes Steel -- PCI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eichinger, F.T. [BMH Claudius Peters AG, Buxtehude (Germany); Dake, S.H.; Wagner, E.D.; Brown, G.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the planning, design, and start-up of the 90 tph PCI facility for National Steel`s Great Lakes Steel Division in River Rouge, MI. This project is owned and operated by Edison Energy Services, and was implemented on a fast-track basis by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Babcock Material Handling, and Babcock and Wilcox. This paper presents important process issues, basic design criteria, an the challenges of engineering and building a state-of-the-art PCI facility in two existing plants. Pulverized coal is prepared at the River Rouge Power Plant of Detroit Edison, is pneumatically conveyed 6,000 feet to a storage silo at Great Lakes Steel, and is injected into three blast furnaces.

  14. A Proposal to Reform the Kyoto Protocol: the Role of Escape Clauses and Foresight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    A Proposal to Reform the Kyoto Protocol: the Role of Escape Clauses and Foresight Larry Karp University of California, Berkeley Jinhua Zhao Iowa Sate University February 23, 2007 Abstract A reform be designed. We propose a reform to the Kyoto Proto- col that allows signatories to avoid achieving the target

  15. Role of AmiA in the Morphological Transition of Helicobacter pylori and in Immune Escape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Role of AmiA in the Morphological Transition of Helicobacter pylori and in Immune Escape Catherine´ Paris-Sud, Orsay, France The human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is responsible for peptic ulcers, Werts C, et al. (2006) Role of AmiA in the morphological transition of Helicobacter pylori and in immune

  16. Escape configuration lattice near the nematic-isotropic transition: Tilt analogue of blue phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buddhapriya Chakrabarti; Yashodhan Hatwalne; N. V. Madhusudana

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We predict the possible existence of a new phase of liquid crystals near the nematic-isotropic ($ NI $) transition. This phase is an achiral, tilt-analogue of the blue phase and is composed of a lattice of {\\em double-tilt}, escape-configuration cylinders. We discuss the structure and the stability of this phase and provide an estimate of the lattice parameter.

  17. Aggressive melanoma cells escape from BMP7-mediated autocrine growth inhibition through coordinated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelhardt, John F.

    Aggressive melanoma cells escape from BMP7-mediated autocrine growth inhibition through coordinated melanoma correlates with tumor progression. However, melanoma cells are either inhibited by or become that the expression of BMP antagonist, Noggin, correlates with resistance to BMP7 in advanced melanoma cells. To test

  18. Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    Methane escape from gas hydrate systems in marine environment, and methane-driven oceanic eruptions are suitable for gas hydrate stability [Lunine and Stevenson, 1985]. Enor- mous amounts of methane are stored as gas hydrate and free gas in the pore space of marine sediment [Kvenvolden, 1988; Buffet, 2000

  19. DWARF GALAXIES WITH IONIZING RADIATION FEEDBACK. I. ESCAPE OF IONIZING PHOTONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ji-hoon; Krumholz, Mark R.; Goldbaum, Nathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Wise, John H. [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Turk, Matthew J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Abel, Tom, E-mail: me@jihoonkim.org [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method for simulating ionizing radiation and supernova feedback in the analogs of low-redshift galactic disks. In this method, which we call star-forming molecular cloud (SFMC) particles, we use a ray-tracing technique to solve the radiative transfer equation for ultraviolet photons emitted by thousands of distinct particles on the fly. Joined with high numerical resolution of 3.8 pc, the realistic description of stellar feedback helps to self-regulate star formation. This new feedback scheme also enables us to study the escape of ionizing photons from star-forming clumps and from a galaxy, and to examine the evolving environment of star-forming gas clumps. By simulating a galactic disk in a halo of 2.3 × 10{sup 11} M{sub ?}, we find that the average escape fraction from all radiating sources on the spiral arms (excluding the central 2.5 kpc) fluctuates between 0.08% and 5.9% during a ?20 Myr period with a mean value of 1.1%. The flux of escaped photons from these sources is not strongly beamed, but manifests a large opening angle of more than 60° from the galactic pole. Further, we investigate the escape fraction per SFMC particle, f{sub esc}(i), and how it evolves as the particle ages. We discover that the average escape fraction f{sub esc} is dominated by a small number of SFMC particles with high f{sub esc}(i). On average, the escape fraction from an SFMC particle rises from 0.27% at its birth to 2.1% at the end of a particle lifetime, 6 Myr. This is because SFMC particles drift away from the dense gas clumps in which they were born, and because the gas around the star-forming clumps is dispersed by ionizing radiation and supernova feedback. The framework established in this study brings deeper insight into the physics of photon escape fraction from an individual star-forming clump and from a galactic disk.

  20. Lyalpha RADIATIVE TRANSFER WITH DUST: ESCAPE FRACTIONS FROM SIMULATED HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laursen, Peter; Sommer-Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Anja C., E-mail: pela@dark-cosmology.d, E-mail: jslarsen@astro.ku.d [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100, Copenhagen Oe (Denmark)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lyalpha emission line is an essential diagnostic tool for probing galaxy formation and evolution. Not only is it commonly the strongest observable line from high-redshift galaxies, but from its shape detailed information about its host galaxy can be revealed. However, due to the scattering nature of Lyalpha photons increasing their path length in a nontrivial way, if dust is present in the galaxy, the line may be severely suppressed and its shape altered. In order to interpret observations correctly, it is thus of crucial significance to know how much of the emitted light actually escapes the galaxy. In the present work, using a combination of high-resolution cosmological hydrosimulations and an adaptively refinable Monte Carlo Lyalpha radiative transfer code including an environment dependent model of dust, the escape fractions f {sub esc} of Lyalpha radiation from high-redshift (z = 3.6) galaxies are calculated. In addition to the average escape fraction, the variation of f {sub esc} in different directions and from different parts of the galaxies is investigated, as well as the effect on the emergent spectrum. Escape fractions from a sample of simulated galaxies of representative physical properties are found to decrease for increasing galaxy virial mass M {sub vir}, from f {sub esc} approaching unity for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 9} M {sub sun} to f {sub esc} less than 10% for M {sub vir} approx 10{sup 12} M {sub sun}. In spite of dust being almost gray, it is found that the emergent spectrum is affected nonuniformly, with the escape fraction of photons close to the line center being much higher than of those in the wings, thus effectively narrowing the Lyalpha line.

  1. Transition State Theory Approach to Polymer Escape from a One Dimensional Potential Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of escape of an ideal bead-spring polymer in a symmetric double-well potential is calculated using transition state theory (TST) and the results compared with direct dynamical simulations. The minimum energy path of the transitions becomes flat and the dynamics diffusive for long polymers making the Kramers-Langer estimate poor. However, TST with dynamical corrections based on short time trajectories started at the transition state gives rate constant estimates that agree within a factor of two with the molecular dynamics simulations over a wide range of bead coupling constants and polymer lengths. The computational effort required by the TST approach does not depend on the escape rate and is much smaller than that required by molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Transition to chaos and escape phenomenon in two degrees of freedom oscillator with a kinematic excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Borowiec; Grzegorz Litak

    2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of a two-degrees-of-freedom (two DOF) nonlinear oscillator representing a quartercar model excited by a road roughness profile. Modelling the road profile by means of a harmonic function we derive the Melnikov criterion for a system transition to chaos or escape. The analytically obtained estimations are confirmed by numerical simulations. To analyze the transient vibrations we used recurrences.

  3. Tunneling into black hole, escape from black hole, reflection from horizon and pair creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Flambaum

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Within classical general relativity, a particle cannot reach the horizon of a black hole during a finite time, in the reference frame of an external observer; a particle inside cannot escape from a black hole; and the horizon does not produce any reflection. We argue that these processes may possibly be allowed in the quantum world. It is known that quantum mechanics allows pair creation at the horizon (one particle inside, another particle outside) and Hawking radiation. One can extend this idea to propose other processes. Tunneling of an external particle inside black hole may be produced by the creation of a pair at the horizon, followed by the annihilation of one created particle with the initial particle outside, with the other created particle appearing inside. Escape of a particle from a black hole may result from the creation of a pair, followed by the annihilation of one created particle with the particle inside, with the other created particle appearing outside. The escape may allow the transfer of information to the outside.Finally, the reflection of an external particle from the horizon may be modelled by a combination of the two processes presented above. The relationship between these "pair creation-annihilation'' mechanisms and the "horizon tunneling" calculations [1-5] is discussed.

  4. Cosmic ray diffusive acceleration at shock waves with finite upstream and downstream escape boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ostrowski; R. Schlickeiser

    1996-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we discuss the modifications introduced into the first-order Fermi shock acceleration process due to a finite extent of diffusive regions near the shock or due to boundary conditions leading to an increased particle escape upstream and/or downstream the shock. In the considered simple example of the planar shock wave we idealize the escape phenomenon by imposing a particle escape boundary at some distance from the shock. Presence of such a boundary (or boundaries) leads to coupled steepening of the accelerated particle spectrum and decreasing of the acceleration time scale. It allows for a semi-quantitative evaluation and, in some specific cases, also for modelling of the observed steep particle spectra as a result of the first-order Fermi shock acceleration. We also note that the particles close to the upper energy cut-off are younger than the estimate based on the respective acceleration time scale. In Appendix A we present a new time-dependent solution for infinite diffusive regions near the shock allowing for different constant diffusion coefficients upstream and downstream the shock.

  5. 2009 Great Places Awards -- Call for Submissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009 Great Places Awards Places, the Environmental Designannounce the twelfth annual awards program for Place Design,ipation of Metropolis, the awards program has a new name in

  6. GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COOPERATIVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GREAT PLAINS INTERSTATE FOREST FIRE COMPACT COOPERATIVE ANNUAL OPERATING PLAN 2011 #12;Great Plains are located in Appendices F through K. II. Purpose This cooperative operating plan facilitates assistance ordered through the Compact and used on joint US Federal/State fires will be considered agents

  7. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION U.S. D EPARTMENT OF COMM ER CE Great Lakes Ice Cover facts since 1973 - 94.7% ice coverage in 1979 is the maximum on record - 9.5% ice coverage in 2002 is the lowest on record - 11.5% ice coverage in 1998, a strong El Nino

  8. Great Works Academic Certificate Program Great Works of Our Intellectual Heritage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Great Works Academic Certificate Program Great Works of Our Intellectual Heritage Not all works-Reckoner) Apollonius of Perga (c. 262 - c. 190 BCE) On Conic Sections Ssu-ma Ch'ien (c. 145 - c. 85 BCE) Historical

  9. J. Great Lakes Res. 33 (Special Issue 3):211223 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorcas, Michael E.

    , coastal wetlands, Great Lakes. *Corresponding author. E-mail: hower@uwgb.edu 211 #12;212 Price et al

  10. Galactic porosity and a star formation threshold for the escape of ionising radiation from galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Clarke; M. S. Oey

    2002-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatial distribution of star formation within galaxies strongly affects the resulting feedback processes. Previous work has considered the case of a single, concentrated nuclear starburst, and also that of distributed single supernovae (SNe). Here, we consider ISM structuring by SNe originating in spatially distributed clusters having a cluster membership spectrum given by the observed HII region luminosity function. We show that in this case, the volume of HI cleared per SN is considerably greater than in either of the two cases considered hitherto. We derive a simple relationship between the ``porosity'' of the ISM and the star formation rate (SFR), and deduce a critical SFR_crit, at which the ISM porosity is unity. This critical value describes the case in which the SN mechanical energy output over a timescale t_e is comparable with the ISM ``thermal'' energy contained in random motions; t_e is the duration of SN mechanical input per superbubble. This condition also defines a critical gas consumption timescale t_exh, which for a Salpeter IMF and random velocities of \\simeq 10 km s-1 is roughly 10e10 years. We draw a link between porosity and the escape of ionising radiation from galaxies, arguing that high escape fractions are expected if SFR >~ SFR_crit. The Lyman Break Galaxies, which are presumably subject to infall on a timescale < t_exh, meet this criterion, as is consistent with the significant leakage of ionising photons inferred in these systems. We suggest the utility of this simple parameterisation of escape fraction in terms of SFR for semi-empirical models of galaxy formation and evolution and for modeling mechanical and chemical feedback effects.

  11. Great Lakes Biofuels LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreatGreat

  12. Contact Upper Great Plains Regional Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Great Plains Regional Office Mailing Address: PO Box 35800 Billings, MT 59107-5800 406-255-2800 Toll Free: 1-800-358-3415 Fax: 406-255-2900 Organizational chart with phone numbers...

  13. Escape of Lyman alpha Emission in the Starburst Galaxy Mkn 357 - a Wind's Far Side

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    William C. Keel

    2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    HST imaging and slitless spectroscopy are used to examine where the strong Lyman alpha emission escapes from the interstellar medium in the starburst galaxy Mkn 357. An H-alpha image shows that the ionized gas is mostly in a global wind, rather than associated with the individual star-forming regions seen in the optical and UV continuum. The Lyman alpha emission comes predominantly from the northwest side of the wind structure spatially, and shows a significant redshift relative to the optical lines. Both of these properties are signatures of seeing the line photons backscattered from the far side of a prolate or bipolar starburst wind, fitting both with escape calculations and evidence for winds in high-redshift galaxies with net Lyman alpha emission. Scattering is most important within this wind itself, rather than involving a surrounding neutral medium, as shown by the decreasing relative redshift of the line peak from 250 to 30 km/s between the center and edge of the detected emission. The Lyman alpha emission exhibits strong asymmetry in comparison with both the starlight and H-alpha structures. These results add to the evidence that kinematics, rather than gas metallicity or dust content, are the dominant effect in determining which galaxies have strong Lyman alpha emission, and that powerful (and perhaps episodic) starbursts are common among Lyman-break galaxies as well as those discovered from Lyman alpha line emission.

  14. Delineating the magnetic field line escape pattern and stickiness in a poloidally diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martins, Caroline G. L., E-mail: carolinegameiro@gmail.com, E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Departamento de Física, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, São José dos Campos, SP 12228-900 (Brazil); Department of Physics, Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Roberto, M., E-mail: marisar@ita.br [Departamento de Física, Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, São José dos Campos, SP 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L., E-mail: carolinegameiro@gmail.com, E-mail: ibere@if.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Física, São Paulo, SP 05315-970 (Brazil)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a Hamiltonian model with five wire loops that delineates magnetic surfaces of tokamaks with poloidal divertor. Non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations are added by external coils, similar to the correction coils that have been installed or designed in present tokamaks. To show the influence of magnetic perturbations on the field line escape, we integrate numerically the field line differential equations and obtain the footprints and deposition patterns on the divertor plate. Moreover, we show that the homoclinic tangle describes the deposition patterns in the divertor plate, agreeing with results observed in sophisticated simulation codes. Additionally, we show that while chaotic lines escape to the divertor plates, some of them are trapped, for many toroidal turns, in complex structures around magnetic islands, embedded in the chaotic region, giving rise to stickiness evidences characteristic of chaotic Hamiltonian systems. Finally, we introduce a random collisional term to the field line mapping to investigate stickiness alterations due to particle collisions. Within this model, we conclude that, even reduced by collisions, the observed trapping still influences the field line transport. The results obtained for our numerical estimations indicate that the reported trapping may affect the transport in present tokamaks.

  15. MOLECULAR-KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF ESCAPE FROM THE EX-PLANET AND EXOPLANETS: CRITERION FOR TRANSONIC FLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Robert E.; Volkov, Alexey N.; Erwin, Justin T. [Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The equations of gas dynamics are extensively used to describe atmospheric loss from solar system bodies and exoplanets even though the boundary conditions at infinity are not uniquely defined. Using molecular-kinetic simulations that correctly treat the transition from the continuum to the rarefied region, we confirm that the energy-limited escape approximation is valid when adiabatic expansion is the dominant cooling process. However, this does not imply that the outflow goes sonic. Rather large escape rates and concomitant adiabatic cooling can produce atmospheres with subsonic flow that are highly extended. Since this affects the heating rate of the upper atmosphere and the interaction with external fields and plasmas, we give a criterion for estimating when the outflow goes transonic in the continuum region. This is applied to early terrestrial atmospheres, exoplanet atmospheres, and the atmosphere of the ex-planet, Pluto, all of which have large escape rates.

  16. Energy and water in the Great Lakes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidwell, Vincent Carroll

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nexus between thermoelectric power production and water use is not uniform across the U.S., but rather differs according to regional physiography, demography, power plant fleet composition, and the transmission network. That is, in some regions water demand for thermoelectric production is relatively small while in other regions it represents the dominate use. The later is the case for the Great Lakes region, which has important implications for the water resources and aquatic ecology of the Great Lakes watershed. This is today, but what about the future? Projected demographic trends, shifting lifestyles, and economic growth coupled with the threat of global climate change and mounting pressure for greater U.S. energy security could have profound effects on the region's energy future. Planning for such an uncertain future is further complicated by the fact that energy and environmental planning and regulatory decisionmaking is largely bifurcated in the region, with environmental and water resource concerns generally taken into account after new energy facilities and technologies have been proposed, or practices are already in place. Based on these confounding needs, the objective of this effort is to develop Great Lakes-specific methods and tools to integrate energy and water resource planning and thereby support the dual goals of smarter energy planning and development, and protection of Great Lakes water resources. Guiding policies for this planning are the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact and the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The desired outcome of integrated energy-water-aquatic resource planning is a more sustainable regional energy mix for the Great Lakes basin ecosystem.

  17. Escape from the potential well: competition between long jumps and long waiting times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartlomiej Dybiec

    2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Within a concept of the fractional diffusion equation and subordination, the paper examines the influence of a competition between long waiting times and long jumps on the escape from the potential well. Applying analytical arguments and numerical methods, we demonstrate that the presence of long waiting times distributed according to a power-law distribution with a diverging mean leads to very general asymptotic properties of the survival probability. The observed survival probability asymptotically decays like a power-law whose form is not affected by the value of the exponent characterizing the power-law jump length distribution. It is demonstrated that this behavior is typical of and generic for systems exhibiting long waiting times. We also show that the survival probability has a universal character not only asymptotically but also at small times. Finally, it is indicated which properties of the first passage time density are sensitive to the exact value of the exponent characterizing the jump length distribution.

  18. A maximin characterization of the escape rate of nonexpansive mappings in metrically convex spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaubert, Stephane

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish a maximin characterization of the linear escape rate of the orbits of a nonexpansive mapping on a complete (hemi-)metric space, under a mild form of Busemann's nonpositive curvature condition (we require a distinguished family of geodesics with a common origin to satisfy a convexity inequality). This characterization, which involves horofunctions, generalizes the Collatz-Wielandt characterization of the spectral radius of a nonnegative matrix. It yields as corollaries a theorem of Kohlberg and Neyman (1981), concerning nonexpansive maps in Banach spaces, a variant of a Denjoy-Wolff type theorem of Karlsson (2001), together with a refinement of a theorem of Gunawardena and Walsh (2003), concerning order-preserving positively homogeneous self-maps of symmetric cones.

  19. A MODEL FOR THE ESCAPE OF SOLAR-FLARE-ACCELERATED PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masson, S.; Antiochos, S. K. [Space Weather Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); DeVore, C. R., E-mail: sophie.masson@nasa.gov [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the problem of how particles are accelerated by solar flares can escape into the heliosphere on timescales of an hour or less. Impulsive solar energetic particle (SEP) bursts are generally observed in association with so-called eruptive flares consisting of a coronal mass ejection (CME) and a flare. These fast SEPs are believed to be accelerated directly by the flare, rather than by the CME shock. However, the precise mechanism by which the particles are accelerated remains controversial. Regardless of the origin of the acceleration, the particles should remain trapped in the closed magnetic fields of the coronal flare loops and the ejected flux rope, given the magnetic geometry of the standard eruptive-flare model. In this case, the particles would reach the Earth only after a delay of many hours to a few days (coincident with the bulk ejecta arriving at Earth). We propose that the external magnetic reconnection intrinsic to the breakout model for CME initiation can naturally account for the prompt escape of flare-accelerated energetic particles onto open interplanetary magnetic flux tubes. We present detailed 2.5-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a breakout CME/flare event with a background isothermal solar wind. Our calculations demonstrate that if the event occurs sufficiently near a coronal-hole boundary, interchange reconnection between open and closed fields can occur. This process allows particles from deep inside the ejected flux rope to access solar wind field lines soon after eruption. We compare these results to standard observations of impulsive SEPs and discuss the implications of the model on further observations and calculations.

  20. Ostracoda of Moss Town Blue Hole, Great Exuma Island, Great Bahama Bank (Crustacea: Ostracoda: Myodocopa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    Ostracoda of Moss Town Blue Hole, Great Exuma Island, Great Bahama Bank (Crustacea: Ostracoda Halocypridina, and one Cladocopina) are reported from 30 to 60 m depths in Moss Town Blue Hole, an ocean blue. The collection from Moss Town Blue Hole contained no new species, but five species had not been reported

  1. Investigating the Structure of the Windy Torus in Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallagher, S C; Abado, M M; Keating, S K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal mid-infrared emission of quasars requires an obscuring structure that can be modeled as a magneto-hydrodynamic wind in which radiation pressure on dust shapes the outflow. We have taken the dusty wind models presented by Keating and collaborators that generated quasar mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs), and explored their properties (such as geometry, opening angle, and ionic column densities) as a function of Eddington ratio and X-ray weakness. In addition, we present new models with a range of magnetic field strengths and column densities of the dust-free shielding gas interior to the dusty wind. We find this family of models -- with input parameters tuned to accurately match the observed mid-IR power in quasar SEDs -- provides reasonable values of the Type 1 fraction of quasars and the column densities of warm absorber gas, though it does not explain a purely luminosity-dependent covering fraction for either. Furthermore, we provide predictions of the cumulative distribution of E(B-V...

  2. Discrete Optimization Lower bounds and heuristics for the Windy Rural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández de Córdoba, Pedro

    or not they are consid- ered as non-required edges. Hence, the problem of finding a minimum energy consumption traversal of the known single-vehicle Arc Routing Prob- lems, and it is the mathematical model describing several real periodi- cally. The possibility of using autonomous robots equipped with TV cameras represents a very

  3. The windy city : harnessing power in the neighborhood landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherry, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Sher)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind power has spread in North America, so has an awareness that community acceptance will largely determine whether this renewable energy source continues to grow. Despite apparently widespread popular support for wind ...

