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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Wind Siting Rules and Model Small Wind Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Siting Rules and Model Small Wind Ordinance Wind Siting Rules and Model Small Wind Ordinance Wind Siting Rules and Model Small Wind Ordinance < Back Eligibility Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Local Wind Application Filing Requirements '''Permitting Rules''' In September 2009, the Governor of Wisconsin signed S.B. 185 (Act 40) directing the Wisconsin Public Service Commission (PSC) to establish statewide wind energy siting rules. [http://psc.wi.gov/ PSC Docket 1-AC-231] was created to conduct the rulemaking, requiring the PSC to convene an advisory council composed of various interested stakeholders

2

Comparing Decision Rules for Siting Interconnected Wind Farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability and non-dispatchability of wind power creates many challenges for the operators of electric transmission systems. Current U.S. wind energy policies are focused on encouraging quantities of wind power without much attention paid to quality ...

Paras Choudhary; Seth Blumsack; George Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

NREL: Wind Research - Site Wind Resource Characteristics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Wind Resource Characteristics Site Wind Resource Characteristics A graphic showing the location of National Wind Technology Center and its wind power class 2. Click on the image to view a larger version. Enlarge image This graphic shows the wind power class at the National Wind Technology Center. You can download a printable copy. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is on the Great Plains just miles from the Rocky Mountains. The site is flat and covered with short grasses. The terrain and lack of obstructions make the site highly suitable for testing wind turbines. Take a tour of the NWTC and its facilities to better understand its location and layout. Another prime feature of the NWTC is the strong directionality of the wind - most of the strong winds come within a few degrees of 285°. West of

4

Siting Handbook WIND ENERGY SITING HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Wind Energy Siting Handbook (the "Handbook") presents general information about regulatory and environmental issues associated with the development and siting of wind energy projects in the United States. It is intended to be a general guidance document providing technical information and tools for identifying potential issues that may arise with wind energy projects. The Handbook contains links to resources on the Internet. Those links are provided solely as aids to assist you in locating other Internet resources that may be of interest. They are not intended to state or imply that AWEA or the Contributors endorse, approve, sponsor, or are affiliated or associated with those linked sites. The Handbook is not intended as a comprehensive discussion of all wind energy project issues and should be used in conjunction with other available resources. The Handbook also is not intended as legal or environmental advice or as a best practices manual, nor should it be considered as such. Because the Handbook is only a general guidance document, independent legal counsel and/or environmental consulting services should be obtained to further explore any wind energy siting issue, matter, or project. In reviewing all or any part of the Handbook, you acknowledge and understand that the Handbook is only a general guidance document and does not constitute a best practices manual, legal or environmental advice, or a legal or other relationship with the American Wind Energy Association ("AWEA") or any of the persons or entities

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Siting Wind Turbines  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Resources & Tools Resources & Tools Siting Wind Turbines Wind Powering America works to increase deployment of wind energy. This page provides resources about wind turbine siting. American Wind Wildlife Institute The American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) facilitates timely and responsible development of wind energy, while protecting wildlife and wildlife habitat. AWWI was created and is sustained by a unique collaboration of environmentalists, conservationists, state wildlife agencies, and wind industry leaders. Its purpose is to help lay the scientific groundwork and best practices for wind farm siting and operations, through targeted initiatives: wind-wildlife research, landscape assessment, mitigation, and education. Ordinances Regulating Development of Commercial Wind Energy Facilities

6

Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Program works to remove barriers to wind power deployment and to increase the acceptance of wind power technologies by addressing siting and environmental issues. Wind power is a renewable...

7

Siting Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Siting Wind Energy Siting Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Wind turbines at the Forward Wind Energy Center in Fond du Lac and Dodge Counties, Wisconsin. Photo from Ruth Baranowski/NREL, NREL 21207 The following resources provide information about siting wind energy projects. Some are specific to a state or region but may still contain information applicable to other areas. Wind project siting tools, such as calculators and databases, can be found here. Resources American Wind Energy Association. (Updated 2011). Siting, Health, and the Environment. Accessed August 13, 2013. This fact sheet provides an overview of siting myths and facts. Environmental Law Institute. Siting Wind Energy Facilities: What Do Local Elected Officials Need to Know?. Accessed November 29, 2013.

8

Meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, which focuses on the meteorological aspects of siting large wind turbines (turbines with a rated output exceeding 100 kW), has four main goals. The first is to outline the elements of a siting strategy that will identify the most favorable wind energy sites in a region and that will provide sufficient wind data to make responsible economic evaluations of the site wind resource possible. The second is to critique and summarize siting techniques that were studied in the Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Program. The third goal is to educate utility technical personnel, engineering consultants, and meteorological consultants (who may have not yet undertaken wind energy consulting) on meteorological phenomena relevant to wind turbine siting in order to enhance dialogues between these groups. The fourth goal is to minimize the chances of failure of early siting programs due to insufficient understanding of wind behavior.

Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Siting technologies for large wind turbine clusters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Site selection for large wind turbine clusters requires thorough documentation of the wind characteristics at the site, because of the influence these characteristics will have on the economics, operations, and service life of the wind turbines. The wind prospecting strategy can be used by a utility to determine specific locations for each wind turbine in a cluster of 10 to 50 or more machines. The key to site selection is knowing what and where to measure. Siting techniques to be used at the various stages of the wind-prospecting strategy are discussed. These techniques help determine where to measure. What to measure at a site is still a moot question. Suggestions are made on what data are needed at what sampling rates. These are based on the assumption that until further experience in siting large clusters of wind turbines is in hand, thorough documentation of wind characteristics affecting machine and cluster output characteristics, operation strategies, and service life are necessary.

Hiester, T.R.; Pennell, W.T.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

New England Wind Forum: Siting Considerations  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Siting Considerations Siting Considerations Choosing a proper site for a wind turbine or farm is critical to a successful project. While the most important factors may vary from site to site, in any given instance a single factor can undermine success of an otherwise superlative project. On the other hand, sometimes a site may be weak in one area but so strong in another area that it is viable, such as a site with very strong winds that is farther than normal from a transmission line. A viable wind energy site generally includes the following key factors: Attractive Wind Resource Landowner and Community Support Feasible Permitting Compatible Land Use Nearby Access to an Appropriate Electrical Interconnect Point Appropriate Site Conditions for Access During Construction and Operations

11

NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Sites Field Test Sites Aerial view of the National Wind Technology Center with the Flatiron Mountains in the background NREL's NWTC has numerous test pads available to industry partners for testing wind turbines that range in size from a few hundred kilowatts to several megawatts. PIX 17711. Manufacturers can take advantage of NREL's numerous test pads and the technical expertise of its staff to field test prototypes of small and large wind turbines. Many of the small wind turbines tested at the NWTC are participants in NREL's Small Wind Turbine Independent Test Program. Small and mid-sized turbines field tested at the NWTC include those manufactured by Atlantic Orient Corporation, Bergey Windpower, Southwest Wind Power, Northern Power Systems, Endurance Wind Power Inc., Gaia-Wind Ltd.,

12

Estimation of wind characteristics at potential wind energy conversion sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A practical method has been developed and applied to the problem of determining wind characteristics at candidate wind energy conversion sites where there are no available historical data. The method uses a mass consistent wind flow model (called COMPLEX) to interpolate between stations where wind data are available. The COMPLEX model incorporates the effects of terrain features and airflow. The key to the practical application of COMPLEX to the derivation of wind statistics is the model's linearity. This allows the input data sets to be resolved into orthogonal components along the set of eigenvectors of the covariance matrix. The solution for each eigenvector is determined with COMPLEX; the hourly interpolated winds are then formed from linear combinations of these solutions. The procedure requires: acquisition and merger of wind data from three to five stations, application of COMPLEX to each of the seven to 11 (depending on the number of stations for which wind data are available) eigenvectors, reconstruction of the hourly interpolated winds at the site from the eigenvector solutions, and finally, estimating the wind characteristics from the simulated hourly values. The report describes the methodology and the underlying theory. Possible improvements to the procedure are also discussed.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Estimation of wind characteristics at potential wind energy conversion sites  

SciTech Connect

A practical method has been developed and applied to the problem of determining wind characteristics at candidate wind energy conversion sites where there are no available historical data. The method uses a mass consistent wind flow model (called COMPLEX) to interpolate between stations where wind data are available. The COMPLEX model incorporates the effects of terrain features and airflow. The key to the practical application of COMPLEX to the derivation of wind statistics is the model's linearity. This allows the input data sets to be resolved into orthogonal components along the set of eigenvectors of the covariance matrix. The solution for each eigenvector is determined with COMPLEX; the hourly interpolated winds are then formed from linear combinations of these solutions. The procedure requires: acquisition and merger of wind data from three to five stations, application of COMPLEX to each of the seven to 11 (depending on the number of stations for which wind data are available) eigenvectors, reconstruction of the hourly interpolated winds at the site from the eigenvector solutions, and finally, estimating the wind characteristics from the simulated hourly values. The report describes the methodology and the underlying theory. Possible improvements to the procedure are also discussed.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The Wind Speed Profile At Offshore Wind Farm Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Monin-Obukhov theory the vertical wind speed profile can be predicted from the wind speed at one height, when the two parameters Monin-Obukhov length and sea surface roughness are known. The applicability of this theory for wind power prediction at offshore sites is investigated using data from the measurement program Rdsand in the Danish Baltic Sea. Different methods to estimate the two parameters are discussed and compared. Significant deviations to the theory are found for near-neutral and stable conditions, where the measured wind shear is larger than predicted. A simple correction method to account for this effect has been developed and tested.

Bernhard Lange Sren; Bernhard Lange; Søren E. Larsen; Jørgen Højstrup; Rebecca Barthelmie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Site Assessment: Wind Powering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental impacts have increased the demand for small wind energy systems for homeowners, schools, businesses, and local governments. Over the past decade, the knowledge,...

16

AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar January 29, 2014 8:00AM EST to January 30, 2014 5:00PM EST New Orleans, Louisiana The AWEA Wind Project Siting...

17

NREL: Wind Research - Site Tours  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This is a simulated tour of the National Wind Technology Center showing its location in the state, elevation, and its facilities. Two...

18

Estimation of wind characteristics at potential wind energy conversion sites. Volume 2. Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data are presented concerning climatology development methodology programs; dual station wind correlation analyses; and the candidate site wind climatologies.

Howard, S. M.; Chen, P. C.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Wind Project Siting Tools | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Wind Project Siting Tools Jump to: navigation, search Photo from Alstom 2010, NREL 18207 The following tools are helpful for anyone planning a wind project. Resources Cadmus Group. (2012). Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool. Accessed March 29, 2013. The Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool is an online tool for conducting detailed site assessments for single-turbine projects, from residential to community scale. Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council. (2013). EISPC EZ Mapping Tool. Accessed August 13, 2013. This free online mapping tool helps to identify potential clean energy

20

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Small Wind Guidebook/Is There Enough Wind on My Site | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

There Enough Wind on My Site There Enough Wind on My Site < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

22

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Q: When planning a wind farm, how are wind resources estimated? And if the average wind speed is known at 10 meters is there a general rule for estimating the wind speed at larger heights above ground level? The wind resource at a wind farm can be estimated in two ways: by measurement or by modeling

23

RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON METHODOLOGY: FROM WIND POWER FREQUENCY TO LOSS-OF-LOADJ.P. , "Some Aspects of Wind Power Statistics, " J. of Appl.S£CTION Reliability of Wind Power From Dispersed Sites: A Pr

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

Pennell, W.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Building Toward a Small Wind Turbine Site Assessor Credential (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Proper site assessment is integral to the development of a successful small wind project. Without a small wind site assessor certification program, consumers, including state incentive program managers, lack a benchmark for differentiating between qualified and nonqualified site assessors. A small wind site assessor best practice manual is being developed as a resource for consumers until a credential program becomes available. This presentation describes the purpose, proposed content, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's approach to the development of such a manual.

Sinclair, K.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high-performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Model Ordinance for Siting of Wind-Energy Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2009, the South Dakota Public Utilities Commission (PUC) created a [http://puc.sd.gov/commission/twg/WindEnergyOrdinance.pdf model ordinance] for siting wind-energy systems. This nine-page model...

28

Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: dsat.cadmusgroup.com/Default.aspx Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/distributed-wind-site-analysis-tool-d Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) is a powerful online tool for conducting detailed site assessments for single turbine projects, from residential to community scale. The tool offers users the ability to analyse potential wind turbine installment projects based on the type of turbine being installed, the terrain of the installment site, and the

29

NREL Wind Site Entrance Building: Design Review and Recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report giving review of the NREL Wind Site Guard Post Entrance building design and recommendations for improvement for greater energy savings and backup power.

Ault, R.; Torcellini, P.; Van Geet, O.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Tool to Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to make the Wind Powering America effort a success, homeowners and landowners interested in purchasing grid-connected small wind energy systems must be provided with assistance and education. The Clean Power Estimator (CPE) program is a valuable tool for these individuals. In support of this educational effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is integrating the CPE program with site-specific wind resource data. This paper describes how the CPE program works, how end users can determine the cost-effectiveness of wind for a specific location, and how companies can use the program to identify high-value wind locations.

Jimenez, T.; George, R.; Forsyth, T.; Hoff, T.E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Tool to Market Customer-Sited Small Wind Systems: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In order to make the Wind Powering America effort a success, homeowners and landowners interested in purchasing grid-connected small wind energy systems must be provided with assistance and education. The Clean Power Estimator (CPE) program is a valuable tool for these individuals. In support of this educational effort, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is integrating the CPE program with site-specific wind resource data. This paper describes how the CPE program works, how end users can determine the cost-effectiveness of wind for a specific location, and how companies can use the program to identify high-value wind locations.

Jimenez, T.; George, R.; Forsyth, T.; Hoff, T.E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Astronomical Site Ranking Based on Tropospheric Wind Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present comprehensive and reliable statistics of high altitude wind speeds and the tropospheric flows at the location of five important astronomical observatories. Statistical analysis exclusively of high altitude winds point to La Palma as the most suitable site for adaptive optics, with a mean value of 22.13 m/s at the 200 mbar pressure level. La Silla is at the bottom of the ranking, with the largest average value 200 mbar wind speed(33.35 m/s). We have found a clear annual periodicity of high altitude winds for the five sites in study. We have also explored the connection of high to low altitude atmospheric winds as a first approach of the linear relationship between the average velocity of the turbulence and high altitude winds (Sarazin & Tokovinin 2001). We may conclude that high and low altitude winds show good linear relationships at the five selected sites. The highest correlation coefficients correspond to Paranal and San Pedro Martir, while La Palma and La Silla show similar high to low altitude wind connection. Mauna Kea shows the smallest degree of correlation, which suggests a weaker linear relationship. Our results support the idea of high altitude winds as a parameter for rank astronomical sites in terms of their suitability for adaptive optics, although we have no evidence for adopting the same linear coefficient at different sites. The final value of this linear coefficient at a particular site could drastically change the interpretation of high altitude wind speeds as a direct parameter for site characterization.

B. Garcia-Lorenzo; J. J. Fuensalida; C. Munoz-Tunon; E. Mendizabal

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

Practical method for estimating wind characteristics at potential wind-energy-conversion sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Terrain features and variations in the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer produce local variations in wind, and these variations are not depicted well by standard weather reports. A method is developed to compute local winds for use in estimating the wind energy available at any potential site for a wind turbine. The method uses the terrain heights for an area surrounding the site and a series of wind and pressure reports from the nearest four or five national Weather Service stations. An initial estimate of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer is made, then these winds are adjusted to satisfy the continuity equation. In this manner the flow is made to reflect the influences of the terrain and the shape of the boundary-layer top. This report describes in detail the methodology and results, and provides descriptions of the computer programs, instructions for using them, and complete program listings.

Endlich, R. M.; Ludwig, F. L.; Bhumralkar, C. M.; Estoque, M. A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Lesser of $400,000 per site/customer or 50% of installed cost of system Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge Start Date 01/01/2012 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount First 10,000 kWh of expected annual energy production: $3.50/annual kWh Next 115,000 kWh of expected annual energy production: $1.00/annual kWh Energy production greater than 125,000 kWh: $0.30/annual kWh Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority

35

Variability of wind power near Oklahoma City and implications for siting of wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

Data from five sites near Oklahoma City were examined to assess wind power availability. Wind turbines of identical manufacture were operated at three of the sites, one of which was also equipped with anemometers on a 100-ft tower. Comprehensive anemometric data were available from the other two sites. The study indicates that the average wind speed varies substantially over Oklahoma's rolling plains, which have often been nominally regarded as flat for purposes of wind power generation. Average wind differences may be as much as 5 mph at 20 ft above ground level, and 7 mph at 100 ft above ground level for elevation differences of about 200 ft above mean sea level, even in the absence of substantial features of local terrain. Local altitude above mean sea level seems to be as influential as the shape of local terrain in determining the average wind speed. The wind turbine used at a meteorologically instrumented site in the study produced the power expected from it for the wind regime in which it was situated. The observed variations of local wind imply variations in annual kWh of as much as a factor of four between identical turbines located at similar heights above ground level in shallow valleys and on hilltops or elevated extended flat areas. 17 refs., 39 figs., 11 tabs.

Kessler, E.; Eyster, R.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Site insolation and wind power characteristics: technical report Midwest region  

SciTech Connect

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Midwest Region of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 22 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation is related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal. Also, joint probability distribution tables are constructed showing the number of occurrences, out of a finite sample size, of daily average solar and wind power within selected intervals, by month. Information of this nature is intended as an aid to preliminary planning activities for the design and operation of solar and wind energy utilization and conversion systems.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Determinations of TSD facility acceptability under the CERCLA Off-Site Rule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 22, 1993, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the ``Off-Site Rule`` to implement section 121(d)(3) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). CERCLA {section}121(d)(3) requires that wastes generated as a result of remediation activities taken under CERCLA authority and transferred off-site be managed only at facilities that comply with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. In 1994, the DOE`s Office of Environmental Policy and Assistance (OEPA), RCRA/CERCLA Division (EH-413) published a CERCLA Information Brief titled ``The Off-Site Rule`` which describes the content of the Off-Site Rule and clarifies some of its implications for DOE remedial actions under CERCLA. Additionally, EH-413 published the Guide on Selecting Compliant Off-Site Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities which provides a regulatory roadmap for accomplishing off-site transfers of environmental restoration and process hazardous waste at DOE facilities in a manner compliant with the Off-Site Rule and other relevant Federal regulations. Those guidance documents concentrate primarily on DOE`s perspective as a hazardous waste generator. The purpose of this Information Brief is to address the implications of the Off-Site Rule for DOE-owned hazardous waste treatment, storage or disposal facilities that accept CERCLA remediation wastes from off-site locations.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Reliability of wind power from dispersed sites: a preliminary assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reliability benefit of geographically dispersed wind turbine generators is analyzed. Electricity produced from wind machines experiences wide fluctuations of output at a given site. Yet the value of electricity is a function of its reliability. Pricing schedules have traditionally valued firm power, that is, reliably available power, much more highly than ''dump power;'' that is, power which is available intermittently on an ''if and when'' basis. The conventional wisdom on wind power suggests that it is unrealistic to expect that wind generation will be sufficiently reliable to displace conventional capacity. While such conclusions may be valid for analysis of individual sites, the main thesis of this paper is that geographical dispersal improves aggregate reliability.

Kahn, E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex Terrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex, 50011 An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interferences of wind turbines sited over conducted in a large wind tunnel with of wind turbine models sited over a flat terrain (baseline case

Hu, Hui

40

A simple method of estimating wind turbine blade fatigue at potential wind turbine sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a technique of estimating blade fatigue damage at potential wind turbine sites. The cornerstone of this technique is a simple model for the blade`s root flap bending moment. The model requires as input a simple set of wind measurements which may be obtained as part of a routine site characterization study. By using the model to simulate a time series of the root flap bending moment, fatigue damage rates may be estimated. The technique is evaluated by comparing these estimates with damage estimates derived from actual bending moment data; the agreement between the two is quite good. The simple connection between wind measurements and fatigue provided by the model now allows one to readily discriminate between damaging and more benign wind environments.

Barnard, J.C.; Wendell, L.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Resources and Tools for Siting Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Resources & Tools Resources for Siting Wind Turbines This page lists information resources such as publications, websites, and news for siting wind turbines. Search the Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative's Database Choose a Type of Information All News Publications Web Resource Videos Choose # of Records per Page Default (10 per page) 5 25 50 To search the titles, enter a word or phrase. Start Search Clear Contents Total of 39 records found. Page 1 of 8, Sorted by descending date Filtered by: Siting 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Next Page >> Date sort by ascending date sort by descending date State sort by ascending state sort by descending state Type of Information Program Area Title sort by ascending title sort by descending title

42

Wind Direction Meander at a Coastal Site during Onshore Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 700 cases of wind direction meander occurred in a three-year period during onshore flow at a Long Island coastal site. Most appeared to be caused by internal gravity waves but some by roll vortices. Each case was documented with respect to ...

