Sample records for wind policy tool

  1. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets.

  2. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| DepartmentStatementDepartmentDiggingDistributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

  3. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Energy Information At1986)DistributedTool

  4. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

  5. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2003). Annual Energy Outlook 2003. DOE/EIA-SP SWAT TVA USDA Annual Energy Outlook American Wind Energyaccording to the 2003 Annual Energy Outlook. Although this

  6. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    xii Figure ES-4. Incremental LCOE Without State16 Figure 5. LCOE Results from SWAT Base-Case60 Table A-5. Base Case Results for LCOE for Wind Classes 2-

  7. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning, policies, and programs, wind energy can be a coreof Wind Integration in the Tamil Nadu Grid. Energy PolicyEnergy Technologies Division Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy

  8. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFTJanuary 2004 | DepartmentJanuaryVersion 1.1

  9. Final Technical Report Power through Policy: "Best Practices" for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhoads-Weaver, Heather; Gagne, Matthew; Sahl, Kurt; Orrell, Alice; Banks, Jennifer

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Power through Policy: 'Best Practices' for Cost-Effective Distributed Wind is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded project to identify distributed wind technology policy best practices and to help policymakers, utilities, advocates, and consumers examine their effectiveness using a pro forma model. Incorporating a customized feed from the Database of State Incentives for Renewables and Efficiency (DSIRE), the Web-based Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool (Policy Tool) is designed to assist state, local, and utility officials in understanding the financial impacts of different policy options to help reduce the cost of distributed wind technologies. The project's final products include the Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool, found at www.windpolicytool.org, and its accompanying documentation: Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool Guidebook: User Instructions, Assumptions, and Case Studies. With only two initial user inputs required, the Policy Tool allows users to adjust and test a wide range of policy-related variables through a user-friendly dashboard interface with slider bars. The Policy Tool is populated with a variety of financial variables, including turbine costs, electricity rates, policies, and financial incentives; economic variables including discount and escalation rates; as well as technical variables that impact electricity production, such as turbine power curves and wind speed. The Policy Tool allows users to change many of the variables, including the policies, to gauge the expected impacts that various policy combinations could have on the cost of energy (COE), net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR), and the simple payback of distributed wind projects ranging in size from 2.4 kilowatts (kW) to 100 kW. The project conducted case studies to demonstrate how the Policy Tool can provide insights into 'what if' scenarios and also allow the current status of incentives to be examined or defended when necessary. The ranking of distributed wind state policy and economic environments summarized in the attached report, based on the Policy Tool's default COE results, highlights favorable market opportunities for distributed wind growth as well as market conditions ripe for improvement. Best practices for distributed wind state policies are identified through an evaluation of their effect on improving the bottom line of project investments. The case studies and state rankings were based on incentives, power curves, and turbine pricing as of 2010, and may not match the current results from the Policy Tool. The Policy Tool can be used to evaluate the ways that a variety of federal and state policies and incentives impact the economics of distributed wind (and subsequently its expected market growth). It also allows policymakers to determine the impact of policy options, addressing market challenges identified in the U.S. DOE's '20% Wind Energy by 2030' report and helping to meet COE targets. In providing a simple and easy-to-use policy comparison tool that estimates financial performance, the Policy Tool and guidebook are expected to enhance market expansion by the small wind industry by increasing and refining the understanding of distributed wind costs, policy best practices, and key market opportunities in all 50 states. This comprehensive overview and customized software to quickly calculate and compare policy scenarios represent a fundamental step in allowing policymakers to see how their decisions impact the bottom line for distributed wind consumers, while estimating the relative advantages of different options available in their policy toolboxes. Interested stakeholders have suggested numerous ways to enhance and expand the initial effort to develop an even more user-friendly Policy Tool and guidebook, including the enhancement and expansion of the current tool, and conducting further analysis. The report and the project's Guidebook include further details on possible next steps. NREL Report No. BK-5500-53127; DOE/GO-102011-3453.

  10. Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buildings: A Policy Tool to Improve Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Performance Certification of Buildings: A Policy Tool to...

  11. WINS: Market Simulation Tool for Facilitating Wind Energy Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shahidehpour, Mohammad [Illinois Institute of Technology

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating 20% or more wind energy into the system and transmitting large sums of wind energy over long distances will require a decision making capability that can handle very large scale power systems with tens of thousands of buses and lines. There is a need to explore innovative analytical and implementation solutions for continuing reliable operations with the most economical integration of additional wind energy in power systems. A number of wind integration solution paths involve the adoption of new operating policies, dynamic scheduling of wind power across interties, pooling integration services, and adopting new transmission scheduling practices. Such practices can be examined by the decision tool developed by this project. This project developed a very efficient decision tool called Wind INtegration Simulator (WINS) and applied WINS to facilitate wind energy integration studies. WINS focused on augmenting the existing power utility capabilities to support collaborative planning, analysis, and wind integration project implementations. WINS also had the capability of simulating energy storage facilities so that feasibility studies of integrated wind energy system applications can be performed for systems with high wind energy penetrations. The development of WINS represents a major expansion of a very efficient decision tool called POwer Market Simulator (POMS), which was developed by IIT and has been used extensively for power system studies for decades. Specifically, WINS provides the following superiorities: (1) An integrated framework is included in WINS for the comprehensive modeling of DC transmission configurations, including mono-pole, bi-pole, tri-pole, back-to-back, and multi-terminal connection, as well as AC/DC converter models including current source converters (CSC) and voltage source converters (VSC). (2) An existing shortcoming of traditional decision tools for wind integration is the limited availability of user interface, i.e., decision results are often text-based demonstrations. WINS includes a powerful visualization tool and user interface capability for transmission analyses, planning, and assessment, which will be of great interest to power market participants, power system planners and operators, and state and federal regulatory entities. (3) WINS can handle extended transmission models for wind integration studies. WINS models include limitations on transmission flow as well as bus voltage for analyzing power system states. The existing decision tools often consider transmission flow constraints (dc power flow) alone which could result in the over-utilization of existing resources when analyzing wind integration. WINS can be used to assist power market participants including transmission companies, independent system operators, power system operators in vertically integrated utilities, wind energy developers, and regulatory agencies to analyze economics, security, and reliability of various options for wind integration including transmission upgrades and the planning of new transmission facilities. WINS can also be used by industry for the offline training of reliability and operation personnel when analyzing wind integration uncertainties, identifying critical spots in power system operation, analyzing power system vulnerabilities, and providing credible decisions for examining operation and planning options for wind integration. Researches in this project on wind integration included (1) Development of WINS; (2) Transmission Congestion Analysis in the Eastern Interconnection; (3) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (4) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection. The research resulted in 33 papers, 9 presentations, 9 PhD degrees, 4 MS degrees, and 7 awards. The education activities in this project on wind energy included (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development.

  12. Global Solar Opportunity Tool: A Tool for Policy Makers and Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Solar Opportunity Tool: A Tool for Policy Makers and Energy Analysts Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Solar Opportunity Tool: A Tool for...

  13. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications AmolEstimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications Amolpolicies, and programs, wind energy can be a core component of India’

  14. Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . To illustrate this issue, a web map service enabling "geolocalized life cycle assessment" of offshore wind farms makers in assess- ing the global environmental impacts caused by an offshore wind farm in Northern Europe of configurations and locations of offshore wind farms. A special interest is given to Northern Europe as offshore

  15. Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts September 12, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis...

  16. CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

  17. Distributed Wind All-State Policy Summit and Strategies for Manufactur...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Distributed Wind All-State Policy Summit and Strategies for Manufacturers Advancing Research and Technology Wind Launch Distributed Wind All-State Policy Summit and Strategies for...

  18. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An International Comparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Development in China: Institutional Dynamics and Policyand Candles: Wind Power in China. Energy Policy, 28, 271-wind power development in the United States. Energy Policy.

  19. Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool DIgSILENT Anca D. Hansen, Florin Iov Iov, Poul Sørensen, Nicolaos Cutululis, Clemens Jauch, Frede Blaabjerg Title: Dynamic wind turbine system simulation tool PowerFactory DIgSILENT for different wind turbine concepts. It is the second

  20. Using computational tools to factor wind into architectural environment design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and an acceptable thermal comfort level, by means of passive cooling or natural ventilation. On the other hand, wind tools to factor wind into architectural environment design," Energy and Buildings, 36, 1197-1209. #121 Using computational tools to factor wind into architectural environment design Qingyan (Yan) Chen

  1. Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets â?? Ulfar Linnet Kongens Lyngby 2005 IMM.imm.dtu.dk IMM­THESIS: ISSN 0909­3192 #12; Abstract A large share of the wind energy produced in Scandinavia in a fine, called regulation cost. As wind energy comes from an uncontrollable energy source ­ the wind

  2. Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools supporting wind energy trade in deregulated markets ´Ulfar Linnet Kongens Lyngby 2005 IMM.imm.dtu.dk IMM-THESIS: ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Abstract A large share of the wind energy produced in Scandinavia in a fine, called regulation cost. As wind energy comes from an uncontrollable energy source - the wind

  3. New Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent overhaul of the tool makes it a powerful, robust, and flexible modeling software to aid the development of innovative wind and water power technologies.

  4. Assistance to States on Policies Related to Wind Energy Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Matthew, H; Decesaro, Jennifer; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes work carried out under agreement with the US Department of Energy, related to wind energy policy issues. This project has involved a combination of outreach and publications on wind energy, with a specific focus on educating state-level policymakers. Education of state policymakers is vitally important because state policy (in the form of incentives or regulation) is a crucial part of the success of wind energy. State policymakers wield a significant influence over all of these policies. They are also in need of high quality, non-biased educational resources which this project provided. This project provided outreach to legislatures, in the form of meetings designed specifically for state legislators and legislative staff, responses to information requests on wind energy, and publications. The publications addressed: renewable energy portfolio standards, wind energy transmission, wind energy siting, case studies of wind energy policy, avian issues, economic development, and other related issues. These publications were distributed to legislative energy committee members, and chairs, legislative staff, legislative libraries, and other related state officials. The effect of this effort has been to provide an extensive resource of information about wind information for state policymakers in a form that is useful to them. This non-partisan information has been used as state policymakers attempt to develop their own policy proposals related to wind energy in the states.