  4. Windy Flats(3Q09 portion) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to:Flats

  5. Windy Point (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump to:Flats(08)

  6. Windy Point - REpower (09) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension Jump

  7. Windy Point - Siemens Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Project Jump to:WilsonIIa extension JumpSiemens Wind Farm

  8. Big Windy Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomass ConversionsSouth Carolina:EnergyPark, Arizona: Energy ResourcesStone

  9. Housing and the Great Depression Mehmet Balcilar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Housing and the Great Depression Mehmet Balcilar Department of Economics Eastern Mediterranean Vegas Las Vegas, Nevada, 89154-6005 USA Abstract: This paper considers the role of the real housing between the real housing price and real GDP per capita. We test for structural change in parameter values

  10. Ion escape from Mars as a function of solar wind conditions: A statistical study Hans Nilsson a,*, Ella Carlsson a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    . On average there must be a pressure balance between the outer force, the solar wind dynamic pressureIon escape from Mars as a function of solar wind conditions: A statistical study Hans Nilsson a Available online 13 March 2009 Keywords: Ionosphere Mars, Atmosphere Solar wind a b s t r a c

  11. Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Water Level Statistics Primary Investigator: Cynthia Sellinger Overview Extreme Great disruption throughout the Great Lakes system. Reliable lake level frequency distributions are a critical of monthly lake levels reflect secular changes in connecting channel hydraulics, watershed hydrologic

  12. UHECR ESCAPE MECHANISMS FOR PROTONS AND NEUTRONS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND THE COSMIC-RAY-NEUTRINO CONNECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter, E-mail: philipp.baerwald@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de, E-mail: mauricio.bustamante@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de, E-mail: winter@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The paradigm that gamma-ray burst fireballs are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being probed by neutrino observations. Very stringent bounds can be obtained from the cosmic-ray (proton)-neutrino connection, assuming that the UHECRs escape as neutrons. In this study, we identify three different regimes as a function of the fireball parameters: the standard ''one neutrino per cosmic ray'' case, the optically thick (to neutron escape) case, and the case where leakage of protons from the boundaries of the shells (direct escape) dominates. In the optically thick regime, the photomeson production is very efficient, and more neutrinos will be emitted per cosmic ray than in the standard case, whereas in the direct escape-dominated regime, more cosmic rays than neutrinos will be emitted. We demonstrate that, for efficient proton acceleration, which is required to describe the observed UHECR spectrum, the standard case only applies to a very narrow region of the fireball parameter space. We illustrate with several observed examples that conclusions on the cosmic-ray-neutrino connection will depend on the actual burst parameters. We also show that the definition of the pion production efficiency currently used by the IceCube collaboration underestimates the neutrino production in the optically thick case. Finally, we point out that the direct escape component leads to a spectral break in the cosmic-ray spectrum emitted from a single source. The resulting ''two-component model'' can be used to even more strongly pronounce the spectral features of the observed UHECR spectrum than the dip model.

  13. Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly Reduced Emissions and Improved Fuel Efficiency Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

  14. american great lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    polynorphismsobserved among the North American Great Lakes ciscoes suggest that this fish group has Bernatchez, Louis 2 Great Lakes CiteSeer Summary: Grant realized an...

  15. Multilayered YSZ/GZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    YSZGZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Multilayered YSZGZO films with greatly enhanced ionic conduction for low...

  16. Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur Development of Offshore Wind Projects Obama Administration and Great Lakes States Announce Agreement to Spur...

  17. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  18. Distributions of Alpha Particles Escaping to the Wall because of Sawtooth Oscillations in TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolesnichenko, Ya.I.; Lutsenko, V.V.; White, R.B.; Yakovenko, Yu.V., Zweben, S.J.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been observed experimentally in deuterium-tritium shots of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) that crashes of sawtooth oscillations may result in very inhomogeneous flux of alpha particles to the wall. Namely, measurements with four detectors installed at the wall at 20°, 45°, 60°, and 90° below the midplane of the torus have shown that the alpha flux to the wall is strongly peaked at the 20° and 90° detectors and on the noise level at the 45° detector. To explain this phenomenon, both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation have been carried out. It is concluded that the "crash-induced prompt loss," i.e., the orbital loss of marginally trapped particles arising because of the crash-induced orbit transformation of circulating particles, is responsible for the flux to the 90° and 60° detectors, whereas the crash-induced stochastic diffusion of moderately trapped particles explains the large signal at the 20° detector. The calculated poloidal distributions of the integral alpha flux are in reasonable agreement with experimental data. In addition to the integral flux, the flux of particles with given energy was calculated. The energy spectrum of the escaping particles has also been calculated, which can be used for diagnostics of the crash type.

  19. Great Lakes WIND Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A SUK Place:GeorgiaGimcheonWindenergyGreat Lakes

  20. Great Energy Debate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdf Flash2006-52.pdf0.pdfDepartmentCounselGlass CoatingEducation » ForasGreat Energy

  1. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin Geothermal

  2. Great Plains Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat

  3. Great River Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver Energy Jump to:

  4. Great Valley Ethanol LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver Energy

  5. GreatPoint Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver

  6. Great Lakes Energy Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is aGreat Lakes Energy Coop

  7. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology|Solar wind samplesUS Dept ofSouthern Great

  8. A transmission/escape probabilities model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, W.M.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new computational model for neutral particle transport in the outer regions of a diverted tokamak plasma chamber is presented. The model is based on the calculation of transmission and escape probabilities using first-flight integral transport theory and the balancing of fluxes across the surfaces bounding the various regions. The geometrical complexity of the problem is included in precomputed probabilities which depend only on the mean free path of the region.

  9. Multi-functional Bio-synthetic Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Cellular Uptake, Endosomal Escape and Targeted Delivery Toward Diagnostics and Therapeutics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Ritu 1984-

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    incorporation of histamines to facilitate their endosomal escape for efficient delivery into the cytosol. The cSCKs were further templated onto high aspect ratio anionic cylinders to form hierarchically-assembled nanostructures that bring together individual...

  10. J. Great Lakes Res. 25(4):663682 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inventories and Mercury Profiles from Lake Superior: Evidence for Mining Impacts W. Charles Kerfoot*,1, Sandra size of Lake Superior, were sediment profiles at locations far offshore impacted by nearshore activi, copper, mining, mercury, sediment. 663 INTRODUCTION The Great Lakes ecosystem is susceptible to loading

  11. The Impact of Climate Change on Great Lakes Water Levels Region: Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Discuss global warming as an issue to discover what students already know about polar ice cap melting of global warming, due to melting of the polar ice caps. 3. Have students discuss the effects of changes places in the world (such as the Great Lakes region), while at the same time polar melting is occurring

  12. J. Great Lakes Res. 33:722735 Internat. Assoc. Great Lakes Res., 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes, with their vast nat- ural resources, contribute significantly to the eco- nomic 1992), as well as the hy- dropower industry (Assel et al. 1983), and shipping industry (Cooper et al for icebreaking operations and the most hazardous for ship navigation, can be uniquely identified by co

  13. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-135 Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ____________________________________________________________________________ Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Update: Winters 2003, 2004, and 2005 Raymond A. Assel NOAA, Great..................................................................................................6 DATES OF FIRST (LAST) ICE AND ICE DURATION. .............................................................7 SEASONAL PROGRESSION OF ICE COVER

  14. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  15. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  16. Evolutionary Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Evolutionary Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling Dario Landa-Silva and Joe-linear great deluge algorithm in which evolutionary opera- tors are incorporated. First, we generate of the evo- lutionary operators. Our results show that the hybrid between non-linear great deluge

  17. Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report to USDA Forest Service and MN Cooperative. #12;Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2004 Annual Report ii Executive Summary We summarize the second year of a project on the Canada lynx ecology in the Great Lakes region. The project is designed

  18. book reviews Climate Changeon the Great Lakes Basin. 1992.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,personal communication). The second paper, "Effects of Climate Change on the Water Resources of the Great is a compilation of five papers presented at the Symposium of Climate Change on the Great Lakes Basin held as part- ested in learning more a out climate change issues andstudiesintheGreatL kesisadvisedtoconsultthe

  19. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  20. Further Tests of Changes in Fish Escape Behavior Resulting from Sublethal Stresses Associated with Hydroelectric Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, M.G.

    2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish that pass through a hydroelectric turbine may not be killed directly, but may nonetheless experience sublethal stresses that will increase their susceptibility to predators (indirect mortality). There is a need to develop reliable tests for indirect mortality so that the full consequences of passage through turbines (and other routes around a hydroelectric dam) can be assessed. The most commonly used laboratory technique for assessing susceptibility to predation is the predator preference test. In this report, we evaluate the field application of a new technique that may be valuable for assessing indirect mortality, based on changes in a behavioral response to a startling stimulus (akin to perceiving an approaching predator). The behavioral response is a rapid movement commonly referred to as a startle response, escape response, or C-shape, based on the characteristic body position assumed by the fish. When viewed from above, a startled fish bends into a C-shape, then springs back and swims away in a direction different from its original orientation. This predator avoidance (escape) behavior can be compromised by sublethal stresses that temporarily stun or disorient the fish. Initial studies demonstrated that turbulence created in a small laboratory tank can alter escape behavior. As a next step, we converted our laboratory design to a more portable unit, transported it to Alden Research Laboratory in Holden, Massachusetts, and used it to test fish that passed uninjured through a pilot-scale turbine runner. Rainbow trout were either passed through the turbine or exposed to handling stresses, and their behavior was subsequently evaluated. Groups of five fish were given a startle stimulus (a visual and pressure wave cue) and filmed with a high-speed (500 frames per s) video camera. The reactions of each group of fish to the startle stimulus were filmed at nominally 1-, 5-, and 15-min post-exposure. We compared the behaviors of 70 fish passed through the turbine and another 70 under control conditions (either transferred from the holding tank or injected into the Alden loop downstream of turbine). The resulting image files were analyzed for a variety of behavioral measures including: presence of a startle response, time to first reaction, duration of reaction, time to formation of the maximum C-shape, time to completion of the C-shape, completeness of the C-shape, direction of turn, and degree of turn. The data were evaluated for statistical significance and patterns of response were identified. The most immediate measure of potential changes in fish behavior was whether test and control fish exhibited a startle response. Unlike earlier studies, there was no significant difference among the treatment group and the controls for startle response. The majority of rainbow trout in all groups responded to the startle stimulus. There were however, significant differences in some of the particular aspects of the subsequent escape behavior. The time to first reaction, the duration of the reaction, and the times associated with maximum C-shape formation were all significantly different between the tank controls and the two groups of fish injected into the Alden turbine loop. There were no significant differences in behavioral responses between the trout passed through the turbine runner and those injected downstream of the runner. Other behavioral parameters, such as C-shape completeness ratio, were not significantly affected. The effect of the Alden turbine loop on some aspects of the escape behavior suggest that the process of movement through the system is important, but that the role of the added stress, if any, of passage through the turbine runner is minimal. It may be important that statistically significant differences in timing of phases of the startle response were detected, even though the majority of stressed fish still exhibited the startle response. This is in contrast to earlier studies, where timing of phases of the startle responses were only affected when the overall startle response was impaired. This pattern

  1. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  2. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  3. Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for geothermal energy in the Great Basin. In addition, understanding the geochemical evolution of these various types of systems will provide important insights into the possible...

  4. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    wind development in the Great Lakes closer to fruition." "The country's vast offshore wind resources have the potential to dramatically reduce America's dependence on fossil...

  5. Stantec Investigates Bat Activity in Atlantic and Great Lakes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Maine, Great Lakes, and Mid-Atlantic coastal states regions to inform efforts to mitigate potential impacts associated with offshore wind energy development in these regions....

  6. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Abstract Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense...

  7. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice Lake (Section 6.2) incillding ice thickness, the different types of iceformed, and ice classification

  8. Science and innovation strategy for forestry in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Science and innovation strategy for forestry in Great Britain #12;The cover image is derived from X-rays of juniper berries (Juniperus communis), some containing seeds. #12;Science and innovation strategy COMMISSION (2014). Science and innovation strategy for forestry in Great Britain. Forestry Commission

  9. INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great Lakes to track changes Concentrations Measured by Acoustic and Optical Sensors Nathan Hawley* Great Lakes Environmental Research sensitive to particles of different sizes, the simultaneous deployment of acoustic and optical sensors may

  10. Exploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wild Onion & Balsamroot Gambel Oak Pinyon Pine Salina Wild Rye Sunflower Seed Great Basin Rye IndianExploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin: nutrient content, handling costs, effects of human settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical change in Basin/Plateau #12;Problems Geophytes

  11. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction that will achieve an integrated, comprehensive, and sustainable observing system enterprise for the Great Lakes

  12. All Other Retired Employees Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer. Great-West Life's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to you and your family. The Plan is underwritten by #12;Protecting Your Personal Information At Great as life, disability and critical illness insurance for individuals and families. As a leading providerAll Other Retired Employees #12;Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer

  13. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of escaping core plasma particles to the scrape-off layer for accurate response of plasma-facing components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    Environment, School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette 47907, USA E-mail: vsizyuk and INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY NUCLEAR FUSION Nucl. Fusion 53 (2013) 073023 (8pp) doi:10 Heterogeneous Target Systems (HEIGHTS) package to accurately predict the impact of the escaped particles

  14. Is New Zealand's food supply under threat? What have we learned from the escape of genetically modified (GM) corn throughout New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Is New Zealand's food supply under threat? What have we learned from the escape of genetically. This realization undermines claims that uses of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) outside of the laboratory can modified (GM) corn throughout New Zealand? The most alarming outcome of the recently concluded

  15. Thomas Carlyle and the making of Frederick the Great 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Linda Clark

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thomas Carlyle’s History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, called Frederick the Great was published in six volumes between 1858 and 1865 and was his last major work. Carlyle had a specific purpose in mind when he began writing ...

  16. african great lakes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 FISH COMMUNITIES IN THE EAST AFRICAN GREAT LAKES PEUPLEMENTS ICHTHYOLOGIQUES CiteSeer...

  17. Colorado's Economic Recovery since the Great Recession Professor Martin Shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Colorado's Economic Recovery since the Great Recession Professor Martin Shields Regional Economics Institute Colorado State University csurei, economic performance has been mixed. The northern Front Range has fared best

  18. Serial Echocardiographic Evaluation of 22 Closely Related Great Danes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Michael R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    additive mixed regression, linear regression, and non-linear regression. Results: All dogs demonstrated progressive echocardiographic changes. The Great Danes with DCM showed several echocardiographic differences when compared to the normal dogs...

  19. EIS-0106: Great Falls-Conrad Transmission Line Project, Montana

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Western Area Power Administration prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of the construction and operation of a 230-kilovolt transmission line from Great Falls, Montana, to Conrad, Montana.

  20. 241 Strength in numbers 243 Great leap outwards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    INSIGHT QUANTUM MECHANICS EDITORIAL 241 Strength in numbers THESIS 243 Great leap outwards Mark spintronics: Pumping spins through polymers Bert Koopmans INSIGHT: FOUNDATIONS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS EDITORIAL 253 Foundations of quantum mechanics COMMENTARY 254 Gravity in quantum mechanics Giovanni Amelino

  1. MIE Regional Climate Change Impact Webinar Series: Great Plains

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Minorities in Energy Initiative is hosting a webinar on the Great Plains impacts of climate change on minority and tribal communities featuring presentations...

  2. Great Lakes Energy- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Great Lakes Energy offers rebates to residential customers for the purchase of efficiency air-source heat pumps or geothermal heat pumps. A rebate of $250 is available for air-source heat pumps,...

  3. 17.952 Great Power Military Intervention, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posen, Barry

    The purpose of this seminar is to examine systematically, and comparatively, great and middle power military interventions into civil wars during the 1990's. These civil wars were high on the policy agenda of western states ...

  4. Regional Gravity Survey of the Northern Great Salt Lake Desert...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Great Salt Lake Desert and Adjacent Areas in Utah, Nevada, and Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Regional Gravity...

  5. What Polarized Country? Clean Energy -The Great Convener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    What Polarized Country? Clean Energy - The Great Convener Tuesday, October 2, 2012 11:30 a.m. - 1, vast agreement that we should champion clean energy and energy efficiency. Join us for an engaging

  6. Quaternary freshwater Ostracoda from the Great Salt Lake Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lister, K. H.

    1975-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Dissertation Fellowship. I appreciate loans of type specimens by The Illinois State Geological Survey; The United States National Museum; and the Geological Sur- 5 vey of Canada, Saskatchewan. Specimens of the Great Salt Lake Basin ostracodes studied have been... Dissertation Fellowship. I appreciate loans of type specimens by The Illinois State Geological Survey; The United States National Museum; and the Geological Sur- 5 vey of Canada, Saskatchewan. Specimens of the Great Salt Lake Basin ostracodes studied have been...

  7. XUV exposed non-hydrostatic hydrogen-rich upper atmospheres of terrestrial planets. Part I: Atmospheric expansion and thermal escape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erkaev, N V; Odert, P; Kulikov, Yu N; Kislyakova, K G; Khodachenko, M L; Güdel, M; Hanslmeier, A; Biernat, H

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently discovered low-density "super-Earths" Kepler-11b, Kepler-11f, Kepler-11d, Kepler-11e, and planets such as GJ 1214b represent most likely planets which are surrounded by dense H/He envelopes or contain deep H2O oceans also surrounded by dense hydrogen envelopes. Although these "super-Earths" are orbiting relatively close to their host stars, they have not lost their captured nebula-based hydrogen-rich or degassed steam protoatmospheres. Thus it is interesting to estimate the maximum possible amount of atmospheric hydrogen loss from a terrestrial planet orbiting within the habitable zone of a Sun-like G-type host star. For studying the thermosphere structure and escape we apply a 1-D hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model which solves the equations of mass, momentum and energy conservation for a planet with the mass and size of the Earth and for a "super-Earth" with a size of 2 R_Earth and a mass of 10 M_Earth. We calculate heating rates by the stellar soft X-rays and EUV radiation and expansion of th...

  8. Strain-rate and temperature dependence of yield stress of amorphous solids via self-learning metabasin escape algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Penghui Cao; Xi Lin; Harold S. Park

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A general self-learning metabasin escape (SLME) algorithm~\\citep{caoPRE2012} is coupled in this work with continuous shear deformations to probe the yield stress as a function of strain rate and temperature for a binary Lennard-Jones (LJ) amorphous solid. The approach is shown to match the results of classical molecular dynamics (MD) at high strain rates where the MD results are valid, but, importantly, is able to access experimental strain rates that are about ten orders of magnitude slower than MD. In doing so, we find in agreement with previous experimental studies that a substantial decrease in yield stress is observed with decreasing strain rate. At room temperature and laboratory strain rates, the activation volume associated with yield is found to contain about 10 LJ particles, while the yield stress is as sensitive to a $1.5\\%T_{\\rm g}$ increase in temperature as it is to a one order of magnitude decrease in strain rate. Moreover, our SLME results suggest the SLME and extrapolated results from MD simulations follow distinctly different energetic pathways during the applied shear deformation at low temperatures and experimental strain rates, which implies that extrapolation of the governing deformation mechanisms from MD strain rates to experimental may not be valid.

  9. Phase transition between quantum and classical regimes for the escape rate of dimeric molecular nanomagnets in a staggered magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon Akaraka Owerre; M. B Paranjape

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phase transition of the escape rate of exchange-coupled dimer of single-molecule magnets which are coupled either ferromagnetic ally or antiferromagnetically in a staggered magnetic field and an easy $z$-axis anisotropy. The Hamiltonian for this system has been used to study molecular dimer nanomagnets [Mn$_4$]$_2$. We generalize the method of mapping a single-molecule magnetic spin problem onto a quantum-mechanical particle to dimeric molecular nanomagnets. The problem is mapped to a single particle quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian in terms of the relative coordinate and a coordinate dependent reduced mass. It is shown that the presence of the external staggered magnetic field creates a phase boundary separating the first- from the second-order transition. With the set of parameters used by R. Tiron, $\\textit{et al}$, \\prl {\\bf 91}, 227203 (2003), and S. Hill, $\\textit{et al}$ science {\\bf 302}, 1015 (2003) to fit experimental data for [Mn$_{4}$]$_2$ dimer we find that the critical temperature at the phase boundary is $T^{(c)}_0 =0.29K$. Therefore, thermally activated transitions should occur for temperatures greater than $T^{(c)}_0$.

  10. Great Lakes ports coal handling capacity and export coal potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ames, A.H. Jr.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was developed to determine the competitive position of the Great Lakes Region coal-loading ports in relation to other US coastal ranges. Due to the congestion at some US Atlantic coastal ports US coal producers have indicated a need for alternative export routes, including the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System. The study assesses the regions coal handling capacity and price competitiveness along with the opportunity for increased US flag vessel service. A number of appendices are included showing major coal producers, railroad marketing representatives, US vessel operators, and port handling capacities and throughput. A rate analysis is provided including coal price at the mine, rail rate to port, port handling charges, water transportation rates to western Europe, Great Lakes route versus the US Atlantic Coast ports.

  11. Great Boiling Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreat Boiling

  12. Great Falls, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat BasinGreat

  13. Great Power Battery Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is aGreat Lakes EnergyGreat

  14. Peering through the holes: the far UV color of star-forming galaxies at z~3-4 and the escaping fraction of ionizing radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanzella, E; Castellano, M; Grazian, A; Inoue, A K; Schaerer, D; Guaita, L; Zamorani, G; Giavalisco, M; Siana, B; Pentericci, L; Giallongo, E; Fontana, A; Vignali, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to investigate the effect of the escaping ionizing radiation on the color selection of high redshift galaxies and identify candidate Lyman continuum (LyC) emitters. The intergalactic medium prescription of Inoue et al.(2014) and galaxy synthesis models of Bruzual&Charlot (2003) have been used to properly treat the ultraviolet stellar emission, the stochasticity of the intergalactic transmission and mean free path in the ionizing regime. Color tracks are computed by turning on/off the escape fraction of ionizing radiation. At variance with recent studies, a careful treatment of IGM transmission leads to no significant effects on the high-redshift broad-band color selection. The decreasing mean free path of ionizing photons with increasing redshift further diminishes the contribution of the LyC to broad-band colors. We also demonstrate that prominent LyC sources can be selected under suitable conditions by calculating the probability of a null escaping ionizing radiation. The method is applied to a s...