Gilbert S. Raynor; Janet V. Hayes

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Wind-turbine siting: a summary of the state of the art  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The process of siting large wind turbines may be divided into two broad steps: site selection, and site evaluation. Site selection is the process of locating windy sites where wind energy development shows promise of economic viability. Site evaluation is the process of determining in detail for a given site the economic potential of the site. This paper emphasizes the state of the art in the first aspect of siting, site selection. Several techniques for assessing the wind resource have been explored or developed in the Federal Wind Energy Program. Local topography and meteorology will determine which of the tehniques should be used in locating potential sites.

Hiester, T.R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Siting handbook for small wind energy conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This handbook was written to serve as a siting guide for individuals wishing to install small wind energy conversion systems (WECS); that is, machines having a rated capacity of less than 100 kilowatts. It incorporates half a century of siting experience gained by WECS owners and manufacturers, as well as recently developed siting techniques. The user needs no technical background in meteorology or engineering to understand and apply the siting principles discussed; he needs only a knowledge of basic arithmetic and the ability to understand simple graphs and tables. By properly using the siting techniques, an owner can select a site that will yield the most power at the least installation cost, the least maintenance cost, and the least risk of damage or accidental injury.

Wegley, H.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Orgill, M.M.; Drake, R.L.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Candidate wind turbine generator site: annual data summary, January 1981-December 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized hourly meteorological data for 34 candidate and wind turbine generator sites for calendar year 1981 are presented. These data are collected for the purpose of evaluating the wind energy potential at these sites and are used to assist in selection of potential sites for installation and testing of large wind turbines in electric utility systems. For each site, wind speed, direction, and distribution data are given in eight tables. Use of information from these tables, with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for wind energy production at each site.

Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Wind Energy Assessment and Visualization Laboratory Extra-Tall Tower Wind Resource Assessment: Icing Rules and Trends in the Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study describes the results of the measurement campaign for the Wind Energy Assessment and Visualization Laboratory (WEAV) wind feasibility study in Athens, OH. A… (more)

Harris, James C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Meteorological field measurements at potential and actual wind turbine sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An overview of experiences gained in a meteorological measurement program conducted at a number of locations around the United States for the purpose of site evaluation for wind energy utilization is provided. The evolution of the measurement program from its inception in 1976 to the present day is discussed. Some of the major accomplishments and areas for improvement are outlined. Some conclusions on research using data from this program are presented.

Renne, D.S.; Sandusky, W.F.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coincidence of Demand and Wind Resource Diurnal PowerOutput Variations for Three Wind Regimes List of TablesCAPACITY CREDIT FOR WIND ARRAYS: THE PROBLEM . . . . . . .

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Candidate wind turbine generator site annual data summary for January 1980 through December 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized hourly meteorological data for fourteen candidate and wind turbine generator sites are presented in this report. These data are collected for the Department of Energy for the purpose of evaluating the wind energy potential at these sites and are used to assist in selection of potential sites for installation and testing of large wind turbines in electric utility systems. For each site, data are given in eight tables and one figure. Use of information from these tables, with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for wind energy production at each site.

Sandusky, W.F.; Renne, D.S.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Candidate wind turbine generator site annual data summary for January 1979 through December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized hourly meteorological data for fifteen candidate and wind turbine generator sites are presented in this report. These data are collected for the Department of Energy for the purpose of evaluating the wind energy potential at these sites and are used to assist in selection of potential sites for installation and testing of large wind turbines in electric utility systems. For each site, data are given in eight tables and one figure. Use of information from these tables, with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for wind energy production at each site.

Sandusky, W.F.; Renne, D.S.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Impact of Increasing Distributed Wind Power and Wind Turbine Siting on Rural Distribution Feeder Voltage Profiles: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many favorable wind energy resources in North America are located in remote locations without direct access to the transmission grid. Building transmission lines to connect remotely-located wind power plants to large load centers has become a barrier to increasing wind power penetration in North America. By connecting utility-sized megawatt-scale wind turbines to the distribution system, wind power supplied to consumers could be increased greatly. However, the impact of including megawatt-scale wind turbines on distribution feeders needs to be studied. The work presented here examined the impact that siting and power output of megawatt-scale wind turbines have on distribution feeder voltage. This is the start of work to present a general guide to megawatt-scale wind turbine impact on the distribution feeder and finding the amount of wind power that can be added without adversely impacting the distribution feeder operation, reliability, and power quality.

Allen, A.; Zhang, Y. C.; Hodge, B. M.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wind flow modeling and simulation over the Giza Plateau cultural heritage site in Egypt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, the wind flow over one of the most important Egyptian historical heritage sites, the Giza Plateau, was investigated using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) state-of-the-art techniques. The present study addresses the influences ... Keywords: Cultural heritage, Giza Plateau, Great Sphinx, computational fluid dynamics, wind modeling and simulation, wind over heritage sites

Ashraf S. Hussein; Hisham El-Shishiny

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

RELIABILITY OF WIND POWER FROM DISPERSED SITES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric Company, Wind Energy Mission Analysis, COO/2578-C.G. and W.R. Hargraves, Wind Energy Statistics for Largeng Power Supply from Wind Energy Converting Sys t ems, "

Kahn, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Wind Shear and Turbulence Profiles at Elevated Heights: Great Lakes and Midwest Sites (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzed wind resource characteristics at elevated heights (50 m-200+m) incuding shear and turbulence profiles for some areas of the Great Lakes and M idwest sites.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Wind Velocities at the Chajnantor and Mauna Kea Sites and the Effect on MMA Pointing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Velocities at the Chajnantor and Mauna Kea Sites and the Effect on MMA Pointing M.A. Holdaway email: (mholdawa, sfoster, demerson, jcheng, fschwab)@nrao.edu August 9, 1996 Abstract We analyze wind April 1996 for the purposes of understanding the effects of the winds on pointing errors. Both

Groppi, Christopher

56

Optimal micro-siting of wind farms by particle swarm optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a novel approach to optimal placement of wind turbines in the continuous space of a wind farm The control objective is to maximize the power produced by a farm with a fixed number of turbines while guaranteeing the distance between ... Keywords: particle swarm optimization, penalty function, wind farm micro-siting

Chunqiu Wan; Jun Wang; Geng Yang; Xing Zhang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Wind shear for large wind turbine generators at selected tall tower sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study described in this report is to examine the nature of wind shear profiles and their variability over the height of large horizontal-axis wind turbines and to provide information on wind shear relevant to the design and opertion of large wind turbines. Wind turbine fatigue life and power quality are related through the forcing functions on the blade to the shapes of the wind shear profiles and their fluctuations over the disk of rotation.

Elliott, D.L.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Candidate wind-turbine-generator site summarized meteorological data for December 1976-December 1981. [Program WIND listed  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized hourly meteorological data for 16 of the original 17 candidate and wind turbine generator sites collected during the period from December 1976 through December 1981 are presented. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and provide data that could be considered representative of long-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and a topographic map showing the location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for long-term average wind energy production at each site.

Sandusky, W.F.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NREL-Philippine Wind Farm Analysis and Site Selection Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Wind Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Low emission development planning,...

60

Site insolation and wind power characteristics. Summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design and operation of either large or small scale solar and wind energy conversion systems should be based, in part, on knowledge of expected solar and wind power trends. For this purpose, historic solar and wind data available at 101 National Weather Service stations were processed statistically. Preliminary planning data are provided for selected daily average solar and wind power conditions occurring and persisting for time periods of interest. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Empirical probabilities were constructed from the historic data to provide a reasonable inference of the chance of similar climatological conditions occurring at any given time in the future. (Diurnal wind power variations were also considered.) Ratios were also generated at each station to relate the global radiation data to insolation on a south-facing surface inclined at various angles. In addition, joint probability distributions were derived to show the proportion of days with solar and wind power within selected intervals.

Bray, R E

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Optimal site selection and sizing of distributed utility-scale wind power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As electric market product unbundling occurs, sellers in the wholesale market for electricity will find it to their advantage to be able to specify the quantity of electricity available and the time of availability. Since wind power plants are driven by the stochastic nature of the wind itself, this can present difficulties. To the extent that an accurate wind forecast is available, contract deviations, and therefore penalties, can be significantly reduced. Even though one might have the ability to accurately forecast the availability of wind power, it might not be available during enough of the peak period to provide sufficient value. However, if the wind power plant is developed over geographically disperse locations, the timing and availability of wind power from these multiple sources could provide a better match with the utility`s peak load than a single site. There are several wind plants in various stages of planning or development in the US. Although some of these are small-scale demonstration projects, significant wind capacity has been developed in Minnesota, with additional developments planned in Wyoming and Iowa. As these and other projects are planned and developed, there is a need to perform analysis of the value of geographically diverse sites on the efficiency of the overall wind plant. In this paper, the authors use hourly wind-speed data from six geographically diverse sites to provide some insight into the potential benefits of disperse wind plant development. They provide hourly wind power from each of these sites to an electric reliability simulation model. This model uses generating plant characteristics of the generators within the state of Minnesota to calculate various reliability indices. Since they lack data on wholesale power transactions, they do not include them in the analysis, and they reduce the hourly load data accordingly. The authors present and compare results of their methods and suggest some areas of future research.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Artig, R. [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Dept. of Public Service, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Site insolation and wind power characteristics, technical report northeast region. Vol. 2  

SciTech Connect

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Northeast Region of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 8 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation are related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

Erickson, Wally

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modelling the Vertical Wind Speed and Turbulence Intensity Profiles at Prospective Offshore Wind Farm Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov theory predicts the well-known log-linear form of the vertical wind speed profile. A turbulence intensity profile can be estimated from this by assuming that the standard deviation of the wind speed is proportional to the friction velocity. Two parameters, namely the aerodynamic surface roughness length and the MoninObukhov length, are than needed to predict the vertical wind speed and turbulence intensity profiles from a measurement at one height. Different models to estimate these parameters for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are compared and tested: Four models for the surface roughness and three methods to derive the Monin-Obukov-length from measurements. They have been tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rdsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind speed to 50 m height and comparing it with the measured 50 m wind speed.

Bernhard Lange; Søren Larsen; Jørgen Højstrup; Rebecca Barthelmie; Ulrich Focken

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Diagnostic Model for Estimating Winds at Potential Sites for Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrain features and variations in the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer produce local variations in wind, and these variations are not depicted well by standard weather reports. We have developed a diagnostic model that computes local ...

R. M. Endlich; F. L. Ludwig; C. M. Bhumralkar; M. A. Estoque

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Site insolation and wind power characteristics: technical report western region (south section)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This phase of the Site Insolation and Wind Power Characteristics Study was performed to provide statistical information on the expected future availability of solar and wind power at various sites in the Western Region (South Section) of the US Historic data (SOLMET), at 22 National Weather Service stations with hourly solar insolation and collateral meteorological information, were interrogated to provide an estimate of future trends. Solar data are global radiation incident on a horizontal surface, and wind data represent wind power normal to the air flow. Selected insolation and wind power conditions were investigated for their occurrence and persistence, for defined periods of time, on a monthly basis. Global horizontal insolation is related to inclined surfaces at each site. Ratios are provided, monthly, for multiplying global insolation to obtain insolation estimates on south-facing surfaces inclined at different angles with respect to the horizontal. Also, joint probability distribution tables are constructed showing the number of occurrences, out of a finite sample size, of daily average solar and wind power within selected intervals, by month. Information of this nature is intended as an aid to preliminary planning activities for the design and operation of solar and wind energy utilization and conversion systems.

None

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Analysis of superconducting magnetic energy storage applications at a proposed wind farm site near Browning, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program was developed to analyze the viability of integrating superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) with proposed wind farm scenarios at a site near Browning, Montana. The program simulated an hour-by-hour account of the charge/discharge history of a SMES unit for a representative wind-speed year. Effects of power output, storage capacity, and power conditioning capability on SMES performance characteristics were analyzed on a seasonal, diurnal, and hourly basis. The SMES unit was assumed to be charged during periods when power output of the wind resource exceeded its average value. Energy was discharged from the SMES unit into the grid during periods of low wind speed to compensate for below-average output of the wind resource. The option of using SMES to provide power continuity for a wind farm supplemented by combustion turbines was also investigated. Levelizing the annual output of large wind energy systems operating in the Blackfeet area of Montana was found to require a storage capacity too large to be economically viable. However, it appears that intermediate-sized SMES economically levelize the wind energy output on a seasonal basis.

Gaustad, K.L.; De Steese, J.G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 31, 2002 May 31, 2002 DOE/EA 1378 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICAflJT IMPACT For the NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER Site Operations and Short-Term and Long-Term Improvement Programs Golden, Colorado AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a Site-Wide Environmental Assessment (EA) of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) to evaluate potential impacts of site operations and short-term and long-term improvement programs. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads the national research effort to develop clean, competitive, and reliable renewable energy and power delivery technologies for the 21st century. The mission of EERE's Wind Energy Program is to help the

71

Philippine Wind Farm Analysis and Site Selection Analysis, 1 January 2000 - 31 December 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has been working in partnership with the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) in an ongoing process to quantify the Philippine wind energy potential and foster wind farm development. As part of that process, NREL retained Global Energy Concepts, LLC (GEC) to review and update the policy needs as well as develop a site-screening process applicable for the Philippines. GEC worked closely with the Philippines National Power Corporation (NPC) in completing this work. This report provides the results of the policy needs and site selection analyses conducted by GEC.

Conover, K.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Candidate wind turbine generator site, Culebra, Puerto Rico. Annual data summary, October 1978-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes wind speed and direction data collected on meteorological towers at 14 candidate and wind turbine generator installation sites from October 1978 through September 1979. The basic method of data collection is by digital data cassette recording systems. For the digital data reported, an instantaneous sample is recorded every 2 minutes. An explanation is provided for each data summary table as well as information on how specific values were computed. The rest of the report presents the annual summarized data for each site.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Candidate wind turbine generator site, Culebra, Puerto Rico. Annual data summary, January-December 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes wind speed and direction data collected on meteorological towers at 14 candidate and wind turbine generator installation sites from January 1979 through December 1979. The basic method of data collection is by digital data cassette recording systems. For the digital data reported, an instantaneous sample is recorded every 2 minutes. An explanation is included for each data summary table as well as information on how specific values were computed. The rest of the report presents the annual summarized data for each site.

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

IMPROVED CAPABILITIES FOR SITING WIND FARMS AND MITIGATING IMPACTS ON RADAR OBSERVATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of efficient wind energy production involves challenges in technology and interoperability with other systems critical to the national mission. Wind turbines impact radar measurements as a result of their large reflectivity cross section as well as through the Doppler phase shift of their rotating blades. Wind farms can interfere with operational radar in multiple contexts, with degradation impacts on: weather detection such as tornado location, wind shear, and precipitation monitoring; tracking of airplanes where air traffic control software can lose the tracks of aircraft; and in identification of other low flying targets where a wind farm located close to a border might create a dead zone for detecting intruding objects. Objects in the path of an electromagnetic wave affect its propagation characteristics. This includes actual blockage of wave propagation by large individual objects and interference in wave continuity due to diffraction of the beam by individual or multiple objects. As an evolving industry, and the fastest growing segment of the energy sector, wind power is poised to make significant contributions in future energy generation requirements. The ability to develop comprehensive strategies for designing wind turbine locations that are mutually beneficial to both the wind industry that is dependent on production, and radar sites which the nation relies on, is critical to establishing reliable and secure wind energy. The mission needs of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), Department of Defense (DOD), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) dictate that the nation's radar systems remain uninhibited, to the maximum extent possible, by man-made obstructions; however, wind turbines can and do impact the surveillance footprint for monitoring airspace both for national defense as well as critical weather conditions which can impact life and property. As a result, a number of potential wind power locations have been contested on the basis of radar line of site. Radar line of site is dependent on local topography, and varies with atmospheric refractive index which is affected by weather and geographic conditions.

Chiswell, S.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

US Department of Energy wind turbine candidate site program: the regulatory process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sites selected in 1979 as tentative sites for installation of a demonstration MOD-2 turbine are emphasized. Selection as a candidate site in this program meant that the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the site as eligible for a DOE-purchased and installed meteorological tower. The regulatory procedures involved in the siting and installation of these meteorological towers at the majority of the candidate sites are examined. An attempt is also made, in a preliminary fashion, to identify the legal and regulatory procedures that would be required to put up a turbine at each of these candidate sites. The information provided on each of these sites comes primarily from utility representatives, supplemented by conversations with state and local officials. The major findings are summarized on the following: federal requirements, state requirements, local requirements, land ownership, wind rights, and public attitudes.

Greene, M.R.; York, K.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

An Analysis of Wind Fluctuation Statistics Collected under Stable Atmospheric Conditions at Three Sites in Alberta, Canada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind fluctuation data collected under stable atmospheric conditions at two prairie sites and a site located near the Rocky Mountain foothills have been analyzed. Results of the analysis show a marked tendency for horizontal fluctuation angles to ...

D. M. Leahey; M. C. Hansen; M. B. Schroeder

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Wind Power Opportunities in St. Thomas, USVI: A Site-Specific Evaluation and Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This NREL technical report utilizes a development framework originated by NREL and known by the acronym SROPTTC to assist the U.S. Virgin Islands in identifying and understanding concrete opportunities for wind power development in the territory. The report covers each of the seven components of the SROPTTC framework: Site, Resource, Off-take, Permitting, Technology, Team, and Capital as they apply to wind power in the USVI and specifically to a site in Bovoni, St. Thomas. The report concludes that Bovoni peninsula is a strong candidate for utility-scale wind generation in the territory. It represents a reasonable compromise in terms of wind resource, distance from residences, and developable terrain. Hurricane risk and variable terrain on the peninsula and on potential equipment transport routes add technical and logistical challenges but do not appear to represent insurmountable barriers. In addition, integration of wind power into the St. Thomas power system will present operational challenges, but based on experience in other islanded power systems, there are reasonable solutions for addressing these challenges.

Lantz, E.; Warren, A.; Roberts, J. O.; Gevorgian, V.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Baseline avian use and behavior at the CARES wind plant site, Klickitat County, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a literature review on avian-wind turbine interactions and the results of a one-year avian baseline study conducted in 1998 at the proposed Conservation and Renewable Energy System (CARES) wind development site in Klickitat County, Washington. Avian use of the site ranged from 1.11/survey in the winter to 5.69/survey in the spring. Average use by passerines in the study plots ranged from 1.15 minutes/survey in the winter to 40.98 minutes/survey in the spring. Raptors spent much less time within plots than other groups, ranging from 0.05 minutes/survey in the winter to 0.77 minutes/survey during the fall. Thirteen percent of all flying birds were within the rotor-swept height (25 to 75 m); 41.6% of all raptors were flying at this height. Raptors with the greatest potential turbine exposure are red-tailed hawks and golden eagles. Passerines with the highest turbine exposure are common ravens, American robins, and horned larks. Spatial use data for the site indicate that avian use tends to be concentrated near the rim, indicating that placing turbines away from the rim may reduce risk. Avian use data at the CARES site indicate that if a wind plant is constructed in the future, avian mortality would likely be relatively low.

Erickson, W.P.; Johnson, G.D.; Strickland, M.D.; Kronner, K.; Becker, P.S.; Orloff, S.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

79

New England Wind Forum: Selling Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Selling Wind Power Selling Wind Power Markets are either well-developed or developing for each of the 'products' produced by wind generators. These include electricity products and generation attributes. Electricity Electricity can be used in two ways: on-site (interconnected behind a retail customer's meter) of for sales of electricity over the electric grid. On-site generation can displace a portion of a customer's purchases of electricity from the grid. In addition, net metering rules are in place at the state level that in some cases allow generation in excess of on-site load to be sold back to the local utility (see state pages for net metering specifics). For sales over the electricity grid, the Independent System Operator of New England (ISO New England) creates and manages a wholesale market for electric energy, capacity, and ancillary services within the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL). Wind generators may sell their electric energy and capacity in spot markets organized by the ISO, or they may contract with wholesale buyers to sell these products for any term to buyers operating in the ISO New England marketplace. Wind generators do not generally produce other marketable ancillary services. The ISO has rules specific to the operation of wind generators reflecting operations, scheduling, calculation of installed capacity credit, and so forth.

80

Ponnequin Wind Energy Project: Reference site avian study, January 1, 1998--December 31, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of surveys completed during the period January 1, 1998, through December 31, 1998, at the Ponnequin Wind Energy Project in Weld County, Colorado. The surveys were conducted at two reference sites, and include a pre-construction avian abundance and use survey and raptor nesting, prey, and carcass surveys. The reference sites were situated immediately to the west of the project site in Weld County, Colorado, and 4.8 kilometers to the north of the site in Laramie County, Wyoming. The surveys were conducted along two 800-meter (m) main transects at each site with two 400-m (by 100-m) perpendicular transects. About 30 complete surveys were completed during the year, with a greater frequency of surveys in the late spring and early autumn. The surveys revealed mostly common species, with no endangered or threatened species on the sites. Small numbers of raptors were observed on or near the project and reference areas. During the winter, avian use and abundance was minimal. Prey species consisted primarily of thirteen-lined ground squirrels and northern pocket gophers. Two songbird carcasses were found. The results of these surveys, combined with data from several more months of surveys, will be compared to surveys conducted after construction of the wind farm.