  5. Introduction to the Wind Energy Science, Engineering, and Policy (WESEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Introduction to the Wind Energy Science, Engineering, and Policy (WESEP) Real-Time Research Seminar concepts of "Advanced Wind Energy Concepts." Will use a text plus... · Each student takes 2-3 lectures. · I acceptable evidence that a problem is indeed solved? · What organizational structures and modes of human

  6. Review: Precautionary Tools for Reshaping Environmental Policy, by Nancy J. Myers and Carolyn Raffensperger (eds.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carchidi, Victoria

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    who cares about environmental policy— which should includeTools for Reshaping Environmental Policy Edited by Nancy J.Tools for Reshaping Environmental Policy. Cambridge, MA: MIT

  7. Wind Project Siting Tools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: EnergyWindCooperatives Jump

  8. Optimal Storage Policies with Wind Forecast Uncertainties [Extended Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Optimal Storage Policies with Wind Forecast Uncertainties [Extended Abstract] Nicolas Gast EPFL, IC generation. The use of energy storage compensates to some extent these negative effects; it plays a buffer role between demand and production. We revisit a model of real storage proposed by Bejan et al.[1]. We

  9. Proposed Academic Doctoral Degree Genesis PhD -Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy (WESEP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Proposed Academic Doctoral Degree Genesis PhD - Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy Executive summary: Iowa is second in the nation in wind energy production and is the leading state in terms of jobs related to wind energy. The proposed Ph.D. program in Wind Energy Science, Engineering and Policy

  10. A Critical Assessment of Computer Tools for Calculating Composite Wind Turbine Blade Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Wenbin

    A Critical Assessment of Computer Tools for Calculating Composite Wind Turbine Blade Properties Hui assess several computer tools for calculating the inertial and structural properties of wind turbine, and a realistic composite wind turbine blade are used to evaluate the performance of different tools

  11. Solar wind modeling: a computational tool for the classroom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woolsey, Lauren N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a Python model and library that can be used for student investigation of the application of fundamental physics on a specific problem: the role of magnetic field in solar wind acceleration. The paper begins with a short overview of the open questions in the study of the solar wind and how they relate to many commonly taught physics courses. The physics included in the model, The Efficient Modified Parker Equation Solving Tool (TEMPEST), is laid out for the reader. Results using TEMPEST on a magnetic field structure representative of the minimum phase of the Sun's activity cycle are presented and discussed. The paper suggests several ways to use TEMPEST in an educational environment and provides access to the current version of the code.

  12. Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mustakerov, Ivan

    Web-based Tool for Preliminary Assessment of Wind Power Plant Design Daniela Borissova1 and Ivan. Designing of reliable and cost-effective industrial wind power plant is a prerequisite for the effective use of wind power as an alternative resource. The design of a wind power plant includes the determination

  13. Alternative Policy Tools for U.S. Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Ronald D.; Richardson, James W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by setting a floor on market prices. Some policy tools are more effective than others in accomplishing the objectives for which they are intended. For example, quotas that dictate the volume a producer can market are more efficient than acreage reduction... of the 1980 's. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. 1980. Tweeten, L. Foundations of Farm Policy. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press. 1979. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Domestic Farm Programs ? Supply Control - - Marketing Quotas (and Certificates...

  14. Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-010, Fall 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-010, Fall 2008 Revised 10 October@udel.edu Class web site with lecture notes: www.udel.edu/sakai UD offshore wind research: http, plan, regulate, and develop offshore wind resources for large-scale power production. Offshore wind

  15. The Energy Policy Pyramid - A Hierarchal Tool for Decision Makers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieira, R. K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with conventional resources and, as such, should be considered prior to or in conjunction with conventional resources. Roof-integrated photovoltaics, hydrogen- powered vehicles or wind- powered water pumps are examples of alternative energy supply methods. Note... photovoltaics for buildings but ignore solar thermal systems. Building codes, voluntary green standards and state rebate programs need to reward based on performance, not simply targeting a technology. For example policies that simply create incentives...

  16. The Energy Policy Pyramid - A Hierarchal Tool for Decision Makers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vieira, R. K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with conventional resources and, as such, should be considered prior to or in conjunction with conventional resources. Roof-integrated photovoltaics, hydrogen- powered vehicles or wind- powered water pumps are examples of alternative energy supply methods. Note... photovoltaics for buildings but ignore solar thermal systems. Building codes, voluntary green standards and state rebate programs need to reward based on performance, not simply targeting a technology. For example policies that simply create incentives...

  17. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An International Comparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policy and Renewable Energy Technology. Proceedings of theDiffusion of Renewable Energy Technologies: Wind Power inFostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An

  18. Decision support tools for policy and planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacyk, P.; Schultz, D.; Spangenberg, L.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A decision support system (DSS) is being developed at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The DSS will be used to evaluate alternatives for improving LANL`s existing central radioactive waste water treatment plant and to evaluate new site-wide liquid waste treatment schemes that are required in order to handle the diverse waste streams produced at LANL. The decision support system consists of interacting modules that perform the following tasks: rigorous process simulation, configuration management, performance analysis, cost analysis, risk analysis, environmental impact assessment, transportation modeling, and local, state, and federal regulation compliance checking. Uncertainty handling techniques are used with these modules and also with a decision synthesis module which combines results from the modules listed above. We believe the DSS being developed can be applied to almost any other industrial water treatment facility with little modification because in most situations the waste streams are less complex, fewer regulations apply, and the political environment is simpler. The techniques being developed are also generally applicable to policy and planning decision support systems in the chemical process industry.

  19. SOWFA Super-Controller: A High-Fidelity Tool for Evaluating Wind Plant Control Approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, P.; Gebraad, P.; van Wingerden, J. W.; Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Scholbrock, A.; Michalakes, J.; Johnson, K.; Moriarty, P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new tool for testing wind plant controllers in the Simulator for Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA). SOWFA is a high-fidelity simulator for the interaction between wind turbine dynamics and the fluid flow in a wind plant. The new super-controller testing environment in SOWFA allows for the implementation of the majority of the wind plant control strategies proposed in the literature.

  20. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the need to reassess wind potential estimates in India andDivision Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India:July 2011 Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India:

  1. State of the Art in Floating Wind Turbine Design Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordle, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the simulation codes available to the offshore wind industry that are capable of performing integrated dynamic calculations for floating offshore wind turbines.

  2. 1 Energy Markets and Policy Group Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis Department The Impact of Wind Power Projects) This analysis was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program #12;2 Energy Markets and Policy Group · Energy Analysis

  3. A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES BY NICOLAS BENOIT reserves resulting in increased system production costs. Consequently, there is an acute need production simulation tool with the capability to quantify the variable effects of systems with varying wind

  4. Wind Turbine Shutdowns and Upgrades in Denmark: Timing Decisions and the Impact of Government Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    Wind Turbine Shutdowns and Upgrades in Denmark: Timing Decisions and the Impact of Government structural econometric model of wind turbine owners' decisions about whether and when to add new turbines the underlying profit structure for wind producers and evaluate the impact of technology and government policy

  5. Energy Policy 36 (2008) 2333 Change in public attitudes towards a Cornish wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 36 (2008) 23­33 Viewpoint Change in public attitudes towards a Cornish wind farm to particular wind farm developments from the local population which can result in planning permission being to a wind farm change after an extended period following commissioning. Residents of St. Newlyn East

  6. ECE 457 Dawson Fall 2010 Course Syllabus & Policies Fundamentals of Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolding, M. Chad

    ECE 457 ­Dawson Fall 2010 Course Syllabus & Policies ­ Fundamentals of Wind Power Course: ECE 457 - Fundamentals of Wind Power, 3(3,0) Time: TBA, Room: TBA Instructor: Dr. D. Dawson, Professor of Electrical: 978-3-540-24240-6). J. Wagner and D. Dawson, Fundamentals of Wind Power, Course Notes, 2010 References

  7. A Review of "Small-Scale Wind Turbines Policy Perspectives and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    ERG/200607 A Review of "Small-Scale Wind Turbines ­ Policy Perspectives and Recommendations of Engineering Mathematics at Dalhousie University. #12;Hughes-Long: A Review of Small-Scale Wind Turbines proposed changes to their municipal Bylaws to allow the installation of "small-scale" wind turbines (i

  8. Energy Policy 35 (2007) 15841598 Public opinion about large offshore wind power: Underlying factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 35 (2007) 1584­1598 Public opinion about large offshore wind power: Underlying opinion regarding offshore wind power based on a survey of residents near a proposed development off Cape, the first offshore wind proposal in North America, in Nantucket Sound (MA, USA) has generated a strong

  9. MAST628 Syllabus-8/12/2014 p. 1 Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    MAST628 Syllabus- 8/12/2014 p. 1 Offshore Wind Power: Science, engineering, and policy MAST 628-4842, dveron@udel.edu, Robinson 114B Class web site with lecture notes: www.udel.edu/sakai UD offshore wind the multiple disciplines required to understand, plan, regulate, and develop offshore wind resources for large

  10. WHY CONVENTIONAL TOOLS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS ARE OFTEN INADEQUATE FOR PROBLEMS OF GLOBAL CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risbey, James S.

    WHY CONVENTIONAL TOOLS FOR POLICY ANALYSIS ARE OFTEN INADEQUATE FOR PROBLEMS OF GLOBAL CHANGE of tools for quantitative policy analysis. As policy analysts have turned to the consideration of climate and other problems of global change, they have found it natural to employ such now standard tools as utility

  11. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this study, wind energy potential for turbines at 80m, 100m,wind energy potential due to better technology in the form of higher efficiency, hub heights, and sizes of wind turbines.wind energy potential is higher than currently believed. Those aspects are 1) the rapidly improving wind turbine

  12. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of Wind Energy Resource Assessment in China. Chinaindependent 3 party wind resource assessment of at least awind_june07.pdf for Wind Resource Assessment and mapping for

  13. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1 Coincidence of Wind Generation with Seasonal Load Shapes3.2 Coincidence of Wind Generation with Diurnal Load Shapessites for an actual wind generation facility or predict its

  14. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of variability of wind generation and costs related toLaxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India are

  15. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. Sinden, A. Zervos, (2011): Wind Energy. In IPCC SpecialM. Hand, and A. Laxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and2009). Analysis of Impacts of Wind Integration in the Tamil

  16. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of Potential for Wind Farms in India, RenewableNetworks for Offshore Wind Farms, Bremen, Germany, 14-15Assessment of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable

  17. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India areWe estimate the cost of wind energy and compare it with

  18. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unleashing the Potential of Renewable Energy in India.of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (

  19. New Modeling Tool Analyzes Floating Platform Concepts for Offshore Wind Turbines (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a new complex modeling and analysis tool capable of analyzing floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines. The new modeling tool combines the computational methodologies used to analyze land-based wind turbines with the comprehensive hydrodynamic computer programs developed for offshore oil and gas industries. This new coupled dynamic simulation tool will enable the development of cost-effective offshore technologies capable of harvesting the rich offshore wind resources at water depths that cannot be reached using the current technology.

  20. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

  1. Distributed Wind Policy Comparison Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Energy Information

  2. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

  3. Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part I: Ramping Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Makarov, Yuri V.; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. This tool predicts and displays additional capacity and ramping requirements caused by uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation. The tool is currently operational in the CAISO operations center. This is one of two final reports on the project.

  4. Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part II: Transmission Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. The tool analyzes and displays the impacts of uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation on: (1) congestion, (2)voltage and transient stability margins, and (3)voltage reductions and reactive power margins. The impacts are analyzed in the base case and under user-specified contingencies.A prototype of the tool has been developed and implemented in software.

  5. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times the current installed capacity) will be about 40,000largest portion of RE installed capacity in the world, withleads all states in installed wind capacity – would yield a

  6. Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tools for sustainability impact assessment of forestry policies: what role for social science: · Models & tools developed for the forestry sector are typically under-used · Impact assessment has little involvement to be deliberative, we need analytical tools, commonly associated with `the experts'." · "The most

  7. Policies and market factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,100 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states in which a substantial amount of wind energy capacity has been developed or planned. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  8. A Predictive Maintenance Policy Based on the Blade of Offshore Wind Wenjin Zhu, Troyes University of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    A Predictive Maintenance Policy Based on the Blade of Offshore Wind Turbine Wenjin Zhu, Troyes onshore to offshore locations [1]. As offshore wind turbines are located at remote sites withlimited]. Operation and maintenance (O&M) costs of off-shore wind turbines contribute about 25-30% to the total energy

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

  11. Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Energy InformationSite Analysis Tool (DSAT)

  12. Review of wind power tariff policies in China Zheng Hu a,n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    the share of renewable energy (i.e., make the transition from thermal power to clean energy). For instance Kurdgelashvili a a Centre for Energy and Environmental Policy, 278 Graham Hall, University of Delaware, Newark. Incentives are in place for German and Danish offshore wind power, while China will have to remove

  13. Solar/Wind Access Policy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSodaAtlassourceResourceSolar/Wind

  14. Incentive competitions as a policy tool for technological innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Georgina A. (Georgina Amy)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large incentive competitions are becoming increasingly popular amongst policymakers and philanthropists as a mission-orientated tool for inducing innovation, particularly in areas of national priority where market incentives ...