  15. A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Computer Tutorial for Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology R.A. ASSELL U.S. Department of Commerce tutorial was developed to provide an overview of the annual ~ r e a fLakes ice cycle. The tutorial includes an animation to aid in visualizing the normal seasonal progression and the spatial patterns of ice cover

  16. GUEST EDITORIAL Multimedia indexing and retrieval: ever great challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbouj, Moncef

    GUEST EDITORIAL Multimedia indexing and retrieval: ever great challenges Chabane Djeraba & Moncef Abstract In this introduction, we present a brief state of the art of multimedia indexing and retrieval the next multimedia indexing and retrieval generation. The contributions explore wide range of fields

  17. The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamnidae), and the tiger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , located dorsolaterally and posterior to the first dorsal fin. A second boat was present and both shark646 The great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamnidae), and the tiger shark, Galeocerdo cuvier (Carcharhin- idae), are two of the largest species of macropredatory sharks. Both are known

  18. Great Lakes Ecosystems Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    --> light energy ­ there is a loss of "useful" energy during transformation: heat The sun is the ultimate ­ Sun to producer to consumer to decomposer · Solar energy is trapped by photosynthesis as chemical1 Great Lakes Ecosystems Part I Flow of energy through ecosystems; recycling of matter within

  19. August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    August 2012 Brazil is one of the great success stories of the last several decades ­ and today has become a vibrant democracy and an economic powerhouse. Brazil's international profile has never been and staff. Our study of Brazil is strong and our engagement with Brazil is growing. Today, work

  20. Coupling Quantitative Precipitation Estimate and Great Lakes Hydrologic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rationale The ability to provide accurate runoff estimates not only impacts forecasting of the water levels of the Seaway, but can help business such as commercial shippers, marinas, and hydropower and nuclear plants environment, the Great Lakes basin, and GLERL will improve its LBRM to hourly computations and its AHPS

  1. Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2003 Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Canada Lynx in the Great Lakes Region 2003 Annual Report to USDA Forest Service and MN Cooperative-01 #12;Canada Lynx Annual Report ii of 33 ii In this report we summarize accomplishments of the Canada Forest to address 4 major questions about this population of Canada lynx: location, distribution

  2. Effects of Great Plains Irrigation on Regional Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, David B.

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of radiative and turbulent fluxes, the development of the planetary boundary layer, and the transport of water vapor from the regions of irrigation. The first two effects have the potential to drastically alter the climate of irrigated regions of the Great...

  3. How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How extensive are the impacts of nitrogen pollution in Great Britain's forests? Protecting our forests from pollutant deposition is and has been a topical issue for some time. Nitrogen, as well as being an essential nutrient for trees, is one of the most important of these pollutants. This article

  4. Genetic analysis of dilated cardiomyopathy in the great dane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbst, Stephanie Michelle

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    that are involved in the sarcomere or cytoskeletal components, leading to problems with contraction or cardiac cell integrity. In order to identify causative or susceptibility genes for DCM in the Great Dane, a whole-genome linkage screen was conducted in a family...

  5. FGas Regulation & Ecodesign: A great challenge for Heatpumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Europe 4. Using all types of refrigerants #12;EPEE's main fields of activities · Promote Energy of Buildings Directive ­ RES Renewable Energies Directive ­ Energy Efficiency Directive · The FGas RegulationFGas Regulation & Ecodesign: A great challenge for Heatpumps Andrea Voigt, EPEE October 2013 #12

  6. Changing Weather and Climate in the Great Lakes Region Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Offered by the University of Wisconsin-Madison through Coursera, this four-week course will feature a new season each week through short lectures and activities covering Great Lakes weather, observed changes in the climate, and societal impacts of climate change.

  7. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  8. FACULTY and LIBRARIANS Great-West Life is a leading Canadian life and health insurer. Great-West Life's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , disability and critical illness insurance for individuals and families. As a leading provider of employee. This booklet contains important information and should be kept in a safe place known to you and your family. The Plan is underwritten by 10-11 #12;Protecting Your Personal Information At Great-West Life, we recognize

  9. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Applicaiton from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. Federal Register Notice. EA-389 Great Bay Energy (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications Application to Export...

  10. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  11. Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 3. Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paton, D.L.; Bass, A.; Smith, D.G.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes Region atlas assimilates six collections of wind resource data, one for the region and one for each of the five states that compose the Great Lakes region: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, Wisconsin. At the state level, features of the climate, topography, and wind resource are discussed in greater detail than in the regional discussion and the data locations on which the assessment is based are mapped. Variations over several time scales in the wind resource at selected stations in each state are shown on graphs of monthly average and interannual wind speed and power, and of hourly average wind speed for each season. Other graphs present speed, direction, and duration frequencies of the wind at these locations.

  12. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  13. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS, being prepared jointly by DOE's Western Area Power Administration and the Department of the Interior’s Fish and Wildlife Service, will evaluate the environmental impacts of wind energy development in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota – Western’s Upper Great Plains customer service region. Western will use the EIS to implement a comprehensive regional program to manage interconnection requests for wind energy projects.

  14. Great Western Malting Company geothermal project, Pocatello, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, N.T.; McGeen, M.A.; Corlett, D.F.; Urmston, R.

    1981-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Western Malting Company recently constructed a barley malting facility in Pocatello, Idaho, designed to produce 6.0 million bushels per year of brewing malt. This facility uses natural gas to supply the energy for germination and kilning processes. The escalating cost of natural gas has prompted the company to look at alternate and more economical sources of energy. Trans Energy Systems has investigated the viabiity of using geothermal energy at the new barley processing plant. Preliminary investigations show that a geothermal resource probably exists, and payback on the installation of a system to utilize the resource will occur in under 2 years. The Great Western Malting plant site has geological characteristics which are similar to areas where productive geothermal wells have been established. Geological investigations indicate that resource water temperatures will be in the 150 to 200/sup 0/F range. Geothermal energy of this quality will supply 30 to 98% of the heating requirements currently supplied by natural gas for this malting plant. Trans Energy Systems has analyzed several systems of utilizing the geothermal resource at the Great Western barley malting facility. These systems included: direct use of geothermal water; geothermal energy heating process water through an intermediary heat exchanger; coal or gas boosted geothermal systems; and heat pump boosted geothermal system. The analysis examined the steps that are required to process the grain.

  15. Respirator studies for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation and performance of escape-type self-contained breathing apparatus. Progress report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hack, A.; Trujillo, A.; Carter, K.; Bradley, O.D.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of escape type breathing apparatus was evaluated for weight, comfort, ease of use, and protection factor (calculated from facepiece leakage). All of the devices tested provided a self-contained air supply of 5- to 15-min duration. Five of them have the provision to connect an air line but allow the use of the self-contained supply for safe egress. The air supply was stored in cylinders, tubing, or disposable containers. Respiratory inlet coverings were half masks, full facepieces, hoods, and mouthpieces. An estimate is given for the ease of quick donning. Recommendations for conditions of use of the equipment are given. 8 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Western Coal/Great Lakes Alternative export-coal conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference dealt with using the Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway as an alternative to the East and Gulf Coasts for the exporting of coal to Europe and the potential for a piece of the European market for the subbituminous coals of Montana and Wyoming. The topics discussed included: government policies on coal exports; the coal reserves of Montana; cost of rail transport from Western mines to Lake Superior; the planning, design, and operation of the Superior Midwest Energy Terminal at Superior, Wisconsin; direct transfer of coal from self-unloading lakers to large ocean vessels; concept of total transportation from mines to users; disadvantage of a nine month season on the Great Lakes; costs of maritime transport of coal through the Great Lakes to Europe; facilities at the ice-free, deep water port at Sept Iles; the use of Western coals from an environmental and economic viewpoint; the properties of Western coal and factors affecting its use; the feasibility of a slurry pipeline from the Powder River Basin to Lake Superior; a systems analysis of the complete hydraulic transport of coal from the mine to users in Europe; the performance of the COJA mill-burner for the combustion of superfine coal; demand for steam coal in Western Europe; and the effect the New Source Performance Standards will have on the production and use of Western coal. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 19 papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB); 17 will appear in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and 11 in Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA). (CKK)

  17. Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowa |Programs inPrograms inwith Great

  18. Great Bend, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin

  19. Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiver Energy Jump

  20. North Great River, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: Energy ResourcesGranby, Connecticut: Energy Resources Jump to:Great

  1. Great Plains The Camelina Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating AGeothermal/Exploration <GlacialGoldenarticle is aGreat Lakes Energy

  2. Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederic Kuzel

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Council of Great Lakes Governors administered the Great Lakes Biomass State and Regional Partnership (GLBSRP) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). This Partnership grew out of the existing Regional Biomass Energy Program which the Council had administered since 1983. The GLBSRP includes the States of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin. The GLBSRPÃ?Â?s overall goal is to facilitate the increased production and use of bioenergy and biobased products throughout the region. The GLBSRP has traditionally addressed its goals and objectives through a three-pronged approach: providing grants to the States; undertaking region-wide education, outreach and technology transfer projects; and, providing in-house management, support and information dissemination. At the direction of US Department of Energy, the primary emphasis of the GLBSRP in recent years has been education and outreach. Therefore, most activities have centered on developing educational materials, hosting workshops and conferences, and providing technical assistance. This report summarizes a selection of activities that were accomplished under this cooperative agreement.

  3. Lighting the Great Outdoors: LEDs in Exterior Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Tyson D. S.; Bryan, Mary M.; Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent progress in the development of white light LEDs promises great impact by opening up the huge potential for LED illumination in new areas. One such area is general illumination for exterior applications. For example, there are an estimated combined 60.5 million roadway and parking installations in the U.S. These lights account for an estimated 53.3 TWh of electricity usage annually -- nearly 7% of all lighting. If LEDs could provide the same light performance with just 25% greater efficiency, savings of over 13 TWh could be achieved. In 2007, the authors assessed emerging LED lighting technologies in a parking garage and on a city street. The purpose of these tests was to enable a utility to determine whether energy efficiency programs promoting white light LED products might be justified. The results have supported the great promise of LEDs in exterior applications, while also highlighting the barriers that continue to hinder their widespread adoption. Such barriers include 1) inconsistent product quality across manufacturers; 2) lack of key metrics for comparing LEDs to conventional sources; and 3) high upfront cost of LED luminaires compared to conventional luminaires. This paper examines these barriers, ways in which energy-efficiency programs could help to overcome them, and the potential for energy and financial savings from LED lighting in these two exterior applications.

  4. Structural investigations of Great Basin geothermal fields: Applications and implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Hinz, Nicholas H. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States); Coolbaugh, Mark F [Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because fractures and faults are commonly the primary pathway for deeply circulating hydrothermal fluids, structural studies are critical to assessing geothermal systems and selecting drilling targets for geothermal wells. Important tools for structural analysis include detailed geologic mapping, kinematic analysis of faults, and estimations of stress orientations. Structural assessments are especially useful for evaluating geothermal fields in the Great Basin of the western USA, where regional extension and transtension combine with high heat flow to generate abundant geothermal activity in regions having little recent volcanic activity. The northwestern Great Basin is one of the most geothermally active areas in the USA. The prolific geothermal activity is probably due to enhanced dilation on N- to NNE-striking normal faults induced by a transfer of NW-directed dextral shear from the Walker Lane to NW-directed extension. Analysis of several geothermal fields suggests that most systems occupy discrete steps in normal fault zones or lie in belts of intersecting, overlapping, and/or terminating faults. Most fields are associated with steeply dipping faults and, in many cases, with Quaternary faults. The structural settings favoring geothermal activity are characterized by subvertical conduits of highly fractured rock along fault zones oriented approximately perpendicular to the WNW-trending least principal stress. Features indicative of these settings that may be helpful in guiding exploration for geothermal resources include major steps in normal faults, interbasinal highs, groups of relatively low discontinuous ridges, and lateral jogs or terminations of mountain ranges.

  5. On the nature of H$\\alpha$ emitters at $z \\sim 2$ from the HiZELS survey: physical properties, Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction, and main sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oteo, I; Ivison, R J; Smail, I; Best, P N; Cepa, J; Pérez-García, A M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed multi-wavelength study (from rest-frame UV to far-IR) of narrow-band (NB) selected, star-forming (SF) H$\\alpha$ emitters (HAEs) at $z \\sim 2.23$ taken from the High Redshift(Z) Emission Line Survey (HiZELS). We find that HAEs have similar SED-derived properties and colors to $sBzK$ galaxies and probe a well-defined portion of the SF population at $z \\sim 2$. This is not true for Ly$\\alpha$ emitters (LAEs), which are strongly biased towards blue, less massive galaxies (missing a significant percentage of the SF population). Combining our H$\\alpha$ observations with matched, existing Ly$\\alpha$ data we determine that the Ly$\\alpha$ escape fraction ($f_{\\rm esc}$) is low (only $\\sim$ 4.5\\% of HAEs show Ly$\\alpha$ emission) and decreases with increasing dust attenuation, UV continuum slope, stellar mass, and star formation rate (SFR). This suggests that Ly$\\alpha$ preferentially escapes from blue galaxies with low dust attenuation. However, a small population of red and massive LAEs is also ...

  6. The Difficulty Getting High Escape Fractions of Ionizing Photons from High-redshift Galaxies: a View from the FIRE Cosmological Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiangcheng; Hopkins, Philip F; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Quataert, Eliot; Keres, Dusan; Murray, Norman

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of high-resolution (20-2000 Msun, 0.1-4 pc) cosmological zoom-in simulations at z~6 from the Feedback In Realistic Environment (FIRE) project. These simulations cover halo masses 10^9-10^11 Msun and rest-frame ultraviolet magnitude Muv = -9 to -19. These simulations include explicit models of the multi-phase ISM, star formation, and stellar feedback, which produce reasonable galaxy properties at z = 0-6. We post-process the snapshots with a radiative transfer code to evaluate the escape fraction (fesc) of hydrogen ionizing photons. We find that the instantaneous fesc has large time variability (0.01%-20%), while the time-averaged fesc over long time-scales generally remains ~5%, considerably lower than the estimate in many reionization models. We find no strong dependence of fesc on galaxy mass or redshift. In our simulations, the intrinsic ionizing photon budgets are dominated by stellar populations younger than 3 Myr, which tend to be buried in dense birth clouds. The escaping photons mo...

  7. Star Formation in the Era of the Three Great Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott J. Wolk; Norbert Schulz; John Stauffer; Nancy Evans; Leisa Townsley; Tom Megeath; Dave Huenemoerder; Claus Leitherer; Ray Jayawardana

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes contributions and suggestions as presented at the Chandra Workshop Star Formation in the Era of Three Great Observatories conducted in July 2005. One of the declared goals of the workshop was to raise recognition within the star formation research community about the sensible future utilization of the space observatories Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra in their remaining years of operation to tackle imminent questions of our understanding of stellar formation and the early evolution of stars. A white paper was generated to support the continuous and simultaneous usage of observatory time for star formation research. The contents of this paper have been presented and discussed at several other meetings during the course of 2005 and January 2006.

  8. The reception and study of Renaissance architecture in Great Britain, 1890-1914

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Katherine Jean

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The writing of Renaissance architectural history in the period 1890-1914 in Great Britain changed dramatically. Despite modernism's tenet of rejecting history from design, Renaissance architectural history in Great Britain ...

  9. Great Republic: a historical and archaeological analysis of a Pacific mail steamship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Andrew Philip

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Republic that belonged to the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, rather than Isabella. This thesis investigates the history of Great Republic and its role in American maritime history, as well as its possible archaeological remains at the bottom...

  10. Thermal performance simulation of a solar cavity receiver under windy conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.B.; Wei, J.J.; Dong, X.W.; Wang, Y.S. [State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049 (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar cavity receiver plays a dominant role in the light-heat conversion. Its performance can directly affect the efficiency of the whole power generation system. A combined calculation method for evaluating the thermal performance of the solar cavity receiver is raised in this paper. This method couples the Monte-Carlo method, the correlations of the flow boiling heat transfer, and the calculation of air flow field. And this method can ultimately figure out the surface heat flux inside the cavity, the wall temperature of the boiling tubes, and the heat loss of the solar receiver with an iterative solution. With this method, the thermal performance of a solar cavity receiver, a saturated steam receiver, is simulated under different wind environments. The highest wall temperature of the boiling tubes is about 150 C higher than the water saturation temperature. And it appears in the upper middle parts of the absorbing panels. Changing the wind angle or velocity can obviously affect the air velocity inside the receiver. The air velocity reaches the maximum value when the wind comes from the side of the receiver (flow angle {alpha} = 90 ). The heat loss of the solar cavity receiver also reaches a maximum for the side-on wind. (author)

  11. Construction of Course Timetables Based on Great Deluge and Tabu Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, Barry

    Construction of Course Timetables Based on Great Deluge and Tabu Search Salwani Abdullah1 , Khalid of two metaheuristics i.e. great deluge and tabu search approaches. The algorithm is tested over eleven when compared against other techniques from the literature. Keywords: Great deluge, tabu search, course

  12. Non-Linear Great Deluge with Reinforcement Learning for University Course Timetabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Non-Linear Great Deluge with Reinforcement Learning for University Course Timetabling Joe Henry.sevaux@univ-ubs.fr Abstract. This paper describes a non-linear great deluge hyper-heuristic incorporating a reinforcement learning mechanism for the selection of low-level heuristics and a non-linear great deluge acceptance

  13. Electromagnetism-like Mechanism with Force Decay Rate Great Deluge for the Course Timetabling Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCollum, Barry

    Electromagnetism-like Mechanism with Force Decay Rate Great Deluge for the Course Timetabling called Electromagnetism-like mechanism with force decay rate great deluge algorithm for university course on these benchmark problems. Keywords: Electromagnetism-like mechanism, force decay rate great deluge, course

  14. Computational Study of Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Computational Study of Non-linear Great Deluge for University Course Timetabling Joe Henry Obit and Dario Landa-Silva Abstract. The great deluge algorithm explores neighbouring solutions which the current water level. In the original great deluge method, the water level decreases steadily in a linear

  15. Great Deluge with Non-linear Decay Rate for Solving Course Timetabling Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    Great Deluge with Non-linear Decay Rate for Solving Course Timetabling Problems Dario Landa. The great deluge algorithm explores neighbouring solutions which are accepted if they are better than. In the original great deluge, the water level decreases steadily in a linear fashion. In this paper, we propose

  16. The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North Norfolk Paper 97 #12;The effect of dredging off Great Yarmouth on the wave conditions and erosion of the North and seabed lowering due to dredging off Great Yarmouth. A scenario of extreme dredging was defined and used

  17. Long-term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A. Assel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long-term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A. Assel OPEN FILE REPORT December Commonwealth Blvd. Ann Arbor, MI 48105 #12;Long-Term Trends in Laurentian Great Lakes Ice Cover Raymond A is to give a brief overview of nearshore and lake wide trends in Great Lakes ice cover over the past one

  18. Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Thickness Data Rescue Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA/GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover is an important environmental factor affecting physical and biological processes in the coastal region of the Great Lakes. However, computerized ice thickness data along the shores of the Great

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE GREAT LAKES ICE RESEARCH WORKSHOP* Held October 18-19, 1983

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROCEEDINGS OF THE GREAT LAKES ICE RESEARCH WORKSHOP* Held October 18-19, 1983 at the Ohio State, and where we should be going relative to ice cover research on the Great Lakes. The original papers research in which Great Lakes ice is an important consideration. #12;CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION

  20. Tmoins Muets/Mute Witnesses: ethnography and archaeology encounter the objects of the Great War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    59 Témoins Muets/Mute Witnesses: ethnography and archaeology encounter the objects of the Great War MUTE WITNESSES: AN ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND ETHNOLOGICAL APPROACH TO OBJECTS FROM THE GREAT WAR "Mute witnesses" are objects from the Great War according to the brochure of a remarkable collection open

  1. Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

  2. Adapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; this is the adaptation component. Communication of climate change information to various publicsAdapting to Climate Change and Variability in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin 52 Great Lakes in response to potential climate change and variability. When we were preparing for this talk on what we have

  3. Mercury and cause of death in great white herons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spalding, M.G.; Sundlof, S.F. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)); Djork, R.D.; Powell, G.V.N. (National Audobon Research, Tavernier, FL (United States))

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mercury contamination is suspected to adversely affect wading birds in southern Florida. To determine the magnitude of contamination associated with cause of death we followed 3 adult and 19 juvenile radio-tagged great white herons (Ardea herodias occidentalis), recovered them soon after death, and determined liver mercury content and cause of death. Birds that died from acute causes had less (P < 0.001) mercury in their livers (geometric [bar x] [GM] = 1.77 ppm wet mass [wm], range 0.6-4.0 ppm, n = 9) than did those that died of chronic, often multiple, diseases (GM = 9.76 ppm, range 2.9-59.4 ppm, n = 13). Juvenile herons that migrated to mainland Florida accumulated more (P = 0.009) mercury in their livers than those that did not migrate. Kidney disease and gout were present in birds that died with >25 ppm wm liver mercury. Although detrimental to the health of wading birds, mercury contamination is presumably more detrimental to their reproductive efforts; therefore, an understanding of its ill effects is important in the management of these birds. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Regional setting of Niobrara Formation in Northern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shurr, G.W.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is currently produced from the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation in northeastern Colorado, northwestern Kansas, and several small fields in Nebraska. As a part of studies of low-permeability gas reservoirs in the northern Great Plains, the regional geologic setting of the Niobrara has been investigated in North Dakota, South Dakota, and Nebraska. Structural contours of the Ardmore Bentonite Bed suggest that the area of thin Niobrara strata presently approximates the south flank of the Williston basin and north flank of the Denver and Kennedy basins. Chalk tongues are interpreted as low-angle shelf surfaces, known as carbonate ramps, which sloped gently to the northwest and southeast off a paleotectonic high. The paleotectonic high cut obliquely across the seaway and was close to the position of the Transcontinental arch that influenced Paleozoic sedimentation. As a result, the present-day stratigraphy and structural setting of the Niobrara are different north and south of the arch crest. 58 references, 13 figures, 1 table.

  5. Multi-functional Bio-synthetic Hybrid Nanostructures for Enhanced Cellular Uptake, Endosomal Escape and Targeted Delivery Toward Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Ritu 1984-

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Applications of nanotechnology in medicine, also known as nanomedicine, is a rapidly growing field as it holds great potential in the development of novel therapeutics toward treatment of various diseases. Shell crosslinked knedel...