Kerlinger, P.; Curry, R.; Ryder, R.

2000-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Rules Governing Water and Wastewater Operator Certification are

82

Alongwind Dispersion—A Simple Similarity Formula Compared with Observations at 11 Field Sites and in One Wind Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of alongwind dispersion of clouds were collected from 11 field sites and from one wind tunnel and were used to test simple similarity relations. Because most of the observations consist of concentration time series from fixed ...

Steven R. Hanna; Pasquale Franzese

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine Characteristics and Siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distribution and siting depth. Mean wind power increases by 30%, 69 % and 73 % within the tropics and northern and southern hemisphere extratropics, respectively, between hub heights of 10 m and 100 m. A turbine with a cut-out speed of 25 m s?1 (30 m s?1) within the northern hemisphere storm track harvests between 55 % (82%) and 85% (> 98%) of available power. Within this region, a 2–3m s?1 change in cut-out speed can result in a 5–7 % change in usable power. 80 m wind power accumulates at a rate of 20–45 GW km2 m?2 per meter depth increase from the shore to the shelf break. Beyond the shelf break, wind power accumulates at a slower rate (wind power is assessed for three technology tiers: existing, planned, and future innovations. Usable percent of 80 m available global ocean wind power ranges from 0.40 % for existing to 2.73 % for future envisioned turbine specifications. Offshore wind power production is estimated using typical turbine characteristics including rotor diameter, rated power and siting density. Global offshore wind power is as much as 37 TW (50 % of onshore) and is maximized for the smallest and least powerful of the three turbine specifications evaluated. 1 1

Charles S. Zender

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Wind Power Opportunities in St. Thomas, USVI: A Site-Specific Evaluation and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Opportunities in Power Opportunities in St. Thomas, USVI: A Site-Specific Evaluation and Analysis E. Lantz, A. Warren, J.O. Roberts, and V. Gevorgian Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-55415 September 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Wind Power Opportunities in St. Thomas, USVI: A Site-Specific Evaluation and Analysis E. Lantz, A. Warren, J.O. Roberts, and V. Gevorgian Prepared under Task No. IDVI.1020 Technical Report NREL/TP-7A20-55415 September 2012 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

85

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

86

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Facilities. ” American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns onthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWind

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y Y : J O H N D . S T E V E N S O N C O N S U L T I N G E N G I N E E R 6 6 1 1 R O C K S I D E R D . I N D E P E N D E N C E , O H I O 4 4 1 3 1 T E L . 2 1 6 - 4 4 7 - 9 4 4 0 E M A I L : J S T E V E N S O N 4 @ E A R T H L I N K . N E T SUMMARY OF REVISED TORNADO, HURRICANE AND EXTREME STRAIGHT WIND CHARACTERISTICS AT NUCLEAR FACILITY SITES Categorization of Natural Hazard Phenomenon and Operational Load Combinations Prior to the 1988 Uniform Building Code, UBC (1) natural hazard phenomenon (earthquake, wind, flooding and precipitation) and operational load combinations were divided into two categories: NORMAL- Loads such as dead, live and design basis pressure. Expected frequency: 1.0 per yr with a limiting acceptance criteria Allowable stress design criteria: equal to one-half to two-thirds of specified minimum yield stress. SEVERE - Natural hazard and operational transient loads.

88

Stormwater Management Rules (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules (New Jersey) Rules (New Jersey) Stormwater Management Rules (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider State of New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection This chapter establishes general requirements for stormwater management

89

Assessment of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative: Addressing Environmental and Siting Issues Associated with Wind Energy Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) is a consensus-based stakeholder group comprised of representatives from the utility, wind industry, environmental, consumer, regulatory, power marketer, agricultural, tribal, economic development, and state and federal government sectors. The purpose of the NWCC is to support the development of an environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable commercial market for wind power (NWCC 2010). The NWCC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since its inception in 1994. In order to evaluate the impact of the work of the NWCC and how this work aligns with DOE’s strategic priorities, DOE tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a series of informal interviews with a small sample of those involved with NWCC.

Van Cleve, Frances B.; States, Jennifer C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

90

NREL Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting (Fact Sheet), The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies Wind Farm Studies Wind Farm Aerodynamics to Improve Siting NREL researchers have used high-tech instruments and high- performance computing to understand atmospheric turbulence and turbine wake behavior in order to improve wind turbine design and siting within wind farms. The knowledge gained from this research could lead to improved turbine design standards, increased productivity in large wind farms, and a lower cost of energy from wind power. This is key, because as turbines grow in size-approximately doubling in height over the past five years-they present more complex challenges to wind turbine designers and operators. To gain new insights into turbine wind wakes, NREL and the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (RASEI) joined together with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the

91

Comparison of Mean Wind Speeds and Turbulence at a Coastal Site and Offshore Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mean wind speed and longitudinal turbulence at a height of 8 m over the Atlantic ocean, 5 km off Long Island, New York, were compared with simultaneous observations at the beach. Results were grouped into wind direction classes ...

S. SethuRaman; G. S. Raynor

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting Scott B. Capps1 and Charles S. Zender1 Received 17 June, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub, between hub heights of 10 m and 100 m. A turbine with a cutout speed of 25 m s-1 (30 m s-1 ) within

Zender, Charles

93

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Development of a 2-MW Direct-Drive Wind Turbine for Low Wind Speed Sites; Northern Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes a subcontract with Northern Power Systems (NPS) to develop and evaluate a 2-MW wind turbine that could offer significant opportunities for reducing the cost of energy (COE).

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

towers or operational wind farms are needed to resolveapproach to locating wind farms in the UK. ” Renewablepower from potential wind farm locations in California and

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7 2.2.3 Wind Farm Production1. Rated Capacity of Wind Farms for which Monthly Productionpower from potential wind farm locations in California and

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992). “Capacity credit of wind power in the Netherlands. ”modeling as a tool for wind resource assessment andBurton, T. , et al. (2001). Wind Energy Handbook, John

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Facilities. ” American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)21. Brower, M. 2002a. New Wind Energy Resource Maps ofand M. Schwartz. 1993. Wind Energy Potential in the United

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for off- shore wind turbines in Europe and North America,of wind power and wind turbine characteristics, Renewablea multi?megawatt wind turbine, Renewable Energy, Matthews,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Model Wind Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Model Wind Ordinance Model Wind Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider North Carolina Department of Commerce ''Note: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While it was developed as part of a cooperative effort involving several state agencies, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority.'' In July, 2008 the North Carolina Wind Working Group, a coalition of state government, non-profit and wind industry organizations, published a model

100

Candidate wind-turbine generator site cumulative meteorological data summary and data for January 1982 through September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarized cumulative hourly meteorological data for 20 new sites selected in early 1980 as part of the expanded candidate site program are presented. The reporting period is July 1980 through September 1982. The data collection program at some individual sites may not span this entire period, but will be contained within the reporting period. The purpose of providing the summarized data is to document the data collection program and to provide data that could be considered representative of longer-term meteorological conditions at each site. For each site, data are given in eight tables and in a topographic map showing the approximated location of the meteorological tower and turbine, if applicable. Use of the information from these tables, along with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for longer-term average wind energy production at each site. Two appendices of other data are provided. Appendix A contains summarized data collected at new and original sites during the period January 1982 through September 1982. Appendix B contains cumulative summarized data for those original sites selected in 1976 with data collection programs continuing into 1982.

Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.; Bradymire, S.L.; Gregory, J.L.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1992). “Capacity credit of wind power in the Netherlands. ”the capacity credit of wind power in the presence ofSimulating Long-Term Wind- Power Output. ” Wind Engineering

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

40, 70, and 100 m. ” Oklahoma Wind Power Initiative. OWPI.m sensor heights. ” Oklahoma Wind Power Initiative. Perez,

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Post-Injection Geophysical Evaluation of the Winding Ridge Site CRADA 98-F012, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Acid mine drainage (AMD) from underground mines is a major environmental problem. The disposal of coal combustion by-products (CCB) is also a major national problem due to the large volumes produced annually and the economics associated with transportation and environmentally safe disposal. The concept of returning large volumes of the CCB to their point of origin, underground mines, and using the typically alkaline and pozzolanic attributes of the waste material for the remediation of AMD has been researched rather diligently during the past few years by various federal and state agencies and universities. As the result, the State of Maryland initiated a full-scale demonstration of this concept in a small, 5-acre, unmapped underground mine located near Friendsville, MD. Through a cooperative agreement between the State of Maryland and the U.S. Department of Energy, several geophysical techniques were evaluated as potential tools for the post-injection evaluation of the underground mine site. Three non-intrusive geophysical surveys, two electromagnetic (EM) techniques and magnetometry, were conducted over the Frazee Mine, which is located on Winding Ridge near Friendsville, MD. The EM surveys were conducted to locate ground water in both mine void and overburden. The presence of magnetite, which is naturally inherent to CCB'S due to the combustion process and essentially transparent in sedimentary rock, provided the reason for using magnetometry to locate the final resting place of the CCB grout.

Connie Lyons; Richard Current; Terry Ackman

1998-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

104

Sowing the Seeds for a Bountiful Harvest: Shaping the Rules and Creating the Tools for Wisconsin's Next Generation of Wind Farms  

SciTech Connect

Project objectives are twofold: (1) to engage wind industry stakeholders to participate in formulating uniform permitting standards applicable to commercial wind energy installations; and (2) to create and maintain an online Wisconsin Wind Information Center to enable policymakers and the public to increaser their knowledge of and support for wind generation in Wisconsin.

Vickerman, Michael Jay

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Pipeline Safety Rule (Tennessee) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Pipeline Safety Rule (Tennessee) Pipeline Safety Rule (Tennessee) Eligibility Commercial...

106

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards the Development of Wind Farms in Australia. JournalEconomic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. Beaconabout Wind Turbines and Wind Farms. Wind Engineering. 13(4):

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Evaluation Of Models For The Vertical Extrapolation Of Wind Speed Measurements At Offshore Sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Monin-Obukhov theory predicts the well-known log-linear form of the vertical wind speed profile. Two parameters, namely the aerodynamic surface roughness length and the Monin-Obukhov-length, are needed to predict the vertical wind speed profile from a measurement at one height. Different models to estimate these parameters for conditions important for offshore wind energy utilisation are discussed and tested: Four models for the surface roughness and three methods to derive the Monin-Obukov-length from measurements are compared. They have been tested with data from the offshore field measurement Rdsand by extrapolating the measured 10 m wind speed to 50 m height and comparing it with the measured 50 m wind speed. The mean

Bernhard Lange; Jørgen Højstrup; Søren Larsen; Rebecca Barthelmie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

El Roque de Los Muchachos Site Characteristics. II. Analysis of Wind, Relative Humidity and Air Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present an analysis of wind speed, wind direction, relative humidity and air pressure taken at TNG, CAMC and NOT at Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos, in the Canary Islands. Data are compared in order to check local variations and both long term and short term trends of the microclimate. Furthermore, influence of wind speed on the astronomical seeing is estimated to the aim to better understand the influence of wide scale parameters on local meteorological data. The three telescopes show different prevailing wind direction, wind speed, relative humidity and air pressure confirming differences in local microclimate. We found that seeing deteriorates when wind speed is lower than 3.3 m/s. Comparison in terms of wind speed and high relative humidity (> 90%) shows that TNG seems to have optimal observational conditions with respect to CAMC and NOT. Air pressure analysis shows that ORM is dominated by high pressure. Short time variations of pressure anticipate temperature variations tipically by 2-3 hours, this property vanishes in time scales higher than some hours and disappear in longer time scales.

G. Lombardi; V. Zitelli; S. Ortolani; M. Pedani

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

110

Born Rule(s)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is based on work published in [1]. It describes a triple slit experiment using single photons that has been used to provide a bound on one of the most fundamental axioms of quantum mechanics i.e. Born's rule for probabilities [2]. In spite of being one of the most successful theories which describes various natural phenomena, quantum mechanics has enough intricacies and ''weirdness'' associated with it which makes many physicists believe that it may not be the final theory and hints towards the possibility of more generalized versions. Quantum interference as shown by a double slit diffraction experiment only occurs from pairs of paths. Even in multi-slit versions, interference can only occur between pairs of possibilities and increasing the number of slits does not increase the complexity of the theory that still remains second-order. However, more generalized versions of quantum mechanics may allow for multi-path i.e. higher than second order interference. This experiment also provides a bound on the magnitude of such higher order interference. We have been able to bound the magnitude of three-path interference to less than 10{sup -2} of the expected two-path interference, thus ruling out third and higher order interference and providing a bound on the accuracy of Born's rule.

Sinha, Urbasi [Institute for Quantum Computing, University of Waterloo, 200 University avenue west, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUPWG Meeting FUPWG Meeting NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Robi Robichaud November 18, 2009 Topics Introduction Review of the Current Wind Market Drivers for Wind Development Siting g Issues Wind Resource Assessment Wind Characteristics Wind Power Potential Basic Wind Turbine Theory Basic Wind Turbine Theory Types of Wind Turbines Facts About Wind Siting Facts About Wind Siting Wind Performance 1. United States: MW 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 Current Status of the Wind Industry Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity

112

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

113

Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWindValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of Solarthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References Gipe, P.

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T. , et al. (2001). Wind Energy Handbook, John Wiley & Sons.optimal planning for wind energy conversion systems over59-71. Brower, M. (2002a). New Wind Energy Resource Maps of

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

On-Site Small Wind Incentive Program (New York) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

paid directly to the owner of the wind system. Instead, they are paid to eligible installers that have been approved to participate in this program, but the entire incentive...

116

Average Diurnal Behavior of Surface Winds during Summer at Sites in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean diurnal wind distributions from five surface stations in the rugged Geysers area of northern California were examined to determine how they were affected by the terrain. The one dimensional slope-flow model of Garrett was able to simulate ...

Alfred J. Garrett; Frank G. Smith III

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002) Economic Impacts of Wind Power in Kittitas County, WA.about Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. EnergyOpinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report. University

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options Site Map Printable Version Offshore Standards and Testing NREL's Offshore Wind Testing Capabilities 35 years of wind turbine testing experience Custom high speed data...

119

Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) Coastal Permit Program Rules (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Coastal Permit Program Rules provide the processes for permit reviews.

120

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing One of the barriers for the small wind market has been the lack...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Wind Powering America: New England Wind Forum  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About the New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share The New England Wind Forum was conceived in 2005 as a platform to provide a single, comprehensive and objective source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. The New England Wind Forum provides information to wind energy stakeholders through Web site features, periodic newsletters, and outreach activities. The New England Wind Forum covers the most frequently discussed wind energy topics.

122

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. Energy Policy. 35(Wind Development on Local Property Values. Renewable Energy Policy

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Opinion about Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and economic cost?benefit analysis of offshore wind energy,energy sources [Jacobson, 2009]. Onshore wind power costs

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Best Practices in Literature Research for the 10-Year Extreme Wind Update at the DOE Pantex Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Practices in Literature Review Best Practices in Literature Review for the 10 Year Extreme Wind Update at the DOE Pantex Site Presented by October 26, 2011 DOE Standards * DOE O 420.1 - Basis of Requirements * DOE 1020 - Soon to be updated * Development of several ANS consensus codes have replaced several older DOE standards New DOE 1020 for Wind NPH Analysis and Design Process * Step 1: Establish performance requirements for SSCs * Step 2: Calculate maximum NPH demands on SSCs resulting from NPH Events * Step 3: Design of SSCs to ensure their ability to maintain required functionality ANSI/ANS - 2.3 - 2011 Scope Establishes guidelines to estimate the frequency of occurrence and the magnitude of parameters associated with rare meteorological events such as tornadoes, hurricanes, and extreme

126

Applicability of digital terrain analyses to wind energy prospecting and siting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent publication of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) database by the US Geological Survey (USGS) has provided a unique opportunity for the development of cost-effective wind energy prospecting technology. This database contains terrain elevation values on a Latitude-Longitude grid with a resolution of 3 arc-seconds (about 90 m) for the contiguous United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. This database has been coupled with software that will produce shaded-relief maps on a laser printer in a format compatible with the state wind power maps in the US wind energy atlas. By providing a much higher resolution of the terrain features than was possible when the US atlas was prepared, these maps can be useful in general wind prospecting activities. As highly resolved as the 90-m DEM data seem to be when compared to the atlas grid, they still appear to be too coarse to resolve terrain features in the detail required for local wind flow characterization and wind plant layout. Gridded terrain data at about 10-m resolution are available from the USGS for some areas of the United States. In areas where these data are unavailable, they may be generated by digitizing and gridding the contours from a 1:24,000-scale USGS map over the area of interest. Comparisons of terrain profiles from cross sections of the 10-m and 90-m data provide an indication of the effect of resolution on the reliability of terrain feature representation. Oblique views of the terrain in shaded-relief format provide a dramatic enhancement of the shape and relative position of features of interest.

Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Birn, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Castellano, C.C. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NREL: Wind Research - International Wind Resource Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Maps NREL is helping to develop high-resolution projections of wind resources worldwide. This allows for more accurate siting of wind turbines and has led to the...

130

US Department of Energy response to standards for remedial actions at inactive uranium processing sites: Proposed rule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Title I groundwater standards for inactive uranium mill tailings sites, which were promulgated on January 5, 1983, by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, were remanded to the EPA on September 3, 1985, by the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. The Court instructed the EPA to compile general groundwater standards for all Title I sites. On September 24, 1987, the EPA published proposed standards (52FR36000-36008) in response to the remand. This report includes an evaluation of the potential effects of the proposed EPA groundwater standards on the UMTRA Project, as well as a discussion of the DOE's position on the proposed standards. The report also contains and appendix which provides supporting information and cost analyses. In order to assess the impacts of the proposed EPA standards, this report summarizes the proposed EPA standards in Section 2.0. The next three sections assess the impacts of the three parts of the EPA standards: Subpart A considers disposal sites; Subpart B is concerned with restoration at processing sites; and Subpart C addresses supplemental standards. Section 6.0 integrates previous sections into a recommendations section. Section 7.0 contains the DOE response to questions posed by the EPA in the preamble to the proposed standards. 6 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Moored Surface Wind Observations at Four Sites along the Pacific Equator between 140° and 95°W  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mooted surface wind measurements were recorded along the Pacific equator at 140°, 124°, 110°, and 95°W during portions of 1980–85. Minimum record length is one year. The annual mean and monthly mean westward speeds at 110°W were about 1.5 m s?1 ...

David Halpern

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ground-water protection standards for inactive uranium tailings sites (40 CFR 192): Background information for final rule. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Final Background Information Document summarizes the information and data considered by the Agency in developing the ground-water protection standards. The report presents a brief description of the Title II ground water standard and how it can be used to develop the Title I rulemaking. A description of the 24 designated uranium-tailings sites and their current status in the DOE remedial-action program is included as well as a detailed analysis of the available data on the ground water in the vicinity of 14 of the 24 sites. It also describes different methods that can be used for the restoration of ground water and the costs of using these restoration methods.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance Carteret County - Wind Energy System Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial General Public/Consumer Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Carteret County Carteret County passed an ordinance to specify the permitting process and establish siting requirements for wind energy systems. There are different rules and a different permitting process depending on the size and location of a system. Small systems up to 25 kilowatts (kW) are considered to be an accessory use and do not require the approval of a Wind Energy Permit

134

Wind | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment and Characterization Defining, measuring, and forecasting land-based and offshore wind resources Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects Avoiding,...

135

Large wind turbine siting handbook: television interference assessment. Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rotating blades of a horizontal axis wind turbine can distort the video portion of a television signal and thereby interfere with TV reception in the vicinity of the machine. The nature of this interference is described and methods are presented for calculating the zone within which the interference may be severs. Specific results are given for the MOD-OA, MOD-1 and MOD-2 machines as functions of the TV frequency.

Senior, T B.A.; Sengupta, D L

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or production data from tall towers are needed before we canmore data from tall anemometer towers or operational wind

Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002) Economic Impacts of Wind Power in Kittitas County, WA.Beck, D. (2004) How Hull Wind "I" Impacted Property Valuesof Visual Impact: The Case of Wind Turbines. Environment and

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price Facility Statistics Facility Name Weatherford Wind Energyprices of homes situated inside of one mile of the nearest wind energyprices. For this reason, the hedonic model is wind energy

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Understanding Public Perceptions of Wind Energy.Wind Energy. 8(2): 125 - 139. Dubin, R. A. (1998) Spatial2008. 60 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (2009)

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational setting. It shall be demonstrated that when used properly, the real-time offsite measurements materially improve wind ramp capture and prediction statistics, when compared to traditional wind forecasting techniques and to a simple persistence model.

Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) Cogeneration Rules (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Interconnection Provider Arkansas Public Service Commission The Cogeneration Rules are enforced by the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are designed to ensure that all power producers looking to sell their power to residents of Arkansas are necessary, benefit the public and are environmentally friendly. Under these rules new

142

Permit by Rule for Small Renewable Energy Projects (Virginia) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Permit by Rule for Small Renewable Energy Projects (Virginia) Permit by Rule for Small Renewable Energy Projects (Virginia) Permit by Rule for Small Renewable Energy Projects (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality In 2009, the Virginia General Assembly enacted legislation directing the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality to develop regulations for the construction and operation of renewable energy projects of 100 megawatts

143

Annotated bibliography of literature relating to wind transport of plutonium-contaminated soils at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

During the period from 1954 through 1963, a number of tests were conducted on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and Tonopah Test Range (TTR) to determine the safety of nuclear devices with respect to storage, handling, transport, and accidents. These tests were referred to as ``safety shots.`` ``Safety`` in this context meant ``safety against fission reaction.`` The safety tests were comprised of chemical high explosive detonations with components of nuclear devices. The conduct of these tests resulted in the dispersion of plutonium, and some americium over areas ranging from several tens to several hundreds of hectares. Of the various locations used for safety tests, the site referred to as ``Plutonium Valley`` was subject to a significant amount of plutonium contamination. Plutonium Valley is located in Area 11 on the eastern boundary of the NTS at an elevation of about 1036 m (3400 ft). Plutonium Valley was the location of four safety tests (A,B,C, and D) conducted during 1956. A major environmental, health, and safety concern is the potential for inhalation of Pu{sup 239,240} by humans as a result of airborne dust containing Pu particles. Thus, the wind transport of Pu{sup 239,240} particles has been the subject of considerable research. This annotated bibliography was created as a reference guide to assist in the better understanding of the environmental characteristics of Plutonium Valley, the safety tests performed there, the processes and variables involved with the wind transport of dust, and as an overview of proposed clean-up procedures.

Lancaster, N.; Bamford, R.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Baltimore County - Wind Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Baltimore County - Wind Ordinance Eligibility Agricultural Residential Savings For Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Information Maryland Program Type Siting and...

145

Talbot County - Wind Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Wind Ordinance Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings For Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Information Maryland Program Type Siting & Permitting This ordinance...

146

Modeling of Plume Downwash and Enhanced Diffusion near Buildings: Comparison to Wind Tunnel Observations for in Arctic Industrial Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of a modified Industrial Source Complex model to simulate concentration distributions resulting from high wind speeds (neutral conditions) has been evaluated by comparison to data from a wind tunnel study of a Prudhoe Bay, AK oil-...

Alex Guenther; Brian Lamb; Ronald Petersen

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home America's Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities Addthis National Wind Technology...

148

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

149

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resources Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Resources Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. New England Wind Resource Maps Wind resources maps of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

150

Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) Net Metering Rules (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Net Metering Provider Arkansas Public Service Commission The Net Metering Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules are created to establish rules for net energy metering and interconnection. These rules are developed pursuant to the Arkansas Renewable Energy Development Act (Arkansas Code Annotated 23-18-603). These rules apply to all electric utilities.

152

NREL: Wind Research - New England Wind Forum Publishes Newsletter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 The New England Wind Forum Newsletter informs stakeholders of New England Wind Energy Education Project (NEWEEP) announcements, plus events and project, siting, and policy...

153

NREL: Wind Research - New England Wind Forum Helps You Follow...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on wind turbine siting and acoustics, long-term contracts, the Massachusetts Wind Turbine Health Impact Study, and stakeholder engagement. Past presentations from meetings are...

154

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and business planning) Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program - Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment...

155

Solar Decathlon Rules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RULES RULES Last Updated: September 3, 2009 2009 Solar Decathlon Rules i September 3, 2009 Contents SECTION I: DEFINITIONS ........................................................................................................................................1 SECTION II: GENERAL RULES ..................................................................................................................................5 Rule 1. Authority ............................................................................................................................................................................. 5 1-1. Director ................................................................................................................................................................................ 5

156

New England Wind Forum: Small Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies: Thomas Harrison Middle School, Virginia Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies: Thomas Harrison Middle School, Virginia August 26, 2013 Workshop Explores Information's Role in Wind Project Siting: A Wind Powering America Success Story November 19, 2012 More News Subscribe to News Updates Events Renewable Energy Market Update Webinar January 29, 2014 Strategic Energy Planning: Webinar February 26, 2014 Introduction to Wind Systems March 10, 2014 More Events Publications 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications August 12, 2013 More Publications Features Sign up for the New England Wind Forum Newsletter. New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England

157

Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C. S. Zender (2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity toG. C. Johnson (2001), Ocean currents evident in satellitepower distribution over the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 35,

Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind facility, which is situated near the city of Weatherford, 70 miles due west of Oklahomawind turbine. Census Statistics Population Weatherford City Hydro Town Custer County Oklahoma

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Projects  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Projects This page shows the location of installed and planned New England wind projects. Find windfarms, community-scale wind projects, customer-sited wind projects, small wind projects, and offshore wind projects. Read more information about how to use the Google Map and how to add your wind project to the map. Text version New England Wind Energy Projects Connecticut, East Canaan Wind Connecticut, Klug Farm Connecticut, Phoenix Press Connecticut, Wind Colebrook (South and North)

160

Wind Powering America: Wind Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind power-related events. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Wind Events http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/calendar.asp Pennsylvania Wind for Schools Educator Workshop https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1352684 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4068 Wed, 4 Dec 2013 00:00:00 MST 2014 Joint Action Workshop http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 Mon, 21 Oct 2013 00:00:00 MST AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 Mon, 21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Model Wind Ordinance for Local Governments | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ordinance for Local Governments Ordinance for Local Governments Model Wind Ordinance for Local Governments < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Note: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While it was developed as part of a cooperative effort involving several state agencies, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority. In 2006, Pennsylvania developed a model local ordinance for wind energy facilities through a collaborative effort involving several state

162

Model Wind Energy Facility Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Facility Ordinance Energy Facility Ordinance Model Wind Energy Facility Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Land Use Planning Note: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While it was developed as part of a cooperative effort involving several state agencies, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority. In 2008, the Governor's Task Force on Wind Power Development issued its final report. One of the Task Force's recommendations was that the State

163

Guidance for Local Wind Energy Ordinances | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Guidance for Local Wind Energy Ordinances Guidance for Local Wind Energy Ordinances < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New York Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority Note: The documents described in this summary were designed to provide guidance to local governments that wish to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While they were developed under contract with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), a state agency, none of the documents themselves have any legal or regulatory

164

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zoneleakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites Fotini K.assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Wind Site Assessor Training  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Mauris id ornare sapien, eget mattis nibh. Morbi luctus venenatis interdum. Donec eget pharetra risus. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et...

166

Water Rules (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Rules (Alabama) Water Rules (Alabama) Water Rules (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Residential Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Environmental Regulations These rules and regulations shall apply to all water systems subject to the jurisdiction of the Alabama Public Service Commission. They are intended to promote good utility practices, to assure adequate and efficient service to the public at a reasonable cost, and to establish the rights and responsibilities of both the utility and the customer. Applications for certificates must be filed separately for each water system.

167

Wind Powering America  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

These news items are notable additions These news items are notable additions to the Wind Powering America Web site. The Wind Powering America Web site reports recent national and state wind market changes by cataloging wind activities such as wind resource maps, small wind consumer's guides, local wind workshops, news articles, and publications in the areas of policy, public power, small wind, Native Americans, agricultural sector, economic development, public lands, and schools. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/ Nominate an Electric Cooperative for Wind Power Leadership Award by January 15 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4076 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4076 Mon, 16

168

Wind Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avg Wind Speed 7.5 m/s 8.74 m/s GE 2.x turbine family ... 1 to 48 Hour Wind Forecasting ... Danish Transmission Grid w/ Interconnects & Offshore Sites ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Comparison of post-processing methods for the calibration of 100 m wind ensemble forecasts at off- and onshore sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble forecasts are a valuable addition to deterministic wind forecasts since they allow the quantification of forecast uncertainties. To remove common deficiencies of ensemble forecasts such as biases and ensemble spread deficits, various post-...

Constantin Junk; Lueder von Bremen; Martin Kühn; Stephan Späth; Detlev Heinemann

170

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hills Big Spring I & II Weatherford I & II Storm Lake I &Hills Big Spring I & II Weatherford I & II Storm Lake I &Texas, and includes the Weatherford wind facility, which is

Hoen, Ben

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With wind energy expanding rapidly in the U.S. and abroad, and with an increasing number of communities considering wind power development nearby, there is an urgent need to empirically investigate common community concerns about wind project development. The concern that property values will be adversely affected by wind energy facilities is commonly put forth by stakeholders. Although this concern is not unreasonable, given property value impacts that have been found near high voltage transmission lines and other electric generation facilities, the impacts of wind energy facilities on residential property values had not previously been investigated thoroughly. The present research collected data on almost 7,500 sales of singlefamily homes situated within 10 miles of 24 existing wind facilities in nine different U.S. states. The conclusions of the study are drawn from eight different hedonic pricing models, as well as both repeat sales and sales volume models. The various analyses are strongly consistent in that none of the models uncovers conclusive evidence of the existence of any widespread property value impacts that might be present in communities surrounding wind energy facilities. Specifically, neither the view of the wind facilities nor the distance of the home to those facilities is found to have any consistent, measurable, and statistically significant effect on home sales prices. Although the analysis cannot dismiss the possibility that individual homes or small numbers of homes have been or could be negatively impacted, it finds that if these impacts do exist, they are either too small and/or too infrequent to result in any widespread, statistically observable impact.

Hoen, Ben; Wiser, Ryan; Cappers, Peter; Thayer, Mark; Sethi, Gautam

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

172

HIPAA Security Rule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Related ActivitiesHIPAA Security RuleHealth Information Exchange (HIE) Security Architecture. Related ... HIPAA Security Rule. NIST ...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

173

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. “Annual Report on US Wind Power Installation, Cost,Feed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure ES-1. AdvancedFeed Sequestration Site Wind Power Figure 1. Advanced-Coal

Phadke, Amol

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle assessment of a wind farm and related externalities. ”and onshore sited wind farms. Document number 200128,

Bolinger, Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach to locating wind farms in the UK," RenewableV. G. Rau, "Optimum siting of wind turbine generators," IEEEoptimal planning for wind energy conver- sion systems over

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Probability Distribution of Wind Power From a Dispersed Array of Wind Turbine Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating the probability distribution of wind power from a dispersed array of wind turbine sites where the correlation between wind speeds at distinct sites is less than unity. The distribution is obtained from a model ...

John Carlin; John Haslett

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

NREL: Wind Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's wind energy research and development projects focus on reducing the cost of wind technology and expanding access to wind energy sites. Our specialized technical expertise, comprehensive design and analysis tools, and unique testing facilities help industry overcome challenges to bringing new wind technology to the marketplace. Some of these success stories are described in NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories. We also work closely with universities and other national laboratories supporting fundamental research in wind technologies, including aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, and material sciences essential in the development of new blade technologies and advanced controls, power electronics, and testing to further refine drivetrain topology.

179

Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wetland Rules (Vermont) Wetland Rules (Vermont) Vermont Wetland Rules (Vermont) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Vermont Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation A permit is required for any activity within a Class I or Class II wetland

180

American Wind Manufacturing | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home American Wind Manufacturing American Wind Manufacturing Addthis 1 of 9 Nordex USA -- a global...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NREL: Wind Research - Systems Engineering Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search More Search Options Site Map The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its...

182

Model As-of Right Zoning Ordinance or Bylaw: Allowing Use of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Model As-of Right Zoning Ordinance or Bylaw: Allowing Use of Wind Energy Facilities Model As-of Right Zoning Ordinance or Bylaw: Allowing Use of Wind Energy Facilities < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Note: This model ordinance was designed to provide guidance to local governments seeking to develop their own siting rules for wind turbines. While it was developed as part of a cooperative effort involving several state agencies, the model itself has no legal or regulatory authority. In 2007, the Massachusetts Department of Energy Resources (DOER) and the

183

Category:Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types Jump to: navigation, search Rules, Regulations and Policies Types. Pages in category "Rules, Regulations & Policies Incentive Types" The following 15 pages are in this category, out of 15 total. A Appliance/Equipment Efficiency Standards B Building Energy Codes E Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Energy Standards for Public Buildings Equipment Certification Requirements G Green Power Purchasing I Interconnection Standards L Line Extension Analysis M Mandatory Utility Green Power Option N Net Metering P Public Benefit Funds R Renewables Portfolio Standards S Solar and Wind Permitting Standards Solar/Wind Access Policy Solar/Wind Contractor Licensing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Rules,_Regulations_%26_Policies_Incentive_Types&oldid=390305

184

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy (RE) on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA is collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate RE options at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Newport in Newport, Rhode Island where multiple contaminated areas pose a threat to human health and the environment. Designated a superfund site on the National Priorities List in 1989, the base is committed to working toward reducing the its dependency on fossil fuels, decreasing its carbon footprint, and implementing RE projects where feasible. The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) partnered with NREL in February 2009 to investigate the potential for wind energy generation at a number of Naval and Marine bases on the East Coast. NAVSTA Newport was one of several bases chosen for a detailed, site-specific wind resource investigation. NAVSTA Newport, in conjunction with NREL and NFESC, has been actively engaged in assessing the wind resource through several ongoing efforts. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and a survey of potential wind turbine options based upon the site-specific wind resource.

Robichaud, R.; Fields, J.; Roberts, J. O.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Alaska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alaska/Wind Resources Alaska/Wind Resources < Alaska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alaska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

186

Wyoming/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wyoming/Wind Resources Wyoming/Wind Resources < Wyoming Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wyoming Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

187

Nevada/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada/Wind Resources Nevada/Wind Resources < Nevada Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nevada Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

188

Kansas/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kansas/Wind Resources Kansas/Wind Resources < Kansas Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kansas Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

189

Nebraska/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nebraska/Wind Resources Nebraska/Wind Resources < Nebraska Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Nebraska Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

190

Alabama/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alabama/Wind Resources Alabama/Wind Resources < Alabama Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Alabama Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

191

Florida/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida/Wind Resources Florida/Wind Resources < Florida Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Florida Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

192

Vermont/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vermont/Wind Resources Vermont/Wind Resources < Vermont Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Vermont Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

193

Wisconsin/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wisconsin/Wind Resources Wisconsin/Wind Resources < Wisconsin Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Wisconsin Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

194

Idaho/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Idaho/Wind Resources Idaho/Wind Resources < Idaho Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Idaho Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

195

Missouri/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Missouri/Wind Resources Missouri/Wind Resources < Missouri Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Missouri Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

196

Iowa/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa/Wind Resources Iowa/Wind Resources < Iowa Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Iowa Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

197

Maryland/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland/Wind Resources Maryland/Wind Resources < Maryland Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Maryland Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

198

Massachusetts/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts/Wind Resources Massachusetts/Wind Resources < Massachusetts Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Massachusetts Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

199

Minnesota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota/Wind Resources Minnesota/Wind Resources < Minnesota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Minnesota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

200

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania/Wind Resources Pennsylvania/Wind Resources < Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Pennsylvania Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hawaii/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii/Wind Resources Hawaii/Wind Resources < Hawaii Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Hawaii Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

202

Washington/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington/Wind Resources Washington/Wind Resources < Washington Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Washington Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

203

Louisiana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Louisiana/Wind Resources Louisiana/Wind Resources < Louisiana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Louisiana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

204

Oregon/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon/Wind Resources Oregon/Wind Resources < Oregon Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Oregon Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

205

Kentucky/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kentucky/Wind Resources Kentucky/Wind Resources < Kentucky Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Kentucky Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

206

Generating concise association rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Association rule mining has made many achievements in the area of knowledge discovery. However, the quality of the extracted association rules is a big concern. One problem with the quality of the extracted association rules is the huge size of the extracted ... Keywords: closed itemsets, generators, redundant association rules

Yue Xu; Yuefeng Li

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Renewable Hydrogen From Wind in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen at the site of the wind farm and transport it tothe maximum output of the wind farm, or it might be sized athydrogen produced at the wind farm to the end users. Either

Bartholomy, Obadiah

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Forum Newsletter  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Forum Newsletter Follow news from the New England Wind Forum by subscribing to its newsletter. Newsletter The New England Wind Forum Newsletter informs stakeholders of New England Wind Energy Education Project announcements, plus, events, project, siting, and policy updates. Enter your email address below to begin the registration process. After you subscribe to the New England Wind Forum Newsletter, you can choose to subscribe to other energy efficiency and renewable energy news. Archived copies of this e-newsletter are not available, but all of the news items can be found on this website under news, events, and publications. If you have ideas or news items to contribute for future issues, please contact Sustainable Energy Advantage.

209

New England Wind Forum: Building Wind Energy in New England  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Building Wind Energy in New England Many factors influence the ability to develop wind power in the New England region. A viable project requires the right site and the right technology for the application. It must provide suitable revenue or economic value to justify investment in this capital-intensive but zero-fuel technology. Policy initiatives are in place throughout the region to support the expansion of wind power's role in the regional supply mix. However, issues affecting public acceptance of wind projects in host communities must be addressed. Information on topics affecting wind power development in New England can be found by using the navigation to the left.

210

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards In July 2008, New Hampshire enacted legislation designed to prevent municipalities from adopting ordinances or regulations that place unreasonable limits or hinder the performance of wind energy systems up to 100 kilowatts (kW) in capacity. Such wind turbines must be used primarily to produce energy for on-site consumption. The law identifies a several

211

Montana/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Montana/Wind Resources < Montana Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Montana Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

212

Ohio/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Ohio/Wind Resources < Ohio Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Ohio Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

213

Small Wind Guidebook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms

214

Wind power for farms, homes, and small industry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning basic wind turbine energy conversion; wind behavior and site selection; power and energy requirements; the components of a wind energy conversion system; selecting a wind energy conversion system and system economics; and legal aspects.

Park, J.; Schwind, D.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: State Wind Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting State Wind Activities The U.S. map below summarizes Wind Powering America's state activities as of February 2010, which include Wind Working Groups, validated wind maps, anemometer loan programs, small wind guides, Wind for Schools Wind Applications Centers, exhibits, and workshops or webcasts. To read more state-specific news, click on a state. You can also view an enlarged map or print the state wind activities map. U.S. map showing Wind Powering America's activities in each state. Washington has an inactive/evolved wind working group, validated wind map, and a small wind guide. Exhibits have been displayed. Oregon has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. California has an inactive/evolved wind working group and valided wind map. Exhibits have been displayed. Idaho has an inactive/evolved wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Nevada has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Montana has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Wyoming has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Utah has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Arizona has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and exhibits have been displayed. Colorado has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. New Mexico has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and exhibits have been displayed. North Dakota has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. South Dakota has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Nebraska has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Kansas has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Oklahoma has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Texas currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Minnesota has a small wind guide. Iowa has a small wind guide and has had exhibits. Missouri has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Arkansas has a wind working group, validated wind map, and workshops or Webcasts. Lousiana currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Mississippi currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Alabama currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Georgia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Florida currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. South Carolina has a wind working group. Alaska has a wind working group, validated wind map, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Hawaii has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had exhibits. Puerto Rico has a validated wind map and a planned wind working group. Wisconsin has a wind working group, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Illinois has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Michigan has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Indiana has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Kentucky has a wind working group and a validated wind map. Tennessee has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. North Carolina has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Virginia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. West Virginia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Ohio has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Maryland has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, and an anemometer loan program. Pennsylvania has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Delaware has a validated wind map and a small wind guide. New Jersey has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Connecticut has a wind working group and a validated wind map. New York has a small wind guide. Vermont has a validated wind map and a small wind guide. Massachusetts has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had exhibits. New Hampshire has a validated wind map and small wind guide. Maine has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Rhode Island has a validated wind map and small wind guide. The U.S. Virgin Islands have a validated wind map.

216

Designing Electricity Markets with Large Shares of Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-time (RT) prices in Iowa (MEC interface), May 11­17, 2009. MISO NYISO PJM ERCOT CAISO Wind Power Capacity) and PJM have already introduced rules for mandatory real-time bidding and control of wind power

Kemner, Ken

217

The Wind Project Development Process  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Project Wind Project Development Process Developed for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory by Dale Osborn Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. September 1998 The Wind Project Development Process Site Selection Land Agreements Wind Assessment Environmental Review Economic Modeling Interconnection Studies Financing Permitting Sales Agreements Turbine Procurement Construction Contracting Operations & Maintenance Site Selection Evidence of Significant Wind Preferably Privately Owned Remote Land Proximity to Transmission Lines Reasonable Road Access Few Environmental Concerns Receptive Community Land Agreements Term: Expected Life of the Turbine Assignable Indemnification Rights Compensation: Percentage of Revenues Reclamation Provision Wind Rights, Ingress/Egress Rights, Transmission Rights

218

Mongolia wind resource assessment project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of detailed, regional wind-resource distributions and other pertinent wind resource characteristics (e.g., assessment maps and reliable estimates of seasonal, diurnal, and directional) is an important step in planning and accelerating the deployment of wind energy systems. This paper summarizes the approach and methods being used to conduct a wind energy resource assessment of Mongolia. The primary goals of this project are to develop a comprehensive wind energy resource atlas of Mongolia and to establish a wind measurement program in specific regions of Mongolia to identify prospective sites for wind energy projects and to help validate some of the wind resource estimates. The Mongolian wind resource atlas will include detailed, computerized wind power maps and other valuable wind resource characteristic information for the different regions of Mongolia.