  15. Calibration and Validation of a Spar-Type Floating Offshore Wind Turbine Model using the FAST Dynamic Simulation Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browning, J. R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Goupee, A. J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2007, the FAST wind turbine simulation tool, developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), was expanded to include capabilities that are suitable for modeling floating offshore wind turbines. In an effort to validate FAST and other offshore wind energy modeling tools, DOE funded the DeepCwind project that tested three prototype floating wind turbines at 1/50th scale in a wave basin, including a semisubmersible, a tension-leg platform, and a spar buoy. This paper describes the use of the results of the spar wave basin tests to calibrate and validate the FAST offshore floating simulation tool, and presents some initial results of simulated dynamic responses of the spar to several combinations of wind and sea states.

  16. HazardsandDisastersTools,TechniquesandPolicyImplications_ Project Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Welsh, Staci Zavatarro Catastrophic hurricane disasters such as Andrew and Katrina highlighted dilemmas to Catastrophic Hurricanes Assessing Potential Magnitude and Policy Implications for Housing and Land Development; created a Hurricane Exposure Probability metric derived using hurricane tracks for the period 1851

  17. New Modularization Framework for the FAST Wind Turbine CAE Tool: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL has recently put considerable effort into improving the overall modularity of its FAST wind turbine aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool to (1) improve the ability to read, implement, and maintain source code; (2) increase module sharing and shared code development across the wind community; (3) improve numerical performance and robustness; and (4) greatly enhance flexibility and expandability to enable further developments of functionality without the need to recode established modules. The new FAST modularization framework supports module-independent inputs, outputs, states, and parameters; states in continuous-time, discrete-time, and in constraint form; loose and tight coupling; independent time and spatial discretizations; time marching, operating-point determination, and linearization; data encapsulation; dynamic allocation; and save/retrieve capability. This paper explains the features of the new FAST modularization framework, as well as the concepts and mathematical background needed to understand and apply it correctly. It is envisioned that the new modularization framework will transform FAST into a powerful, robust, and flexible wind turbine modeling tool with a large number of developers and a range of modeling fidelities across the aerodynamic, hydrodynamic, servo-dynamic, and structural-dynamic components.

  18. DOE 2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies for Distributed...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Global Distributed Wind Market (Poster) - Matt Gagne, eFormative Options Using the Wind Policy Tool to Examine Potential Feed-In Tariffs in the United States (Poster) - Matt...

  19. Assessing the Importance of Nonlinearities in the Development of a Substructure Model for the Wind Turbine CAE Tool FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Song, H.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and analysis of wind turbines are performed using aero-servo-elastic tools that account for the nonlinear coupling between aerodynamics, controls, and structural response. The NREL-developed computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool FAST also resolves the hydrodynamics of fixed-bottom structures and floating platforms for offshore wind applications. This paper outlines the implementation of a structural-dynamics module (SubDyn) for offshore wind turbines with space-frame substructures into the current FAST framework, and focuses on the initial assessment of the importance of structural nonlinearities. Nonlinear effects include: large displacements, axial shortening due to bending, cross-sectional transverse shear effects, etc.

  20. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An International Comparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Renewable Energy, Wind & Hydropower Technologiesand Renewable Energy, Wind & Hydropower Technologies2004. International Wind Energy Development, World Market

  1. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007. "Learning from Wind Energy Policy in the EU: Lessonsof Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms." Energy Policy,Earth Policy Institute, BTM Consult, American Wind Energy

  2. Community Wind: Once Again Pushing the Envelope of Project Finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Projects in the United States. ” Energy Policy.Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2010. Community Wind Policy

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

  4. OpenStudio Policy Analysis Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThe community Energy Tools

  5. SPATIALLY-EXPLICIT BAT IMPACT SCREENING TOOL FOR WIND TURBINE SITING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Versar, Inc.; Exponent, Inc.

    2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    As the U.S. seeks to increase energy production from renewable energy sources, development of wind power resources continues to grow. One of the most important ecological issues restricting wind energy development, especially the siting of wind turbines, is the potential adverse effect on bats. High levels of bat fatality have been recorded at a number of wind energy facilities, especially in the eastern United States. The U.S. Department of Energy contracted with Versar, Inc., and Exponent to develop a spatially-explicit site screening tool to evaluate the mortality of bats resulting from interactions (collisions or barotrauma) with wind turbines. The resulting Bat Vulnerability Assessment Tool (BVAT) presented in this report integrates spatial information about turbine locations, bat habitat features, and bat behavior as it relates to possible interactions with turbines. A model demonstration was conducted that focuses on two bat species, the eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis) and the Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis). The eastern red bat is a relatively common tree-roosting species that ranges broadly during migration in the Eastern U.S., whereas the Indiana bat is regional species that migrates between a summer range and cave hibernacula. Moreover, Indiana bats are listed as endangered, and so the impacts to this species are of particular interest. The model demonstration used conditions at the Mountaineer Wind Energy Center (MWEC), which consists of 44 wind turbines arranged in a linear array near Thomas, West Virginia (Tucker County), to illustrate model functions and not to represent actual or potential impacts of the facility. The turbines at MWEC are erected on the ridge of Backbone Mountain with a nacelle height of 70 meters and a collision area of 72 meters (blade height) or 4,071 meters square. The habitat surrounding the turbines is an Appalachian mixed mesophytic forest. Model sensitivity runs showed that bat mortality in the model was most sensitive to perceptual range and flying height. The BVAT model demonstration found that after 30 model iterations, Red bats suffered greater rates of mortality (i.e., 2.5 times the number of bats killed per 10-day period) than Indiana bats, primarily resulting from the higher flying height of the red bat. The model described in this report is a first release. There are opportunities to expand and enhance the model in the future. For example, additional focus on the model experience would include adding project level saving/loading, integrating the outputs (trajectory mapping) into the main output window, and providing tools for preparing habitat maps. In addition to the model framework, the actual modeling options could be enhanced by adding associative learning (including additional behavioral states), adding additional movement models, and exploring the information transfer among bats. Ultimately, this standalone model could be integrated into ArcGIS as a plugin.

  6. Fostering a Renewable Energy Technology Industry: An International Comparison of Wind Industry Policy Support Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004. International Wind Energy Development, World Market2005. International Wind Energy Development, World Market2004, March 2005. Canadian Wind Energy Association (CanWEA),

  7. FAST Modular Wind Turbine CAE Tool: Nonmatching Spatial and Temporal Meshes: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J. M.; Jonkman, B. J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose and examine numerical algorithms for coupling time-dependent multi-physics modules relevant to computer-aided engineering (CAE) of wind turbines. In particular, we examine algorithms for coupling modules where spatial grids are non- matching at interfaces and module solutions are time advanced with different time increments and different time integrators. Sharing of data between modules is accomplished with a predictor-corrector approach, which allows for either implicit or explicit time integration within each module. Algorithms are presented in a general framework, but are applied to simple problems that are representative of the systems found in a whole-turbine analysis. Numerical experiments are used to explore the stability, accuracy, and efficiency of the proposed algorithms. This work is motivated by an in-progress major revision of FAST, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) premier aero-elastic CAE simulation tool. The algorithms described here will greatly increase the flexibility and efficiency of FAST.

  8. European Wind Energy Conference & Exhibition EWEC 2003, Madrid, Spain. State-of-the-Art on Methods and Software Tools for Short-Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    European Wind Energy Conference & Exhibition EWEC 2003, Madrid, Spain. State-of-the-Art on Methods and Software Tools for Short-Term Prediction of Wind Energy Production G. Giebel*, L. Landberg, Risoe National Roskilde, Denmark Abstract: The installed wind energy capacity in Europe today is 20 GW, while

  9. axis wind energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magueijo 2005-02-11 366 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  10. NREL: News Feature - NREL Software Tool a Boon for Wind Industry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    temperatures, and other variables alter the air flow and energy production at wind farms. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL Wind energy is blowing away skeptics-it's so close to...

  11. RWT TOOL: OFFSHORE WIND ENERGY MAPPING FROM SAR C. B. Hasager, M. Nielsen, M. B. Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    much interest during the last decade. The adventure started in 1991 when the first offshore wind farm. New development plans near Horns Rev and Nysted are ongoing. Offshore wind farms are in development the highest spatial detail (~500 m by 500 m grid cells) and are observed within the offshore `wind-farming

  12. assessment tool denat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu, Andrew 446 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  13. assessment tool mdat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu, Andrew 444 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  14. aid decision tool: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 121 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  15. WAVELET ANALYSIS AS A TOOL TO LOCALIZE MAGNETIC AND CROSS-HELICITY EVENTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telloni, D. [National Institute for Astrophysics, Astronomical Observatory of Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Bruno, R.; D'Amicis, R. [National Institute for Astrophysics, Institute for Interplanetary Space Physics, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Pietropaolo, E. [Department of Physics, University of L'Aquila, Via Vetoio Localita Coppito, 67100 L'Aquila (Italy); Carbone, V. [Department of Physics, University of Calabria, Via Ponte P. Bucci Cubo 31/C, 87036 Rende (Italy)

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we adopt the use of the wavelet transform as a new tool to investigate the time behavior at different scales of reduced magnetic helicity, cross-helicity, and residual energy in space plasmas. The main goal is a better characterization of the fluctuations in which interplanetary flux ropes are embedded. This kind of information is still missing in the present literature, and our tool can represent the basis for a new treatment of in situ measurements of this kind of event. There is a debate about the origins of small-scale flux ropes. It has been suggested that they are formed through magnetic reconnection in the solar wind, such as across the heliospheric current sheet. On the other hand, it has also been suggested that they are formed in the corona, similar to magnetic clouds. Thus, it looks like that there are two populations, one originating in the solar wind via magnetic reconnection across the current sheet in the inner heliosphere and the other originating in the corona. Small-scale flux ropes might be the remnants of the streamer belt blobs formed from disconnection; however, a one-to-one observation of a blob and a small-scale flux rope in the solar wind has yet to be found. Within this panorama of possibilities, this new technique appears to be very promising in investigating the origins of these objects advected by the solar wind.

  16. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty –cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

  17. accelerating policy decisions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tiongson 2012-01-01 56 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  18. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.3 Simplethe Wind: Renewable Energy Policies and Air Pollu- tion3.4 Policy Evaluation . . . . . .