  6. Chinook Salmon Adult Abundance Monitoring; Hydroacoustic Assessment of Chinook Salmon Escapement to the Secesh River, Idaho, 2002-2004 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Mueller, R.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate determination of adult salmon spawner abundance is key to the assessment of recovery actions for wild Snake River spring/summer Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha), a species listed as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). As part of the Bonneville Power Administration Fish and Wildlife Program, the Nez Perce Tribe operates an experimental project in the South Fork of the Salmon River subbasin. The project has involved noninvasive monitoring of Chinook salmon escapement on the Secesh River between 1997 and 2000 and on Lake Creek since 1998. The overall goal of this project is to accurately estimate adult Chinook salmon spawning escapement numbers to the Secesh River and Lake Creek. Using time-lapse underwater video technology in conjunction with their fish counting stations, Nez Perce researchers have successfully collected information on adult Chinook salmon spawner abundance, run timing, and fish-per-redd numbers on Lake Creek since 1998. However, the larger stream environment in the Secesh River prevented successful implementation of the underwater video technique to enumerate adult Chinook salmon abundance. High stream discharge and debris loads in the Secesh caused failure of the temporary fish counting station, preventing coverage of the early migrating portion of the spawning run. Accurate adult abundance information could not be obtained on the Secesh with the underwater video method. Consequently, the Nez Perce Tribe now is evaluating advanced technologies and methodologies for measuring adult Chinook salmon abundance in the Secesh River. In 2003, the use of an acoustic camera for assessing spawner escapement was examined. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in a collaborative arrangement with the Nez Perce Tribe, provided the technical expertise to implement the acoustic camera component of the counting station on the Secesh River. This report documents the first year of a proposed three-year study to determine the efficacy of using an acoustic camera to count adult migrant Chinook salmon as they make their way to the spawning grounds on the Secesh River and Lake Creek. A phased approach to applying the acoustic camera was proposed, starting with testing and evaluation in spring 2003, followed by a full implementation in 2004 and 2005. The goal of this effort is to better assess the early run components when water clarity and night visibility preclude the use of optical techniques. A single acoustic camera was used to test the technology for enumerating adult salmon passage at the Secesh River. The acoustic camera was deployed on the Secesh at a site engineered with an artificial substrate to control the river bottom morphometry and the passage channel. The primary goal of the analysis for this first year of deployment was to validate counts of migrant salmon. The validation plan involved covering the area with optical video cameras so that both optical and acoustic camera images of the same viewing region could be acquired simultaneously. A secondary test was contrived after the fish passage was complete using a controlled setting at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington, in which we tested the detectability as a function of turbidity levels. Optical and acoustic camera multiplexed video recordings of adult Chinook salmon were made at the Secesh River fish counting station from August 20 through August 29, 2003. The acoustic camera performed as well as or better than the optical camera at detecting adult Chinook salmon over the 10-day test period. However, the acoustic camera was not perfect; the data reflected adult Chinook salmon detections made by the optical camera that were missed by the acoustic camera. The conditions for counting using the optical camera were near ideal, with shallow clear water and good light penetration. The relative performance of the acoustic camera is expected to be even better than the optical camera in early spring when water clarity and light penetration are limited. Results of the laboratory tests at the Pacific North

  7. Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within a larger natural ecosystem. An Eco-Logical guide waschanges in the Great Lakes ecosystem from the introductionfor a State of the Lakes Ecosystem Conference (SOLEC) Pre-

  8. Wind Shear and Turbulence Profiles at Elevated Heights: Great Lakes and Midwest Sites (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzed wind resource characteristics at elevated heights (50 m-200+m) incuding shear and turbulence profiles for some areas of the Great Lakes and M idwest sites.

  9. Division of Water, Part 675: Great Lakes Water Withdrawal Registration Regulations (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set forth requirements for the registration of water withdrawals and reporting of water losses from the Great Lakes Basin. The regulations apply to water withdrawals from...

  10. Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria Desert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    183 Natural history of thorny devils Moloch horridus (Lacertilia: Agamidae) in the Great Victoria received August 1997; accepted February 1998 Abstract Daily movements and activity of three male and five female thorny devils (Moloch horridus) were monitored using biotelemetry in the Great Victoria Desert

  11. Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Great Lakes Ice Cover Climatology Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co-Investigators: Thomas Croley - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Overview Ice cover affects mass and energy exchange between the planetary boundary layer and the waters of the Great Lakes. The improved ice

  12. Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 20032004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Development of the Great Lakes Ice-circulation Model (GLIM): Application to Lake Erie in 2003: Received 4 May 2009 Accepted 30 November 2009 Communicated by Dr. Ram Yerubandi Index words: Coupled Ice-Ocean Model Ice modeling Lake ice cover Ice thickness Ice speed Lake surface temperature Great Lakes Lake Erie

  13. Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co Board The formation, duration, and extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes has a major impact and cooling water intakes, and damaging shoreline structures. The ice cover also has an impact on the water

  14. Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Is the Relationship between Great Lakes Ice Cover and Climate Patterns Statistically Significant) - NOAA GLERL Overview This work is based on previous projects titled "Great Lakes Ice Cycle" conducted and climate GCM products along with historical sea ice observations including recent satellite measurements

  15. Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Non-native grasses alter evapotranspiration and energy balance in Great Basin sagebrush communities Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801, United States Received 19 April 2006; accepted 23 August 2006 Abstract Over key ecosystem processes in the Great Basin, including hydrology and energy balance. To determine how

  16. GRC Transactions, Vol. 29, 2005 Geothermal, GIS, potential, favorability, Great Basin, map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _gis2. htm) of the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy (GBC- GE). This map allows for separate to host high-temperature (> 150° C) geothermal systems capable of producing electrical energy. ThreeGRC Transactions, Vol. 29, 2005 223 Keywords Geothermal, GIS, potential, favorability, Great Basin

  17. GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey J. M. MAZZARELLA,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey L. ARMUS,1 J. M. MAZZARELLA,2 A. S. EVANS,3,4 J. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS20 ) combines data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope 200 low-redshift (z Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset

  18. Citizen Science Case Study: The Great Sunflower Project Nathan R. Prestopnik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science Case Study: The Great Sunflower Project Nathan R. Prestopnik Syracuse University napresto@syr.edu Abstract The Great Sunflower Project is a citizen science project designed to collect play in citizen science implementations, and the debate between custom website development

  19. The Great Moderation and Leptokurtosis after GARCH WenShwo Fang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    The Great Moderation and Leptokurtosis after GARCH Adjustment WenShwo Fang Department of Economics that this finding of fat tails may reflect the Great Moderation. That is, leptokurtosis disappears after GARCH Moderation, leptokurtosis, GARCH models JEL classification: C32; E32; O40 * Corresponding author #12

  20. ...2!.J1... .J. J!j btl Great Lakes Gill Net

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...2!.J1... .J. J!j btl Great Lakes Gill Net AUG1;) 1968 UNITED ST ATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE BUREAU OF COMMERCIAL FISHERIES Great Lakes Gill Net and cordage Synthetic twines. Cordage . Mesh size Gill net construction Fishing operations . . Setting

  1. Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin* YAZDAN MOLLAZAL Tehran petrology and petrography in three areas in the eastern Great Basin. Results are as follows: (1) At Moorman ..............................Ely Limestone 7 Carbonate petrology and ......................................petrography 8

  2. Geothermics, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 347-358, 1986. Printed inGreatBritain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Geothermics, Vol. 15, No. 3, pp. 347-358, 1986. Printed inGreatBritain. 0375 - 6505/86 $3.130 + 0.00 Pergamon Journals Ltd. © 1986 CNR. THERMOPHILIC MICROORGANISMS IN THE HOT SPRINGS OF TENGCHONG GEOTHERMAL volcanicgeothermalenvironmentsis discussed. INTRODUCTION In recent years biologists have been attaching great importance to thermal

  3. Suppression of thermal carrier escape and efficient photo-carrier generation by two-step photon absorption in InAs quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells using a dot-in-well structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asahi, S.; Teranishi, H.; Kasamatsu, N.; Kada, T.; Kaizu, T.; Kita, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the effects of an increase in the barrier height on the enhancement of the efficiency of two-step photo-excitation in InAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells with a dot-in-well structure. Thermal carrier escape of electrons pumped in QD states was drastically reduced by sandwiching InAs/GaAs QDs with a high potential barrier of Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As. The thermal activation energy increased with the introduction of the barrier. The high potential barrier caused suppression of thermal carrier escape and helped realize a high electron density in the QD states. We observed efficient two-step photon absorption as a result of the high occupancy of the QD states at room temperature.

  4. Acceleration and Deceleration in Curvature Induced Phantom Model of the Late and Future Universe, Cosmic Collapse as Well as its Quantum Escape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Srivastava

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Here, cosmology of the late and future universe is obtained from $f(R)$-gravity with non-linear curvature terms $R^2$ and $R^3$ ($R$ being the Ricci scalar curvature). It is different from $f(R)$-dark enrgy models, where non-linear curvature terms are taken as gravitational alternative of dark energy. In the present model, neither linear nor no-linear curvature terms are taken as dark energy. Rather, dark energy terms are induced by curvature terms in the Friedmann equation derived from $f(R)$-gravitational equations. It has advantage over $f(R)$- dark energy models in the sense that the present model satisfies WMAP results and expands as $\\sim t^{2/3}$ during matter-dominance. So, it does not have problems due to which $f(R)$-dark energy models are criticized. Curvature-induced dark energy, obtained here, mimics phantom. Different phases of this model, including acceleration and deceleration during phantom phase, are investigated here.It is found that expansion of the universe will stop at the age $(3.87 t_0 + 694.4 {\\rm kyr})$ ($t_0$ being the present age of the universe) and after this epoch, it will contract and collapse by the time $(336.87 t_0 + 694.4 {\\rm kyr})$. Further,it is shown that universe will escape predicted collapse (obtained using classical mechanics) on making quantum gravity corrections relevant near collapse time due to extremely high energy density and large curvature analogous to the state of very early universe. Interestingly, cosmological constant is also induced here, which is very small in classical domain, but very high in quantum domain.

  5. Program and abstracts of the 28th conference on Great Lakes research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstracts of papers presented at the 28th Conference on Great Lakes Research and the annual meeting of the International Association for Great Lakes Research covered two symposia. The first was a comparison of Great Lakes and Baltic ecosystems, which provided an opportunity for international exchanges of information and insights. The second featured pollution problems in the Green Bay estuary environment that is of particular value to Wisconsin and Michigan. There are 41 separate abstracts selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Four of those were also selected for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), six for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA), and two for INS.

  6. SCAQMD Quantum Escape PHEV Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 65 53 Percent of miles with internal combustion engine off 2% 2% Average trip driving intensity 4 3 Average trip distance (mi) 3.5...

  7. SCAQMD Quantum Escape PHEV Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 75 63 Percent of miles with internal combustion engine off 4% 1% Average trip driving intensity 4 3 Average trip distance (mi) 2.8...

  8. SCAQMD Quantum Escape PHEV Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 81 55 Percent of miles with internal combustion engine off 3% 0% Average trip driving intensity 4 2 Average trip distance (mi) 3.2...

  9. SCAQMD Quantum Escape PHEV Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    41 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 64 58 Percent of miles with internal combustion engine off 0% 0% Average trip driving intensity 4 2 Average trip distance (mi) 4.4...

  10. SCAQMD Quantum Escape PHEV Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    39 DC electrical energy consumption (DC Whmi) 71 61 Percent of miles with internal combustion engine off 2% 1% Average trip driving intensity 4 3 Average trip distance (mi) 3.5...

  11. Seizing a species : the story of the Great Salt Lake brine shrimp harvest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wotipka, Samuel Alex

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the early 1950s, C.C. "Sparkplug" Sanders began harvesting brine shrimp from Utah's Great Salt Lake. Sanders built up a small business selling their eggs, called "cysts, to aquarium stores across the country. During the ...

  12. On death ground : why weak states resist great powers explaining coercion failure in asymmetric interstate conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haun, Phil M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Powers often adopt coercive strategies, threatening or using limited force to convince weak states to comply with their demands. While coercive strategies have succeeded in just over half of asymmetric crises since ...

  13. Did the Great Recession Wipe Out a Decade of Economic Progress in Colorado?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Did the Great Recession Wipe Out a Decade of Economic Associate Professor of Economics Michael Marturana Research Economist Colorado rebuild. To make better decisions about Colorado's open economic path

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER An Equation of State for Hypersaline Water in Great Salt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Great Salt Lake, Utah 810 Aquat Geochem (2011) 17:809­820 123 #12;more saline brine layer in the south arm, commonly referred to as the deep brine layer (DBL), is not subject to annual turnover and can

  15. Microbiology (2000), 146, 851860 Printed in Great Britain Absence of translationally selected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbiology (2000), 146, 851­860 Printed in Great Britain Absence of translationally selected Batterie des Lions, 13007 Marseille, France. Abbreviations: GC3s, GjC content at synonymously variable

  16. Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nissan Multi-Mode RCCI Has Great Potential to Improve Fuel Economy in Light-Duty Diesel Engines DOE Supports PG&E Development of Next Generation Plug-in Hybrid Electric Trucks...

  17. RECONSTRUCTING CLIMATE ON THE GREAT PLAINS FROM BURIED SOILS: A QUANTITATIVE APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zung, Ashley B.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains, U.S.A. lack quantitative paleoclimatic data for the late Quaternary largely because two common sources of paleoclimatic data, tree ring and pollen records, are rare in the region. Sequences of buried ...

  18. Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMaster University

    Change in biomass of benthic and planktonic algae along a disturbance gradient for 24 Great Lakes a content of planktonic algae and benthic algae in periphyton on acrylic rods and in epiphyton growing

  19. Great Lakes Issues of Interest by Dr. Stephen B. Brandt and Margaret B. Lansing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    26 T Great Lakes Issues of Interest by Dr. Stephen B. Brandt and Margaret B. Lansing he National. This figure was provided by Stuart Ludsin (NOAA-GLERL) and Tom Johengen (CILER, U of Michigan). (including

  20. A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: A Map Of...

  1. Estimating Nonpoint Source Pollution Loadings in the Great Lakes Watersheds Chansheng He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contaminated sediments, urban runoff, storm sewers, and agriculture impairs Great Lakes shoreline waters will be used as the input to the water quality model for simulating pollutant transport through surface-scale water quality model to estimat

  2. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

  3. Environmental and Pedogenic Change in the Central Great Plains from the Middle Wisconsinan to the Present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willey, Karen Lynn

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the middle Wisconsinan, the Gilman Canyon Formation (GCF), consisting of three loess units and three soils, formed on the loess plateaus of the central Great Plains about 40-25 ka. Stable carbon isotope analysis of ...

  4. A review of "Peter the Great and the West: New Perspectives." by Lindsey Hughes, ed. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathy J. Potter

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - lication of Lindsey Hughes?s own important book, Russia in the Age of Peter the Great, as well as a collection sponsored by the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, Britain and Russia in the Age of Peter the Great: Historical Documents... made it possible for Russia to surmount a systemic crisis that had matured by the end of the seventeenth century. Andrei Medushevskii argues for the applica- tion of a comparative approach to the Petrine reforms and Russian modernization, again...

  5. An investigation of dust storm generation in the Southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Marshall Conrad

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DUST STORM GENERATION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS A Thesis by NARSHALL CONRAD POLLARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER... OF SCIFNCE December 1977 H. -ior S?b]ect: Jleteorology AN INVESTIGATION OF DUST STORM GENERATION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS A Thesis by MARSHALL CONRAD POLLARD Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committ ) (Head of Department...

  6. Dilemmas of decline, risks of rise : the systemic and military sources of rising state strategy towards declining great powers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzkowitz Shifrinson, Joshua R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What explains variation in relatively rising state strategy towards declining great powers? This project develops and tests a theory of state strategy vis-a-vis declining great powers, termed Realist Decline Theory. Realist ...

  7. Towards a chronology of brownware pottery in the western Great Basin: A case study from owens valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eerkens, J W

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Revisions in Archaeological Sequences of the Great Basin in Interior Southern California, Nevada Archaeological Survey Research Papers, 5,

  8. Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Peter J.

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific Guidance, Research, and Educational Outreach for the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) in the Southern Great Plains

  9. MIC 2009: The VIII Metaheuristics International Conference id-1 Non-Linear Great Deluge with Learning Mechanism for Solving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landa-Silva, Dario

    M IC 2009 MIC 2009: The VIII Metaheuristics International Conference id-1 Non-Linear Great Deluge acceptance criterion while Kendall and Mohamad [15] used the great deluge acceptance criterion. Hamburg In this paper, we propose an approach that uses a learning mechanism and a non-linear great deluge acceptance

  10. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  11. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  12. Hyper heuristic based on great deluge and its variants for exam timetabling problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Ei Shwe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, University Timetabling problems are occurred annually and they are often hard and time consuming to solve. This paper describes Hyper Heuristics (HH) method based on Great Deluge (GD) and its variants for solving large, highly constrained timetabling problems from different domains. Generally, in hyper heuristic framework, there are two main stages: heuristic selection and move acceptance. This paper emphasizes on the latter stage to develop Hyper Heuristic (HH) framework. The main contribution of this paper is that Great Deluge (GD) and its variants: Flex Deluge(FD), Non-linear(NLGD), Extended Great Deluge(EGD) are used as move acceptance method in HH by combining Reinforcement learning (RL).These HH methods are tested on exam benchmark timetabling problem and best results and comparison analysis are reported.

  13. SuomiNet efforts in the U. S. Southern Great Plains.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R. A.; Carr, F. H.; Ahern, J. L.; Liljegren, J. C.; Eagan, R. C.; Smith, J. J.

    2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    SuomiNet provides great promise for advancing research at the University of Oklahoma in numerical weather prediction and plate tectonics studies, and will further help the U.S. DOE ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Program better specify the measurement of water vapor over the Southern Great Plains. The SuomiNet program is also allowing ARM to upgrade its data collection infrastructure to provide more reliable and near real-time observations not only to SuomiNet but also to other researchers.

  14. Shallow Water Offshore Wind Optimization for the Great Lakes (DE-FOA-0000415) Final Report: A Conceptual Design for Wind Energy in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wissemann, Chris [Freshwater Wind I, LLC] [Freshwater Wind I, LLC; White, Stanley M [Stanley White Engineering LLC] [Stanley White Engineering LLC

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the project was to develop a innovative Gravity Base Foundation (GBF) concepts, including fabrication yards, launching systems and installation equipment, for a 500MW utility scale project in the Great Lakes (Lake Erie). The goal was to lower the LCOE by 25%. The project was the first to investigate an offshore wind project in the Great Lakes and it has furthered the body of knowledge for foundations and installation methods within Lake Erie. The project collected historical geotechnical information for Lake Erie and also used recently obtained data from the LEEDCo Icebreaker Project (FOA DE-EE0005989) geotechnical program to develop the conceptual designs. Using these data-sets, the project developed design wind and wave conditions from actual buoy data in order to develop a concept that would de-risk a project using a GBF. These wind and wave conditions were then utilized to create reference designs for various foundations specific to installation in Lake Erie. A project partner on the project (Weeks Marine) provided input for construction and costing the GBF fabrication and installation. By having a marine contractor with experience with large marine projects as part of the team provides credibility to the LCOE developed by NREL. NREL then utilized the design and construction costing information as part of the LCOE model. The report summarizes the findings of the project. • Developed a cost model and “baseline” LCOE • Documented Site Conditions within Lake Erie • Developed Fabrication, Installation and Foundations Innovative Concept Designs • Evaluated LCOE Impact of Innovations • Developed Assembly line “Rail System” for GBF Construction and Staging • Developed Transit-Inspired Foundation Designs which incorporated: Semi-Floating Transit with Supplemental Pontoons Barge mounted Winch System • Developed GBF with “Penetration Skirt” • Developed Integrated GBF with Turbine Tower • Developed Turbine, Plant Layout and O&M Strategies The report details lowering LCOE by 22.3% and identified additional strategies that could further lower LCOE when building an utility scale wind farm in the Great Lakes.

  15. Low-rank coal research: Volume 3, Combustion research: Final report. [Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M. D.; Hajicek, D. R.; Zobeck, B. J.; Kalmanovitch, D. P.; Potas, T. A.; Maas, D. J.; Malterer, T. J.; DeWall, R. A.; Miller, B. G.; Johnson, M. D.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Combustion Research, contains articles on fluidized bed combustion, advanced processes for low-rank coal slurry production, low-rank coal slurry combustion, heat engine utilization of low-rank coals, and Great Plains Gasification Plant. These articles have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  16. Weather pattern climatology of the Great Plains and the related wind regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barchet, W.R.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The meteorology of the Great Plains can be described as a constant progression of air masses, fronts and cyclonic storm systems. Each of these meteorological conditions can be characterized by identifiable isobaric and related weather parameter patterns. Nine such patterns have been defined to type the weather patterns in the Great Plains. Time series of weather pattern types were produced for 62 stations on the Great Plains. Statistical analyses of these time series produced annual and seasonal frequencies of occurrence of the weather pattern types. Maps of the annual and seasonal frequency of occurrence of weather pattern type are presented for the Great Plains. Persistence and alternation frequencies match what is expected for traveling temperate latitude cyclones, anticyclones and fronts. The wind regime for stations at which the anemometer height and location was constant (and known) for a minimum of three consecutive years was stratified by weather pattern type. Statistical analyses were made to show the response of the wind to the large-scale distribution of air pressure associated with a weather pattern type. The response of the wind to the weather pattern is a site-specific result of the interaction of the large-scale meteorology with local terrain, surface roughness and atmospheric stability. Mean wind speed discriminates between pairs of weather pattern types with better than 75% confidence for more than two-thirds of the possible pairs of weather pattern types.