Elliott, D.; Chadraa, B.; Natsagdorj, L.

1998-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Microsoft Word - DOE lead agency interim final and proposed rules...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

rule will encourage federal permitting agencies to engage constructively in the siting of essential transmission facilities. C. DOE Has Important New Responsibilities Under FPA...

220

Evaluation of WRF-predicted near-hub-height winds and ramp events over a Pacific Northwest site with complex terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One challenge with wind power forecasts is the accurate prediction of rapid changes in wind speed (ramps). To evaluate the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model’s ability to predict such events, model simulations, conducted over an area of ...

Qing Yang; Larry K. Berg; Mikhail Pekour; Jerome D. Fast; Rob K. Newsom; Mark Stoelinga; Catherine Finley

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Horizontal Variability in 10 m Wind Velocities as Observed at Two Prairie Sites Separated by a Distance of 7.5 km  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to assess the representativeness of mesoscale wind data because most short range pollution models assume that wind velocity will remain constant over distances in the order of 10 km. Previous observational studies have shown that ...

D. M. Leahey; M. C. Hansen; M. B. Schroeder

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Evaluation of WRF-Predicted Near-Hub-Height Winds and Ramp Events over a Pacific Northwest Site with Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One challenge with wind-power forecasts is the accurate prediction of rapid changes in wind speed (ramps). To evaluate the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model's ability to predict such events, model simulations, conducted over an area of ...

Qing Yang; Larry K. Berg; Mikhail Pekour; Jerome D. Fast; Rob K. Newsom; Mark Stoelinga; Catherine Finley

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. G. Rau, "Optimum siting of wind turbine generators," IEEEwould be expected from wind turbines at each site [1-6].the hub height of modern wind turbines. The modeled data for

Wiser, Ryan H

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Rules for Pipeline Public Utilities, Rules for Gas Service and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Rules for Pipeline Public Utilities, Rules for Gas Service and Safety (New Hampshire) Rules for Pipeline...

225

NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Wind Resource Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Information Wind Resource Information Photo of five wind turbines at the Nine Canyon Wind Project. The Nine Canyon Wind Project in Benton County, Washington, includes 37 wind turbines and 48 MW of capacity. Detailed wind resource information can be found on NREL's Wind Research Web site. This site provides access to state and international wind resource maps. Wind Integration Datasets are provided to help energy professionals perform wind integration studies and estimate power production from hypothetical wind plants. In addition, RReDC offers Meteorological Field Measurements at Potential and Actual Wind Turbine Sites and a Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United States. Wind resource maps are also available from the NREL Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Web site.

226

Wisconsin Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resources Wind Resources Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Wisconsin Wind Resources WisconsinMap.jpg Retrieved from

227

Discovering significant rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many applications, association rules will only be interesting if they represent non-trivial correlations between all constituent items. Numerous techniques have been developed that seek to avoid false discoveries. However, while all provide useful ... Keywords: association rules, rule discovery, statistics

Geoffrey I. Webb

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rules for contrast sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a technique to derive rules describing contrast sets. Contrast sets are a formalism to represent groups differences. We propose a novel approach to describe directional contrasts using rules where the contrasting effect is partitioned ... Keywords: Bonferroni adjustment, Contrast Sets, Fisher exact test, association rules

Paulo J. Azevedo

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Building Technologies Office: Process Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: Process Rule on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Process Rule on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Process Rule on Delicious Rank Building...

230

NREL: Wind Research - DOE Kicks Off Inaugural Collegiate Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version DOE Kicks Off Inaugural...

231

Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle assessment of a wind farm and related externalities. ”and onshore sited wind farms. Document number 200128,

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Small Wind Guidebook/What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need?

233

Small Wind Guidebook/What Do Wind Systems Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

What Do Wind Systems Cost What Do Wind Systems Cost < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information What Do Wind Systems Cost?

234

Wind Energy 101.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation on wind energy discusses: (1) current industry status; (2) turbine technologies; (3) assessment and siting; and (4) grid integration. There are no fundamental technical barriers to the integration of 20% wind energy into the nation's electrical system, but there needs to be a continuing evolution of transmission planning and system operation policy and market development for this to be most economically achieved.

Karlson, Benjamin; Orwig, Kirsten (NREL)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Kivalina wind generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project reported was to construct a system to harness the winds of an Arctic site to generate electricity that would power a greenhouse where fruit and vegetables could be raised for local consumption. The installation of the tower and an Enertech 4K wind generator are described. (LEW)

Aldrich, D.

1984-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mountain Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Wind Mountain Wind Jump to: navigation, search Mountain Wind is a wind farm located in Uinta County, Wyoming. It consists of 67 turbines and has a total capacity of 140.7 MW. It is owned by Edison Mission Group.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Fort Bridger, its approximate coordinates are 41.318716°, -110.386418°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.res-americas.com/wind-farms/operational-/mountain-wind-i-wind-farm.aspx Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mountain_Wind&oldid=132229" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

237

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. The Engineering ... section. I. Extreme Winds: ... II. Wind Effects on Buildings. Database ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

Wind Energy Information Guide 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The guide provides a list of contact information and Web site addresses for resources that provide a range of general and technical information about wind energy, including general information, wind and renewable energy, university programs and research institutes, international wind energy associations and others.

anon.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/RERL_Fact_Sheet_6_Wind_resource_interpretation.pdf * 1 m/s = 2.237 mph. July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research square. Figure 1 - Map of Chester wind tower site July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page average wind speeds are plotted against time. July 14, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 8

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

240

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Wind Program Commercial Wind Program Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Public Entities: $100,000 Non-Public Entities: $67,000 Program Info Funding Source Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Start Date 05/2011 Expiration Date 08/01/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on applicant type (public vs. non-public) and grant type (site assessment, feasibility study, onsite wind monitoring, acoustic studies, and business planning)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Low Wind Speed Technology Phase II: Design and Demonstration of On-Site Fabrication of Fluted-Steel Towers Using LITS-Form(TM) Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes NREL's subcontract with Native American Technologies to develop a new method of metal plate forming to produce wind turbine towers.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Category:Small Wind Guidebook Pages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidebook Pages Guidebook Pages Jump to: navigation, search This is the category containing the Small Wind Guidebook pages. Pages in category "Small Wind Guidebook Pages" The following 16 pages are in this category, out of 16 total. S Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Go Off-Grid Small Wind Guidebook/First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms Small Wind Guidebook/How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine S cont. Small Wind Guidebook/How Much Energy Will My System Generate Small Wind Guidebook/Image Library Small Wind Guidebook/Introduction Small Wind Guidebook/Is There Enough Wind on My Site Small Wind Guidebook/Is Wind Energy Practical for Me

244

Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

245

OpenEI Community - Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind for Schools Wind for Schools Portal http://en.openei.org/community/group/wind-schools-portal

Description: Project to inspire students in the United States by educating and installing wind turbines. Wind Wind for Schools Portal Mon, 23 Sep 2013 20:01:10 +0000 Rmckeel 751 at http://en.openei.org/community Renewable Energy RFPs http://en.openei.org/community/group/renewable-energy-rfps
Description: Find renewable energy financial opportunities. We post solicitations for renewable energy generation, renewable energy certificates, and green power as a courtesy to our web site visitors. Unless otherwise noted, these requests

246

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

247

Session: Offshore wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Session: Offshore wind  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Requirements for Wind Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements for Wind Development Requirements for Wind Development Requirements for Wind Development < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Oklahoma Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards In 2010, Oklahoma passed HB 2973, known as The Oklahoma Wind Energy Development Act. The bill becomes effective January 1, 2011. The Act provides sets rules for owners of wind energy facilities related to decommissioning, payments, and insurance. * Within one year of abandonment of a project, equipment from wind energy facilities must be removed and the land must be returned to its condition prior to the facility construction, except for roads. * After 15 years of operation, wind energy facility owners must file an

250

Advancements in Wind Integration Study Data Modeling: The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regional wind integration studies in the United States require detailed wind power output data at many locations to perform simulations of how the power system will operate under high-penetration scenarios. The wind data sets that serve as inputs into the study must realistically reflect the ramping characteristics, spatial and temporal correlations, and capacity factors of the simulated wind plants, as well as be time synchronized with available load profiles. The Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit described in this paper fulfills these requirements. A wind resource dataset, wind power production time series, and simulated forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model run on a nationwide 2-km grid at 5-min resolution will be made publicly available for more than 110,000 onshore and offshore wind power production sites.

Draxl, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.; Jones, W.; Searight, K.; Getman, D.; Harrold, S.; McCaa, J.; Cline, J.; Clark, C.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

West Virginia/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Virginia/Wind Resources West Virginia/Wind Resources < West Virginia Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> West Virginia Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

252

North Dakota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Dakota/Wind Resources North Dakota/Wind Resources < North Dakota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> North Dakota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

253

South Dakota/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Dakota/Wind Resources South Dakota/Wind Resources < South Dakota Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> South Dakota Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

254

New York/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York/Wind Resources New York/Wind Resources < New York Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New York Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid?

255

New Jersey/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Jersey/Wind Resources New Jersey/Wind Resources < New Jersey Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Jersey Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

256

Rhode Island/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhode Island/Wind Resources Rhode Island/Wind Resources < Rhode Island Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> Rhode Island Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

257

South Carolina/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina/Wind Resources South Carolina/Wind Resources < South Carolina Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> South Carolina Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid?

258

EERE: Wind  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy funds R&D to develop wind energy. Learn about the DOE Wind Program, how to use wind energy and get financial incentives, and access...

259

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary since energy production depends non-linearly on wind speed (U ), and wind speed observa- tions for the assessment of future long-term wind supply A. M. R. Bakker1 , B. J. J. M. Van den Hurk1 and J. P. Coelingh2 1

Haak, Hein

260

Solid Waste Management Rule (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rule (West Virginia) Rule (West Virginia) Solid Waste Management Rule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes requirements for the siting, financial assurance, installation, establishment, construction, design, groundwater monitoring, modification, operation, permitting, closure and post-closure care of any

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes requirements for the permitting siting, bonding, installation, establishment, construction, modification, and operation of any facility that generates, processes, recycles and/or disposes of sewage

262

Small Wind Guidebook/Is Wind Energy Practical for Me | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practical for Me Practical for Me < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Is Wind Energy Practical for Me?

263

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Energy Education Project  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

New England Wind Energy Education Project Conference and Workshop New England Wind Energy Education Project Conference and Workshop The New England Wind Energy Education Project (NEWEEP) held its one-day Conference and Workshop on June 7, 2011 in Marlborough, Massachusetts. The conference and workshop focused on presenting objective information relevant to issues of importance to individuals affected by wind energy proposals throughout New England. The conference was featured on the website of the Department of Energy's former Wind Powering America initiative: NEWEEP Convenes Conference and Workshop to Advance Social Acceptance of Well-Sited Wind Projects in New England: A Wind Powering America Success Story. Session I: Opening Plenary: Welcoming Remarks and Overview of New England Wind Project Development Activity

264

Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the cost of a modern wind farm, with the rest going toclose to the site of the wind farm. Other parts are smallerexcluded from China’s major wind farm projects (Kirkegaard

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Governing the Administration and Enforcement of the Fresh Water Wetlands Act (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Managemenet

266

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

267

Wind Energy Update  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Energy Update Wind Powering America January 2012 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Evolution of Commercial Wind Technology NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Small (≤100 kW) Homes Farms Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Midscale (100-1000 kW) Village Power Hybrid Systems Distributed Power Large, Land-based (1-3 MW) Utility-scale wind farms Large Distributed Power Sizes and Applications Large, Offshore (3-7 MW) Utility-scale wind farms, shallow coastal waters No U.S. installations NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Capacity & Cost Trends As of January 2012 (AWEA) 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200

268

Illinois Wind Workers Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

David G. Loomis

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Policy in New England  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Renewable Energy Portfolio Standards State Renewable Energy Funds Federal Tax Incentives and Grants Net Metering and Interconnection Standards Pollutant Emission Reduction Policies Awareness Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Policy in New England Why Incentives and Policy? Federal and state policies play an important role in encouraging wind energy development by leveling the playing field compared to other energy sources. Many of the substantial benefits of wind power as a domestic, zero-emission part of the energy portfolio - sustainability, displacement of pollutant emissions from other power sources, fuel diversity, price stabilization, keeping a substantial portion of energy expenditures in the local economy - are shared by society as a whole and cannot be readily captured by wind generators directly in the price they charge for their output. In addition, while wind power receives some policy support, the level of federal incentives for wind represents less than 1% of the subsidies and tax breaks given to the fossil fuels and nuclear industries (source: "Wind Power An Increasingly Competitive Source of New Generation." Wind Energy Weekly #1130.).

270

Rules and Regulations for Control of Ionizing Radiation (Arkansas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations for Control of Ionizing Radiation (Arkansas) Rules and Regulations for Control of Ionizing Radiation (Arkansas) Rules and Regulations for Control of Ionizing Radiation (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Health The Rules and Regulations for Control of Ionizing Radiation are the Arkansas state laws made in accordance the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission Rules. Any contractor with the US DOE or US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is exempt from the state laws. This set of rules and regulations basically restates the federal policy to ensure that Arkansas is in compliance with the federal standards governing nuclear energy. Specifically the State rules are equivalent to Nuclear Regulatory

271

Optimal refinement of rule bases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents a formal analysis of the rule refinement selection problem. There is no satisfactory methodical standard for the optimal refinement of rule bases. Current refinement systems select the best overall rule base refinements out of a ... Keywords: Rule base validation, complex gain calculation, conflicting and alternative rule refinements, evaluation of safety-critical knowledge bases, optimal refinement selection, rule refinement classes, subsumption and synergy

Hans-Werner Kelbassa

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) Electric Light and Power Rules (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider NC Utilities Commission These rules shall apply to any person, firm, or corporation (except municipalities, or agents thereof) which is now or may hereafter become engaged as a public utility in the business of furnishing electric current for domestic, commercial or industrial consumers within the State of North Carolina. The rules are intended to define good practice which can normally

273

Microsoft Word - Final Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 CFR, part 835 Docket No. HS-RM-09-835 RIN 1992-AA-45 Occupational Radiation Protection AGENCY: Office of Health, Safety and Security Department of Energy ACTION: Final Rule...

274

Protoneutron Star Winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutrino-driven winds are thought to accompany the Kelvin-Helmholtz cooling phase of nascent protoneutron stars in the first seconds after a core-collapse supernova. These outflows are a likely candidate as the astrophysical site for rapid neutron-capture nucleosynthesis (the r-process). In this chapter we review the physics of protoneutron star winds and assess their potential as a site for the production of the heavy r-process nuclides. We show that spherical transonic protoneutron star winds do not produce robust $r$-process nucleosynthesis for `canonical' neutron stars with gravitational masses of 1.4 M_sun and coordinate radii of 10 km. We further speculate on and review some aspects of neutrino-driven winds from protoneutron stars with strong magnetic fields.

Todd A. Thompson

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

New Mexico/Wind Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Mexico/Wind Resources < New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook >> New Mexico Wind Resources WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine?

276

A simulation solution of the integration of wind power into an electricity generating network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively harness the power of wind electricity generation, significant infrastructure challenges exist. First, the individual wind turbines must be sited and constructed as part of a wind farm. Second, the wind farm must be connected to the electricity ...

Thomas F. Brady

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

(FIELD) SYMMETRIZATION SELECTION RULES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QCD and QED exhibit an infinite set of three-point Green's functions that contain only OZI rule violating contributions, and (for QCD) are subleading in the large N{sub c} expansion. We prove that the QCD amplitude for a neutral hybrid {l_brace}1,3,5. . .{r_brace}{+-} exotic current to create {eta}{pi}{sup 0} only comes from OZI rule violating contributions under certain conditions, and is subleading in N{sub c}.

P. PAGE

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

New England Wind Forum: More Search Options  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT More Search Options New England Wind Forum Site...

279

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Utility-Scale Land-Based 80-Meter Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Maps & Data Maps & Data Printable Version Bookmark and Share Utility-Scale Land-Based Maps Wind Resource Potential Offshore Maps Community-Scale Maps Residential-Scale Maps Anemometer Loan Programs & Data Utility-Scale Land-Based 80-Meter Wind Maps The U.S. Department of Energy provides an 80-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource map for the United States with links to state wind maps. States, utilities, and wind energy developers use utility-scale wind resource maps to locate and quantify the wind resource, identifying potentially windy sites within a fairly large region and determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. A wind resource map of the United States. Washington wind map and resources. Oregon wind map and resources. California wind map and resources. Idaho wind map and resources. Nevada wind map and resources. Arizona wind map and resources. Utah wind map and resources. Montana wind map and resources. Wyoming wind map and resources. North Dakota wind map and resources. South Dakota wind map and resources. Nebraska wind map and resources. Colorado wind map and resources. New Mexico wind map and resources. Kansas wind map and resources. Oklahoma wind map and resources. Texas wind map and resources. Minnesota wind map and resources. Iowa wind map and resources. Missouri wind map and resources. Arkansas wind map and resources. Lousiana wind map and resources. Wisconsin wind map and resources. Michigan wind map and resources. Michigan wind map and resources. Illinois wind map and resources. Indiana wind map and resources. Ohio wind map and resources. Kentucky wind map and resources. Tennessee wind map and resources. Mississippi wind map and resources. Alabama wind map and resources. Georgia wind map and resources. Florida wind map and resources. South Carolina wind map and resources. North Carolina wind map and resources. West Virginia wind map and resources. Virginia wind map and resources. Maryland wind map and resources. Pennsylvania wind map and resources. Delaware wind map and resources. New Jersey wind map and resources. New York wind map and resources. Maine wind map and resources. Vermont wind map and resources. New Hampshire wind map and resources. Massachusetts wind map and resources. Rhode Island wind map and resources. Connecticut wind map and resources. Alaska wind map and resources. Hawaii wind map and resources.

280

Wind power: executive summary on research on network wind power over the Pacific Northwest. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research in FY80 is composed of six primary tasks. These tasks include data collection and analysis, wind flow studies around an operational wind turbine generator (WTG), kite anemometer calibration, wind flow analysis and prediction, the Klickitat County small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) program, and network wind power analysis. The data collection and analysis task consists of four sections, three of which deal with wind flow site surveys and the fourth with collecting and analyzing wind data from existing data stations.

Baker, R.W.; Hewson, E.W.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Basics and Education  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Basics and Education Wind Basics and Education Learn about wind power, the Wind for Schools project and curricula, and locate higher education and training programs. Learn about Wind Learn about how wind energy generates power; where the best wind resources are; how you can get wind power; and how and where wind energy has increased over the past decade. Wind for Schools Project Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project, which began in 2005 and ended in September 2013, worked to promote wind industry workforce development by focusing on K-12 and university educators and students to counter the trend of reduced numbers of U.S. students entering science and engineering fields. The project also raised awareness in rural America about the benefits of wind energy through wind energy curricula and on-site

282

Improved diagnostic model for estimating wind energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because wind data are available only at scattered locations, a quantitative method is needed to estimate the wind resource at specific sites where wind energy generation may be economically feasible. This report describes a computer model that makes such estimates. The model uses standard weather reports and terrain heights in deriving wind estimates; the method of computation has been changed from what has been used previously. The performance of the current model is compared with that of the earlier version at three sites; estimates of wind energy at four new sites are also presented.

Endlich, R.M.; Lee, J.D.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Offshore Wind Energy Market Overview (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the current international market conditions regarding offshore wind, including the breakdown of installation costs, how to reduce costs, and the physical siting considerations considered when planning offshore wind construction. The presentation offers several examples of international existing and planned offshore wind farm sites and compares existing international offshore resources with U.S. resources. The presentation covers future offshore wind trends and cites some challenges that the United States must overcome before it will be able to fully develop offshore wind sites.