  19. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Valuing the Wind: Renewable Energy Policies and Air Pollu-1 Valuing the Wind: Renewable Energy Policies and Airwind power in a carbon constrained world, Energy Policy, 34-

  20. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Center. Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy.from the Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy,

  1. Modelling Tools for Wind Farm Upgrading Hans Georg Beyer*, Bernhard Lange, Hans-Peter Waldl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    rows (see Figure 1). They are pitch controlled variable speed turbines with a rated power of 330 kW (WT-Antipolis, France ABSTRACT: Planning of modifications of existing wind farms by adding or replacing turbines makes of the farm to that of individual turbines. Additionally, modelling has to deal with different turbine types

  2. Hybrid Electro-Mechanical Simulation Tool for Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of MATLAB/Simulink to simulate the electrical and grid-related aspects of a WTG and the FAST aero-elastic wind turbine code to simulate the aerodynamic and mechanical aspects of the WTG. The combination of the two enables studies involving both electrical and mechanical aspects of the WTG.

  3. Recharging U.S. Energy Policy: Advocating for a National Renewable Portfolio Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lunt, Robin J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Assoc. (1997), http:// www.awea.org/policy/ENERGY POLICY From the renewable generator's perspective, WindPolicy Act as *'electric energy generated from solar, wind,

  4. analytic-deliberative policy making: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Handy, Susan L. 49 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe Physics Websites Summary: 1...

  5. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. Energy Policy. 35(Wind Development on Local Property Values. Renewable Energy Policy

  6. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. Energy Policy,Wind Development on Local Property Values. Renewable Energy Policy

  7. New Structural-Dynamics Module for Offshore Multimember Substructures within the Wind Turbine Computer-Aided Engineering Tool FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, H.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool for aero-hydro-servo-elastic analysis of land-based and offshore wind turbines. This paper discusses recent upgrades made to FAST to enable loads simulations of offshore wind turbines with fixed-bottom, multimember support structures (e.g., jackets and tripods, which are commonly used in transitional-depth waters). The main theory and strategies for the implementation of the multimember substructure dynamics module (SubDyn) within the new FAST modularization framework are introduced. SubDyn relies on two main engineering schematizations: 1) a linear frame finite-element beam (LFEB) model and 2) a dynamics system reduction via Craig-Bampton's method. A jacket support structure and an offshore system consisting of a turbine atop a jacket substructure were simulated to test the SubDyn module and to preliminarily assess results against results from a commercial finite-element code.

  8. The uses and limits of economic models as a climate change policy tool: A summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, M.B.; Nitze, W.A.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy initiated this workshop as a means of bringing climate change policy makers and economists together on the eve of the opening negotiating session for a climate change convention. The one and one-half day workshop was attended by 16 analysts who provided presentations on modeling approaches. There is a need for policy makers to be better able to evaluate the growing literature estimating the potential cost of policy options. Our hope is that this report, to be presented at the conclusion of the negotiations on the framework convention on climate change at the Earth Summit in Brazil, will help policy makers in the US and elsewhere evaluate the costs and benefits of national climate change mitigation policies. Although it is still unclear how far the convention will go in requiring emissions reductions, many countries are proceeding with detailed plans to reduce domestic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. Our goal in holding the workshop and writing this report is to spark a new level of dialogue between the producers and users of information on the costs and benefits of climate mitigation policies leading to the development of more cost-effective policy solutions at the national and international levels.

  9. The uses and limits of economic models as a climate change policy tool: A summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, M.B.; Nitze, W.A.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy initiated this workshop as a means of bringing climate change policy makers and economists together on the eve of the opening negotiating session for a climate change convention. The one and one-half day workshop was attended by 16 analysts who provided presentations on modeling approaches. There is a need for policy makers to be better able to evaluate the growing literature estimating the potential cost of policy options. Our hope is that this report, to be presented at the conclusion of the negotiations on the framework convention on climate change at the Earth Summit in Brazil, will help policy makers in the US and elsewhere evaluate the costs and benefits of national climate change mitigation policies. Although it is still unclear how far the convention will go in requiring emissions reductions, many countries are proceeding with detailed plans to reduce domestic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. Our goal in holding the workshop and writing this report is to spark a new level of dialogue between the producers and users of information on the costs and benefits of climate mitigation policies leading to the development of more cost-effective policy solutions at the national and international levels.

  10. Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimization Online Policy. Mission statement. Optimization Online is a repository of eprints about optimization and related topics. It facilitates quick ...

  11. Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

  12. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors. Energy Policy. 35(Wind Development on Local Property Values. Renewable Energy Policy

  13. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Valuing the Wind: Renewable Energy Policies and Air Pollu-Emissions Reductions from Wind Energy: Location, Location,High-capacity factor wind energy systems, Jounal of Solar

  14. Numerical Stability and Accuracy of Temporally Coupled Multi-Physics Modules in Wind-Turbine CAE Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gasmi, A.; Sprague, M. A.; Jonkman, J. M.; Jones, W. B.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we examine the stability and accuracy of numerical algorithms for coupling time-dependent multi-physics modules relevant to computer-aided engineering (CAE) of wind turbines. This work is motivated by an in-progress major revision of FAST, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) premier aero-elastic CAE simulation tool. We employ two simple examples as test systems, while algorithm descriptions are kept general. Coupled-system governing equations are framed in monolithic and partitioned representations as differential-algebraic equations. Explicit and implicit loose partition coupling is examined. In explicit coupling, partitions are advanced in time from known information. In implicit coupling, there is dependence on other-partition data at the next time step; coupling is accomplished through a predictor-corrector (PC) approach. Numerical time integration of coupled ordinary-differential equations (ODEs) is accomplished with one of three, fourth-order fixed-time-increment methods: Runge-Kutta (RK), Adams-Bashforth (AB), and Adams-Bashforth-Moulton (ABM). Through numerical experiments it is shown that explicit coupling can be dramatically less stable and less accurate than simulations performed with the monolithic system. However, PC implicit coupling restored stability and fourth-order accuracy for ABM; only second-order accuracy was achieved with RK integration. For systems without constraints, explicit time integration with AB and explicit loose coupling exhibited desired accuracy and stability.

  15. Grass roots technology and energy policy: Solar ovens and wind turbines in Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammen, D.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Kenya is said to be an ideal site for projects that promote renewable energy sources since it devotes over forty percent of its GNP to the purchase of imported coal and oil. The author presents a chronology of solar oven projects in Kenya and suggests that success of the program will be measured by the number of people who move on to wind turbine use. He discusses the role of renewable energy technology in reducing greenhouse gases and closes by recommending that industrialized nations that produce large amounts of carbon dioxide provide aid to develop projects that reduce carbon dioxide elsewhere in the world. At the same time they would receive credit towards their carbon dioxide quotas.

  16. MIRAGE: A Management Tool for the Analysis and Deployment of Network Security Policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia-Alfaro, Joaquin

    of configuration policies over network security components, such as firewalls, intrusion detection systems, and VPN the advances in the field of network security technologies, such as filtering of traffic, use of encrypted be exploited by unauthorized parties. The use of firewalls, NIDSs (network intrusion detection systems

  17. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices, though the economic value of wind energyenergy and climate policy initiatives. With wind turbine pricesprices reported here would be at least $20/MWh higher without the PTC), they do not represent wind energy

  18. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  19. Understanding Trends in Wind Turbine Prices Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of wind energy lower, regardless of the policy environment.price of wind energy in the US. ” Energy Policy, Volume 37,

  20. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Policies for Renewable Energy-the example of China‘s windframework,? Energy Policy 32 (2004): ?PR China,? Global WindWind Power in China: Policy and development challenges,? Energy Policy

  1. SciTech Connect: Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies Office Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY OFFSHORE WIND JOBS; OFFSHORE WIND...

  2. Final Report - Facilitating Wind Energy: Addressing Challenges around Visual Impacts, Noise, Credible Data, and Local Benefits through Creative Stakeholder Engagement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Kate; Field, Patrick; Fierman, Elizabeth; Raab, Jonathan; Susskind, Lawrence

    2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The project team consisting of the Consensus Building Institute, Inc., Raab Associates, Ltd., and the MIT-Harvard Program on Negotiation created a model and set of tools for building the capacity of state officials to effectively collaborate with diverse stakeholders in advancing wind development policy formation, wind facility siting, and transmission policy and siting. The model was used to enhance the ability of state officials to advance wind development in their states. Training was delivered in Cambridge, MA, in Spring 2011. The training and associated materials, including a Wind Energy Workbook, website, and simulations, is available for ongoing and widespread dissemination throughout the US.

  3. POLICY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreachPNNL AdvancesPNNL:13, 2013 POLICY

  4. Policies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysicsPits | NationalYou'vePolicies Policies

  5. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  6. State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manufacturing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA): State Policy and the Pursuit of Renewable Energy...

  7. POLICY

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreachPNNL AdvancesPNNL:13, 2013

  8. Understanding Wind Turbine Price Trends in the U.S. Over the Past Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of wind energy lower, regardless of the policy environment.price of wind energy in the US. ” Energy Policy, Volume 37,to Energy Policy Abstract: On a $-per-kW basis, wind turbine

  9. Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment Programme's Renewable...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment Programme's Renewable Energy Resource Explorer Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Solar and Wind Energy Resource...

  10. UTS Policy Framework: Introduction 11.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    UTS Policy Framework: user guide Contents Introduction 11. TheroleofpolicywithintheUniversity 12 Policytemplate 64kbWord Directivetemplate 64kbWord Coversheets Coversheet--policies 48kbWord Coversheet--academicpolicies 48kbWord Coversheet--directives 48kbWord Policy Tools PolicyTool1:IssuesLog 60kbWord PolicyTool2

  11. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew D.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind power in a carbon constrained world. Energy Policy 34,wind energy: modeling the competition between gas turbines and compressed air energy storage for supplemental generation. Energy Policy

  12. Learning curves and changing product attributes: the case of wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulomb, Louis; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Three main factors can result in deviations from this. Firstly, excess demand; for example, the large US demand for wind turbines in 2005, driven by high natural gas prices, is creating scarcity and is allowing turbine manufacturers to charge higher... , P.E. (2003) Final Report of EXTOOL – Experience Curves: a tool for energy policy programmes assessment. Lund, Sweden. Nijssen (2000). Scaling rules relevant to the Lagewey 50/70 wind turbine: literature study. MSc Thesis report, TU Delft...

  13. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDIJob and

  14. Practitioner Perspectives Matter: Public Policy and Private Investment in the U.S. Electric Power Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barradale, Merrill Jones

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these policies would give wind energy a boost relative toon the cost of wind power. ” Energy Policy 25(1): 15-27.of Policy Uncertainty on Renewable Energy Investment: Wind

  15. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Curves for Wind Farms. ” Energy Policy, 33: 133-150. Lusey,Wind Power Development in the United States” Energy Policy.Curves for Wind Power. ” Energy Policy, 30: 1181- IHS CERA.

  16. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  17. Sowing the Seeds for a Bountiful Harvest: Shaping the Rules and Creating the Tools for Wisconsin's Next Generation of Wind Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickerman, Michael Jay

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Project objectives are twofold: (1) to engage wind industry stakeholders to participate in formulating uniform permitting standards applicable to commercial wind energy installations; and (2) to create and maintain an online Wisconsin Wind Information Center to enable policymakers and the public to increaser their knowledge of and support for wind generation in Wisconsin.

  18. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2.2 Renewable Energy Policies . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Valuing the Wind: Renewable Energy Policies and Air Pollu-Moselle, Harnessing Renewable Energy, London, Earthscan. [6

  19. Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seamless Transport Policy: Institutional and Regulatory Aspects of Inter-Modal Coordination Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Seamless Transport Policy:...