  17. Classification of Annual Great Lakes Ice Cycles: Winters of 19732002* RAYMOND A. ASSEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Annual Great Lakes Ice Cycles: Winters of 1973­2002* RAYMOND A. ASSEL National (Manuscript received 12 July 2004, in final form 13 June 2005) ABSTRACT Annual seasonal average ice cover from 1973 to 2002 and associated dates of first ice, last ice, and ice duration are presented and discussed

  18. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  19. IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPLICATIONS OF CO, GLOBAL WARMING O N GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND A. ASSEL US. Department to project daily mean basin ice cover and annual ice cover duration for Lakes Superior and Erie. Models were), and the Oregon State University (OSU)general circulationmodels. Ice cover estimateswere made for the West

  20. ANIMATION OF THE NORMAL ICE CYCLE OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES OF NORTH AMERICA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANIMATION OF THE NORMAL ICE CYCLE OF THE LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES OF NORTH AMERICA R.A. Assel and J describes an interactive menu- driven computer tutorial on the contemporary ice cover climatology information on ice cover data and analysis, and the second text module contains a generalized description

  1. [ ]May 2014 Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success in many locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    accelerated pavement testing on bonded concrete overlay pavements to be constructed at the Pavement Research testing; evaluate the structural bearing capacity of the concrete overlay pavement structures[ ]May 2014 PROBLEM Portland cement concrete (PCC) overlays have been used with great success

  2. Lack of conservation effort rapidly increases African great ape extinction risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Leipzig, Germany 3 Fauna Flora International 4 Wildlife Conservation Society 5 Garamba National ParkLETTER Lack of conservation effort rapidly increases African great ape extinction risk Sandra, Democratic Republic of Congo 6 Ghana Wildlife Society 7 Federal University of Technology, Akure, Nigeria 8

  3. Planet. Space Sri. Vol. 30, No. 8. pp.&g-854, 1982 Printed in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    Planet. Space Sri. Vol. 30, No. 8. pp.&g-854, 1982 Printed in Great Britain. 0032-0533/82/08084946s, and the Lyman-alpha dayglow of Saturn when analyzed in conjunction with photochemical models of the hydrocarbons and energy budget, of the upper atmospheric composition and thermal structure of Jupiter (Atreya, Donahue

  4. Planet. Space Sci., Vol. 37, No. I, pp. 109-129, 1989 Printed in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lummerzheim, Dirk

    spectra and model predictions. Differences occur at low energies (below 500 eV) in the structurePlanet. Space Sci., Vol. 37, No. I, pp. 109-129, 1989 Printed in Great Britain. ANGULAR DEPENDENT scattering of electrons resulting in changes of pitch angle, and degradation in energy as the electrons

  5. Ultrafast Switching of Coherent Electronic Excitation: Great Promise for Reaction Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    With the advent of femtosecond laser pulses the temporal aspect of the interplay of light and molecular dynamics pulses [4] are the suitable tools to exert microscopic control on molecular dynamics at the quantum levelUltrafast Switching of Coherent Electronic Excitation: Great Promise for Reaction Control

  6. On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques Alfredo Pe~na1 by the wind energy industry due to the high sensitivity that the wind characteristics have on the performance Dong energy, Dong Energy, Kraftværksvej 53, DK-7000, Fredericia, Denmark e-mail: alfredo

  7. People love watching TV and going to the movies. This is great news for multimedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmerman, John

    People love watching TV and going to the movies. This is great news for multimedia researchers that rarely gets addressed in the research is, Why do people love to consume TV programs and movies? Current, which lift them out of their ordinary exis- tence. Viewers develop strong attachments

  8. Using Open Source Geospatial Tools to Create OSM Web Services for Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    OSM­GB OSM­GB Using Open Source Geospatial Tools to Create OSM Web Services for Great Britain A use case of integrating a variety of open-source geospatial tools is presented in this paper of the volunteer nature of the commu- nity, many open-source geospatial tools have been developed around OSM

  9. Anthony Wayne: The History and Archaeology of an Early Great Lakes Steamboat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Bradley Alan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes side-wheel steamboat Anthony Wayne was built in 1837 at Perrysburg, OH and participated in lakes shipping during a time when such vessels were experiencing their heyday. Designed as a passenger and cargo carrier, the steamer spent 13...

  10. AIR QUALITY: ODOR, DUST, AND GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM CONCENTRATED FEEDING OPERATIONS IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    standards are imposed. The Texas Agricultural Experiment Station, West Texas A&M University, Texas IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS NON TECHNICAL SUMMARY: Texas and Kansas are the nation's largest cattle at cattle feedlots and dairies in Northwest Texas and Southwest Kansas. They will test alternative surface

  11. www.carbon-business.com 67 THERE'S REALLY NOT a great deal of guidance for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Andrew J.

    thirty BELC companies and developed a model for business to address climate change as a business problem and operations, the sustainable consumption of resources, improving the efficiencies of processes and methodswww.carbon-business.com 67 THERE'S REALLY NOT a great deal of guidance for business when it comes

  12. Comparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to test the strengths and limitations of cloud boundary retrievals from radiosonde profiles, 4 yearsComparison between active sensor and radiosonde cloud boundaries over the ARM Southern Great Plains radiosonde-based methods applied to 200 m resolution profiles obtained at the same site. The lidar

  13. GRC Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 Geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, geodesy,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GRC Transactions, Vol. 31, 2007 391 Keywords Geothermal, energy resources, Great Basin, GPS, and will be incorporated in future models. Introduction Geothermal energy resources have long been associated of active crustal deformation and its spatial relationship to active geothermal systems in the northern

  14. Observations of erosion of in-bed tubes in the Great Lake AFBC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantesaria, P.P.; Jukkola, G.D.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erosion measurements have been made on evaporator tubes, superheater tubes and front wall tubes in the atmospheric, fluidised-bed combustor, demonstration plant at Great Lakes Naval Base, Chicago. A brief indication of the results obtained is given. High erosion rates on vertical tube surfaces were attributed to the tendency of bubbles rising through the bed to follow preferred paths along the vertical surfaces.

  15. www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    www.physicstoday.org November 2012 Physics Today 59 Nuclear energy can provide great The Nuclear on keeping costs and book length in check. For example, most of the graphics use gray- scale, with only a few pages in the cen- ter providing color plates. In addition, in many places additional graphics could have

  16. Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven -NOAA GLERL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bioenergetics of Lake Whitefish in the Great Lakes Primary Investigator: Steve Pothoven - NOAA elicited concern by fishery managers and commercial fishermen. We propose to use bioenergetics modeling that are contributing to declines in fish growth is bioenergetics modeling. We recently evaluated and modified

  17. Anthony Wayne: The History and Archaeology of an Early Great Lakes Steamboat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krueger, Bradley Alan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Lakes side-wheel steamboat Anthony Wayne was built in 1837 at Perrysburg, OH and participated in lakes shipping during a time when such vessels were experiencing their heyday. Designed as a passenger and cargo carrier, the steamer spent 13...

  18. Capital improvements can contribute greatly to an airport's future success, but

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    description, cost estimate, federal programming sheets (available at www.mnaero.com), and start date. FederalCapital improvements can contribute greatly to an airport's future success, but they require a serious financial commit- ment by the airport owner. Planning ahead for capital improvements is critical

  19. The discovery of topological insulators and possible topological superconductors has greatly expanded research into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    The discovery of topological insulators and possible topological superconductors has greatly Superconductor, a Copper-doped Topological Insulator: Cu1/4Bi2Se3 Ben J. Lawson1, Y. S. Hor2, J. Mannhart3, Lu Li in CuxBi2Se3 and its implications for pairing in the undoped topological insulator" PRL, 104, 057001

  20. Director, MIT Libraries A great benefit of involvement in the planning for MIT's 150th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    Director, MIT Libraries A great benefit of involvement in the planning for MIT's 150th anniversary, and then sustain, MIT's novel and visionary educational philosophy of "Mens et Manus." MIT's future- oriented a university library system that is, like MIT itself, inventive and forward looking. From an early expectation

  1. Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konhauser, Kurt

    LETTERS Oceanic nickel depletion and a methanogen famine before the Great Oxidation Event Kurt O a decline in the molar nickel to iron ratio recorded in banded iron formations about 2.7 Gyr ago, which we attribute to a reduced flux of nickel to the oceans, a consequence of cooling upper-mantle temperatures

  2. Race and Male Employment in the Wake of the Great Recession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Race and Male Employment in the Wake of the Great Recession: Black Male Employment Rates by this Center), nearly half of working-age black males were not employed in many inner city neighborhoods.1 another devastating blow to inner city economies and the employment prospects of African American males

  3. AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AEROSOL CHEMICAL COMPOSITION CHARACTERIZATION AT THE ARM SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS (SGP) SITE USING AN AEROSOL CHEMICAL SPECIATION MONITOR Yin-Nan Lee1 , Fan Mei1 , Stephanie DeJong1 , Anne Jefferson2 1 Atmospheric Sciences Division, Brookhaven National Lab, Upton, NY 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO

  4. GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERMITTENCY POWER ELECTRONICS EFFICIENCY INFRASTRUCTURE CODES & STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY MANAGE- MENT GRIDGREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts-55080 #12;GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Electric Vehicle Grid Integration 2 Cross Cutting

  5. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping° to 60° for all polarizations, was processed to radar cross-section to establish a library of signatures (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion

  6. Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory,and understood the importance of random and systematic errors in his observations. In 1600Tycho Brahe employed such a diligent observer inTycho Brahe that his observations convicted this Ptolemaic calculation of an error of 8

  7. Book Reviews 93 2012 Center for Great Plains Studies, University of NebraskaLincoln

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    of disturbed sites. While alternative or renewable energy sources such as wind, solar, and biofuels appearBook Reviews 93 © 2012 Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska­Lincoln Energy Development and Wildlife Conservation in Western North America. Edited by David E. Naugle. Foreword by Mark S

  8. Histology of Herniations through the Body Wall and Cuticle of Zooplankton from the Laurentian Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109; §Department of Pathology, Veterans Administration Medical and then preserved. A fresh sam- ple was collected from Lake Michigan at 3 m on 2 June 1999, placed on ice Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105; and Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, National Oceanic

  9. Assessing Naturalness in Northern Great Lakes Forests Based on Historical Land-Cover and Vegetation Changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was developed to assess to what degree landscapes represent a natural state. Protected areas are often regarded Land-use history Á Land-use change Á Naturalness Á Logging Á Great Lakes Á Protected areas Introduction the question to what degree protected areas represent a natural state. To assess this question conservation

  10. Energy Budget-Based Simulation of Evapotranspiration from Land in the Great Lakes Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Budget-Based Simulation of Evapotranspiration from Land in the Great Lakes Basin Primary-available data for change in net radiative energy for land surfaces in the same region in the same general energy available in this region according to the corresponding GCM. Thus there is a mismatch: While air

  11. THE GREAT DEBATE: STARBURSTS AS THE ENERGY SOURCE OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Robert D.

    THE GREAT DEBATE: STARBURSTS AS THE ENERGY SOURCE OF ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES R. D. JOSEPH response (from someone aged less than 30 yr) will be, "Wow! Cool!" On the other hand, if you reply, "I am as the principal and dominant energy source in ULIRGs. 2. Evidence that ULIRGS Are Predominantly Powered by Star

  12. Modeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    . Introduction Linkages between atmospheric carbon dioxide and global thermal properties have forcedModeling soil respiration based on carbon, nitrogen, and root mass across diverse Great Lake the examination of biospheric carbon flows and pools. Variability in carbon storage or the net ecosystem exchange

  13. VIEW OFPASSAIC FALLS by W. H. Bartlett, 1840 FOSSIL GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Paul E.

    to Field Trips,52nd Ann. Mtg.New York State Geology Association, Newark College of Arts and SciencesVIEW OFPASSAIC FALLS by W. H. Bartlett, 1840 FOSSIL GREAT LAKES OF THE NEWARK SUPERGROUP IN NEW JERSEY Paul E. Olsen From: W. Manspeizer (ed.),1980,Field Studies in New Jersey Geology and Guide

  14. Southern Great Plains Expansion of Glyphosate Resistant Brassica Napus L.: Management and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Alfredo

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    , as well as control of volunteer/weed B. napus in wheat cropping systems that have been incorporated in the southern latitudes of the Great Plains. A secondary objective was the refinement and potential implementation of a new precision farming tool...

  15. The Great Lakes at a Crossroads Preparing for a Changing Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /index.html Communication Tactics for Climate Change: www.futerra.co.uk/downloads/NewRules:NewGame.pdf Union of ConcernedThe Great Lakes at a Crossroads Preparing for a Changing Climate International Association Climate Change Science 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Assessment Report: www

  16. great basin naturalist 502 1990 ppap 121 134 FOLIAGE BIOMASS AND COVER relationships BETWEEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inin the great basin and southwest both species are aggressive and can nearly eliminate the previous the range of site conditions sampled treetiee dominated plots varied by about two to one cover inin shrub twototwotroto to one total foliage biomass inin both tree and shrub dominated plots correlated best

  17. The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    The great 2012 Arctic Ocean summer cyclone enhanced biological productivity on the shelves Jinlun influences the marine planktonic ecosystem by enhancing productivity on the shelves of the Chukchi, East days, the simulated biological effects on the shelves last 1 month or longer. At some locations

  18. Drought experience and cavitation resistance in six shrubs from the Great Basin, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Drought experience and cavitation resistance in six shrubs from the Great Basin, Utah Uwe G. Hacke capability of the xylem. This is due to drought-induced cavitation. We used the centrifuge method to measure the vulnerability of root and stem xylem to cavitation in six native shrub species. The shrubs fall into three

  19. Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Décembre 2012 Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach for the EU, Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière, Janine Leschke, Andrew Watt 161-1 Document de travail #12;#12;Trends in Job publication : Jean-Louis Dayan ISSN 1629-7997 ISBN 978-2-11-129831-6 #12;TRENDS IN JOB QUALITY DURING

  20. Monitoring Creatures Great and Small: ComputerVision Systems for Looking at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mori, Greg

    Monitoring Creatures Great and Small: ComputerVision Systems for Looking at Grizzly Bears, Fish'iinlii Njik Park #12;Bearcam · Bearcam system recorded approx. 4h video per day for 15 days #12;Bear Detection background subtraction and gradient features pos. gradient ht(x) = pt ft(x)

  1. Estimating the return times of great Himalayan earthquakes in eastern Nepal: Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klinger, Yann

    Estimating the return times of great Himalayan earthquakes in eastern Nepal: Evidence from the Patu, Kathmandu, Nepal, 3 Earth Observatory of Singapore, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore not documented the occurrence of several similar events at the same location. In east central Nepal, however

  2. Technical Report: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Great Lakes Protection Fund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, Robert J.

    1 Technical Report: Michigan Department of Environmental Quality, Michigan Great Lakes Protection (TTR). In mammals, TTR is a T4-specific binding protein. However, in nonmammalian species, TTR binds 3 competitive binding assays with several PCB congeners or hydroxylated PCBs to determine whether they exhibit

  3. Digital Book Showcases Washington Wind Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The New American Farm" chronicles the stages of the Windy Flats/Windy Point project, from prospecting to harvest.

  4. Microclimatic Performance of a Free-Air Warming and CO2 Enrichment Experiment in Windy Wyoming, USA

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeCain, Daniel; Smith, David; Morgan, Jack; Kimball, Bruce A.; Pendall, Elise; Miglietta, Franco; Liang, Wenju

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to plan for global changing climate experiments are being conducted in many countries, but few have monitored the effects of the climate change treatments (warming, elevated CO2) on the experimental plot microclimate. During three years of an eight year study with year-round feedback-controlled infra-red heater warming (1.5/3.0°C day/night) and growing season free-air CO2 enrichment (600 ppm) in the mixed-grass prairie of Wyoming, USA, we monitored soil, leaf, canopy-air, above-canopy-air temperatures and relative humidity of control and treated experimental plots and evaluated ecologically important temperature differentials. Leaves were warmed somewhat less than the target settings (1.1 & 1.5°C day/night)more »but soil was warmed more creating an average that matched the target settings extremely well both during the day and night plus the summer and winter. The site typically has about 50% bare or litter covered soil, therefore soil heat transfer is more critical than in dense canopy ecosystems. The Wyoming site commonly has strong winds (5 ms-1 average) and significant daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations (as much as 30°C daily) but the warming system was nearly always able to maintain the set temperatures regardless of abiotic variation. The within canopy-air was only slightly warmed and above canopy-air was not warmed by the system, therefore convective warming was minor. Elevated CO2 had no direct effect nor interaction with the warming treatment on microclimate. Relative humidity within the plant canopy was only slightly reduced by warming. Soil water content was reduced by warming but increased by elevated CO2. This study demonstrates the importance of monitoring the microclimate in manipulative field global change experiments so that critical physiological and ecological conclusions can be determined. Highly variable energy demand fluctuations showed that passive IR heater warming systems will not maintain desired warming for much of the time.« less

  5. EIS-0400: Granby Pumping Plant Switchyard-Windy Gap Substation Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Grand County, CO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration prepared an EIS, with the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of Land Management, and Grand County (Colorado) as cooperating agencies, to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of rebuilding a 12-mile, 69 kV electric transmission line in Grand County. The proposed project would rebuild the single-circuit line as a double-circuit transmission line and add a second power transformer. Western identified potentially significant impacts while preparing an EA for this proposal (DOE/EA-1520) and prepared an EIS instead of completing the EA. Further information about the project is available on the project website.

  6. Atmosphere-Land-Surface Interaction over the Southern Great Plains: Diagnosis of Mechanisms from SGP ARM Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumant Nigam

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work reported included analysis of pentad (5 day) averaged data, proposal of a hypothesis concerning the key role of the Atlantic Multi-decadal Oscillation in 20th century drought and wet periods over the Great Plains, analysis of recurrent super-synoptic evolution of the Great Plains low-level jet, and study of pentad evolution of the 1988 drought and 1993 flood over the Great Plains from a NARR perspective on the atmospheric and terrestrial water balance.

  7. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-12 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER, WINTER 1975-76 George A. Leshkevich.2 Data Analysis 2 3. DATA PRESENTATION 4 3.1 Freezing Degree-Days 4 3.2 Composite Ice Charts 4 4. DISCUSSION 4 4.1 Winter Characteristics 4 4.2 General Seasonal Trends in Ice-Cover Distribution 5 4.3 Lake

  8. Reproductive Peformance of Great Egrets (Ardea alba) at High Island, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnes, Andrew

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and Baxter 1991), Brazil (de Toledo 2000), Mexico (Gladstone 1979), and Rhodesia (Tomlinson 1976). The Great Egret?an Ardeidae (Ardea alba) in the order Ciconiiformes along with ibises, spoonbills, storks, and others?is a common wading bird along...). As such, quality foraging habitat proximal to breeding colonies is an important aspect driving the general health of colonial wading birds (Custer and Galli 2002); nesting wading birds are constrained to forage relatively close to the colony; therefore...

  9. Images of Moby-Dick: An exhibition of editions of Herman Melville's great novel of whaling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : University Press of Kansas, 1995), the culmination of many years of study of Melville's great novel by Elizabeth A. Schultz, professor of English at the University of Kansas. Herman Melville's Moby-Dick; or, The Whale, a work which fills the mind's eye... of Moby-Dick presents a selection of these illustrated editions, collected by Professor Schultz during her study of Moby-Dick and now generously donated to the Kenneth Spencer Research Library. Professor Schultz's gift collection, supplemented here...

  10. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  11. Optical fiber configurations for transmission of laser energy over great distances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinzler, Charles C; Zediker, Mark S

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided optical fiber configurations that provide for the delivery of laser energy, and in particular, the transmission and delivery of high power laser energy over great distances. These configurations further are hardened to protect the optical fibers from the stresses and conditions of an intended application. The configurations provide means for determining the additional fiber length (AFL) need to obtain the benefits of such additional fiber, while avoiding bending losses.

  12. Handbook for the GREAT08 Challenge: An image analysis competition for cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarah Bridle; John Shawe-Taylor; Adam Amara; Douglas Applegate; Sreekumar T. Balan; Joel Berge; Gary Bernstein; Hakon Dahle; Thomas Erben; Mandeep Gill; Alan Heavens; Catherine Heymans; F. William High; Henk Hoekstra; Mike Jarvis; Donnacha Kirk; Thomas Kitching; Jean-Paul Kneib; Konrad Kuijken; David Lagatutta; Rachel Mandelbaum; Richard Massey; Yannick Mellier; Baback Moghaddam; Yassir Moudden; Reiko Nakajima; Stephane Paulin-Henriksson; Sandrine Pires; Anais Rassat; Alexandre Refregier; Jason Rhodes; Tim Schrabback; Elisabetta Semboloni; Marina Shmakova; Ludovic van Waerbeke; Dugan Witherick; Lisa Voigt; David Wittman

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from these communities. This document details the GREAT08 Challenge for potential participants. Please visit http://www.great08challenge.info for the latest information.

  13. The health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration of ecosystems. A multitude of threats affect the health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife, and many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering and design of additional in-stream and bank restoration, and the treatment of invasive speciesThe health of Great Lakes habitats and wildlife depends upon the protection and restoration opportunities exist to protect and restore critical elements of the Great Lakes ecosystem. Habitat and Wildlife

  14. Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind Fields over the Great Lakes Measured by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT Satellite for wind retrieval over the Great Lakes on a daily basis. We use data acquired by the SeaWinds Scatterometer on the QuikSCAT (QSCAT) satellite launched in June 1999 to derive wind speeds and directions over

  15. 1914-1918: The Death Throes of Civilisation. The elites of Latin America face the Great War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 1914-1918: The Death Throes of Civilisation. The elites of Latin America face the Great War less on the two world wars than on two turning points that mark a true break in continuity in the sub.1 The natural conclusion of this approach is that the Great War did not have the same formative role in Latin

  16. Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F. Schaefer b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gido, Keith B.

    Patterns of fish invasions in the Great Plains of North America Keith B. Gido a,*, Jacob F 66506, USA b Department of Biology, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62026 in Oklahoma and Kansas to examine spatial patterns of species invasions in the Great Plains region of the US

  17. Trophic Transfer of Atmospheric and Sedimentary Contaminants into Great Lakes Fish: Control on Ecosystem Scale Response Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Administration (FDA) advisory level is problematic. The persistence of PCBs in Great Lakes fish has led some in the Great Lakes is a natural consequence of internal recycling and continental scale atmospheric exchange atmospheric deposition) and 'in-place' (i.e., recycling from contaminated sediments) sources of contaminants

  18. Regional efforts through the IJC to address contaminated bottom-sediment problems in the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kizlauskas, A.G.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Joint Commission (IJC) is a binational (United States and Canada) organization that was established under the Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909. In 1978, the two countries signed a Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement, pursuant to the Boundary Waters Treaty. Carrying out the provisions of this Agreement, the United States and Canada, through the IJC, are addressing the problem of contaminated bottom sediments both in the traditional context of dredging projects and in the newer context of the potentially harmful environmental impacts of contaminated bottom sediments, even in the absence of dredging activity.

  19. Evolution of a mafic volcanic field in the central Great Basin, south central Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Naumann, T. R.; Smith, E. I.; Bradshaw, T. K.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1996-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    2 (basanites and hawaiites) is more restricted (0.7035 - 0.7037, Figure 10). Neodymium isotopes are also more variable in basalts of episode I than episode 2, though the differences are not as great as for Sr (Figure 10). A similar pattern can... Sr=850 ppm .  Nd=10 ppm _ Xl Nd=85) . I I I I I I I 0.70800 0.71000 Figure 12. Neodymium-Sr isotope correlation diagram for Reveille Range basalts with binary mixing lines between low 87Sr/86Sr episode 2 basalts (hawaiites and basanites...