Baring-Gould, I.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Reliable representations for association rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Association rule mining has contributed to many advances in the area of knowledge discovery. However, the quality of the discovered association rules is a big concern and has drawn more and more attention recently. One problem with the quality of the ... Keywords: Association rule mining, Closed itemsets, Data mining agents, Knowledge discovery, Redundant association rules

Yue Xu; Yuefeng Li; Gavin Shaw

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms Small Wind Guidebook/Glossary of Terms < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

286

Small Wind Guidebook/State Information Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Portal Information Portal < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF Print Full Version WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home OpenEI Home >> Wind >> Small Wind Guidebook WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal

287

PHYSICS DEPARTMENT RULES EVERYONE MUST KNOW  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PHYSICS DEPARTMENT RULES EVERYONE MUST KNOW - December 2012 PHYSICS DEPARTMENT RULES EVERYONE MUST KNOW - December 2012 All individuals performing work at BNL are required to obtain a guest or permanent appointment before beginning work. Radioactive materials, chemicals, and equipment may not be brought into the Department without prior notification. All Employees must take General Employee Training (GET), Stop Work Training, Emergency Planning and Response Training, Environmental Protection Training, Cyber Security Training, Security Program and Responsibilities for New Employees Training, and a Department Specific Briefing. All Guests and Visitors working at BNL must take the Guest Site Orientation, Cyber Security Training (if access to computer networks is required) and a Department Specific Briefing.

288

NEWTON: Rules of Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rules of Science Rules of Science Name: Steven Status: other Grade: 12+ Location: WA Country: USA Date: Spring 2012 Question: What are the hard-and-fast rules of science? Are there any? How does science avoid becoming fiction? Replies: Interesting question. Since the question posed refers to some generic 'science', I would offer these few thoughts.... Science (to me) involves careful, precise observation of some natural or man-made phenomenon, accurately and objectively capturing the observation, honestly and objectively sharing of the captured data, fair and objective analysis of the captured data, and fair, honest, and objective efforts to test and thereby replicate the data in the interest of adding the gathered information to the ever-growing body of gathered, analyzed, tested and replicated knowledge we accept as the nearest thing to "fact" we know. Collection of the observed components of the phenomenon with integrity can help us to make predictions of future similar and dissimilar events

289

Chapter 52 Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules (Kentucky) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 52 Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules (Kentucky) Chapter 52 Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules (Kentucky) Chapter 52 Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Kentucky Department for Environmental Protection Kentucky Administrative Regulation Chapter 52, entitled Air Quality: Permits, Registrations, and Prohibitory Rules, is promulgated under the authority of the Division of Air Quality within the Energy and Environment Cabinet's Department for Environmental Protection. Chapter 52 outlines the permitting requirements for all air pollution sources within the state;

290

NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) NPDES Rule for Coal Mining Facilities (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This rule establishes requirements implementing the powers, duties, and responsibilities of State's Water Pollution Control Act with respect to all

291

Wind Resource Assessment Overview | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Assessment Overview Wind Resource Assessment Overview Jump to: navigation, search Maps.jpg The first step in developing a wind project is to locate and quantify the wind resource. The magnitude of the wind and the characteristics of the resource are the largest factors in determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. There are three basic steps to identifying and characterizing the wind resource: prospecting, validating, and micrositing. The process of locating sites for wind energy development is similar to exploration for other resources, such as minerals and petroleum. Thus, the term prospecting is often used to describe the identification and preliminary evaluation of a wind resource area. Prospecting includes identifying potentially windy sites within a fairly large region - such

292

Solar and Wind Rights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Wind Rights and Wind Rights Solar and Wind Rights < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government General Public/Consumer Industrial Local Government Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Provider Public Service Commission of Wisconsin Wisconsin has several laws that protect a resident's right to install and operate a solar or wind energy system. These laws cover zoning restrictions by local governments, private land use restrictions, and system owner rights to unobstructed access to resources. Wisconsin permitting rules and model policy for small wind can be found [http://dsireusa.org/incentives/incentive.cfm?Incentive_Code=WI16R&re=1&ee=1

293

Hydropower: Setting a Course for Our Energy Future. Wind and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aim to identify potential sites and partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program - Harnessing America's abundant natural resources...

295

Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations (Arkansas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commission General Rules and Regulations (Arkansas) Commission General Rules and Regulations (Arkansas) Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Natural Resources The Oil and Gas Commission General Rules and Regulations are the body of rules and regulations that relate to natural gas production in Arkansas. The statutory law is found Arkansas Code Annotated Title 15 chapter 72. Contained in this summary are the rules and regulations most relevant to

296

Wind Class Sampling of Satellite SAR Imagery for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution wind fields retrieved from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are combined for mapping of wind resources offshore where site measurements are costly and sparse. A new sampling strategy for the SAR scenes is ...

Merete Badger; Jake Badger; Morten Nielsen; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Alfredo Peña

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wind Speeds at Heights Crucial for Wind Energy: Measurements and Verification of Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speed measurements from one year from meteorological towers and wind turbines at heights between 20 and 250 m for various European sites are analyzed and are compared with operational short-term forecasts of the global ECMWF model. The ...

Susanne Drechsel; Georg J. Mayr; Jakob W. Messner; Reto Stauffer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

EIA: Wind  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technical information and data on the wind energy industry from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

299

WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Map of Chester wind tower site April 11, 2007 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory Page 5 UniversityWIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 ­ February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology April 11, 2007 Report template version 3.1 Renewable Energy Research Laboratory University

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

300

NREL: Wind Research - New England Offshore Wind Advances on Several...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version New England Offshore Wind Advances on Several Fronts January 14, 2013 At the end of 2012, New England's first two...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Wind Energy Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy ...  

Site Map; Printable Version; Share this resource. Send a link to Wind Energy Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy Innovation Portalto someone by E-mail

302

Calvert County - Wind Ordinance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Information Maryland Program Type Siting & Permitting Zoning regulations for wind power systems Maryland What We Do For You Month by month the clean energy economy...

303

Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space...

304

Distributed Wind Market Applications  

SciTech Connect

Distributed wind energy systems provide clean, renewable power for on-site use and help relieve pressure on the power grid while providing jobs and contributing to energy security for homes, farms, schools, factories, private and public facilities, distribution utilities, and remote locations. America pioneered small wind technology in the 1920s, and it is the only renewable energy industry segment that the United States still dominates in technology, manufacturing, and world market share. The series of analyses covered by this report were conducted to assess some of the most likely ways that advanced wind turbines could be utilized apart from large, central station power systems. Each chapter represents a final report on specific market segments written by leading experts in this field. As such, this document does not speak with one voice but rather a compendium of different perspectives, which are documented from a variety of people in the U.S. distributed wind field.

Forsyth, T.; Baring-Gould, I.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Wind Resource Map: Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Map: Mexico Wind Resource Map: Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Resource Map: Mexico Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.altestore.com/howto/Reference-Materials/Wind-Resource-Map-Mexico/a Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-resource-map-mexico,http://clean Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is on-shore wind resource map for rural power applications in Mexico. The map can be used to aid in appropriate siting of wind power installations. Please note that the wind speed classes are taken at 30 m (100 feet [ft]), instead of the usual 10 m (33 ft). Each wind power class should span two power densities. For example, Wind Power Class = 3

306

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps Residential-Scale 30-Meter Wind Maps The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 30-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource maps for the United States. Businesses, farms, and homeowners use residential-scale wind resource maps to identify wind sites that may be appropriate for small-scale wind projects. A wind resource map of the United States. Go to the California wind resource map. Go to the Washington wind resource map. Go to the Oregon wind resource map. Go to the Idaho wind resource map. Go to the Nevada wind resource map. Go to the Montana wind resource map. Go to the Wyoming wind resource map. Go to the Utah wind resource map. Go to the Colorado wind resource map. Go to the Arizona wind resource map. Go to the New Mexico wind resource map. Go to the North Dakota wind resource map. Go to the South Dakota wind resource map. Go to the Nebraska wind resource map. Go to the Kansas wind resource map. Go to the Oklahoma wind resource map. Go to the Texas wind resource map. Go to the Minnesota wind resource map. Go to the Iowa wind resource map. Go to the Missouri wind resource map. Go to the Arkansas wind resource map. Go to the Louisiana wind resource map. Go to the Wisconsin wind resource map. Go to the Illinois wind resource map. Go to the Indiana wind resource map. Go to the Michigan wind resource map. Go to the Ohio wind resource map. Go to the Kentucky wind resource map. Go to the Tennessee wind resource map. Go to the Mississippi wind resource map. Go to the Alabama wind resource map. Go to the Florida wind resource map. Go to the Georgia wind resource map. Go to the South Carolina wind resource map. Go to the North Carolina wind resource map. Go to the Virginia wind resource map. Go to the West Virginia wind resource map. Go to the Pennsylvania wind resource map. Go to the Maryland wind resource map. Go to the Delaware wind resource map. Go to the New Jersey wind resource map. Go to the New York wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Alaska wind resource map. Go to the Hawaii wind resource map.

307

Test application of a semi-objective approach to wind forecasting for wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

The test application of the semi-objective (S-O) wind forecasting technique at three locations is described. The forecasting sites are described as well as site-specific forecasting procedures. Verification of the S-O wind forecasts is presented, and the observed verification results are interpreted. Comparisons are made between S-O wind forecasting accuracy and that of two previous forecasting efforts that used subjective wind forecasts and model output statistics. (LEW)

Wegley, H.L.; Formica, W.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Small Wind Guidebook/Introduction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Introduction Introduction < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Introduction Can I use wind energy to power my home? This question is being asked across

309

Wind Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry http://energy.gov/eere/articles/two-facilities-one-goal-advancing-america-s-wind-industry wind-industry" class="title-link">Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry

310

Using a new characterization of turbulent wind for accurate correlation of wind turbine response with wind speed  

SciTech Connect

The turbulence encountered by a point on a rotating wind turbine blade has characteristics that in some important respects are different from those measured by a stationary anemometer. The conventional one-peaked continuous spectrum becomes, broadly, a two-peaked spectrum that in addition contains a set of narrow-band spikes of turbulence energy, one centered on the frequency of rotor rotation and the others centered on multiples of that frequency. The rotational sampling effect on wind spectra is quantified using measurements of wind velocity by anemometers on stationary crosswind circular arrays. Characteristics of fluctuating wind are compared to measured fluctuations of bending moments of the rotor blades and power output fluctuations of a horizontal-axis wind turbine at the same site. The wind characteristics and the correlations between wind fluctuations and wind turbine fluctuations provide a basis for improving turbine design, siting, and control. 6 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Connell, J.R.; George, R.L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Solid Waste Management Rules (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These rules establish procedures and standards to protect public health and the environment by ensuring the safe, proper, and sustainable management of solid waste in Vermont. The rules apply to...

312

EU approves food labeling rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New food-labeling regulations are in place in the European Union after the European Parliament (EP) approved rules aimed at helping consumers make “better informed, healthier [sic] choices.” EU approves food labeling rules Inform Magazine Inform Archives

313

Nepal: Beyond Royal Rule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report N°99, Towards a Lasting Peace in Nepal: The Constitutional Issues, 15 June 2005. In the months following the 2005 coup, international pressure had some effect. Most notably, it left the royal government in an awkward limbo -- prevented from... "King cuts civil service reservations for indigenous peoples", Weekly Indigenous News, 26 August 2005, available at http://us.oneworld.net. 11 "Parties should be declared anti-national", The Kathmandu Post, 3 July 2005. Nepal: Beyond Royal Rule...

International Crisis Group

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Transportation Rule Technical Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI initiated this project as part of an industry effort to seek regulatory relief for two low-level waste (LLW) transportation container rules that the industry perceived as overly conservative. This report presents the technical arguments for regulatory change developed by the EPRI project team. EPRI, through the cooperation of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), is in the process of bringing these two technical arguments forward to the various regulatory agencies.

2002-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

315

ERCOT Wind Scraper | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ERCOT Wind Scraper Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: ERCOT Wind Scraper Agency/Company /Organization: Prof. Mack Grady, Baylor University Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: web.ecs.baylor.edu/faculty/grady/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Community Generated ERCOT Wind Scraper Screenshot References: W. Mack Grady[1] ERCOT Wind Scraper retrieves, displays, and logs minute-by-minute system generation, load, and wind generation from ERCOT's public web site. ERCOT Wind Scraper retrieves, displays, and logs minute-by-minute system generation, load, and wind generation from ERCOT's public web site. Instructions are included in a zipped file along with the program.

316

New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project - Newsletter #6 - September 2010, (NEWF), Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

6 - September 2010 6 - September 2010 WIND AND WATER POWER PROGRAM PIX 16204 New England and Northeast Look to the Horizon...and Beyond, for Offshore Wind In early December, Boston hosted the American Wind Energy Association's second annual Offshore Wind Project Workshop. U.S. and European offshore wind stakeholders convened to discuss the emerging U.S. offshore wind industry and provided evidence of a significant increase in activity along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to Maine. The wind power industry and policymakers are looking to offshore for long-term growth, driven by aggressive policy goals, economic develop- ment opportunities, a finite set of attractive land-based wind sites, and immense wind energy potential at a modest distance from major population centers.

317

Distributed Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Distributed Wind Distributed Wind Jump to: navigation, search Distributed wind energy systems provide clean, renewable power for on-site use and help relieve pressure on the power grid while providing jobs and contributing to energy security for homes, farms, schools, factories, private and public facilities, distribution utilities, and remote locations.[1] Resources Clean Energy States Alliance. (2010). State-Based Financing Tools to Support Distributed and Community Wind Projects. Accessed September 27, 2013. This guide reviews the financing role that states, and specifically state clean energy funds, have played and can play in supporting community and distributed wind projects. Clean Energy States Alliance. (May 2010). Supporting Onsite Distributed Wind Generation Projects. Accessed September 27, 2013.

318

Assessment of Tall Wind Tower Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technologies that enable wind turbines to capture more energy at a given site have the potential to reduce the overall cost of energy, thereby making wind power more competitive against conventional power generation. Because wind speed generally increases with height above ground, one way to increase energy capture is to elevate the rotor by means of a taller tower. To exploit this potential, a number of tall tower models are under development or have recently been introduced to the wind energy market. I...

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

319

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

320

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Eligibility...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Haxtun Wind Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Haxtun Wind Project Haxtun Wind Project Haxtun Wind Project November 13, 2013 - 10:45am Addthis The Haxtun Wind project in Phillips County, Colorado, is a community-owned 30 megawatt wind farm. The U.S. Department of Energy provided more than $2.5 million in funding for this Community Renewable Energy Deployment (CommRE) project. Wind Farm Phillips County is located in northeastern Colorado. The Haxtun Wind CommRE project will consist of up to 20 turbines located on more than 9,200 acres just south of the town of Haxtun, Colorado, and will tie into the grid at the existing Haxtun substation with few additional improvements needed. To ensure success, the Haxtun Wind project needs to be located on a site with a good wind resource, accessible transmission, a supportive community,

322

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Makarov, Y. , 2007: Wind Integration Issues and So- lutionsexpectations, and integration strategy for any wind powerwind climate and variability. Site design and operation, as well as market integration

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Status of the large wind turbine handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The site-selection strategy presented here and in the LWH is conservative, partially because utilities are conservative. They should be. The large-scale generation of electricity by wind turbine generators is an unproven technology. It is assumed that wind characteristics at a site will have to be thoroughly documented. This is because the nature of the wind at the site not only governs the energy output of the WECS farm, but also affects the service life of the wind equipment and both scheduled and unscheduled maintenance costs. Perhaps as experience is gained, the site-selection process can be simplified. Certain steps may be found unnecessary, or requirements on the quantity and quality of wind data collected at each step may be relaxed; however, at this stage of wind energy development, a conservative approach seems prudent.

Heister, T. R.; Pennell, W. T.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative September 26, 2013 - 5:50pm Addthis Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative A train carrying wind turbine components arrives in Alaska. The components were then transported to the Eva Creek Wind Farm site. | Photo courtesy of Golden Valley Electric Association A train carrying wind turbine components arrives in Alaska. The components were then transported to the Eva Creek Wind Farm site. | Photo courtesy of Golden Valley Electric Association Wind turbine blades are transported up the 10-mile-long, narrow dirt road to the Eva Creek Wind Farm site. | Photo courtesy of Golden Valley Electric Association

325

Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines.

326

NREL: Wind Research - U.S. Department of Energy, Wind Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version U.S. Department of...

327

Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind Atlas Data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): The wind climate of Ireland has been calculated using the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model KAMM using the statistical-dynamical method. The large-scale climatology is represented by 65 classes of geostropic wind. From the frequency of the classes and the simulations the climatology of the surface wind is determined. The simulated winds are processed similar to observed data to obtain LIB-files for the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program WAsP. Comparisons are made with mast observations which have been analyzed by WAsP. Sites with high wind power potential are well predicted. Stations with low power are over predicted. (Purpose): Article describing an example of a KAMM

328

Small Wind Guidebook/Image Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Image Library Image Library < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information *Capacity-10 kilowatts *Turbine manufacturer-Bergey Windpower Company

329

Low-Level Trade Winds Over the Western Coral Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the trade wind season, the wind over the western Coral Sea is highly coherent over very long distances (at least 1000 km). At any site, the wind direction changes little with time, while the wind speed varies with period of 7–15 days. The ...

Eric Wolanski

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers (presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are: (1) Analyze wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites for diverse areas in the central plains (Texas to North Dakota)--Turbines hub heights are now 70-100 m above ground and Wind measurements at 70-100+ m have been rare. (2) Present conclusions about wind shear characteristics for prime wind energy development regions.

Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) Budget Permits (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State Michigan Program Type Siting and Permitting Michigan implements the federal requirements of the Clean Air Interstate Rule (CAIR) through state regulations. Michigan's Rule 821 requires subject sources to obtain and operate in compliance with a CAIR Annual NOx Budget

332

Natural Gas Rules (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules (North Carolina) Rules (North Carolina) Natural Gas Rules (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider North Carolina Utilities Commission These rules apply to any gas utility operating within the State of North Carolina under the jurisdiction of the North Carolina Utilities Commission and also to interstate natural gas companies having pipeline facilities located in North Carolina insofar as safety is concerned. These rules are intended to promote safe and adequate service to the public, to provide standards for uniform and reasonable practices by utilities, and to establish a basis for determining the reasonableness of such demands as may

333

Session: Wind industry project development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This first session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a question and answer period. The session was intended to provide a general overview of wind energy product development, from the industry's perspective. Tom Gray of AWEA presented a paper titled ''State of the Wind Energy Industry in 2004'', highlighting improved performance and lower cost, efforts to address avian impacts, a status of wind energy in comparison to other energy-producing sources, and ending on expectations for the near future. Sam Enfield of Atlantic Renewable Energy Corporation presented a paper titled ''Key Factors for Consideration in Wind Plant Siting'', highlighting factors that wind facility developers must consider when choosing a site to build wind turbines and associated structures. Factors covered include wind resources available, ownership and land use patterns, access to transmission lines, accessibility and environmental impacts. The question and answer sum mary included topics related to risk taking, research and development, regulatory requirements, and dealing with utilities.

Gray, Tom; Enfield, Sam

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest  

SciTech Connect

Wind power production is variable, but also has diurnal and seasonal patterns. These patterns differ between sites, potentially making electric power from some wind sites more valuable for meeting customer loads or selling in wholesale power markets. This paper investigates whether the timing of wind significantly affects the value of electricity from sites in California and the Northwestern United States. We use both measured and modeled wind data and estimate the time-varying value of wind power with both financial and load-based metrics. We find that the potential difference in wholesale market value between better-correlated and poorly correlated wind sites is modest, on the order of 5-10 percent. A load-based metric, power production during the top 10 percent of peak load hours, varies more strongly between sites, suggesting that the capacity value of different wind projects could vary by as much as 50 percent based on the timing of wind alone.

Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H; Fripp, Matthias

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Naval Station Newport Naval Station Newport Wind Resource Assessment A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites, and The Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center Robi Robichaud, Jason Fields, and Joseph Owen Roberts Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52801 February 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Naval Station Newport

336

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Rural Rural Communities Printable Version Bookmark and Share Agricultural & Rural Farm Bill Outreach Articles Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, & Businesses Wind Farms Resources & Tools Native Americans Wind for Homeowners, Farmers, and Businesses Wind Powering America produced Small Wind Electric Systems Consumer's Guides to help homeowners, ranchers, and small businesses decide if wind energy will work for them. A Small Wind Guidebook is available for each state and answers these questions. Is wind energy practical for me? What size wind turbine do I need? What are the basic parts of a small wind electric system? What do wind systems cost? Where can I find installation and maintenance support? How much energy will my system generate? Is there enough wind on my site?

337

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at wind energy sites are becoming paramount. Regime-switching space-time (RST) models merge meteorological forecast regimes at the wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime

Washington at Seattle, University of

338

Wind Farm Recommendation Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and INL’s rights and responsibilities in regards to access to the wind farm once constructed. An expression of interest is expected to go out soon to developers. However, with the potential of 2 years of study remaining for Site 6, the expectation of obtaining meaningful interest from developers should be questioned.