  20. Wind Powering America Webinar Series (Postcard), Wind Powering America (WPA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America offers a free monthly webinar series that provides expert information on today?s key wind energy topics. This postcard is an outreach tool that provides a brief description of the webinars as well as the URL.

  1. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992). “Capacity credit of wind power in the Netherlands. ”modeling as a tool for wind resource assessment andBurton, T. , et al. (2001). Wind Energy Handbook, John

  2. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States: Struggling to Remain Competitive in the Face of Strong Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Build a Durable Market for Wind Power in the United States”Consult. 2008. “International Wind Energy Development: WorldGlobal Experience Curves for Wind Farms. ” Energy Policy,

  3. Weighing the Costs and Benefits of Renewables Portfolio Standards: A Comparative Analysis of State-Level Policy Impact Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy/clean_energy_policies/strong-winds-opportunities-for-Energy Economics Wind Utility Consulting (WUC) UCS Rutgers CEEEP Center for Clean Air Policy (

  4. The Political Economy of Wind Power in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Ryan Landon

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    woes hamper China wind farms‘ push for profitability. ?18.9 gigawatts (GW) of new wind farms and overtook the US togrid companies to connect wind farms to the grid. The policy

  5. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Wind Energy Policy in the EU: Lessons from Denmark,Wind Energy Development: World Market Update 2007." Ringkobing, Denmark:Wind Energy Association Although European countries such as Germany, Denmark

  6. Wind Tunnel Building - 1 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available...

  7. Policymaker's Guide to Feed-in Tariff Policy Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couture, T. D.; Cory, K.; Kreycik, C.; Williams, E.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feed-in tariffs (FITs) are the most widely used renewable energy policy in the world for driving accelerating renewable energy (RE) deployment, accounting for a greater share of RE development than either tax incentives or renewable portfolio standard (RPS) policies. FITs have generated significant RE deployment, helping bring the countries that have implemented them successfully to the forefront of the global RE industry. In the European Union (EU), FIT policies have led to the deployment of more than 15,000 MW of solar photovoltaic (PV) power and more than 55,000 MW of wind power between 2000 and the end of 2009. In total, FITs are responsible for approximately 75% of global PV and 45% of global wind deployment. Countries such as Germany, in particular, have demonstrated that FITs can be used as a powerful policy tool to drive RE deployment and help meet combined energy security and emissions reductions objectives. This policymaker's guide provides a detailed analysis of FIT policy design and implementation and identifies a set of best practices that have been effective at quickly stimulating the deployment of large amounts of RE generation. Although the discussion is aimed primarily at decision makers who have decided that a FIT policy best suits their needs, exploration of FIT policies can also help inform a choice among alternative renewable energy policies.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: support wind-energy development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support wind-energy development Sandia Develops Tool to Evaluate Wind-TurbineRadar Impacts On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  9. NREL researchers are the first to use a high-performance com-puting tool for a large-eddy simulation of an entire wind plant.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denmark and Sweden and compared results with more than a year's worth of plant data.The simulated power at least 50% wastepaper, including 10% post consumer waste. NREL Develops Simulations forWind Plant Power-eddy simulation of an entire wind plant. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National

  10. Policy Flash 2014-19 Electronic Products Environmental Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    19 Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) Policy Flash 2014-19 Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) Questions concerning this policy flash...

  11. Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NRELDOE Approach Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Effective Community-Wide Policy Technical Assistance: The NREL...

  12. assessment tool begins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the inertial and structural properties of wind turbine, and a realistic composite wind turbine blade are used to evaluate the performance of different tools Yu, Wenbin 36...

  13. Intelligent wind power prediction systems final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intelligent wind power prediction systems ­ final report ­ Henrik Aalborg Nielsen (han (FU 4101) Ens. journal number: 79029-0001 Project title: Intelligent wind power prediction systems #12;#12;Intelligent wind power prediction systems 1/36 Contents 1 Introduction 6 2 The Wind Power Prediction Tool 7 3

  14. POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    POLICY SECTIONS POLICY OFFICE POLICIES FORMS PROCEDURES UNIVERSITY POLICY #12;guide to WRITING POLICIES Administrative policies align opera- tions, set behavior expectations across the University system and communicate policy roles and responsibilities. You, as the policy owner or writer, have the important task

  15. Part of the Climate Change Problem . . . and the Solution? Chinese-Made Wind Power Technology and Opportunities for Dissemination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Joanna I.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the building of wind farms  with  turbines  manufactured tender  for  a  100  MW  wind  farm  located  in  Huilai, wind  turbines  in  its  wind  farm  projects.   Policy 

  16. Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    v Acronyms Acronyms AC alternating current AEO Annual Energy Outlook AP2 (formerly APEEP) Air Pollution Emission Experiments and Policy AWEA American Wind Energy Association AWC...

  17. JEREMY FIRESTONE School of Marine Science and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Science and Policy, 2011- Courses: Offshore Wind Power: Science, Engineering and Policy Renewable Energy on public attitudes toward offshore oil drilling and wind development, Energy Policy (to be published 2013.1080/00908320.2012.698926 (2012) Firestone, J., Kempton, W., Lilley, M.B., Samoteskul, K., Public acceptance of offshore wind

  18. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads from the wind inflow through rotor aerodynamics, drive train and power electronics is stillWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wächter ForWind-Center for Wind

  19. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  20. New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has developed a tool to estimate jobs and other economic impacts associated with offshore wind development in the United States. The modeling tool, which illustrates the potential...

  1. The communication dimension of wind energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    The communication dimension of wind energy: Challenges and opportunities #12;OPPORTUNITIES #12;Pew;1. Emergent anti-wind energy advocacy groups #12;2. A multi-faceted technical issue that is difficult to explain Wind energy Policy Science Engineering Ethics Public relations Others #12;3. Different audience

  2. Women of Wind Energy Leadership Forum

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2014 Women of Wind Energy Leadership Forum combines professional development with tools to advance renewable energy. Join professionals from across the country to discuss current renewable...

  3. Save with Solar and Wind, Winter 2001/2002 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This issue describes some of the ways in which our government is saving energy and money by using solar and wind systems to produce heat and electricity at Federal facilities. It focuses on successful energy efficiency and renewable energy projects-such as those in Joshua Tree National Park in California-sponsored by DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) and other agencies. And it includes information about software, innovative financing opportunities, and other tools that can help agencies fulfill the mandates of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and Executive Order 13123.

  4. UNDERLYING MOTIVATIONS FOR DELAWARE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN SUPPORT OF OFFSHORE WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    UNDERLYING MOTIVATIONS FOR DELAWARE PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN SUPPORT OF OFFSHORE WIND: IMPLICATIONS PARTICIPATION IN SUPPORT OF OFFSHORE WIND: IMPLICATIONS FOR STATE ENERGY POLICY by Jacqueline D Piero Approved ................................................................................................. 3 Offshore wind: a new option in the United States.............................................. 4

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Matlab which simplifies the process of creating a three-dimensional model of a wind turbine blade. The graphical, user-friendly tool manages all blade information including...

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Matlab which simplifies the process of creating a three-dimensional model of a wind turbine blade. The graphical, user-friendly tool manages all blade information including...

  7. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  8. Guidelines for Solar and Wind Local Ordinances (Virginia) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    wind. The law states that any local ordinance related to the siting of solar or wind energy facilities must: * Be consistent with the Commonwealth Energy Policy ( 67-102) *...

  9. New England Wind Forum: A Wind Powering America Project, Volume 1, Issue 4 -- May 2008 (Newsletter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, R. C.; Gifford, J.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education, and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 4 features an interview with Brian Fairbank, president and CEO of Jiminy Peak Mountain Resort.

  10. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  11. Probabilistic wind power forecasting -European Wind Energy Conference -Milan, Italy, 7-10 May 2007 Probabilistic short-term wind power forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Probabilistic wind power forecasting - European Wind Energy Conference - Milan, Italy, 7-10 May 2007 Probabilistic short-term wind power forecasting based on kernel density estimators J´er´emie Juban jeremie.juban@ensmp.fr; georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting tools

  12. Policy brief The case for and against onshore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy brief June 2012 The case for and against onshore wind energy in the UK Samuela Bassi, Alex and Policy can be found at: http://www.cccep.ac.uk #12;| 1The case for and against onshore wind energy contribute to the UK's energy mix? 7 3. What is the impact of onshore wind intermittency on the electricity

  13. 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the past year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with significant federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. This report examines key trends.

  14. Automatic selection of tuning parameters in wind power prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic selection of tuning parameters in wind power prediction Lasse Engbo Christiansen (lec Report number: IMM-Technical Report-2007-12 Project title: Intelligent wind power prediction systems PSO The wind power forecasting system developed at DTU - the Wind Power Prediction Tool (WPPT) - predicts

  15. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  16. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  17. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

  18. Wind Energy Ordinances (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to increasing energy demands in the United States and more installed wind projects, rural communities and local governments with limited or no experience with wind energy now have the opportunity to become involved in this industry. Communities with good wind resources may be approached by entities with plans to develop the resource. Although these opportunities can create new revenue in the form of construction jobs and land lease payments, they also create a new responsibility on the part of local governments to create ordinances to regulate wind turbine installations. Ordinances are laws, often found within municipal codes that provide various degrees of control to local governments. These laws cover issues such as zoning, traffic, consumer protection, and building codes. Wind energy ordinances reflect local needs and wants regarding wind turbines within county or city lines and aid the development of safe facilities that will be embraced by the community. Since 2008 when the National Renewable Energy Laboratory released a report on existing wind energy ordinances, many more ordinances have been established throughout the United States, and this trend is likely to continue in the near future as the wind energy industry grows. This fact sheet provides an overview of elements found in typical wind energy ordinances to educate state and local government officials, as well as policy makers.

  19. Simulation and Optimization of Wind Farm Operations under Stochastic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byon, Eunshin

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops a new methodology and associated solution tools to achieve optimal operations and maintenance strategies for wind turbines, helping reduce operational costs and enhance the marketability of wind generation. The integrated...

  20. DOE Announces Webinars on Wind Energy and Property Values, the...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Wind Energy and Property Values, the Best of the Clean Cities Tools and Resources, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Wind Energy and Property Values, the Best of the Clean Cities...