  20. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  1. EIS-0408: Upper Great Plains Wind Energy Programmatic EIS | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised FindingDepartment of EnergyEnergy DraftEnergy 8: Upper Great

  2. Contamination of stream fishes with chlorinated hydrocarbons from eggs of Great Lakes salmon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merna, J.W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp. have been stocked in the Great Lakes where they accumulate body burdens of chlorinated hydrocarbons. The transport of these contaminants to resident communities in spawning streams was studied in two tributaries of Lake Michigan accessible to anadromous spawners and one control tributary blocked to them. No polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), DDT, or dieldrin were detected in the sediments or biota of the control stream, or in sediments of the test streams. However, trout Salmo spp. and, to a lesser extent, sculpins Cottus spp. accumulated PCBs and DDT as a result of eating contaminated salmon eggs. Eggs constituted as much as 87% (by weight) of the total stomach contents of trout collected during the salmon spawning season early October to early January. Salmon eggs contained 0.46-9.50 mg PCBs/kg,. and 0.14-1.80 mg DDT/kg. Consumption of eggs varied greatly among individual trout, and there was a strong correlation between numbers of eggs in the stomachs and PCB and DDT concentrations in the fillets.

  3. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CLUB OF NEW YORK Now is a great time to join the Columbia University Club of New York!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CLUB OF NEW YORK Now is a great time to join the Columbia University Club-719-0380 fax: 212-944-6944 info@columbiaclub.org www.columbiaclub.org Columbia's Social

  4. From new towns to eco-towns : transferable lessons in the building of new cities in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Trinity F

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis looks to Great Britain for lessons in building New Towns, with an eye towards the nascent Eco-Towns program. Specifically, three areas in urban design are considered: the employment of the neighborhood unit, ...

  5. NOVEMBER 1997 2847L O F G R E N Simulated Effects of Idealized Laurentian Great Lakes on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cycle of latent and sensible heat flux. Very high upward sensible heat flux occurs over these idealized noted remote effects of the Great Lakes in the form of different precipitation patterns over

  6. Comparers Chem. Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 91-102, 1993 Printed in Great Britain. All rightsreserved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    suggest that 3-D modeling will be possible at the level of chemical resolution in the programs. INTRODUffComparers Chem. Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 91-102, 1993 Printed in Great Britain. All rightsreserved 0097

  7. Identification of differences in human and great ape phytanic acid metabolism that could influence gene expression profiles and physiological functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knott CD, Wrangham RW: Energy intake by wild chimpanzees andwild derive a significant amount of their total daily metabolic energywild great apes derive greater amount of total daily metabolic energy

  8. ~mcupkric EnviroMvnr Vol. IS. No. IO, pp. 1969-2002. 1984 Pnnted in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    ~mcupkric EnviroMvnr Vol. IS. No. IO, pp. 1969-2002. 1984 Pnnted in Great Britain. ocKJ4-6981/84 13 diffusion, stratified flow, wind tunnel, towing tank, complex terrain, air pollution. NOMENCLATURE constant

  9. ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 Computing and Muon Calibration Center Commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawn McKee

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale computing in ATLAS is based on a grid-linked system of tiered computing centers. The ATLAS Great Lakes Tier-2 came online in September 2006 and now is commissioning with full capacity to provide significant computing power and services to the USATLAS community. Our Tier-2 Center also host the Michigan Muon Calibration Center which is responsible for daily calibrations of the ATLAS Monitored Drift Tubes for ATLAS endcap muon system. During the first LHC beam period in 2008 and following ATLAS global cosmic ray data taking period, the Calibration Center received a large data stream from the muon detector to derive the drift tube timing offsets and time-to-space functions with a turn-around time of 24 hours. We will present the Calibration Center commissioning status and our plan for the first LHC beam collisions in 2009.

  10. Water assessment report: Section 13 (c); Great Plains gasification project, Mercer County, ND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Resources Council is completing a water assessment of synfuels development in the Upper Missouri River Basin. This is being done under Section 13(a) of the Federal Nonnuclear Energy Research and Development Act. The assessment area includes the coal deposits in the Mercer County project site. Levels of North Dakota coal gasification development that are several times the production level of the Great Plains gasification project are being examined. This report assesses: (1) the availability of adequate water supplies to meet the water requirements of the project, supporting activities, and other development induced by the project; and (2) the changes in the water resources that will result from the project. Findings of the 13(a) assessment show that water supplies are physically available within the mainstem of the Missouri River in North Dakota to supply the requirements of the gasification facilities and the supporting activities - mining and reclamation, electricity, and project-induced population increases.

  11. Handbook for the GREAT08 Challenge: An image analysis competition for cosmological lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridle, Sarah; Amara, Adam; Applegate, Douglas; Balan, Sreekumar T; Bernstein, Gary; Berge, Joel; Dahle, Hakon; Erben, Thomas; Gill, Mandeep; Heavens, Alan; Heymans, Catherine; High, Will; Hoekstra, Henk; Jarvis, Mike; Kitching, Thomas; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Kuijken, Konrad; Lagattuta, David; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Massey, Richard; Mellier, Yannick; Moghaddam, Baback; Moudden, Yassir; Nakajima, Reiko; Paulin-Henriksson, Stephane; Pires, Sandrine; Rassat, Anais; Refregier, Alexandre; Rhodes, Jason; Schrabback, Tim; Semboloni, Elisabetta; Shmakova, Marina; van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Voigt, Lisa; Wittman, David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GRavitational lEnsing Accuracy Testing 2008 (GREAT08) Challenge focuses on a problem that is of crucial importance for future observations in cosmology. The shapes of distant galaxies can be used to determine the properties of dark energy and the nature of gravity, because light from those galaxies is bent by gravity from the intervening dark matter. The observed galaxy images appear distorted, although only slightly, and their shapes must be precisely disentangled from the effects of pixelisation, convolution and noise. The worldwide gravitational lensing community has made significant progress in techniques to measure these distortions via the Shear TEsting Program (STEP). Via STEP, we have run challenges within our own community, and come to recognise that this particular image analysis problem is ideally matched to experts in statistical inference, inverse problems and computational learning. Thus, in order to continue the progress seen in recent years, we are seeking an infusion of new ideas from the...

  12. Electrofishing survey of the Great Miami River, September 1992. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, M.C.; Bixby, R.; Engman, J.; Ross, L.; Stocker, L. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the end of summer in 1992 the fishery of the Great Miami River took an unexpected deviation from the stasis of past years as an intense suspended algal bloom decreased the compositional diversity found at the lower GMR stations. Daytime supersaturation of oxygen and elevated pHs, reaching 9 by midday during the month of August, undoubtedly caused severe deficits of oxygen at night. Despite the aeration at every riffle, the intensities of the biological processes in the water were sufficient to cause very high positive and negative excursions of oxygen over the day and night cycle. This report documents a fish harvest that was conducted as part of the oxygen excess/deficit study.

  13. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union, Vol. 91, No.5, 2 February 2010, P-Jges 41-42 Severe Ice Cover on Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ice Cover on Great Lakes DuringWinter 2008-2009 The North American Great Lakes contain about 95. Because of this concentration of pop- ulation, the ice cover that forms on the Great Lakes each winter and its year-la-year vari- ability affect the regional economy [Niimi, 1982]. Ice cover also affects

  14. The United States after the great recession: the challenge of sustainable growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meltzer, Joshua [The Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (United States); Steven, David (The Brookings Institution Center and the Center on International Cooperation at New York University (United States)); Langley, Claire (The Brookings Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper outlines the strengths and weaknesses of the U.S. economic growth model, assesses its’ ability to respond to the key economic, environmental and social challenges currently facing the U.S. and proposes policies that if adopted would move the U.S. onto a more sustainable growth path. The paper provides scenarios of projected future growth trajectories, as well as recommendations for specific policies in key areas: employment, infrastructure, energy and fiscal rebalancing. To reach this goal this paper focuses on four areas for action: Increasing employment, which is the most urgent priority to accelerate recovery from the Great Recession, while addressing underlying structural issues that have led to a decade of poor economic outcomes for most citizens; Investing in the future, as the key marker of whether the United States is prepared to make farsighted decisions to improve education, build new infrastructure and increase innovation; Maximizing an increased energy endowment in a way that grows the economy, while reinforcing the trend towards reducing resource demand and reducing greenhouse gas emissions; and, Fiscal rebalancing, where the United States must insulate economic recovery from the process of fiscal reform while reducing and stabilizing debt over the long term. Finally, we argue that President Obama can re-energize America’s global leadership if he builds on a platform of domestic actions that enhance the sustainability of America’s society and economy.

  15. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  16. Feasibility of producing jet fuel from GPGP (Great Plains Gasification Plant) by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willson, W.G.; Knudson, C.L.; Rindt, J.R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Plains Gasification Plant (GPGP) in Beulah, North Dakota, is in close proximity to several Air Force bases along our northern tier. This plant is producing over 137 million cubic feet per day of high-Btu Natural Gas from North Dakota lignite. In addition, the plant generates three liquid streams, naphtha, crude phenol, and tar oil. The naphtha may be directly marketable because of its low boiling point and high aromatic content. The other two streams, totalling about 4300 barrels per day, are available as potential sources of aviation fuel jet fuel for the Air Force. The overall objective of this project is to assess the technical and economic feasibility of producing aviation turbine fuel from the by-product streams of GPGP. These streams, as well as fractions, thereof, will be characterized and subsequently processed over a wide range of process conditions. The resulting turbine fuel products will be analyzed to determine their chemical and physical characteristics as compared to petroleum-based fuels to meet the military specification requirements. A second objective is to assess the conversion of the by-product streams into a new, higher-density aviation fuel. Since no performance specifications currently exist for a high-density jet fuel, reaction products and intermediates will only be characterized to indicate the feasibility of producing such a fuel. This report discusses the suitability of the tar oil stream. 5 refs., 20 figs., 15 tabs.

  17. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  18. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  19. ADVANCES IN HYDROGEOCHEMICAL INDICATORS FOR THE DISCOVERY OF NEW GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE GREAT BASIN, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Stuart F [Colorado School of Mines; Spycher, Nicolas [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Sonnenthal, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Dobson, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase I work for a go/no go decision on Phase II funding. In the first objective, we assessed the extent to which fluid-mineral equilibria controlled deep water compositions in geothermal systems across the Great Basin. Six systems were evaluated: Beowawe; Desert Peak; Dixie Valley; Mammoth; Raft River; Roosevelt. These represent a geographic spread of geothermal resources, in different geological settings and with a wide range of fluid compositions. The results were used for calibration/reformulation of chemical geothermometers that reflect the reservoir temperatures in producing reservoirs. In the second objective, we developed a reactive -transport model of the Desert Peak hydrothermal system to evaluate the processes that affect reservoir fluid geochemistry and its effect on solute geothermometry. This included testing geothermometry on “reacted” thermal water originating from different lithologies and from near-surface locations where the temperature is known from the simulation. The integrated multi-component geothermometer (GeoT, relying on computed mineral saturation indices) was tested against the model results and also on the systems studied in the first objective.

  20. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  1. Housing Archetype Analysis for Home Energy-Efficient Retrofit in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S. K.; Mrozowski, T.; Harrell-Seyburn, A.; Ehrlich, N.; Hembroff, L.; Bieburn, B.; Mazor, M.; McIntyre, A.; Mutton, C.; Parsons, G.; Syal, M. G.; Wilkinson, R.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project report details activities and results of the 'Market Characterization' project undertaken by the Cost Effective Energy Retrofit (CEER) team targeted toward the DOE goal of achieving 30%-50% reduction in existing building energy use. CEER consists of members from the Dow Chemical Company, Michigan State University, Ferris State University and Habitat for Humanity Kent County. The purpose of this market characterization project was to identify housing archetypes which are dominant within Great Lakes region and therefore offer significant potential for energy-efficient retrofit research and implementation due to the substantial number of homes possessing similar characteristics. Understanding the characteristics of housing groups referred to as 'archetypes' by vintage, style, and construction characteristics can allow research teams to focus their retrofit research and develop prescriptive solutions for those structure types which are prevalent and offer high potential uptake within a region or market. Key research activities included; literature review, statistical analysis of national and regional data of the American Housing Survey (AHS) collected by the U.S. Census Bureau, analysis of Michigan specific data, development of a housing taxonomy of architectural styles, case studies of two local markets (i.e., Ann Arbor and Grand Rapids in Michigan) and development of a suggested framework (or process) for characterizing local markets. In order to gain a high level perspective, national and regional data from the U.S. Census Bureau was analyzed using cross tabulations, multiple regression models, and logistic regression to characterize the housing stock and determine dominant house types using 21 variables.

  2. Deep-Sell Rtsearch. Vol. 38. Suppl I, pp S32}-S343. 1991. Pnnted In Great Britam.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Arnold L.

    -Benguela Front. separates the cyclonic gyre regime from that of the subtropical gyre. Using the regionalDeep-Sell Rtsearch. Vol. 38. Suppl I, pp S32}-S343. 1991. Pnnted In Great Britam. Cyclonic gyre-A cyclonic gyre within the eastern tropical South Atlantic is resolved by an extensive oceanographic station

  3. The 2012 summertime drought over the Central Great Plains--the most severe seasonal drought in 117 years--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through summer 2012. This greatly improved their soil moisture balance, and the U.S. Drought Monitor estimated that northeast Texas was drought free by May 2012. Oklahoma City also showed strong signsMAr And Mo--NOAA/Climate Prediction Center, Camp Springs, Maryland; leung--Department of Energy, Pacific

  4. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great by symptoms of foliar ozone injury. Abstract The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts

  5. Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis) in Great Smoky Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, Howard S.

    Ozone injury on cutleaf coneflower (Rudbeckia laciniata) and crown-beard (Verbesina occidentalis ``Capsule'': Ground-level ozone causes deleterious effects to cutleaf coneflower and crown-beard in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Abstract Incidence and severity of visible foliar ozone injury on cutleaf

  6. NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT LAKES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Memorandum ERL GLERL-44 ICE-COVER GROWTH RATES AT NEARSHORE LOCATIONS IN THE GREAT of such products is not authorized. ii #12;CONTENTS Abstract 1. INTRODUCTION 2. THE THEORETICAL BASIS OF THE ICE GROWTH EQUATION 3. THE INFLUENCE OF SNOW COVER 4. THE DEGREE-DAY LINEAR MODEL 5. THE DATA SETS 5.1 Ice

  7. Located in the heart of South America, the Pantanal (meaning"great swamp"in Portuguese) is an immense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C.

    and the Atlantic Ocean. It is also an integral part of the hy- drologic cycle of South America because of its size and the direct connection with neighboring South American phytogeographic regions also produce a remarkableLocated in the heart of South America, the Pantanal (meaning"great swamp"in Portuguese

  8. Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 431 to 434, 1989 Printed in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Christopher M.

    stabilized by perpendicular thermal conduction. INA FULLY IGNITED thermonuclear plasma the fusion energyPlasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, Vol. 31, No. 3. pp. 431 to 434, 1989 Printed in Great Britain MAGNETOACOUSTIC INSTABILITY IN A THERMONUCLEAR PLASMA C. M. BISHOP,R. FITZPATRICKand R. J. HASTIE Culham

  9. J. Phys. F : Metal Phys., Vol. 7, No. 12, 1977. Printed in Great Britain. @ 1977 LETTER TO THE EDITOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gimzewski, James

    measurements of Au 4f and Ag 3d core- level spectra excited with synchrotron radiation at energies of the orderJ. Phys. F : Metal Phys., Vol. 7, No. 12, 1977. Printed in Great Britain. @ 1977 LETTER and Lindau (1977)discuss in detail the energy resolution and performance attainable and it has become clear

  10. Annals of Nuclear Energy, Vol. 7, pp. 535 to 539 Pergamon Press Ltd. 1980. Printed in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siewert, Charles E.

    Annals of Nuclear Energy, Vol. 7, pp. 535 to 539 Pergamon Press Ltd. 1980. Printed in Great Britain,bt(a, - It) = ~b2(a, - It) (3d) for It ~ (0, 1). Since ~bl(X, It) and S @*(x, It) = ~b2(x, It) (4) ~r,(1 - c2

  11. Automated Vehicle Policy Work Automated vehicles are a subject of great interest, both in transportation and society in general.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automated Vehicle Policy Work Automated vehicles are a subject of great interest, both researchers are currently exploring automation's effects on the transportation system, determining preparation in the estimations of how automation will affect both congestion and safety. Both of these issues are critical

  12. Annals of Nuclear Eneroy, Vol. 7. pp. 171 to 183 Pergamon Press Ltd. 1980. Printed in Great Britain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    slab reactor in the modified one-group theory, and subsequently, the neutronresponse to twoAnnals of Nuclear Eneroy, Vol. 7. pp. 171 to 183 Pergamon Press Ltd. 1980. Printed in Great Britain I. P.~ZSIT*and G. TH. ANALYTIS~ Department of Nuclear Engineering,Queen Mary College,Mile End Road

  13. International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology (2001), 51, 737749 Printed in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gent, Universiteit

    in Great Britain Phylogenetic relationships among algae based on complete large-subunit rRNA sequences 1 of the different groups of algae, and in particular to study the relationships among the different classes of heterokont algae. In LSU rRNA phylogenies, the chlorarachniophytes, cryptomonads and haptophytes seem to form

  14. Oval BA (and the Great Red Spot) extend down to a supersolar water cloud layer in Jupiter's atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Philip S.

    Oval BA (and the Great Red Spot) extend down to a supersolar water cloud layer in Jupiter in Jupiter's troposphere, with stable layers near cloud bases [4,6,7]. We use these two results to determine horizontal band in Fig. 2 shows that vortex- model derived static stability (white bars) is consistent

  15. RECENT TRENDS IN LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND ASSEL1, KEVIN CRONK2 and DAVID NORTON1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commonwealth Blvd, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105-2945, U.S.A. 2The University of Michigan, Cooperative InstituteRECENT TRENDS IN LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RAYMOND ASSEL1, KEVIN CRONK2 and DAVID NORTON1 1 for Limnology and Ecosystems Research, 2200 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2099, U.S.A. Abstract

  16. Spatial analysis of ice phenology trends across the Laurentian Great Lakes region during a recent warming period

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Canada Patricia A. Soranno Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1222 Kenton M. Stewart Department of Biological Science, State University of New YorkSpatial analysis of ice phenology trends across the Laurentian Great Lakes region during a recent

  17. Magnetic refrigeration, based on the magnetocaloric ef-fect, has great promise for domestic and industrial use and is at-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canet, Léonie

    Magnetic refrigeration, based on the magnetocaloric ef- fect, has great promise for domestic the magnetization phase, and heat is withdrawn from the volume to be refrigerated during the demagnetization phase but these LaFeSi ma- terials seem to have the best properties in view of magnetic refrigeration applications

  18. Cloud climatology at the Southern Great Plains and the layer structure, drizzle, and atmospheric modes of continental stratus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydro- logic effects.5 years) cloud observations from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Cloud climatologies

  19. Environmental testing of escape breathing apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stengel, J W

    1982-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of 60-minute self-contained breathing apparatus was being introduced into the underground coal mining industry for use as respiratory protection during fires and mine disasters. Little field experience existed from which to predict the survivability of this new life-support equipment. A series of environmental tests was proposed consisting of exposure to heat, cold, shock, and vibration. Treated and untreated apparatus were evaluated and compared by use on human subjects and a mechanical breathing simulator. Results are reported. After field data have been collected, information may be able to be correlated with environmental testing and used as a predictor of survivability.

  20. THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ALL-SKY LIRG SURVEY: COMPARISON OF ULTRAVIOLET AND FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Justin H.; Armus, Lee; Surace, Jason A.; Petric, Andreea; Bridge, Carrie; Haan, Sebastian; Inami, Hanae [Spitzer Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Chan, Ben H. P.; Madore, Barry F. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, Aaron S.; Kim, Dong-Chan [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Sanders, David B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Appleton, Phil; Frayer, David T.; Lord, Steven; Schulz, Bernhard [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bothun, Greg [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Charmandaris, Vassilis [University of Crete, Department of Physics, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Melbourne, Jason, E-mail: jhhowell@ipac.caltech.ed [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 320-47, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) consists of a complete sample of 202 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) selected from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The galaxies span the full range of interaction stages, from isolated galaxies to interacting pairs to late stage mergers. We present a comparison of the UV and infrared properties of 135 galaxies in GOALS observed by GALEX and Spitzer. For interacting galaxies with separations greater than the resolution of GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2''-6''), we assess the UV and IR properties of each galaxy individually. The contribution of the FUV to the measured star formation rate (SFR) ranges from 0.2% to 17.9%, with a median of 2.8% and a mean of 4.0% {+-} 0.4%. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) of the GOALS sample is extremely high, with a median value (3.9 x 10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}) that is comparable to the highest SSFRs seen in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample. We examine the position of each galaxy on the IR excess-UV slope (IRX-{beta}) diagram as a function of galaxy properties, including IR luminosity and interaction stage. The LIRGs on average have greater IR excesses than would be expected based on their UV colors if they obeyed the same relations as starbursts with L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub sun} or normal late-type galaxies. The ratio of L{sub IR} to the value one would estimate from the IRX-{beta} relation published for lower luminosity starburst galaxies ranges from 0.2 to 68, with a median value of 2.7. A minimum of 19% of the total IR luminosity in the RBGS is produced in LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies with red UV colors ({beta}>0). Among resolved interacting systems, 32% contain one galaxy which dominates the IR emission while the companion dominates the UV emission. Only 21% of the resolved systems contain a single galaxy which dominates both wavelengths.