John Reisenauer

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Novel Rule Ordering Approach in Classification Association Rule Mining  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A Classification Association Rule (CAR), a common type of mined knowledge in Data Mining, describes an implicative co-occurring relationship between a set of binary-valued data-attributes (items) and a pre-defined class, expressed in the form of an “antecedent ? consequent-class ” rule. Classification Association Rule Mining (CARM) is a recent Classification Rule Mining (CRM) approach that builds an Association Rule Mining (ARM) based classifier using CARs. Regardless of which particular methodology is used to build it, a classifier is usually presented as an ordered CAR list, based on an applied rule ordering strategy. Five existing rule ordering mechanisms can be identified: (1) Confidence-Support-size_of_Antecedent (CSA), (2) size_of_Antecedent-Confidence-Support (ACS), (3) Weighted Relative Accuracy (WRA), (4) Laplace Accuracy, and (5) ? 2 Testing. In this paper, we divide the above mechanisms into two groups: (i) pure “support-confidence ” framework like, and (ii) additive score assigning like. We consequently propose a hybrid rule ordering approach by combining one approach taken from (i) and another approach taken from (ii). The experimental results show that the proposed rule ordering approach performs well with respect to the accuracy of classification.

Yanbo J. Wang; Qin Xin; Frans Coenen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Rule-Based Framework for Gene Regulation Pathways Discovery  

SciTech Connect

We present novel approach to discover the rules that govern gene regulation mechanisms. The method is based on supervised machine learning and is designed to reveal relationships between transcription factors and gene promoters. As the representation of the gene regulatory circuit we have chosen a special form of IF-THEN rules associating certain features (a generalized idea of a Transcription Factor Binding Site) in gene promoters with specific gene expression profiles.

Wilczynski, B; Hvidsten, T; Kryshtafovych, A; Stubbs, L; Komorowski, J; Fidelis, K

2003-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. Description/Summary: The Building and Fire Research Laboratory has an ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

342

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps Community-Scale 50-Meter Wind Maps The Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach initiative provides 50-meter (m) height, high-resolution wind resource maps for most of the states and territories of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands in the United States. Counties, towns, utilities, and schools use community-scale wind resource maps to locate and quantify the wind resource, identifying potentially windy sites determining a potential site's economic and technical viability. Map of the updated wind resource assessment status for the United States. Go to the Washington wind resource map. Go to the Oregon wind resource map. Go to the California wind resource map. Go to the Nevada wind resource map. Go to the Idaho wind resource map. Go to the Utah wind resource map. Go to the Arizona wind resource map. Go to the Montana wind resource map. Go to the Wyoming wind resource map. Go to the Colorado wind resource map. Go to the New Mexico wind resource map. Go to the North Dakota wind resource map. Go to the South Dakota wind resource map. Go to the Nebraska wind resource map. Go to the Kansas wind resource map. Go to the Oklahoma wind resource map. Go to the Missouri wind resource map. Go to the Alaska wind resource map. Go to the Hawaii wind resource map. Go to the Michigan wind resource map. Go to the Illinois wind resource map. Go to the Indiana wind resource map. Go to the Ohio wind resource map. Go to the North Carolina wind resource map. Go to the Virginia wind resource map. Go to the Maryland wind resource map. Go to the West Virginia wind resource map. Go to the Pennsylvania wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Kentucky wind resource map. Go to the Tennessee wind resource map. Go to the Arkansas wind resource map. Go to the Puerto Rico wind resource map. Go to the U.S. Virgin Islands wind resource map. Go to the New Jersey wind resource map. Go to the Delaware wind resource map.

343

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Regional Wind Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Regional Activities Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting Regional Wind Activities Learn more about regional activities in New England. New England Wind Forum The New England Wind Forum has its own website with information particular to the region and its own unique circumstances. Find regional events, news, projects, and information about wind technology, economics, markets for wind energy, siting considerations, policies and public acceptance issues as they all pertain to the New England region. The site was launched in 2005 to provide a single comprehensive source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. Contacts | Website Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov Content Last Updated: 9/2

345

EPA Final Ground Water Rule  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Office of Nuclear Safety and Environment Nuclear Safety and Environment Information Brief HS-20-IB-2007-02 (March 2007) EPA Final Ground Water Rule Safe Drinking Water Act: National Primary Drinking Water Regulations Ground Water Rule - 40 CFR Parts 9, 141 and 142 Final Rule: 71 FR 65574 Effective Date: January 8, 2007 1 RULE SYNOPSIS On November 8, 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published a final Ground Water Rule (GWR) to promote increased protection against microbial pathogens that may be present in public water systems (PWSs) that use ground water sources for their supply (these systems are known as ground water systems). This Rule establishes a risk-targeted approach

346

Process Rule | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process Rule Process Rule Process Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a formal effort between 1995 and 1996 to improve the process it used to develop appliance efficiency standards. This effort involved many different stakeholders, including manufacturers, energy-efficiency advocates, trade associations, state agencies, utilities, and other interested parties. The result was the publication of the Process Rule: 61 FR 36974 (July 15, 1996). Found in the Code of Federal Regulations at 10 CFR 430 Appendix A to Subpart C, the Process Rule describes the procedures, interpretations, and policies that guide DOE in establishing new or revised energy-efficiency standards for consumer products. Elements of the Process Rule have been superseded or supplemented by more recent practices described elsewhere on

347

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

348

Wind resource assessment and wind energy system cost analysis: Fort Huachuca, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this joint DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project is to determine whether wind turbines can reduce costs by providing power to US military facilities in high wind areas. In support of this objective, one year of data on the wind resources at several Fort Huachuca sites was collected. The wind resource data were analyzed and used as input to an economic study for a wind energy installation at Fort Huachuca. The results of this wind energy feasibility study are presented in the report.

Olsen, T.L. [Tim Olsen Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Proposed Rules Federal Register  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21813 21813 Vol. 76, No. 75 Tuesday, April 19, 2011 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 429 [Docket Number: EERE-2010-BT-CE-0014] RIN 1904-AC23 Energy Conservation Program: Certification, Compliance, and Enforcement for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the ''Department'') proposes to amend the compliance dates for revisions to its certification, compliance, and enforcement regulations for certain commercial and industrial equipment covered under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended (EPCA or the ''Act''). Specifically, DOE is tentatively proposing an 18-month extension to the

350

Underground Injection Control Rule (Vermont)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This rule regulates injection wells, including wells used by generators of hazardous or radioactive wastes, disposal wells within an underground source of drinking water, recovery of geothermal...

351

2007 Solar Decathlon Rules and Regulations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Decathlon Rules and Regulations Solar Decathlon Rules and Regulations Number of Pages Date of Last Revision Primary Documents Overview 7 pages February 16, 2007 Definitions 4 pages February 16, 2007 Competition Regulations 23 pages February 16, 2007 The Contests 2 pages February 16, 2007 Contest 1: Architecture 2 pages May 3, 2006 Drawings and Specifications Contest Activity Details 7 pages February 16, 2007 Contest 2: Engineering 2 pages February 16, 2007 Energy Analysis Contest Activity Details 3 pages February 16, 2007 Contest 3: Market Viability 2 pages February 16, 2007 Economic Analysis Contest Activity Details 6 pages February 16, 2007 Contest 4: Communications 2 pages February 16, 2007 Web Site Contest Activity Details 6 pages February 16, 2007 Contest 5: Comfort Zone

352

New England Wind Forum: Historic Wind Development in New England: More New  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

More New England Wind Farms More New England Wind Farms Since Crotched Mountain, six additional wind farms have been installed to date in New England. The performance of New England wind farms has generally mirrored the performance of wind farms elsewhere, i.e., a slow start followed by rapid improvement. Original wind farm on Equinox Mountain, circa 1982. Photo courtesy of Endless Energy Corporation. Click on the image to view a larger version. Original wind farm on Equinox Mountain, circa 1982. Equinox Mountain, VT The four WTG turbines installed in 1981 and 1982 at Equinox Mountain, VT, comprised one of the first wind farm installations in the United States. These early turbines, which suffered mechanical issues (including blade throws), were subsequently removed, but Equinox Mountain continued to receive attention as a wind power site (see below).

353

Environmental data for sites in the National Solar Data Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following data are presented for 38 sites in the National Solar Data Newtork: insolation, temperature, wind, and humidity. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Toward Objective, Standardized Intensity Estimates from Surface Wind Speed Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme wind climatology and event-specific intensity assessments rely heavily on surface wind field observations. The most widely used platforms sited at airports are the Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) and its predecessor, the ...

Forrest J. Masters; Peter J. Vickery; Phuong Bacon; Edward N. Rappaport

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

NREL: Wind Research - Towns throughout New England Acting to...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towns throughout New England Acting to Exert Local Control over Wind Siting January 14, 2013 In recent months, towns across New England have grappled with the issue of local wind...

356

Wind Shear Characteristics at Central Plains Tall Towers: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing the wind shear characteristics at tall tower sites in the Central Plains of the United States.

Schwartz, M.; Elliott, D.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

SeaWest WindPower Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

92108-4310 Sector Services, Wind energy Product SeaWest is a turnkey developer of wind power plants. Their services include consultancy on the market viability, site and...

358

First wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Work crews began to erect the first of five wind turbines that will make up the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP). The first wind turbine blade was delivered to the site...

359

Federal Wind Energy Assistance through NREL (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL assists with wind resource assessment and development activities initiated by federal agencies to facilitate distributed renewable energy projects at federal agency sites. This brief outlines the process for requesting NREL assistance with federal wind energy projects.

Not Available

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Maine coast winds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maine Coast Winds Project was proposed for four possible turbine locations. Significant progress has been made at the prime location, with a lease-power purchase contract for ten years for the installation of turbine equipment having been obtained. Most of the site planning and permitting have been completed. It is expect that the turbine will be installed in early May. The other three locations are less suitable for the project, and new locations are being considered.

Avery, Richard

2000-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wind Turbine Lubrication Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rush to develop todays massive wind energy sites, more attention should be paid to the inevitable need to perform routine maintenance and develop practical means of assessing the condition of the components within the nacelles and other outside support equipment for the wind farms. Current operating models have not adequately established accurate assumptions or expectations on the unavailability of the windmills and the impact on lost generation. Contracts for purchase of their generation output...

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

363

Wind News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters http://energy.gov/eere/articles/new-report-shows-trend-toward-larger-offshore-wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects" class="title-link">New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters

364

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains,...

365

Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model  

SciTech Connect

In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Clean Air Mercury Rule  

SciTech Connect

Coming into force on July 15, 2005, the US Clean Air Mercury Rule will use a market-based cap-and-trade approach under Section 111 of the Clean Air Act to reduce mercury emissions from the electric power sector. This article provides a comprehensive summary of the new rule. 14 refs., 2 tabs.

Michael Rossler [Edison Electric Institute, Washington, DC (US)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Reactive rules on the web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive rules are used for programming rule-based, reactive systems, which have the ability to detect events and respond to them automatically in a timely manner. Such systems are needed on the Web for bridging the gap between the existing, passive ...

Bruno Berstel; Philippe Bonnard; François Bry; Michael Eckert; Paula-Lavinia P?trânjan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Wind power is a rapidly growing con-tributor to worldwide energy supplies and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the U.S., represent- ing nearly one-third of the total installed wind energy capacity in the country for wind turbine siting and wind source prediction. Ironically, PPM has hired 3TIER to provide wind energy and operates wind farms in Ireland, Scotland, England, Wales and the United States. With the recent extension

370

Network Wind Power Over the Pacific Northwest. Progress Report, October 1979-September 1980.  

SciTech Connect

The research in FY80 is composed of six primary tasks. These tasks include data collection and analysis, wind flow studies around an operational wind turbine generator (WTG), kite anemometer calibration, wind flow analysis and prediction, the Klickitat County small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) program, and network wind power analysis. The data collection and analysis task consists of four sections, three of which deal with wind flow site surveys and the fourth with collecting and analyzing wind data from existing data stations. This report also includes an appendix which contains mean monthly wind speed data summaries, wind spectrum summaries, time series analysis plots, and high wind summaries.

Baker, Robert W.; Hewson, E. Wendell

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Small Wind Guidebook/For More Information < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site?

372

Towns across Massachusetts are considering wind power, not only because it is one of the cleanest,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy captured from the wind and electricity produced. The quality of a wind site depends on may things of the wind and create turbulence. Turbulence reduces the amount of energy that can be captured and can Power: Siting in Communities Wind Power on the Community Scale Renewable Energy Research Laboratory

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

373

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Small Wind Turbine Applications: Current Practice in Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous small wind turbines are being used by homeowners in Colorado. Some of these installations are quite recent while others date back to the federal tax-credit era of the early 1980s. Through visits with small wind turbine owners in Colorado, I have developed case studies of six small wind energy applications focusing on the wind turbine technology, wind turbine siting, the power systems and electric loads, regulatory issues, and motivations about wind energy. These case studies offer a glimpse into the current state-of-the-art of small-scale wind energy and provide some insight into issues affecting development of a wider market.

Green, J.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Technology  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power Technology Wind Power Technology Modern wind turbines have become sophisticated power plants while the concept of converting wind energy to electrical energy remains quite simple. Follow these links to learn more about the science behind wind turbine technology. Wind Power Animation An image of a scene from the wind power animation. The animation shows how moving air rotates a wind turbine's blades and describes how the internal components work to produce electricity. It shows small and large wind turbines and the differences between how they are used, as stand alone or connected to the utility grid. How Wind Turbines Work Learn how wind turbines make electricity; what are the types, sizes, and applications of wind turbines; and see an illustration of the components inside a wind turbine.

376

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Assessment Wind Resource Assessment A map of the United States is color-coded to indicate the high winds at 80 meters. This map shows the wind resource at 80 meters for both land-based and offshore wind resources in the United States. Correct estimation of the energy available in the wind can make or break the economics of wind plant development. Wind mapping and validation techniques developed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) along with collaborations with U.S. companies have produced high-resolution maps of the United States that provide wind plant developers with accurate estimates of the wind resource potential. State Wind Maps International Wind Resource Maps Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Due to the existence of special use airspace (SUA) (i.e., military airspace

377

Balancing of Wind Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the future, renewable energy share, especially wind power share, in electricity generation is expected to increase. Due to nature of the wind, wind… (more)

Ülker, Muhammed Akif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Wind-Stress Coefficients at Light Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of the wind-stress coefficient with wind velocity was found to start with winds as light as 3 m s?1, below which, following the formula for aerodynamically smooth flows, the wind-stress coefficient decreases as the wind velocity ...

Jin Wu

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, Seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other Than State-Owned Marine Waters (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Mississippi Development Authority The Rules and Regulations Governing Geophysical, seismic or Other Type Exploration on State-Owned Lands Other than State-Owned Marine Waters is applicable to the Natural Gas Sector and the Coal with CCS Sector. This law

380

Rule of Tennessee Department of Conservation Division of Surface Mining  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rule of Tennessee Department of Conservation Division of Surface Rule of Tennessee Department of Conservation Division of Surface Mining (Tennessee) Rule of Tennessee Department of Conservation Division of Surface Mining (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Retail Supplier Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Division of Surface Mining, under the authority of the Department of Environment and Conservation, has established rules specific to the mining of coal. All coal mining operations must first obtain a National Pollution Discharge Elimination System Permit (NPEDS) from the Division of Water Pollution Control (WPC). In addition they must obtain a state mining Surface Mining Permit from the Division of Water Pollution Control, Mining

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Groundwater Protection Rules Coal Mining Operations (West Virginia) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection Rules Coal Mining Operations (West Virginia) Protection Rules Coal Mining Operations (West Virginia) Groundwater Protection Rules Coal Mining Operations (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection These rules establish a series of practices for the protection of groundwater which are to be followed by any person who conducts coal mining operations subject to the provisions of West Virginia Groundwater Protection Act and subject to regulation under the West Virginia Coal Mining and Reclamation Act and/or under West Virginia Water Pollution

382

Community Wind Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Toolkit Wind Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search "Community wind" refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. Projects are considered "community" projects when they are at least partially owned by individuals or businesses in the state and local area surrounding the wind power project. The community element of these projects can be defined narrowly so that ownership is concentrated in the county or region where the project is built, or it may be defined broadly so that project investors are from the state where the project is sited. Furthermore, the extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers,

383

The National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy research began at the Rocky Flats test site in 1976 when Rockwell International subcontracted with the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Rocky Flats Plant was competitively selected from a number of ERDA facilities primarily because it experienced high instantaneous winds and provided a large, clear land area. By 1977, several small wind turbines were in place. During the facility`s peak of operation, in 1979-1980, researchers were testing as many as 23 small wind turbines of various configurations, including commercially available machines and prototype turbines developed under subcontract to Rocky Flats. Facilities also included 8-kW, 40-kW, and 225-kW dynamometers; a variable-speed test bed; a wind/hybrid test facility; a controlled velocity test facility (in Pueblo, Colorado); a modal test facility, and a multimegawatt switchgear facility. The main laboratory building was dedicated in July 1981 and was operated by the Rocky Flats Plant until 1984, when the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and Rocky Flats wind energy programs were merged and transferred to SERI. SERI and now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to conduct wind turbine system component tests after 1987, when most program personnel were moved to the Denver WEst Office Park in Golden and site ownership was transferred back to Rocky Flats. The Combined Experiment test bed was installed and began operation in 1988, and the NREL structural test facility began operation in 1990. In 1993, the site`s operation was officially transferred to the DOE Golden Field Office that oversees NREL. This move was in anticipation of NREL`s renovation and reoccupation of the facility in 1994.

Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R.R.; Cadogon, J.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

NREL: News Feature - NREL Thinks Big at Wind Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thinks Big at Wind Technology Center Thinks Big at Wind Technology Center March 22, 2012 An aerial photograph of the National Wind Technology Center site shows three large wind turbines with other smaller wind turbines in the background. Mountains are in the background of the photo behind the site. Enlarge image The most noticeable change at the NWTC in recent years is the addition of multi-megawatt wind turbines used for a wide variety of R&D activities in collaboration with industry partners. Credit: Dennis Schroeder The Front Range environment at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is harsh. The winds - the very reason the NWTC is there - have little mercy. The frigid cold of winter gives way to the baking sun of summer. Yet in the midst of this difficult landscape, the future of wind energy grows

385

NREL: Wind Research - News Release Archives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 December 9, 2011 Saving Farmland One Wind Energy Project at a Time Rich VanderVeen, president of Mackinaw Power, LLC in Michigan talks about wind power being an important wealth-building second crop for American farmers. November 22, 2011 New Database Assists with Wind Project Siting November 2, 2011 Wind Energy Has A Lot Riding on Programs up for Debate in Congress Lisa Daniels, Windustry executive director, talks about how wind energy has become a farm product and that clean energy program funding decisions are being made that will affect farm energy progress for years to come. October 25, 2011 Wind Powering America Updates Interactive Maps The school wind energy projects map features 291 projects, and the anemometer loan projects map features 45 projects.

386

Wind Opportunities for Idaho State Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

and Local Initiatives Group and Local Initiatives Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory Terri Walters Carol Tombari 303-275-3005 303-275-3821 terri_walters@nrel.gov carol_tombari@nrel.gov Wind Opportunities For Idaho State Lands March 3, 2004 Wind Overview Wind Overview * Technology * Resources * Markets and Drivers * Economic Development Opportunities * Wind Powering America U.S. Electricity Fuel Mix U.S. Electricity Fuel Mix Coal 51.8% Nuclear 19.8% Hydro 7.2% Petroleum 2.9% Gas 16.1% Other/Renewables 2.2% Sizes and Applications Sizes and Applications Small (≤10 kW) * Homes * Farms * Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Intermediate (10-100 kW) * Village Power * Hybrid Systems * Distributed Power Large (660 kW - 2+MW) * Central Station Wind Farms * Distributed Power Growth of Wind Energy Capacity Growth of Wind Energy Capacity

387

Wind Energy Act (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Act (Maine) Wind Energy Act (Maine) Wind Energy Act (Maine) < Back Eligibility Developer Utility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Solar/Wind Access Policy Siting and Permitting The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the regulatory process for

388

Wind Energy Asynchronous Generator Maintenance Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rush to develop todays massive wind energy sites, little attention is being given to the inevitable need to perform routine maintenance and develop practical means of assessing the condition of the components within the nacelles and other outside support equipment for the wind farms. Current operating models have not adequately established accurate assumptions or expectations on the unavailability of the wind turbines and the impact on lost generation. Contracts for purchase of their generation ...

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

389

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island) Rules and Regulations for Dredging and the Management of Dredged Material (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management

391

Analytical expressions for maximum wind turbine average power in a Rayleigh wind regime  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Average or expectation values for annual power of a wind turbine in a Rayleigh wind regime are calculated and plotted as a function of cut-out wind speed. This wind speed is expressed in multiples of the annual average wind speed at the turbine installation site. To provide a common basis for comparison of all real and imagined turbines, the Rayleigh-Betz wind machine is postulated. This machine is an ideal wind machine operating with the ideal Betz power coefficient of 0.593 in a Rayleigh probability wind regime. All other average annual powers are expressed in fractions of that power. Cases considered include: (1) an ideal machine with finite power and finite cutout speed, (2) real machines operating in variable speed mode at their maximum power coefficient, and (3) real machines operating at constant speed.