  1. s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk CCS deployment 11 April 2008 Inst Public Policy Research, London 1 CCS : one tool for mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    .haszeldine@ed.ac.uk CCS deployment 11 April 2008 Inst Public Policy Research, London 3 World energy prediction (Business power Hydro power Other renewables Fossil fuel use doubles in next 30yr IEA 2004 World Energy outlook Fossil fuels will still provide most of world energy #12;s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk CCS deployment 11 April

  2. Buildings Energy Efficiency Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Efficiency Wind Biomass Natural Gas Combined Cycle Nuclear Coal IGCC Photovoltaics RangeofBuildings Energy Efficiency Policy ­ A Brief History Steven Nadel Executive Director American Council for an Energy- Efficient Economy #12;U.S. Energy Use in Relation to GDP 1970-2008 0.0 50.0 100

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  4. Wind power forecasting : state-of-the-art 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteiro, C.; Bessa, R.; Miranda, V.; Botterud, A.; Wang, J.; Conzelmann, G.; Decision and Information Sciences; INESC Porto

    2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Many countries and regions are introducing policies aimed at reducing the environmental footprint from the energy sector and increasing the use of renewable energy. In the United States, a number of initiatives have been taken at the state level, from renewable portfolio standards (RPSs) and renewable energy certificates (RECs), to regional greenhouse gas emission control schemes. Within the U.S. Federal government, new energy and environmental policies and goals are also being crafted, and these are likely to increase the use of renewable energy substantially. The European Union is pursuing implementation of its ambitious 20/20/20 targets, which aim (by 2020) to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 20% (as compared to 1990), increase the amount of renewable energy to 20% of the energy supply, and reduce the overall energy consumption by 20% through energy efficiency. With the current focus on energy and the environment, efficient integration of renewable energy into the electric power system is becoming increasingly important. In a recent report, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) describes a model-based scenario, in which wind energy provides 20% of the U.S. electricity demand in 2030. The report discusses a set of technical and economic challenges that have to be overcome for this scenario to unfold. In Europe, several countries already have a high penetration of wind power (i.e., in the range of 7 to 20% of electricity consumption in countries such as Germany, Spain, Portugal, and Denmark). The rapid growth in installed wind power capacity is expected to continue in the United States as well as in Europe. A large-scale introduction of wind power causes a number of challenges for electricity market and power system operators who will have to deal with the variability and uncertainty in wind power generation when making their scheduling and dispatch decisions. Wind power forecasting (WPF) is frequently identified as an important tool to address the variability and uncertainty in wind power and to more efficiently operate power systems with large wind power penetrations. Moreover, in a market environment, the wind power contribution to the generation portofolio becomes important in determining the daily and hourly prices, as variations in the estimated wind power will influence the clearing prices for both energy and operating reserves. With the increasing penetration of wind power, WPF is quickly becoming an important topic for the electric power industry. System operators (SOs), generating companies (GENCOs), and regulators all support efforts to develop better, more reliable and accurate forecasting models. Wind farm owners and operators also benefit from better wind power prediction to support competitive participation in electricity markets against more stable and dispatchable energy sources. In general, WPF can be used for a number of purposes, such as: generation and transmission maintenance planning, determination of operating reserve requirements, unit commitment, economic dispatch, energy storage optimization (e.g., pumped hydro storage), and energy trading. The objective of this report is to review and analyze state-of-the-art WPF models and their application to power systems operations. We first give a detailed description of the methodologies underlying state-of-the-art WPF models. We then look at how WPF can be integrated into power system operations, with specific focus on the unit commitment problem.

  5. Policy Impacts on Deforestation: Lessons Learned from Past Experiences...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Inform New Initiatives Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Impacts on Deforestation: Lessons Learned from Past Experiences to Inform New...

  6. Climate policies for road transport revisited (I): Evaluation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the current framework Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate policies for road transport revisited (I): Evaluation of the current framework...

  7. Green Investment Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Horizons: Effects of Policy on the Market for Building Energy Efficiency Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Investment Horizons: Effects...

  8. CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy Innovations to Support Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to Support Energy Efficiency: Energy Performance Contracting and On-Bill Financing Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CESC-Webinar: Financial and Policy...

  9. The U.S. wind production tax credit - evaluating its impact on wind deployment and assessing the cost of its renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ernst, Patrick C. (Patrick Charles)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The desirability, viability, and cost effectiveness of policies designed to incentivize growth of the wind energy industry are subject to widespread debate within the U.S. government, wind industry groups, and the general ...

  10. Benefit-cost assessment of aviation environmental policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Christopher K. (Christopher Kenneth)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis aids in the development of a framework in which to conduct global benefit-cost assessments of aviation policies. Current policy analysis tools, such as the aviation environmental portfolio management tool (APMT), ...

  11. Sandia National Laboratories Releases Updated Wind Plant Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases Updated Wind Plant Modeling Guidelines Revamped Simulation Tool to Power Up Wave Energy Development DOE's AVESTAR Center to Expand Research, Training Opportunities...

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: DOE/Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  13. Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

  14. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: McMaster University Alcohol Policy Policy Number, 1998 Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: May 11, 1998 Responsible Executive: Vice-President (Administration policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. INTRODUCTION Mc

  15. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, R.; Bolinger, M.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. wind power industry experienced yet another record year in 2009, once again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, 2009 was a year of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting the wind power industry and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry toward continued aggressive expansion. The year 2010, meanwhile, is anticipated to be one of some retrenchment, with expectations for fewer wind power capacity additions than seen in 2009. The rapid pace of development and change within the industry has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace, yet the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the fourth in an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the United States wind power market, with a particular focus on 2009.

  16. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  17. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  18. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  19. Wind | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPower 2010 1 TNews &AppliancesYourAboutPoliciesWind

  20. Regulatory and technical barriers to wind energy integration in northeast China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davidson, Michael (Michael Roy)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    China leads the world in installed wind capacity, which forms an integral part of its long-term goals to reduce the environmental impacts of the electricity sector. This primarily centrally-managed wind policy has concentrated ...

  1. Sandia Energy - Tool for Siting, Planning, and Encroachment Analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Renewables (TSPEAR) Viewshed Model Completed Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Computational Modeling & Simulation Tool for Siting, Planning, and...

  2. Tool Improves Electricity Demand Predictions to Make More Room...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addthis Related Articles PNNL Reviews Wildlife-Interaction Monitoring for Offshore Wind Farms - Technology Hybrids Show Best Potential Updated Web Tool Focuses on Bottom Line...

  3. Essays on energy and environmental policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novan, Kevin Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Electricity Dispatch Process . . . 1.2.2 Renewable Energy1 Valuing the Wind: Renewable Energy Policies and Air Pollu-2.3.3 Impact on the Value of Renewable Electricity . . 2.4

  4. WINDExchange: Wind Economic Development Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable Version BookmarkDevelopment

  5. POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    POLICY: A:VPFA # / Purchasing Policy PROCEDURES: APPENDIX: Approved: April 1, 2013 Revised: Cross References: Purchasing Policy Capital Projects and Renovations Policy Conflict of Interest Policy Sustainability Policy Green Procurement Policy 1 of 9 PROCEDURES: Purchasing Policy AUTHORITY: University

  6. Winding Trail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, the demand for clean renewable energy continues to rise drastically in Europe, the US, and other countries. Wind energy in the ocean can possibly be one of those future renewable clean energy sources as long...

  7. Wind Power Resource Assessment in Ohio and Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Womeldorf, Carole

    Wind Power Resource Assessment in Ohio and Puerto Rico: A Motivational and Educational Tool Juan University, Athens, Ohio Abstract This paper presents an educational guide and example of a wind resource calculations. New data representing wind speed and direction for locations in Ohio and Puerto Rico

  8. Development and Deployment of an Advanced Wind Forecasting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    findings. Part 2 addresses how operators of wind power plants and power systems can incorporate advanced the output of advanced wind energy forecasts into decision support models for wind power plant and power and applications of power market simulation models around the world. Argonne's software tools are used extensively

  9. Modelling of transient wind turbine loads during pitch motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling of transient wind turbine loads during pitch motion Niels.N. Sřrensen, Helge Aa. Madsen In connection with the design of wind turbines and their control algorithms, the transient loads, especially widespread tool in the wind turbine industry, the time constants necessary to describe these problems

  10. NREL Innovations Help Drive Wind Industry Transformation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For nearly 30 years, NREL has helped the wind turbine industry through design and research innovations. The comprehensive capabilities of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), ranging from specialized computer simulation tools to unique test facilities, has been used to design, develop, and deploy several generations of advanced wind energy technology.

  11. Potential Flow Modelling for Wind Turbines Shane Cline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Potential Flow Modelling for Wind Turbines by Shane Cline B.Sc., University of Toledo, 2003 M means, without the permission of the author. #12;ii Potential Flow Modelling for Wind Turbines by Shane potential flow methods are a promising alternative to mainstream wind turbine aerodynamics tools

  12. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: Engagement of Independent Contractors Policy Number of Original Approval: Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: Payments to Individuals (Independent Contractors) versus between this electronic policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails

  13. Wind Energy Career Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwen Andersen

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Saint Francis University has developed curriculum in engineering and in business that is meeting the needs of students and employers (Task 1) as well as integrating wind energy throughout the curriculum. Through a variety of approaches, the University engaged in public outreach and education that reached over 2,000 people annually (Task 2). We have demonstrated, through the success of these programs, that students are eager to prepare for emerging jobs in alternative energy, that employers are willing to assist in developing employees who understand the broader business and policy context of the industry, and that people want to learn about wind energy.

  14. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  15. SciTech Connect: U.S. Virgin Islands Wind Resources Update 2014

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Integrated Deployment Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND...

  16. Basic Wind Tech Course - Lesson Plans and Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swapp, Andy

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The funds from this project were used to purchase tools and instrumentation to help replicate actual on-the-job wind energy scenarios which provided the students with the practical or applied components of wind energy jobs. This project enhanced the educational experiences provided for the students in terms of engineering and science components of wind energy by using electronics, control systems, and electro-mechanical instrumentation to help students learn standardized wind-specific craftsman skills. In addition the tools and instrumentation helped the students learn the safety necessary to work in the wind industry.

  17. Idaho Power Develops Renewable Integration Tool for More Cost...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    developed a Renewables Integration Tool (RIT) that enables grid operators to use wind energy more cost-effectively to serve electricity customers in Idaho and Oregon. The tool was...

  18. Comparison of Feed in Tariff, Quota and Auction Mechanisms to Support Wind Power Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Lucy; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of policy instruments employed to support onshore wind projects suggests that in terms of capacity installed, policies adopted in Germany have been more effective than those adopted in the UK. Price comparisons have frequently...

  19. The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerty, John Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

  20. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett Mattapoisett, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 ­ February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  3. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jřrgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  4. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  5. Policy Flash 2015-06 Energy Star and Electronic Products Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Policy Flash 2015-06 Energy Star and Electronic Products Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) Policy Flash 2015-06 Energy Star and Electronic Products Environmental Assessment...

  6. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  7. Trade Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an otherwise insightful and thoughtful article, Sebastian Pfotenhauer (Trade Policy Is Science Policy,” Issues, Fall 2013) might better have entitled his contribution “Trade Policy Needs to Be Reconciled with Science ...

  8. EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY POLICY STATEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES POLICY POLICY STATEMENT Imperial College London is committed to a policy Resources (HR) has overall responsibility for the formulation, implementation and monitoring of the policy that this policy is effective by: · advising the College's senior management, other appropriate members of staff

  9. Multi-Fidelity Uncertainty Quantification: Application to a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Under an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Juan J.

    Multi-Fidelity Uncertainty Quantification: Application to a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Under, USA Designing better vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) requires considering the uncertain wind cost. Low-fidelity tools are used extensively in the modeling of vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs)3

  10. Ris-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř-R-1000(EN) Cost Optimization of Wind Turbines for Large-scale Off-shore Wind Farms Peter contains a preliminary investigation of site specific design of off- shore wind turbines for a large off using a design tool for wind turbines that involve numerical optimization and aeroelastic calculations

  11. Security Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Security Policy analyzes, develops and interprets safeguards and security policy governing national security functions and the protection of related critical assets entrusted to the...

  12. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Hand, Maureen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global wind power market has been growing at a phenomenal pace, driven by favorable policies towards renewable energy and the improving economics of wind projects. On a going forward basis, utility-scale wind power offers the potential for significant reductions in the carbon footprint of the electricity sector. Specifically, the global wind resource is vast and, though accessing this potential is not costless or lacking in barriers, wind power can be developed at scale in the near to medium term at what promises to be an acceptable cost.