  1. Behind Every Good Metabolite there is a Great Enzyme (and perhaps a structure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Phan, Isabelle; Cron, Lisabeth; Stacy, Robin; Stewart, Lance J.; Staker, Bart L.; Edwards, Tom E.; Varani, Gabriele; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, due to great technological advancements, it is possible to study everything at the same time. This ability has given birth to “totality” studies in the fields of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. In turn, the combined study of all these global analyses gave birth to the field of systems biology. Another “totality” field brought to life with new emerging technologies is structural genomics, an effort to determine the three-dimensional structure of every protein encoded in a genome. The Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infectious Disease (SSGCID) is a specialized structural genomics effort composed of academic (University of Washington), government (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory), not-for-profit (Seattle BioMed), and commercial (Emerald BioStructures) institutions that is funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Federal Contract: HHSN272200700057C and HHSN27220120025C) to apply genome-scale approaches in solving protein structures from biodefense organisms, as well as those causing emerging and re-emerging disease. In five years over 540 structures have been deposited into the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by SSGICD. About one third of all SSGCID structures contain bound ligands, many of which are metabolites or metabolite analogues present in the cell. These proteins structures are the blueprints for the structure-based design of the next generation of drugs against bacterial pathogens and other infectious diseases. Many of the selected SSGCID targets are annotated enzymes from known metabolomic pathways essential to cellular vitality since selectively “knocking-out” one of the enzymes in an important pathway with a drug may be fatal to the organism. One reason metabolomic pathways are important is because of the small molecules, or metabolites, produced at various steps in these pathways and identified by metabolomic studies. Unlike genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics that may be influenced by epigenetic, post-transcriptional, and post-translational modifications, respectively, the metabolites present in the cell at any one time represent downstream biochemical endproducts, and therefore, metabolite profiles may be most closely associated with a phenotype and provide valuable information for infectious disease research. Metabolomic data would be even more useful if it could be linked to the vast amount of structural genomics data. Towards this goal SSGCID has created an automated website (http://apps.sbri.org/SSGCIDTargetStatus/Pathway) that assigns selected SSGCID target proteins to MetaCyc pathways (http://metacyc.org/). Details of this website will be provided here. The SSGCID-Pathway website represents a first big step towards linking metabolites and metabolic pathways to structural genomic data with the goal of accelerating the discovery of new agents to battle infectious diseases.

  2. Physics Commencement, Friday June 14, 2013 Folks, you're such a GREAT CLASS! I'm pretty sure I know almost all of you. I had

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , are graduating, and moving on to great postdoctoral positions, after a STELLAR graduate career. Tim was offered almost every postdoctoral job in his field this year

  3. Oration for Professor Marshall Sahlins (LSE Presentation Ceremony, 14 December 2011) Director, ladies and gentlemen, it is with great pleasure and conviction that I propose Professor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Paul

    Oration for Professor Marshall Sahlins (LSE Presentation Ceremony, 14 December 2011) Director, ladies and gentlemen, it is with great pleasure and conviction that I propose Professor Marshall Sahlins

  4. A southern black community comes of age: black San Antonio in the Great Depression, 1930-1941

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Charles Christopher

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A&M University Press, 1984) compares the Depression This thesis follows the format of the Journal of 9 t ~Ht experiences of black, white, and Mexican American women of San Antonio. Judy Kaaz Doyle's "Maury Maverick and Racial Politics in San...A SOUTHERN BLACK COMMUNITY COMES OF AGE: BLACK SAN ANTONIO IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION, 1930-1941 A Thesis by CHARLES CHRISTOPHER JACKSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. Archaeological investigations using geophysics at Chimney Rock Great House, Colorado Michael A. Mitchell, Sarah G.R. Devriese, Roxanna N. Frary, Richard A. Krahenbuhl, Brenda K. Todd,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archaeological investigations using geophysics at Chimney Rock Great House, Colorado Michael A of Geophysics, Colorado School of Mines Department of Anthropology, University of Colorado, Boulder SUMMARY In this talk, we present results from a geophysical investiga- tion at the Chimney Rock Great House using

  6. Geothermal Resources Council Transactions,Vol. 26, September 22-25, 2002 Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geothermal Resources Council Transactions,Vol. 26, September 22-25, 2002 Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional Relationships Between Geodetic Strain and GeologicalA. Bennett3 lGreat Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, Universityof Nevada, Reno, Nevada *State Universityof

  7. Blewitt, G., et al., Transactions Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 26, p. 523-526, 2002 Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    Blewitt, G., et al., Transactions Geothermal Resources Council, Vol. 26, p. 523-526, 2002 1 Targeting of Potential Geothermal Resources in the Great Basin from Regional Relationships between Geodetic Strain and Geological Structures Geoffrey Blewitt and Mark Coolbaugh Great Basin Center for Geothermal

  8. Biochemical Pharmacology, Vol. 37, No. 7, pp. 1331-1341, 1988. 0006-2952/88 $3.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. ~ 1988. Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    in Great Britain. ~ 1988. Pergamon Press plc SODIUM CHOLATE EXTRACTION OF RAT LIVER NUCLEAR XENOBIOTIC

  9. Journal of StructuralGeology, Vol. 1I, No. 7, pp. 847 to 858, 1989 0191-8141/86$03.00+ 0.00 Printed in Great Britain Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chester, Frederick M.

    in Great Britain Pergamon Press plc Dynamic recrystallization in semi-brittle faults FREDERICKM. CHESTER

  10. Allometric biomass estimators for aspen-dominated ecosystems in the upper Great Lakes. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perala, D.A.; Alban, D.H.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors recently described the climate, geology, soils, and the biotic structure and dynamics of four contrasting ecosystems dominated by quaking and bigtooth aspen (Populus tremuloides and P. grandidentata). Other papers describe how those ecosystems responded to perturbation. Common to most of those papers were biomass estimates for the tree and shrub layers. The authors derived the estimators from weight and dimensional analysis of a subsample of stems measured on sample plots. They found much variability among sites that could not be adequately explained by stand or soils data. These equations should be useful in estimating woody plant components of similar forests on upland soils in the Upper Great Lakes region.

  11. A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Debra Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

  12. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project (DOE/EIS-0183) (11/29/06)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+18, 2012Energy Reliability (OE): EA-405 Del Norte Energy LLCRecord

  13. OSU is dedicated to encouraging conservation and protecting the environment for future generations. With OSU's Energy Conservation Program, we have made great strides in protecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    . With OSU's Energy Conservation Program, we have made great strides in protecting our natural resources help make OSU's efforts successful. Use these simple energy conservation strategies in the office

  14. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, ...

  15. Clinical Science (2012) 122, 513525 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/CS20110622 513 Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clinical Science (2012) 122, 513­525 (Printed in Great Britain) doi:10.1042/CS20110622 513, Department for Experimental Medicine, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech

  16. Great Lakes water quality initiative criteria documents for the protection of wildlife (proposed): DDT, mercury 2,3,7,8-TCDD and PCBs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradbury, S.; Nolt, C.; Goodman, B.; Stromborg, K.; Sullivan, J.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document outlines, for each category of contaminant listed in the title, the relevant literature, the calculation of mammalian wildlife value, the calculation of Avian Wildlife Value, and the Great Lakes Wildlife criterion.

  17. Grassland carbon and nitrogen dynamics: effects of seasonal fire and clipping in a mixed-grass prairie of the southern great plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Wylie Neal

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant production and soil microbial biomass (SMB) in grassland ecosystems are linked by flows of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) between the two groups of organisms. In native mixed grasslands of the southern Great Plains, these cycles are strongly...

  18. Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 154, 1997, pp. 747751, 2 figs, 1 table. Printed in Great Britain Discussion on aluminium loss during sandstone diagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Journal of the Geological Society, London, Vol. 154, 1997, pp. 747­751, 2 figs, 1 table. Printed in Great Britain Discussion on aluminium loss during sandstone diagenesis Journal, Vol. 153, 1996, pp. 657

  19. Nesting success of the great-tailed grackle (Cassidix mexicanus prosopidicola) in relation to certain density dependent and density independent factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotie, Robert Francis

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NESTING SUCCESS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (CASSIDIX MEXICANUS PROSOPIDICOLA) IN RELATION TO CERTAIN DENSITY DEPENDENT AND DENSITY INDEPENDENT FACTORS A Thesis by ROBERT FRANCIS GOTIE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... AND DENSITY INDEPENDENT FACTORS A Thesis by ROBERT FRANCIS GOTIE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1972 ABSTRACT Nesting Success of the Great-tailed Grackle (Cassidix...

  20. Nesting success of the great-tailed grackle (Cassidix mexicanus prosopidicola) in relation to certain density dependent and density independent factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotie, Robert Francis

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NESTING SUCCESS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (CASSIDIX MEXICANUS PROSOPIDICOLA) IN RELATION TO CERTAIN DENSITY DEPENDENT AND DENSITY INDEPENDENT FACTORS A Thesis by ROBERT FRANCIS GOTIE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subject: Wildlife Science NESTING SUCCESS OF THE GREAT-TAILED GRACKLE (CASSIDIX MEXICANUS PROSOPIDICOLA) IN RELATION TO CERTAIN DENSITY DEPENDENT...

  1. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  2. Environmental exposure and lifestyle predictors of lead, cadmium, PCB, and DDT levels in Great Lakes fish eaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovinga, M.E.; Sowers, M.; Humphrey, H.E. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously characterized cohort of 115 Great Lakes fish eaters and 95 non-fish-eating regional controls was reexamined in 1989. Levels of blood lead and cadmium and serum PCB and DDT were measured. Lifestyle characteristics, including recent and historic fish consumption, were evaluated as predictors of contaminant levels using multivariate regression analysis. Significantly elevated serum PCB and DDT levels were observed in fish eaters, compared with controls. Historic fish consumption, rather than recent consumption, was identified as the primary predictor of current serum levels. Mean blood lead and cadmium were also significantly higher in fish eaters than in controls. However, the primary predictors of lead and cadmium were behavioral exposures--specifically smoking and self-reported occupational and recreational exposure-rather than fish consumption. These findings illustrate the importance of evaluating a variety of possible sources when investigating human exposure to environmental contaminants.

  3. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand Projects & Initiatives Finance & Rates Expand Finance & Rates Involvement & Outreach Expand Involvement &...

  4. The great American garage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, B. Alex (Brian Alex), 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    How does one explore the suburban home? Go in through the garage, of course. Sales, bands, suicides, and business startups: The suburban garage is the most culturally flexible space in the entire American domestic environment. ...

  5. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lower point so it forms an incline. You can use a desk or chair back. 4. Set the bull's-eye paper target on the floor about halfway between the wall and the chair. 5. Challenge...

  6. Southern Great Plains Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Prell

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This months issue contains the following articles: (1) Scientists convene at SGP site for complex convective cloud experiment; (2) VORTEX2 spins down; (3) Sunphotometer supports SPARTICUS (a Sun and Aureole Measurement imaging sunphotometer) campaign and satellite validation studies; and (4) Ceilometer represents first deployment of new ground-based instruments from Recovery Act.

  7. Great Lakes RESTORATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides much-needed resources to clean up toxic substances and delist remaining AOCs. Indeed, with input NOAA's Mussel Watch Program is providing critical information to help inform AOC delisting. Mussels to the delisting of AOCs. The data from AOCs can be meaningfully interpreted by leveraging long-term monitoring

  8. Great Lakes NATIONALOCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -situ and modeled data, including marine and meteorological observations, buoy observations, water level gauge-line interactive retrieval of physical parameters such as surface temperature, ice cover, winds, and bottom depth such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), scatterometer, and ocean color sensors are being develop

  9. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheastern Federal

  10. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheastern FederalAugust 2004

  11. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheastern FederalAugust

  12. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheastern FederalAugustJune

  13. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheastern

  14. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheasternMay 2004

  15. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheasternMay 2004November

  16. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheasternMay

  17. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYouofSolving theSoutheasternMaySeptember 2004

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features Newsletter5

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features Newsletter56

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features Newsletter567

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features5

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features5Aug./Sept.

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features5Aug./Sept.7

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features5Aug./Sept.74

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter Features5Aug./Sept.745

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-12

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-125

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77 ANL/EVS/NL-07-02

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77 ANL/EVS/NL-07-025

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77 ANL/EVS/NL-07-0256

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77 ANL/EVS/NL-07-02567

  15. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77 ANL/EVS/NL-07-025678

  16. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77

  17. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter776 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter776 ANL/EVS/NL-06-077

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter776 ANL/EVS/NL-06-0775

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter776 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07756

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter776

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7765 ANL/ER/NL-05-03

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7765 ANL/ER/NL-05-037

  4. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7765 ANL/ER/NL-05-0378

  5. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7765 ANL/ER/NL-05-03785

  6. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter7765

  7. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657 ANL/EVS/NL-07-05

  8. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657 ANL/EVS/NL-07-056

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657Oct./Nov. 2005

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657Oct./Nov. 20056

  12. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657Oct./Nov. 200567

  13. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657Oct./Nov. 2005675

  14. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2 Revealing4Newsletter77657Oct./Nov. 20056757

  15. ARM Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP Related Links FacilitiesER-ARM-0402 Atmospheric RadiationIntro

  16. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main MenuPortalSolvingPlains

  17. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditThe FiveBiofuelsGE StoreF.

  18. The Great Marble Drop

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2Dand WaterThe Future is Now

  19. Chemical Engineering Science, Vol. 46. No. 3, pp. 715-722, 1991. tax-x09/91 s3.00 + CKa Printed In Great Britain. 0 1991 Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peppas, Nicholas A.

    In Great Britain. 0 1991 Pergamon Press plc EQUILIBRIUM SWELLING BEHAVIOR OF pH-SENSITIVE HYDROGELS LISA

  20. Biochemical Pharmacology, Vol. 37. No. 14. pp. 2717-2722. 19X8. KN&2952/XX $3.(X) + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. 0 19X8. Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    in Great Britain. 0 19X8. Pergamon Press plc 1,2-EPOXYCYCLOALKANES: SUBSTRATES AND INHIBITORS OF MICROSOMAL

  1. ContinentalShelf Research, Vol, 10, No. 6, pp. 501-519, 1990. 0278,-4343/90 $3.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. 1990 Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansell, Dennis

    in Great Britain. © 1990 Pergamon Press plc Pelagic nitrogen flux in the northern Bering Sea DENNIS A

  2. Chemical Engrneering Science, Vol. 46, No. 9, pp. 2303 -23t3, 1991. ooo9-*509,91 13.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britam. 0 1991 Pergamon Pnss plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    .00 Printed in Great Britam. 0 1991 Pergamon Pnss plc MODELLING OF SIMULTANEOUS ABSORPTION OF H,S AND CO

  3. Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, Vol. 32, No. 5, pp, 335 to 357, 1990 0741-3335;90 ~ 3 . 0 0 ~.oo Printed in Great Britain. 01990 IOP Publishing Ltd. and Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~.oo Printed in Great Britain. 01990 IOP Publishing Ltd. and Pergamon Press plc LOOP-VOLTAGE TOMOGRAPHY

  4. Continental Shelf Research, Vol. 10, No. 2, pp. 123-136, 1990. 0278--4343/90 $3.00 + 0.00 Printed in Great Britain. 1990 Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, .Dake

    in Great Britain. © 1990 Pergamon Press plc Coupling between mixing and advection in a shallow sea front

  5. hf. J. Hear Mass Transfer. Vol. 31, No. 10, pp. 2077-2089, 1988 0017-9310/88 $3.co+o.O0 Printed in Great Britain 0 1988 Pergamon Press plc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckermann, Christoph

    in Great Britain 0 1988 Pergamon Press plc Double-diffusive convection due to melting C. BECKERMANN and R

  6. Investigation of MAGMA chambers in the Western Great Basin. Final report, 9 June 1982-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppin, W.A.

    1986-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes efforts made by the Seismological Laboratory toward the detection and delineation of shallow crustal zones in the western Great Basin, and toward the development of methods to accomplish such detection. The work centers around the recently-active volcanic center near Long Valley, California. The work effort is broken down into three tasks: (1) network operations, (2) data analysis and interpretation, and (3) the study of shallow crustal amomalies (magma bodies). Section (1) describes the efforts made to record thousand of earthquakes near the Long Valley caldera, and focusses on the results obtained for the November 1984 round Valley earthquake. Section (2) describes the major effort of this contract, which was to quantify the large volume of seismic data being recorded as it pertains to the goals of this contract. Efforts described herein include (1) analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms, and (2) the classification, categorization, and interpretation of unusual seismic phases in terms of reflections and refractions from shallow-crustal anomalous zones. Section (3) summarizes the status of our research to date on the locations of magma bodies, with particular emphasis on a location corresponding to the map location of the south end of Hilton Creek fault. Five lines of independent evidence suggest that magma might be associated with this spot. Finally, new evidence on the large magma bodies within the Long Valley caldera, of interest to the DOE deep drilling project, is presented.

  7. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Evidence for ammonia and water ices from analysis of VIMS spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Patrick

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our analysis of Cassini/VIMS near-infrared spectra of Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 reveals a multi-component aerosol composition comprised primarily of ammonia ice, with a significant component of water ice. The most likely third component is ammonium hydrosulfide or some weakly absorbing material similar to what dominates visible clouds outside the storm region. Horizontally heterogeneous models favor ammonium hydrosulfide as the third component, while horizontally uniform models favor the weak absorber. Both models rely on water ice absorption to compensate for residual spectral gradients produced by ammonia ice from 3.0 microns to 3.1 microns and need the third component to fill in the sharp ammonia ice absorption peak near 2.96 microns. The best heterogeneous model has spatial coverage fractions of 55% ammonia ice, 22% water ice, and 23% ammonium hydrosulfide. The best homogeneous model has an optically thin layer of weakly absorbing particles above an optically thick layer of water ice particles coa...

  8. Contaminant concentrations and biomarker response in great blue heron eggs from 10 colonies on the upper Mississippi River, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Custer, T.W.; Hines, R.K. [National Biological Service, LaCrosse, WI (United States). Upper Mississippi Science Center; Melancon, M.J.; Hoffman, D.J. [National Biological Service, Laurel, MD (United States). Patuxent Wildlife Research Center; Wickliffe, J.K.; Bickham, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries; Martin, J.W.; Henshel, D.S. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, great blue heron (Ardea herodias; GBH) eggs were collected from 10 colonies on the upper Mississippi River (UMR). They were then artificially incubated until pipping and analyzed for mercury, selenium, and organochlorines. Livers of embryos were analyzed for hepatic microsomal ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROS) activity and four measures of oxidative stress. Brains were measured for asymmetry and blood was measured for the coefficient of variation of DNA (DNA CV). Organochlorine concentrations were generally low (geometric mean DDE = 1.3 {micro}g/g wet weight; polychlorinated biphenyl [PCB] = 3.0 {micro}g/g; 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin [TCDD] = 11.5 pg/g). Eggshell thickness was negatively correlated with DDE concentrations. Mercury (geometric mean = 0.8 {micro}g/g dry weight) and selenium (3.1 {micro}g/g dry weight) concentrations in GBH eggs were within background levels. EROD activity was not correlated with total PCBs, TCDD, or toxic equivalents (TEQs), based on the relative contribution of individual PCB congeners, dibenzodioxins (PCDDs), and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) to total calculated TEQs. Three of the four measures of oxidative stress were correlated with mercury concentrations. Twenty of 43 (47%) embryo brains were asymmetrical and the embryos with asymmetrical brains had higher EROD concentrations in the liver and higher DNA CV in the blood than embryos with symmetrical brains.

  9. Pesticides and total polychlorinated biphenyls residues in raw and cooked walleye and white bass harvested from the Great Lakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zabik, M.E.; Booren, A.M.; Daubenmire, S.; Pascall, M.A.; Zabik, M.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Welch, R.; Humphrey, H. [Michigan Dept. of Public Health, Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To provide data for public health and other government officials to quantitate the degree of exposure a human might receive from consumption of commonly sought open water fish species prepared and cooked by commonly used methods, five species of Great Lakes fish were chosen. Data is presented for walleye harvested from Lakes Erie, Huron and Michigan which were baked and char-broiled as skin-on fillets with additional walleye from Lake Michigan being deep fat fried. Skin-on white bass fillets from Lakes Erie and Huron also were pan fried. Packed column PCB and pesticide analyses were conducted for all fish species by the Michigan Department of Public Health. The DDT complex (p,p{prime}DDT, p,p{prime}DDE and p,p{prime}DDD), dieldrin, hexa-chlorobenzene (HCB), chlorodane complex (alpha and gamma chlordane, oxychlordane, cis- and trans-nonachlor), toxaphene, heptachlor epoxide, and total PCBs (expressed as Arochlor{sup R} 1254) were found at above the minimum level of detection for many of the species studied. Residues were expressed as ppm wet tissue and then converted to micrograms per fillet to calculate the percentage loss due to cooking. 9 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Investigation of the Impact of Aerosols on Clouds During May 2003 Intensive Operational Period at the Southern Great Plains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H.; Penner, J.E.; Herzog, M.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of aerosols on the clouds, or the so-called aerosol indirect effect (AIE), is highly uncertain (Penner et al. 2001). The estimation of the AIE can vary from 0.0 to -4.8 W/m2 in Global Climate Models (GCM). Therefore, it is very important to investigate these interactions and cloud-related physical processes further. The Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP) at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in May 2003 dedicated some effort towards the measurement of the Cloud Condensation Nucleus concentration (CCN) as a function of super-saturation and in relating CCN concentration to aerosol composition and size distribution. Furthermore, airborn measurement for the cloud droplet concentration was also available. Therefore this AIOP provides a good opportunity to examine the AIE. In this study, we use a Cloud Resolving Model (CRM), i.e., Active Tracer High-resolution Atmospheric Model (ATHAM), to discuss the effect of aerosol loadings on cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and concentration. The case we examine is a stratiform cloud that occurred on May 17, 2003.

  11. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  12. 47

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The preceding calculation of the escape velocity neglects the effect of air resistance, ..... “Natural Displacement of Pollution from the Great Lakes,“ Science 155.