Carlin, P.W.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

New England Wind Forum: Large Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Large Wind When establishing wind farms, wind energy developers generally approach landowners where they want to build. Interest in wind farms is frequently spurred by external pressures such as tax and other financial incentives and legislative mandates. Since each situation is influenced by local policies and permitting, we can only provide general guidance to help you learn about the process of installing wind turbines. Publications Wind Project Development Process Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook. (August 2002). National Wind Coordinating Collaborative. Landowner Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. (August 2003). "State Wind Working Group Handbook." pp. 130-133.

393

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Project Development Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Project Development Updates A 2.3 megawatt Siemens wind turbine nacelle on route to the Record Hill Wind project in Roxbury, Maine. January 14, 2013 As a result of the...

394

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind climate and variability. Site design and operation, as well as market integration mechanisms and energy policy

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Manzanita Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Manzanita Indian Reservation is located in southeastern San Diego County, California. The Tribe has long recognized that the Reservation has an abundant wind resource that could be commercially utilized to its benefit. Manzanita has explored the wind resource potential on tribal land and developed a business plan by means of this wind energy feasibility project, which enables Manzanita to make informed decisions when considering the benefits and risks of encouraging large-scale wind power development on their lands. Technical consultant to the project has been SeaWest Consulting, LLC, an established wind power consulting company. The technical scope of the project covered the full range of feasibility assessment activities from site selection through completion of a business plan for implementation. The primary objectives of this feasibility study were to: (1) document the quality and suitability of the Manzanita Reservation as a site for installation and long-term operation of a commercially viable utility-scale wind power project; and, (2) develop a comprehensive and financeable business plan.

Trisha Frank

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

Jimenez, A. C.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Register Vol. 77, No. 28 Friday, February 10, 2012 Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 431 Docket Number EERE-2010-BT-STD- 0048 RIN 1904-AC04 Energy...

399

Topic: Wind Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Wind Engineering. Forty-Fourth Meeting of the UJNR Panel on Wind and Seismic Effects. NIST researchers collected ...

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Extreme Wind Speeds: Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "Algorithms for Generating Large Sets of Synthetic Directional Wind Speed Data for Hurricane, Thunderstorm, and Synoptic Winds," NIST Technical ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NREL GIS Data: Iowa High Resolution Wind Resource Abstract...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SupplementalInformation: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting...

402

NREL GIS Data: New York High Resolution Wind Resource Abstract...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SupplementalInformation: This data set has been validated by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants. However, the data is not suitable for micro-siting...

403

NREL: Wind Research - Energy Department Honors South Dakota and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Energy Department Honors South Dakota and Alaska Electric Cooperatives with 2012 Wind Cooperative of the Year...

404

TMS 50th Anniversary Materials Bowl Rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Promoting the global science and engineering Professions concerned with minerals, ... Bowl. Rules. Official Rules. This contest is open to all Material Advantage ...

405

Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Natural Gas Procurement Plan Rules are promulgated under the authority of the Arkansas Public Service Commission. These rules require that utilities develop and maintain a diversified gas...

406

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Development Small Wind Turbine Development A photo of Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine in front of a home. PIX14936 Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine. A photo of the Endurance wind turbine. PIX15006 The Endurance wind turbine. A photo of the Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. PIX07301 The Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL supports continued market expansion of small wind turbines by funding manufacturers through competitive solicitations (i.e., subcontracts and/or grants) to refine prototype systems leading to commercialization. Learn more about the turbine development projects below. Skystream NREL installed and tested an early prototype of this turbine at the

407

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Webinars Small Wind Turbine Webinars Here you will find webinars about small wind turbines that NREL hosted. Introducing WindLease(tm): Making Wind Energy Affordable NREL and the American Solar Energy Society (ASES) Wind Division co-hosted this webinar. (Text Version.) Date: August 1, 2013 Run Time: 40 minutes Joe Hess, VP of Business Development at United Wind, described United Wind's WindQuote and WindLease Program and explained the process from the dealer's and consumer's perspective. Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association NREL and the American Solar Energy Society (ASES) Wind Division co-hosted this webinar. (Text Version). Date: March 7, 2013 Run Time: 1 hour Russel Smith, Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association executive director and co-founder, provided an overview of the trade association

408

On the Evaluation of Wind Power from Short Wind Records  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to estimate the meteorological mean wind power of a given site and year based upon data of only three months is presented. It is based on the minimization of the rms errors between observations and a representation by means of empirical ...

Vicente R. Barros; Eduardo A. Estevan

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An Autonomous Doppler Sodar Wind Profiling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An autonomous Doppler sodar wind profiling system has been designed, built, tested, and then deployed for 2 years at a remote site in Coats Land, Antarctica. The system is designed around a commercially available phased-array sodar (a Scintec ...

Philip S. Anderson; Russell S. Ladkin; Ian A. Renfrew

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Market, Legislation Make Wind an Attractive Investment in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure, part of the SEP Stellar Projects series, covers development of wind energy in Texas due to favorable legislation and public policy and favorable market forces. Those odd shaped structures popping up out in West Texas aren't funny looking oil rigs and they're not genetically altered cotton plants. They're wind turbines, an old technology with a 21st century update. Once too expensive for commercial production, the addition of computers to wind turbines and the rise in fossil fuel prices has brought the cost of wind-generated electricity in line with other power sources. A push by the 1999 Legislature to restructure the retail electric power market put in place rules that encourage wind generation. One rule requires Texas utilities to get an additional 2,000 megawatts of their power from renewable resources such as wind and solar power by 2009. Rules easing the cost of transmitting electricity from remote areas also aid the development of wind farms in West Texas.

Not Available

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Research Applications of a Boundary-Layer Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small UHF radar wind profiler was operated over a 40-day period during the summer of 1990 at a site on the windward coast of the island of Hawaii. It provided continuous measurements of winds up to the height of the trade-wind inversion, which ...

R. R. Rogers; S. A. Ethier; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; K. S. Gage

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bid is computed by exploiting the forecast energy price for the day ahead market, the historical windOptimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts Antonio statistics at the plant site and the day-ahead wind speed forecasts provided by a meteorological service. We

Giannitrapani, Antonello

413

Resolving Difficult Issues Of Wind Power Micrositing In Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Micrositing of wind turbines in complex terrain is tricky game, and many of the current siting methods and tools, while useful and improving, remain inadequate to the task in extreme terrain. As a consequence, there are numerous wind turbine installations that are buffeted by damaging turbulence or are faced with suboptimal wind energy performance.

Terrain Session Resource; Russell G. Derickson A; Michael Mcdiarmid B; Brad C. Cochran C; Jon A. Peterka D; Russell G. Derickson A; Michael Mcdiarmid B; Brad C. Cochran C; Jon A. Peterka D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

To users of the Western Wind Dataset: We have run into some issues on the wind dataset. For many uses of the dataset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-of-the-art forecasts would use on-site data to correct the wind energy forecast and effectively remove this biasTo users of the Western Wind Dataset: We have run into some issues on the wind dataset. For many), these issues may not affect you. However, if you are using the dataset for an extensive wind integration study

415

Design and rule base reduction of a fuzzy lter for the estimation of motor currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in permanent magnet synchronous motors. Motor winding current estimation is an important problem because of a permanent magnet synchronous motor are spaced on the stator (the ®xed part of the motor) at regular angles########### ##### Design and rule base reduction of a fuzzy ®lter for the estimation of motor

Simon, Dan

416

Risø–I–1206(EN) Wind Power Meteorology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Wind power meteorology has evolved as an applied science, firmly founded on boundary-layer meteorology, but with strong links to climatology and geography. It concerns itself with three main areas: siting of wind turbines, regional wind resource assessment, and short-term prediction of the wind resource. The history, status and perspectives of wind power meteorology are presented, with emphasis on physical considerations and on its practical application. Following a global view of the wind resource, the elements of boundary layer meteorology which are most important for wind energy are reviewed: wind profiles and shear, turbulence and gust, and extreme winds. The data used in wind power meteorology stem mainly from three sources: onsite wind measurements, the synoptic networks, and the re-analysis projects. Wind climate analysis, wind resource estimation and siting further require a detailed description of the topography of the terrain – with respect to the roughness of the surface, near-by obstacles, and orographical features. Finally, the meteorological models used for estimation and prediction of the wind are described; their classification,

Erik L. Petersen; Niels G. Mortensen; Lars L; Jørgen Højstrup; Helmut P. Frank

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Risk Analysis & Security Rule Compliance Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Risk Analysis & Security Rule Compliance Activities Marissa Gordon- Nguyen, JD, MPH Health Information Privacy Specialist ...

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Wind Research Offshore Wind Research Photo of a European offshore wind farm. Early progress in European Offshore Wind Energy over the last decade provides a glimpse into the vast potential of the global offshore resource. For more than eight years, NREL has worked with the Department of Energy to become an international leader in offshore wind energy research. Capabilities NREL's offshore wind capabilities focus on critical areas that reflect the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the U.S. Department of Energy including: Offshore Design Tools and Methods Offshore Standards and Testing Energy Analysis of Offshore Systems Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Key Research NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United States in

419

Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? Home How can I find more specific information about wind capacity? I can get the max/min/media stuff from the bar graphs. Is there any way to see individual wind farm capacity per year or get examples of performance? I'm helping run a tech site and some specific information would be helpful in dealing with skeptical individuals. Is there any more detailed information on capacity other than the graph summary statistics? (I do not know my way around this site, but I'm willing to learn.) Submitted by Bob Wallace on 15 June, 2013 - 00:23 1 answer Points: 0 Hi Bob- Thank you for posting your question. It seems that your question developed after viewing/using the Transparent Cost Database, however, I

420

Horizon Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) does not have regulatory authority specific to wind power development at this time. WDFW is an agency with environmental expertise as provided for through the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 197-11-920. Comments related to environmental impacts are provided to regulatory authorities through the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 43.21C review process.

Cover Photo; Nina Carter; Heath Packard; Lisa Paribello; Craig Dublanko; Dana Peck; Nicole Hughes; Bill Robinson; Robert Kruse; Arlo Corwin; Joe Buchanan; Ted Clausing; Eric Cummins; Travis Nelson; Eric Pentico; Mike Ritter; Jeff Tayer; James Watson; William Weiler; David Mcclure

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed WindSolar Interconnection Workshop Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed WindSolar Interconnection Workshop May 21, 2013 8:00AM...

422

The Wind Energy Outlook Scenarios 1 India Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ?Status of wind energy in India ????????????????????6 Wind energy in India????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????7 Wind power resource assessment?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????6 Wind power installations by state?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????8

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System July 2, 2012 - 8:22pm Addthis Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System What does this mean for me? When installing a wind system, the location of the system, the energy budget for the site, the size of the system, and the height of the tower are important elements to consider. Deciding whether to connect the system to the electric grid or not is also an important decision. If you went through the planning steps to evaluate whether a small wind electric system will work at your location, you will already have a general idea about: The amount of wind at your site The zoning requirements and covenants in your area The economics, payback, and incentives of installing a wind system

424

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Aeronautics All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be

425

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United States  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This atlas, containing more than 72 maps, estimates wind energy resource for the United States and its terrorities. Early wind resource atlases created for the Federal Wind Energy Program were based on date collected before 1979. Since then, hundreds of new sites have been instrumented specifically for wind energy assessment purposes, and many of these have been located in areas thought to have high wind resource but where data were previously not available or were very limited [copied from http://rredc.nrel.gov/wind/pubs/atlas/chp1.html].

426

Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

Courtney Lane

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

New England Wind Forum: Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Wind Compared to the Cost of Other Electricity Generation Options Figure 1: Average Cumulative Wind and Wholesale Power Prices by Region The chart shows average cumulative wind and wholesale power prices by region. Click on the graph to view a larger version. View a larger version of the graph. In terms of direct costs, larger wind farms in windier areas are now considered economically competitive with "conventional" fossil fuel power plants in many locations. In New England, direct costs for wind power at larger sites with strong winds are approaching the cost of alternatives, particularly given the recent high natural gas and oil prices. Figure 1 compares wind contract prices1 with wholesale electricity market prices in different U.S. regions for 2006. Although not directly comparable to wind prices due to wind's production timing and intermittence, the value of wind Renewable Energy Credits and carbon offsets, and the cost of wind integration and transmission, the average wholesale market energy price is a good indicator of the cost of alternative generation options. This graph demonstrates several points:

428

Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notices and Rules Notices and Rules to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Notices and Rules on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Notices and Rules The following notices, rulemakings, and guidelines were announced through the Federal Register as defined by the Administration Procedure Act and the

429

Definition: Community Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Wind Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Community Wind A community owned wind project. The asset can be owned by one or several types of community groups, including: farmers, small business, local groups and organizations, schools and local electric cooperatives and municipal utilities.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Community wind projects are locally owned by farmers, investors, businesses, schools, utilities, or other public or private entities who utilize wind energy to support and reduce energy costs to the local community. The key feature is that local community members have a significant, direct financial stake in the project beyond land lease payments and tax revenue. Projects may be used for on-site power or to generate wholesale power for sale, usually on a commercial-scale greater

430

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Western Wind Dataset  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Wind Dataset Western Wind Dataset Here you will find information about the Western Wind Dataset, including the methodology used to develop the dataset, the accuracy of the data, site selection, and power output. Alert! Important Note Obtain the Western Wind Dataset This dataset was originally created for the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study. These data are modeled data and not actual measured data. Learn more about the datasets including the similarities and differences between the Eastern and Western datasets and the differences from the NREL state wind maps. Methodology 3TIER created the Western Dataset with oversight and assistance from NREL. Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models were used to essentially recreate the historical weather for the western U.S. for 2004, 2005, and 2006. The

431

Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Wind energy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and exclude windy lands that are not suitable for development as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the potential electric power from wind energy is surprisingly large. Good wind areas, which cover 6% of the contiguous US land area, have the potential to supply more than one and a half times the current electricity consumption of the United States. Technology under development today will be capable of producing electricity economically from good wind sites in many regions of the country.

Elliott, D.L.; Schwartz, M.N.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

New England Wind Forum: Injecting Useful and Credible Information into Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Injecting Useful and Credible Information into Wind Power Siting Workshop Injecting Useful and Credible Information into Wind Power Siting Workshop The New England Wind Forum and New England Wind Energy Education Project hosted a one-day workshop on October 26, 2012 at Mount Wachusett Community College in Gardner, Massachusetts focusing on the role of information on issues impacting public acceptance in the appropriate siting of wind power in New England. The workshop included hands-on plenary sessions, panel presentations, and professionally facilitated small group discussions. See the full agenda. Open Plenary: Welcome and Introduction This presentation was presented by: Deborah Donovan, Sustainable Energy Advantage, LLC Ian Baring-Gould, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Bob Grace, Sustainable Energy Advantage, LLC

434

Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Reformulated Gasoline Foreign Refinery Rules Contents * Introduction o Table 1. History of Foreign Refiner Regulations * Foreign Refinery Baseline * Monitoring Imported Conventional Gasoline * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Oxygenate Supply/Demand Balances in the Short-Term Integrated Forecasting Model * Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model * Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Reformulated Motor Gasoline, 1995 Introduction On August 27, 1997, the EPA promulgated revised the rules that allow foreign refiners to establish and use individual baselines, but it would not be mandatory (the optional use of an

435

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

436

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

437

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

438

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a hilly field, with six visible wind turbines spinning in the wind. Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating...

439

Solar Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Wind Place Krasnodar, Romania Zip 350000 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Russia-based PV product manufacturer. Solar Wind manufactures...

440

EERE: Wind Program Home Page  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wind projects and offshore wind resource potential. Offshore Wind R&D DOE makes strategic research & deployment investments to launch domestic offshore wind industry....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on DomesticUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2012a.D.C. : American Wind Energy Association. American Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.41 6. Wind Power Priceat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges  

SciTech Connect

This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

445

Mean Vertical Motions Seen by Radar Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radar wind profilers have been used to measure directly the vertical motion above the radar site. Mean values of vertical motions in the troposphere and lower stratosphere reported at sites in and near mountains are often several centimeters per ...

G. D. Nastrom; T. E. VanZandt

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative Obama Administration Hosts Great Lakes Offshore Wind Workshop in Chicago with Great Lakes Wind Collaborative October 28, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - The White House Council on Environmental Quality and the U.S. Department of Energy hosted a workshop with the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative in Chicago on October 26 - 27, 2010, focused on the siting of offshore wind power in the Great Lakes. The two day workshop brought together wind developers, Federal and state regulators, environmental advocates, and other regional stakeholders to discuss methods for ensuring greater clarity, certainty and coordination of Federal and state decision-making for offshore wind development in the Great Lakes.

447

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

448

Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

Multiple

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Wind Development on Tribal Lands  

SciTech Connect

Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wind Vision Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Vision Wind Farm Facility Wind Vision Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Vision Developer Wind Vision Location St. Ansgar IA Coordinates 43.348224°, -92.888816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.348224,"lon":-92.888816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

High Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds Wind Farm Winds Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Winds Wind Farm Facility High Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser PPM Energy Inc Location Solano County CA Coordinates 38.124844°, -121.764915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.124844,"lon":-121.764915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Small Wind Project's objectives are to reduce barriers to wind energy expansion, stabilize the market, and expand the number of small wind turbine systems installed in the United States. "Small wind turbine" refers to a turbine smaller than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW). "Distributed wind" includes small and midsize turbines (100 kW through 1 megawatt [MW]). Since 1996, NREL's small wind turbine research has provided turbine testing, turbine development, and prototype refinement leading to more commercially available small wind turbines. Work is conducted under the following areas. You can also learn more about state and federal policies

453

U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Rules  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RULES RULES Last Updated: August 1, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013 Rules i August 1, 2013 Contents SECTION I: DEFINITIONS ........................................................................................................................................1 SECTION II: GENERAL RULES ..................................................................................................................................5 Rule 1. Authority ............................................................................................................................................................................. 5 1-1. Director ................................................................................................................................................................................ 5

454

NREL: Wind Research - Information and Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

small wind systems. Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities Projects Offshore Wind Research Large Wind Turbine Research Midsize Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine...

455

Small Wind Guidebook/Can I Go Off-Grid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Can I Go Off-Grid Can I Go Off-Grid < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information Can I Go "Off-Grid"?

456

Small Wind Guidebook/First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

457

Small Wind Guidebook/How Much Energy Will My System Generate | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

How Much Energy Will My System Generate How Much Energy Will My System Generate < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

458

Small Wind Guidebook/Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind Guidebook Home WindTurbine-icon.png Small Wind Guidebook * Introduction * First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy Efficient? * Is Wind Energy Practical for Me? * What Size Wind Turbine Do I Need? * What Are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System? * What Do Wind Systems Cost? * Where Can I Find Installation and Maintenance Support? * How Much Energy Will My System Generate? * Is There Enough Wind on My Site? * How Do I Choose the Best Site for My Wind Turbine? * Can I Connect My System to the Utility Grid? * Can I Go Off-Grid? * State Information Portal * Glossary of Terms * For More Information

459

Wind Farm Diversification and Its Impact on Power System Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As wind exploitation gains prominence in the power industry, the extensive use of this intermittent source of power may heavily rely on our ability to select the best combination of wind farming sites that yields maximal reliability of power systems at minimal cost. This research proposes a general method to minimize the wind park global power output variance by optimally distributing a predetermined number of wind turbines over a preselected number of potential wind farming sites for which the wind patterns are statistically known. The objective is to demonstrate the benefits of diversification for the reliability of wind-sustained systems through the search for steadier overall power outputs. Three years of wind data from the recent NREL/3TIER study in the western US provides the statistics for evaluating each site for their mean power output, variance and correlation with each other so that the best allocations can be determined. Some traditional reliability indices such as the LOLP are computed by using sequential Monte Carlo simulations to emulate the behavior of a power system uniquely composed of wind turbines and a load modeled from the 1996 IEEE RTS. It is shown that configurations featuring minimal global power output variances generally prove the most reliable for moderate load cases, provided the sites are not significantly correlated with the modeled load. Under these conditions, the choice of uncorrelated/negatively correlated sites is favored. The correlations between the optimized global wind power outputs and the modeled load are studied as well.

Degeilh, Yannick

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Cosmic-ray sum rules  

SciTech Connect

We introduce new sum rules allowing to determine universal properties of the unknown component of the cosmic rays; we show how they can be used to predict the positron fraction at energies not yet explored by current experiments, and to constrain specific models.

Frandsen, Mads T. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Masina, Isabella [Dip. di Fisica dell'Universita di Ferrara and INFN Sez. di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); CP3-Origins, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Sannino, Francesco [CP3-Origins, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind siting rules" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Quantum deduction rules (preliminary version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum deduction rules (preliminary version) Pavel Pudlâ??ak # March 27, 2007 Abstract We define propositional quantum Frege proof systems and compare it with classical Frege proof systems. 1 Introduction In this paper we shall address the question whether quantum circuits could help us prove theorems faster than

Pudlák, Pavel

462

Atmospheric Circulation Effects on Wind Speed Variability at Turbine Height  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean monthly wind speed at 70 m above ground level is investigated for 11 sites in Minnesota for the period 1995–2003. Wind speeds at these sites show significant spatial and temporal coherence, with prolonged periods of above- and below-normal ...

Katherine Klink

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z