  13. Northwest Wind Integration Forum Policy Steering Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Planning, Portland General Electric Company Mark Maher, CEO, Western Electricity Coordinating Council John Power and Conservation Council (Co-Chair) Steve Wright, Administrator and CEO, Bonneville Power Administration (Co-Chair) Paul Norman, Facilitator Jorge Carrasco, Superintendent, Seattle City Light Mike

  14. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  15. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  16. Percussion tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Teddy R.

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A percussion tool is described and which includes a housing mounting a tool bit; a reciprocally moveable hammer borne by the housing and which is operable to repeatedly strike the tool bit; and a reciprocally moveable piston enclosed within the hammer and which imparts reciprocal movement to the reciprocally moveable hammer.

  17. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  18. Essays in monetary policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakdawala, Aeimit Kirti

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monetary Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.11.2.3 Optimal Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Monetary policy shocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  19. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  20. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  1. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar October 20, 2014 8:00AM EDT...

  2. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  3. LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    LASER SAFETY POLICY Policy Statement Each department that acquires or operates lasers for use in the university's Laser Safety Manual. Reason for Policy/Purpose If improperly used or controlled, lasers can produce multiple injuries, including burns, blindness, and electrocution. This policy and the university

  4. The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a Way to Address Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: The Lessons of Practice: Domestic Policy Reform as a...

  5. From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in% the%UK% Florian!laggard!to!leader:!Explaining! offshore!wind!developments!in!the!UK! Florian Kern1* , Adrian Smith1 , Chris Shaw1 , Rob Raven2 and Bram for publication in Energy Policy, 19 Feb 2014 Abstract Offshore wind technology has recently undergone rapid

  6. New report assesses offshore wind technology challenges and potential risks and benefits.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New report assesses offshore wind technology challenges and potential risks and benefits. The report estimates that U.S. offshore winds have a gross potential generating capacity four times greater wind resources can provide many potential benefits, and with effective research, policies

  7. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  8. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers Improve Wind Power On November 15, 2011, in Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy...

  10. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  11. Guide to Using the WIND Toolkit Validation Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieberman-Cribbin, W.; Draxl, C.; Clifton, A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's goal of using 20% wind energy by 2030, the Wind Integration National Dataset (WIND) Toolkit was created to provide information on wind speed, wind direction, temperature, surface air pressure, and air density on more than 126,000 locations across the United States from 2007 to 2013. The numerical weather prediction model output, gridded at 2-km and at a 5-minute resolution, was further converted to detail the wind power production time series of existing and potential wind facility sites. For users of the dataset it is important that the information presented in the WIND Toolkit is accurate and that errors are known, as then corrective steps can be taken. Therefore, we provide validation code written in R that will be made public to provide users with tools to validate data of their own locations. Validation is based on statistical analyses of wind speed, using error metrics such as bias, root-mean-square error, centered root-mean-square error, mean absolute error, and percent error. Plots of diurnal cycles, annual cycles, wind roses, histograms of wind speed, and quantile-quantile plots are created to visualize how well observational data compares to model data. Ideally, validation will confirm beneficial locations to utilize wind energy and encourage regional wind integration studies using the WIND Toolkit.

  12. Distributed Wind Diffusion Model Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Drury, E.; Sigrin, B.; Gleason, M.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind market demand is driven by current and future wind price and performance, along with several non-price market factors like financing terms, retail electricity rates and rate structures, future wind incentives, and others. We developed a new distributed wind technology diffusion model for the contiguous United States that combines hourly wind speed data at 200m resolution with high resolution electricity load data for various consumer segments (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial), electricity rates and rate structures for utility service territories, incentive data, and high resolution tree cover. The model first calculates the economics of distributed wind at high spatial resolution for each market segment, and then uses a Bass diffusion framework to estimate the evolution of market demand over time. The model provides a fundamental new tool for characterizing how distributed wind market potential could be impacted by a range of future conditions, such as electricity price escalations, improvements in wind generator performance and installed cost, and new financing structures. This paper describes model methodology and presents sample results for distributed wind market potential in the contiguous U.S. through 2050.

  13. Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennell, W.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

  14. Wind emission of OB supergiants and the influence of clumping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaela Kraus; Jiri Kubat; Jiri Krticka

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of the wind to the total continuum of OB supergiants is discussed. For wind velocity distributions with \\beta > 1.0, the wind can have strong influence to the total continuum emission, even at optical wavelengths. Comparing the continuum emission of clumped and unclumped winds, especially for stars with high \\beta values, delivers flux differences of up to 30% with maximum in the near-IR. Continuum observations at these wavelengths are therefore an ideal tool to discriminate between clumped and unclumped winds of OB supergiants.

  15. Studying Wind Energy/Bird Interactions: A Guidance Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R. [California Energy Commission (US); Morrison, M. [California State Univ., Sacramento, CA (US); Sinclair, K. [Dept. of Energy/National Renewable Energy Lab. (US); Strickland, D. [WEST, Inc. (US)

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidance document is a product of the Avian Subcommittee of the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC). The NWCC was formed to better understand and promote responsible, credible, and comparable avian/wind energy interaction studies. Bird mortality is a concern and wind power is a potential clean and green source of electricity, making study of wind energy/bird interactions essential. This document provides an overview for regulators and stakeholders concerned with wind energy/bird interactions, as well as a more technical discussion of the basic concepts and tools for studying such interactions.

  16. Wind Turbine Drivetrain Condition Monitoring - An Overview (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, S.; Yang, W.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High operation and maintenance costs still hamper the development of the wind industry despite its quick growth worldwide. To reduce unscheduled downtime and avoid catastrophic failures of wind turbines and their components have been and will be crucial to further raise the competitiveness of wind power. Condition monitoring is one of the key tools for achieving such a goal. To enhance the research and development of advanced condition monitoring techniques dedicated to wind turbines, we present an overview of wind turbine condition monitoring, discuss current practices, point out existing challenges, and suggest possible solutions.

  17. NREL Software Aids Offshore Wind Turbine Designs (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers are supporting offshore wind power development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of both fixed and floating offshore wind turbines. While existing computer-aided engineering (CAE) models can simulate the conditions and stresses that a land-based wind turbine experiences over its lifetime, offshore turbines require the additional considerations of variations in water depth, soil type, and wind and wave severity, which also necessitate the use of a variety of support-structure types. NREL's core wind CAE tool, FAST, models the additional effects of incident waves, sea currents, and the foundation dynamics of the support structures.

  18. Preserving Privacy Based on Semantic Policy Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kagal, Lalana

    Different organizations are constantly collecting, analyzing, and storing individuals' private data: shopping sites want to provide better service and recommendations, hospitals to improve healthcare, and government agencies ...

  19. Policy Tools for U.S. Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Ronald D.; Richardons, James W.; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Rosson, C. Parr; Smith, Edward G.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .. . .. .... . . . ... ... . . . ...... . . . 42 - 1m port Quotas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 - Import Tariffs, Countervailing Duties . . . ...... . . .. . . 44 - Nontariff Trade Barrier .. ............ . ... . . . . .. 45 - Section 22... ... ... .. .... .... . ... .. ..... .. . . .. 46 - Tariff-Rate Quota (TRQ) ............ . ... . ... .. . 47 - Variable Levy . . .... ....... . ................. 48 - Voluntary Export Restraint . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 ? Trade Agreements - Barter/Counter Trade...

  20. Policy Tools for U.S. Agriculture.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Ronald D.; Richardons, James W.; Klinefelter, Danny A.; Paggi, Mechel S.; Smith, Edward G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Trade Programs ? Trade Barrier Reduction -GATT (General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade) .......................................................... 23 -Generalized System of Preferences (GSP... .............................................................................. ..... ... ..... .......................... 32 -Import Tariffs, Countervailing Duties .............................................................................. 33 - Non tariff Trade Barrier...

  1. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develop a new complex modeling and analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and analysis tool capable of analyzing floating platform concepts for offshore wind turbines. The new modeling tool combines the computational methodologies used to analyze land-based wind turbines dynamic simulation tool will enable the development of cost-effective offshore technologies capable

  2. Policy and Contract Management for Semantic Web Services 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uszok, A; Bradshaw, J M; Jeffers, R; Johnson, M; Tate, Austin; Dalton, J; Aitken, Stuart

    This paper summarizes our efforts to develop capabilities for policy and contract management for Semantic Web Services applications. KAoS services and tools allow for the specification, management, analyzes, disclosure and enforcement of policies...

  3. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warmingGlobal »Wind

  4. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New Today aboutWind

  5. NREL Develops Simulations for Wind Plant Power and Turbine Loads (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL researchers are the first to use a high-performance computing tool for a large-eddy simulation of an entire wind plant.

  6. Wind Vision: Updating the DOE 20% Wind Energy by 2030 Report (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report was developed as part of the Advanced Energy Initiative. Published in 2008, the report was largely based on information collected and analyzed in 2006. Much has changed since then, including shifts in technology, markets, and policy. The industry needs a new, clear, vision for wind power that is shared among stakeholders from the U.S. government, industry, academia, and NGO communities. At WINDPOWER 2013, the U.S. Department of Energy, in partnership with the American Wind Energy Association and the Wind Energy Foundation, launched a project to update the 20% report with new objectives. This conference poster outlines the elements of the new Wind Vision.

  7. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  8. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  9. Sunflower Wind Farm EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunflower Wind Farm EA Sunflower Wind Farm Draft EA (25mb pdf) Note: If you have problems downloading this file, pelase contact Lou Hanebury at (406) 255-2812 Sunflower Wind Farm...

  10. Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

  11. Review of Wind Energy Forecasting Methods for Modeling Ramping Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, S; Lundquist, J K; Marjanovic, N; Williams, J L; Rhodes, M; Chow, T K; Maxwell, R

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Tall onshore wind turbines, with hub heights between 80 m and 100 m, can extract large amounts of energy from the atmosphere since they generally encounter higher wind speeds, but they face challenges given the complexity of boundary layer flows. This complexity of the lowest layers of the atmosphere, where wind turbines reside, has made conventional modeling efforts less than ideal. To meet the nation's goal of increasing wind power into the U.S. electrical grid, the accuracy of wind power forecasts must be improved. In this report, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, in collaboration with the University of Colorado at Boulder, University of California at Berkeley, and Colorado School of Mines, evaluates innovative approaches to forecasting sudden changes in wind speed or 'ramping events' at an onshore, multimegawatt wind farm. The forecast simulations are compared to observations of wind speed and direction from tall meteorological towers and a remote-sensing Sound Detection and Ranging (SODAR) instrument. Ramping events, i.e., sudden increases or decreases in wind speed and hence, power generated by a turbine, are especially problematic for wind farm operators. Sudden changes in wind speed or direction can lead to large power generation differences across a wind farm and are very difficult to predict with current forecasting tools. Here, we quantify the ability of three models, mesoscale WRF, WRF-LES, and PF.WRF, which vary in sophistication and required user expertise, to predict three ramping events at a North American wind farm.

  12. Wind/Hydro Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

  13. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  14. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

  15. Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program – Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

  16. New England Wind Forum, Volume 1, Issue 1 -- January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New England Wind Forum electronic newsletter summarizes the latest news in wind energy development activity, markets, education and policy in the New England region. It also features an interview with a key figure influencing New England's wind energy development. Volume 1, Issue 1 features an interview with Brother Joseph of Portsmouth Abbey. A commercial-scale Vestas V47 wind turbine will soon be installed on the grounds of the Benedictine monastery and prep school in Rhode Island, with the assistance of a grant from the Rhode Island Renewable Energy Fund. This will be the first large-scale turbine located behind the customer meter in the region.