  13. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  14. Introductory remarks by Julian Hunt talks at CoZSSA 2, Nov 2005 Ministerial colleagues, I am greatly honoured to open this conference on Coastal Zones in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    for economic and social development consistent with adapting to the special features of the changing climate. Environmental and climate change present great challenges to every country in the world and especially such as those in oil rich areas. The effects of deforestation also have major effects on regional climate

  15. Hope Clinic Internship Application This internship is a great opportunity for a student who is looking to gain real-world experience for 1-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Hope Clinic Internship Application This internship is a great opportunity for a student who be available either Tuesdays and/or Wednesdays. It is a semester-long internship and the start/end date.utahhopeclinic.org. Please direct questions about the internship to Neela Pack at neelapack@gmail.com or 801-860-3988. Full

  16. J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys., Vol. 8, 1975.Printed in Great Britain. @ 1975 The metal-insulator transition in lanthanum strontium vanadate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Reuven

    + and an enhanced hole conduction in the system of vanadium 3d bands. Mott (1972)has suggested that this systemJ. Phys. C: Solid State Phys., Vol. 8, 1975.Printed in Great Britain. @ 1975 The metal in AC conductivity and a temperature dependent activation energy at temperatures below 100K

  17. NOBOB-A: Assessment of Transoceanic NOBOB Vessels and Low-Salinity Ballast Water as Vectors for Nonindigenous Species Introductions to the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tanks are structurally complex and often contain small amounts residual water and accumulated mud include nonindigenous organisms that were in the original residual ballast water and sediment, thus from port to port. This new (Great Lakes) ballast water mixes with the residual ballast water, mud

  18. J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys., Vol. 8, 1975.Printed in Great Britain. @ 1975 Free energies of inhomogeneous spatially dispersive media:11.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys., Vol. 8, 1975.Printed in Great Britain. @ 1975 Free energies and surface free energies in terms of the dielectric response functions ~ ( q ,CO)which characterize the bulk inconsistencies connected with the zero frequency contribution or classical limit of the interaction free energy

  19. Value of Citizen Science Monitoring Involving citizen scientists in the sea star wasting disease survey effort will greatly expand our spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Value of Citizen Science Monitoring Involving citizen scientists in the sea star wasting disease survey effort will greatly expand our spatial and temporal coverage. Citizen science groups can collect. A researcher from the MARINe group should accompany each citizen science group in the field to assist

  20. Abstract--The U.S. power industry is under great pressure to provide reactive power or Var support. Although it is generally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    Abstract--The U.S. power industry is under great pressure to provide reactive power or Var support to provide local reactive power support, a thorough quantitative investigation of the economic benefit reactive power compensation. This paper investigates the benefits including reduced losses, shifting

  1. Pattern Recognition Pergamon Press 1973. Vol. 5, pp. 199-211. Printed in Great Britain The "Rubber-Mask" Technique II.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widrow, Bernard

    Pattern Recognition Pergamon Press 1973. Vol. 5, pp. 199-211. Printed in Great Britain The "Rubber to date, and relates the rubber mask technique to previous work. A scheme for incorporating flexible by flexible matching, is also presented. Flexible templates Rubber masks Pattern recognition and memory system

  2. Pattern Recognition Pergamon Press 1973. Vol, 5, pp. 175-197. Printed in Great Britain The "Rubber-Mask" Technique I.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widrow, Bernard

    Pattern Recognition Pergamon Press 1973. Vol, 5, pp. 175-197. Printed in Great Britain The "Rubber in size, fuzzy, rotated, translated, observed at an unusual perspective, etc. Flexible templates (rubber, and electroencephalogram waveforms are illustrated. The rubber-mask technique will probably be usable in a wide variety

  3. nature materials | VOL 2 | OCTOBER 2003 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 689 ver the past decade great progress has been made on synthesis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zubarev, Eugene

    the past decade great progress has been made on synthesis of nanostructures as a tool-set for new materials containing ZnO nanocrystals as the inorganic component, both phases are oriented in the hybrid materialARTICLES nature materials | VOL 2 | OCTOBER 2003 | www.nature.com/naturematerials 689 O ver

  4. The effects of proposed water development by AWDI on Great Sand Dunes National Monument and the San Luis Valley in southern Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raines, Richard Thomas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF PROPOSED WATER DEVELOPMENT BY AWDI ON GREAT SAND DUNES NATIONAL MONUMENT AND THE SAN LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Submitted to thc College of Agriculture of Texas Agr... LUIS VALLEY IN SOUTHERN COLORADO A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by RICHARD THOMAS RAINES Approved as to style and content by: r Dr. Robert C. Ma mmittec Chairman Dr. Robert W. Kni@~mmittcc Member Dr. a igh olfe, Corbmittcc Member I'Dc t August, 1992...

  5. P1.29 CLIMATE PERSPECTIVE OF THE 1997-98 LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER Raymond A.Assel'. ,John E. Janowia~, David C. Norton', and Chris O'Connors3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P1.29 CLIMATE PERSPECTIVE OF THE 1997-98 LAURENTIAN GREAT LAKES ICE COVER Raymond A.Assel'. ,John E/NCEPINWSlNOAA, Camp Springs, Maryland 3 NIC/NWSlNOAA, Suitland. Maryland 1. INTRODUCTION Great Lakes ice cover affects. 1). Ice can also cause flooding, shore property damage and damage to hydro

  6. A review of "The Great Ocean of Knowledge. The Influence of Travel Literature on the Work of John Locke" by Ann Talbot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro, María G.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whose relevance endures in cognitive science today. He is in this sense, like his subject, ?radically optimistic.? Ann Talbot. #31;e Great Ocean of Knowledge. #31;e In#29;uence of Travel Literature on the Work of John Locke. Leiden / Boston: Brill...?s Studies in Intellectual History vol. 184, 2010. 337 pp. 4 illus. $ 147. Review by #19;#20;#23;#1;#20; . #28;#20;#29;#20;#23;#23;#17;, #24;#28;#15;#29;#30;#23;#31;#15;#27;#22; #17;#7; #20;#19;#31;#27;#30;#23;#18;#20;#19; e researcher Ann Talbot...

  7. Preliminary findings from the evaluation of Project ESCAPE 25-Alive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ledingham, Christopher Michael

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    correlation that was found was between the teacher adoption scores and the class observation scores obtained during the second observation. While there were almost no significant correlations in this study, the study had merit. Over time the observed health...

  8. Morphology and Escape Performance of Tiger Salamander Larvae (Ambystoma tigrinum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Benjamin M.

    ) BENJAMIN M. FITZPATRICKn , MICHAEL F. BENARD, and JAMES A. FORDYCE Center for Population Biology for understanding microevolutionary dynamics (Wainwright and Reilly, '94). Some variation may be due to phenotypic- 0076436 (to P.C. Wainwright), EPA R828896 (to H.B. Shaffer, S.R. Voss, W.D. Koenig, B.M. Fitzpatrick). n

  9. International Environmental Agreements: Emissions trade, safety valves and escape clauses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Zhao, Jinhua

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of emissions trade on IEA participation Ex ante heterogenousachieving ef?cient abatement. An IEA that combines trade inhelp in creating a successful IEA. It is reasonable to use

  10. Pretenuring Based on Escape Analysis mjump@cs.utexas.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jump, Maria

    involved pro- #12;ling; our approach instead employs static analysis. 1. INTRODUCTION Garbage collection research area [2, 3, 7, 8]. The generational copying collector is a widely adopted type of garbage]. The memory allocator allocates all objects into the nurs- ery, and the garbage collector collects the nursery

  11. Escaping the crunch: Gravitational effects in classical transitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew C. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Yang, I-Sheng [ISCAP and Physics Department, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During eternal inflation, a landscape of vacua can be populated by the nucleation of bubbles. These bubbles inevitably collide, and collisions sometimes displace the field into a new minimum in a process known as a classical transition. In this paper, we examine some new features of classical transitions that arise when gravitational effects are included. Using the junction condition formalism, we study the conditions for energy conservation in detail, and solve explicitly for the types of allowed classical transition geometries. We show that the repulsive nature of domain walls, and the de Sitter expansion associated with a positive energy minimum, can allow for classical transitions to vacua of higher energy than that of the colliding bubbles. Transitions can be made out of negative or zero energy (terminal) vacua to a de Sitter phase, restarting eternal inflation, and populating new vacua. However, the classical transition cannot produce vacua with energy higher than the original parent vacuum, which agrees with previous results on the construction of pockets of false vacuum. We briefly comment on the possible implications of these results for various measure proposals in eternal inflation.

  12. Microwave-induced phase escape in a Josephson tunnel junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guozhu, Sun; Yiwen, Wang; Junyu, Cao; Jian, Chen; Zhengming, Ji; Lin, Kang; Weiwei, Xu; Yang, Yu; Han, Siyuan; Peiheng, Wu

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    capacitance and resistance, respectively. Ib is the bias current and I0 is the critical current. For Ib, slightly smaller than I0, the potential has a series of metastable wells with barrier height given by #5;U=2EJ(#5;1? #1;idc#2;2 ? idc cos?1#1;idc#2;). Here... decrease Ip, which can be written as4 ip = 1 ? #12;#15;ip#1;T#2; ? icrmw 2 #1;#8;r#2;/2 #1; #5;1 ? ip 2 ? #8;r 2 #2; 2 + #12;2#8;r 2 , #1;8#2; where #12;#15;ip#1;T#2; = #3;#1;kBT /2EJ#2;ln#1;#8;0I0 /2#7;I?b#2;#4;2/3 / I0 is the shift of ip due to thermal...

  13. International Environmental Agreements: Emissions trade, safety valves and escape clauses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Zhao, Jinhua

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trade policy, and environmental policy in an attempt to help2 Trade policy and environmental policy 3 The ef?ciency ofInstitutute for Environmental Policy Solultions. S TAVINS ,

  14. Potential consequences of GM algae escape on ecosystem services

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed ThuofDemonstration CrosscutonGM

  15. The ionized and hot gas in M17 SW: SOFIA/GREAT THz observations of [C II] and 12CO J=13-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Beaupuits, J P; Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J; Guesten, R; Simon, R; Huebers, H -W; Ricken, O; Sandell, G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With new THz maps that cover an area of ~3.3x2.1 pc^2 we probe the spatial distribution and association of the ionized, neutral and molecular gas components in the M17 SW nebula. We used the dual band receiver GREAT on board the SOFIA airborne telescope to obtain a 5'.7x3'.7 map of the 12CO J=13-12 transition and the [C II] 158 um fine-structure line in M17 SW and compare the spectroscopically resolved maps with corresponding ground-based data for low- and mid-J CO and [C I] emission. For the first time SOFIA/GREAT allow us to compare velocity-resolved [C II] emission maps with molecular tracers. We see a large part of the [C II] emission, both spatially and in velocity, that is completely non-associated with the other tracers of photon-dominated regions (PDR). Only particular narrow channel maps of the velocity-resolved [C II] spectra show a correlation between the different gas components, which is not seen at all in the integrated intensity maps. These show different morphology in all lines but give hardly...

  16. Biglow Canyon Phase II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,Belcher Homes JumpMaintenance |BigBig Windy (GreatBiglow

  17. Land use and land cover change: the effects of woody plant encroachment and prescribed fire on biodiversity and ecosystem carbon dynamics in a southern great plains mixed grass savanna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollister, Emily Brooke

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    LAND USE AND LAND COVER CHANGE: THE EFFECTS OF WOODY PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted... PLANT ENCROACHMENT AND PRESCRIBED FIRE ON BIODIVERSITY AND ECOSYSTEM CARBON DYNAMICS IN A SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS MIXED GRASS SAVANNA A Dissertation by EMILY BROOKE HOLLISTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  18. a world of GREAT SCIENCE ... and great science solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and environmental engineering. Berkeley Lab has also established a Center for Integrated Earth System Modeling aimed

  19. Turn-key Raman lidar for profiling atmospheric water vapor, clouds, and aerosols at the US Southern Great Plains Climate Study Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsmith, J.E.M.; Blair, F.H.; Bisson, S.E.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are clearly identified scientific requirements for continuous profiling of atmospheric water vapor at the Department of Energy, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program, Southern Great Plains CART (Cloud and Radiation Testbed) site in northern Oklahoma. Research conducted at several laboratories has demonstrated the suitability of Raman lidar for providing measurements that are an excellent match to those requirements. We have developed and installed a ruggedized Raman lidar system that resides permanently at the CART site, and that is computer automated to eliminate the requirements for operator interaction. In addition to the design goal of profiling water vapor through most of the troposphere during nighttime and through the boundary layer during daytime, the lidar provides quantitative characterizations of aerosols and clouds, including depolarization measurements for particle phase studies.

  20. Upper Great Plains Home page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sells power in Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota to wholesale customers such as towns; rural electric cooperatives; public utility and irrigation...

  1. Bottle Habitat Region: Great Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to each bottle to minimize sand displacement. In each bottle, root three ten-centimeter elodea stalks period, have the students research pond ecology and the organisms involved in the project. 11. At the end you think would happen if the fish population doubled? Quadrupled?" or "What impact does temperature

  2. Seafood delicacy makes great adhesive

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - Frank Roberto, Heather Silverman

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology from Mother Nature is often hard to beat, so Idaho National Laboratory scientistsgenetically analyzed the adhesive proteins produced by blue mussels, a seafood delicacy. Afterobtaining full-length DNA sequences encoding these proteins, reprod

  3. Groundwater in the Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater lies hidden beneath the soil, out of sight and largely out of mind. As a result, it’s poorly understood by most who depend on it for drinking water and other uses. Misconceptions about groundwater are common. In 1904, a Texas judge ruled...

  4. Another Great Idea Frank Rioux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rioux, Frank

    . At this point I will simply observe that there is only one electrostatic force - Coulomb's Law. There are is ultimately calculated using one equation - Coulomb's Law. If this fact was more widely appreciated of charges (see appendix). Solely on the basis of Coulomb's law the electron would be drawn toward one

  5. Upper Great Plains Rates information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancillary Services Rate Data (2.4mb pdf) Transmission and Ancillary Services 2011 Rate True-up Calculation (3.4mb pdf) Power Reporting Miscellaneous Information If you have any...

  6. Foreign Competition- The Great Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foveaux, M. T.

    . It will take years before the al adjustments to these mergers is complete well known difficulties of Phillips Petrole Unocal may be repeated with other companies Capi funds coun ithout er all ' fices. ge of al and DuPont ntern- The m and ESL...

  7. Great Cities Institute Faculty Scholar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    .uic.edu/cuppa/gci/ For more info and to RSVP: gcities@uic.edu Larry Bennett, PhD Professor, UIC Jane Addams College of Social Bennett and Stephanie Riger will discuss their ongoing research on the interface between Cook County

  8. Groundwater in the Great Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supplies. More than half of all Americans and 95% of all persons in rural areas rely on groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Throughout the United States and the world, vital aquifers supply irrigation and drinking water for many regions...

  9. Great Cities Institute Comparative Urbanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    countries. Robin Hambleton Professor of City Leadership Centre for Sustainable Planning and Environments Department of Planning and Architecture Faculty of Environment and Technology University of the West

  10. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    selectivity at active and passive feeding modes simultaneously, all times. Traditional feeding experiments. The in-house researchpro- gram is supplemented by grants and contracts with private institutions. In turn

  11. U H ~ m * c a ~ e " i smt: uses UcbLTl~e EluAiicaneCamille, with sustained winds of the strongest of the windy, circulating more than 320 kph (200mph),was the most

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storm Figure I-SaSeRite image of Hurricane Andrew over the Gulf of Mexico. NATl and powerful hurricane ever recorded to hit the eastern Pacific oceans; in the western Pacific northern gulf hurricanes are born easy way to classifystorms, in the southernAtlantic Ocean, off the coast other unusual

  12. Precipitation induced stream flow: An event based chemical andisotopic study of a small stream in the Great Plains region of theUSA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machavaram, Madhav V.; Whittemore, Donald O.; Conrad, Mark E.; Miller, Norman L.

    2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A small stream in the Great Plains of USA was sampled tounderstand the streamflow components following intense precipitation andthe influence of water storage structures in the drainage basin.Precipitation, stream, ponds, ground-water and soil moisture were sampledfor determination of isotopic (D, 18O) and chemical (Cl, SO4) compositionbefore and after two intense rain events. Following the first stormevent, flow at the downstream locations was generated primarily throughshallow subsurface flow and runoff whereas in the headwaters region --where a pond is located in the stream channel -- shallow ground-water andpond outflow contributed to the flow. The distinct isotopic signatures ofprecipitation and the evaporated pond water allowed separation of theevent water from the other sources that contributed to the flow.Similarly, variations in the Cl and SO4 concentrations helped identifythe relative contributions of ground-water and soil moisture to thestream flow. The relationship between deuterium excess and Cl or SO4content reveals that the early contributions from a rain event tostreamflow depend upon the antecedent climatic conditions and theposition along the stream channel within the watershed. The design ofthis study, in which data from several locations within a watershed werecollected, shows that in small streams changes in relative contributionsfrom ground water and soil moisture complicate hydrograph separation,with surface-water bodies providing additional complexity. It alsodemonstrates the usefulness of combined chemical and isotopic methods inhydrologic investigations, especially the utility of the deuterium excessparameter in quantifying the relative contributions of various sourcecomponents to the stream flow.

  13. Erosion Potential of a Burn Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Interim Summary of One Year of Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Etyemezian, D. Shafer, J. Miller, I. Kavouras, S. Campbell, D. DuBois, J. King, G. Nikolich, and S. Zitzer

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in deserts in the Southwest U.S. is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. This increase in fires has implications for management of Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site office (NNSA/NSO) has responsibility. A series of studies has been initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn over to understand technical and perceived risk they might pose to site workers and public receptors in communities around the NTS, TTR, and NTTR; and to develop recommendations for stabilization and restoration after a fire. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob fire, a lightning-caused fire approximately 12 kilometers north of Hiko, Nevada, that burned approximately 200 ha between August 6-8, 2008, and is representative of a transition zone on the NTS between the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, where the largest number of Soil Sub-Project CAUs/CASs are located.

  14. A Comparison of Multiscale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions from Six Different Platforms over the Southern Great Plains in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei; Liu, Yangang; Jensen, Michael; Toto, Tami; Foster, Michael J.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates 1997-2011 observationally based cloud fraction estimates from different platforms over the Southern Great Plains, United States, including three ground-based estimates and three satellite-based estimates at multiple temporal and spatial scales. They are: 1) the Active Remotely Sensed Clouds Locations (ARSCL); 2) the Total Sky Imager (TSI); 3) the Radiative Flux Analysis (RFA); 4) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES); 5) the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP); and 6) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder Atmospheres Extended (PATMOS-x). A substantial disagreement is evident among different estimates, especially for ISCCP and ARSCL with statistically significant larger cloud fractions than the other estimates. For example, ISCCP and ARSCL mean cloud fractions in January are ~21% and 8% larger than the average from all the other estimates, respectively. Three estimates (ISCCP, ARSCL, GOES) exhibit an 8%-10% overall increase in the annually averaged cloud fractions from 1998 to 2009; the other three estimates (TSI, RFA, and PATMOS-x) exhibit no significant tendency of increase in this decade. Monthly cloud fractions from all the estimates exhibit Gaussian-like distributions while the distributions of daily cloud fractions are dependent on spatial scales. Investigations of high-resolution cloud fractions reveal that the differences stem from the inconsistent definitions of cloud fraction. Findings from this study suggest caution when using observationally based cloud fraction estimates for climate studies, highlighting that the consistency in defining cloud fraction between models and observations is crucial for studying the Earth’s climate.

  15. A Review of "The Emblem in Scandinavia and the Baltic" by Simon McKeown, and "Emblematic Paintings from Sweden's Age of Greatness. Nils Bielke and the Neo-Stoic Gallery at Skokloster" by Simon McKeown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burman, Lars

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reviews 185 The Emblem in Scandinavia and the Baltic. Ed. Simon McKeown and Mara R. Wade. Glasgow: Glasgow Emblem Studies 11, 2006. xxvi + 340 pp. + illus. ? 21.99. Simon McKeown, Emblematic Paintings from Sweden?s Age of Greatness. Nils...- and early eighteenth centuries, but the Danish and Swedish realms were geographically vast, and the rise of Sweden as a European great power extraordinary. The cultural influx in Scandinavia was strong and quick, and it is interesting to reflect on how...

  16. Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Content Profiles from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-B Brightness Temperatures Near the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, E-K.; Liu, G.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program important goals is to develop and test radiation and cloud parameterizations of climate models using single column modeling (SCMs) (Randall et al. 1996). As forcing terms, SCMs need advection tendency of cloud condensates besides the tendencies of temperature, moisture and momentum. To compute the tendency terms of cloud condensates, 3D distribution of cloud condensates over a scale much larger than the climate model's grid scale is needed. Since they can cover a large area within a short time period, satellite measurements are useful utilities to provide advection tendency of cloud condensates for SCMs. However, so far, most satellite retrieval algorithms only retrieve vertically integrated quantities, for example, in the case of cloud ice, ice water path (IWP). To fulfill the requirement of 3D ice water content field for computing ice water advection, in this study, we develop an ice water content profile retrieval algorithm by combining the vertical distribution characteristics obtained from long-term surface radar observations and satellite high-frequency microwave observations that cover a large area. The algorithm is based on the Bayesian theorem using a priori database derived from analyzing cloud radar observations at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The end product of the algorithm is a 3D ice water content covering 10{sup o} x 10{sup o} surrounding the SGP site during the passage of the satellite. This 3D ice water content, together with wind field analysis, can be used to compute the advection tendency of ice water for SCMs.

  17. Current Biology 19, R567R574, July 28, 2009 2009 Elsevier Ltd All rights reserved DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2009.05.054 ReviewThe Continuing Puzzle of the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessions, Alex L.

    removed a methane greenhouse present on the early Earth and potentially led to dramatic cooling. Moreover that future progress towards solving the riddle of oxygen will benefit greatly from the involve- ment solar system, planetary scientists tend to look first for O2 [1]. It is thus ironic that when and how O2

  18. Aging Cell (2005) 4, pp223233 Doi: 10.1111/j.1474-9726.2005.00165.x Blackwell Publishing Ltd/Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2005 223

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunet, Anne

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2005 223 Blackwell Publishing, Ltd. REVIEW Nothobranchius fishes: a natural model of accelerated aging, T. Genade et al.REVIEW Annual fishes of the genus Nothobranchius Agingresearchinvertebratesishamperedbythelackofshort- lived models. Annual fishes of the genus Nothobranchius live in East African seasonal ponds

  19. Planet. Space Sci., Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 439~i45. 1992 00324)633/92 $5.00+0.00 Printed in Great Britain. ~ 1992Pergamon Press pie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruntman, Mike

    Planet. Space Sci., Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 439~i45. 1992 00324)633/92 $5.00+0.00 Printed in Great are not accurately known. A self-consistent model of the heliosphere has still to be built and many important which its kinetic energy is largely converted into thermal energy in the subsonic plasma. Details

  20. You likely have heard a great deal about Health Care Reform, also known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA), in the news lately. As part of our effort to keep you informed about the ACA, we are providing a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thaxton, Christopher S.

    You likely have heard a great deal about Health Care Reform, also known as the Affordable Care Act Insurance Program (CHIP), TRICARE (for veterans and veterans' families), and veterans' health care programs and the Health Insurance Marketplace. Learn more about these provisions below, then link directly to the ACA