  17. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States. Specifically, Bluewater Wind and Delmarva PowerLLC Babcock & Brown Acquisition Bluewater Wind Good Energies

  18. Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  19. Wilmar Deliverable D6.2 (a) Wilmar Planning Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilmar Deliverable D6.2 (a) Wilmar Planning Tool User guide Helge V. Larsen January 2006 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde Denmark #12;6u) Helge V. Larsen Uvyr) Wilmar Planning Tool User guide 9rhr�h�!�puh: This is a short user guide to the Wilmar Planning Tool developed in the project Wind Power Integration

  20. Data analysis method for wind turbine dynamic response testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, T.L.; Hock, S.M.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Research Branch at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has developed an efficient data analysis package for personal computer use in response to growing needs of the wind turbine industry and SERI's Cooperative Field Test Program. This new software is used by field test engineers to examine wind turbine performance and loads during testing, as well as by data analysts for detailed post-processing. The Wind Data Analysis Tool Set, WINDATS, has been written as a collection of tools that fall into two general groups. First, the preparatory tools perform subsection, filtering, decimation, preaveraging, scaling, and derivation of new channels. Second, analysis tools are used for mean removal, linear detrending, azimuth averaging and removal, per-rev averaging, binning, and spectral analysis. The input data file can be a standard ASCII file as is generated by most data acquisition software. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Yoon Hyeok

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control...

  2. Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bae, Yoon Hyeok

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, a numerical simulation tool has been developed for the rotor-floater-tether coupled dynamic analysis of Multiple Unit Floating Offshore Wind Turbine (MUFOWT) in the time domain including aero-blade-tower dynamics and control...

  3. INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    INTERIM POLICY JANUARY 9, 2004 CORNELL UNIVERSITY POLICY LIBRARY Health and Safety POLICY 2 _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ POLICY STATEMENT. _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ REASON FOR POLICY

  4. Wind/Wave Misalignment in the Loads Analysis of a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barj, L.; Stewart, S.; Stewart, G.; Lackner, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind resources far from the shore and in deeper seas have encouraged the offshore wind industry to look into floating platforms. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is developing a new technical specification for the design of floating offshore wind turbines that extends existing design standards for land-based and fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. The work summarized in this paper supports the development of best practices and simulation requirements in the loads analysis of floating offshore wind turbines by examining the impact of wind/wave misalignment on the system loads under normal operation. Simulations of the OC3-Hywind floating offshore wind turbine system under a wide range of wind speeds, significant wave heights, peak-spectral periods and wind/wave misalignments have been carried out with the aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool FAST [4]. The extreme and fatigue loads have been calculated for all the simulations. The extreme and fatigue loading as a function of wind/wave misalignment have been represented as load roses and a directional binning sensitivity study has been carried out. This study focused on identifying the number and type of wind/wave misalignment simulations needed to accurately capture the extreme and fatigue loads of the system in all possible metocean conditions considered, and for a down-selected set identified as the generic US East Coast site. For this axisymmetric platform, perpendicular wind and waves play an important role in the support structure and including these cases in the design loads analysis can improve the estimation of extreme and fatigue loads. However, most structural locations see their highest extreme and fatigue loads with aligned wind and waves. These results are specific to the spar type platform, but it is expected that the results presented here will be similar to other floating platforms.

  5. Hawaii Utility Integration Initiatives to Enable Wind (Wind HUI) Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dora Nakafuji; Lisa Dangelmaier; Chris Reynolds

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To advance the state and nation toward clean energy, Hawaii is pursuing an aggressive Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), 40% renewable generation and 30% energy efficiency and transportation initiatives by 2030. Additionally, with support from federal, state and industry leadership, the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is focused on reducing Hawaii's carbon footprint and global warming impacts. To keep pace with the policy momentum and changing industry technologies, the Hawaiian Electric Companies are proactively pursuing a number of potential system upgrade initiatives to better manage variable resources like wind, solar and demand-side and distributed generation alternatives (i.e. DSM, DG). As variable technologies will continue to play a significant role in powering the future grid, practical strategies for utility integration are needed. Hawaiian utilities are already contending with some of the highest penetrations of renewables in the nation in both large-scale and distributed technologies. With island grids supporting a diverse renewable generation portfolio at penetration levels surpassing 40%, the Hawaiian utilities experiences can offer unique perspective on practical integration strategies. Efforts pursued in this industry and federal collaborative project tackled challenging issues facing the electric power industry around the world. Based on interactions with a number of western utilities and building on decades of national and international renewable integration experiences, three priority initiatives were targeted by Hawaiian utilities to accelerate integration and management of variable renewables for the islands. The three initiatives included: Initiative 1: Enabling reliable, real-time wind forecasting for operations by improving short-term wind forecasting and ramp event modeling capabilities with local site, field monitoring; Initiative 2: Improving operators situational awareness to variable resources via real-time grid condition monitoring using PMU devices and enhanced grid analysis tools; and Initiative 3: Identifying grid automation and smart technology architecture retrofit/improvement opportunities following a systematic review approach, inclusive of increasing renewables and variable distributed generation. Each of the initiative was conducted in partnership with industry technology and equipment providers to facilitate utility deployment experiences inform decision making, assess supporting infrastructure cost considerations, showcase state of the technology, address integration hurdles with viable workarounds. For each initiative, a multi-phased approach was followed that included 1) investigative planning and review of existing state-of-the-art, 2) hands on deployment experiences and 3) process implementation considerations. Each phase of the approach allowed for mid-course corrections, process review and change to any equipment/devices to be used by the utilities. To help the island grids transform legacy infrastructure, the Wind HUI provided more systematic approaches and exposure with vendor/manufacturers, hand-on review and experience with the equipment not only from the initial planning stages but through to deployment and assessment of field performance of some of the new, remote sensing and high-resolution grid monitoring technologies. HELCO became one of the first utilities in the nation to install and operate a high resolution (WindNet) network of remote sensing devices such as radiometers and SODARs to enable a short-term ramp event forecasting capability. This utility-industry and federal government partnership produced new information on wind energy forecasting including new data additions to the NOAA MADIS database; addressed remote sensing technology performance and O&M (operations and maintenance) challenges; assessed legacy equipment compatibility issues and technology solutions; evaluated cyber-security concerns; and engaged in community outreach opportunities that will help guide Hawaii and the nation toward more reliable adoption of clean energy resources. Resu

  6. Ris-R-1118(EN) Power Control for Wind Tur-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    storage or with an AC/DC converter and battery storage. The AC/DC converter can either be an "add-on" type.3 Wind turbine and wind speed model 24 8.4 Storage models 25 Pumped storage model 25 Battery storage, use of different storage types, development of a framework for comparing different options and tools

  7. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  8. A quantitative method to analyze the quality of EIA information in wind energy development and avian/bat assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tony, E-mail: tc282@nau.edu [Environmental Science and Policy Program, School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, 602 S Humphreys P.O. Box 5694, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011 (United States); Nielsen, Erik, E-mail: erik.nielsen@nau.edu [Environmental Science and Policy Program, School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, 602 S Humphreys P.O. Box 5694, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011 (United States); Auberle, William, E-mail: william.auberle@nau.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northern Arizona University, 2112 S Huffer Ln P.O. Box 15600, Flagstaff, AZ, 860011 (United States); Solop, Frederic I., E-mail: fred.solop@nau.edu [Political Science Program, Department of Politics and International Affairs, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 15036, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been a tool for decision makers since the enactment of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Since that time, few analyses have been performed to verify the quality of information and content within EIAs. High quality information within assessments is vital in order for decision makers, stake holders, and the public to understand the potential impact of proposed actions on the ecosystem and wildlife species. Low quality information has been a major cause for litigation and economic loss. Since 1999, wind energy development has seen an exponential growth with unknown levels of impact on wildlife species, in particular bird and bat species. The purpose of this article is to: (1) develop, validate, and apply a quantitative index to review avian/bat assessment quality for wind energy EIAs; and (2) assess the trends and status of avian/bat assessment quality in a sample of wind energy EIAs. This research presents the development and testing of the Avian and Bat Assessment Quality Index (ABAQI), a new approach to quantify information quality of ecological assessments within wind energy development EIAs in relation to avian and bat species based on review areas and factors derived from 23 state wind/wildlife siting guidance documents. The ABAQI was tested through a review of 49 publicly available EIA documents and validated by identifying high variation in avian and bat assessments quality for wind energy developments. Of all the reviewed EIAs, 66% failed to provide high levels of preconstruction avian and bat survey information, compared to recommended factors from state guidelines. This suggests the need for greater consistency from recommended guidelines by state, and mandatory compliance by EIA preparers to avoid possible habitat and species loss, wind energy development shut down, and future lawsuits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed, validated, and applied a quantitative index to review avian/bat assessment quality for wind energy EIAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the trends and status of avian/bat assessment quality in a sample of wind energy EIAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applied index to 49 EIA documents and identified high variation in assessment quality for wind energy developments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the reviewed EIAs, 66% provided inadequate preconstruction avian and bat survey information.

  9. CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Does foreign environmental policy influence domestic innovation ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    renewable energy policies on innovation activity in wind power using patent data from OECD countries from energy policies, wind power Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment, London papers show that higher energy prices induce innovation in energy-efficient technologies (Newell et al

  10. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  11. Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkinton, Chris [DNV GL] [DNV GL; Blatiak, Alicia; Ameen, Hafsa

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As offshore wind energy develops in the United States, port facilities will become strategic hubs in the offshore wind farm supply chain because all plant and transport logistics must transit through these facilities. Therefore, these facilities must provide suitable infrastructure to meet the specific requirements of the offshore wind industry. As a result, it is crucial that federal and state policy-makers and port authorities take effective action to position ports in the offshore wind value chain to take best advantage of their economic potential. The U.S. Department of Energy tasked the independent consultancy GL Garrad Hassan (GL GH) with carrying out a review of the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and an assessment of the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support the growth of as many as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind installed in U.S. waters by 2030. The GL GH report and the open-access web-based Ports Assessment Tool resulting from this study will aid decision-makers in making informed decisions regarding the choice of ports for specific offshore projects, and the types of investments that would be required to make individual port facilities suitable to serve offshore wind manufacturing, installation and/or operations. The offshore wind industry in the United States is still in its infancy and this study finds that additional port facilities capable of supporting offshore wind projects are needed to meet the anticipated project build-out by 2030; however, no significant barriers exist to prevent the development of such facilities. Furthermore, significant port capabilities are in place today with purpose-build port infrastructure currently being built. While there are currently no offshore wind farms operating in the United States, much of the infrastructure critical to the success of such projects does exist, albeit in the service of other industries. This conclusion is based on GL GH’s review of U.S. ports infrastructure and its readiness to support the development of proposed offshore wind projects in U.S. waters. Specific examples of facility costs and benefits are provided for five coastal regions (North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and Pacific) around the country. GL GH began this study by identifying the logistical requirements of offshore wind ports to service offshore wind. This review was based on lessons learned through industry practice in Northern Europe. A web-based port readiness assessment tool was developed to allow a capability gap analysis to be conducted on existing port facilities based on the identified requirements. Cost models were added to the assessment tool, which allowed GL GH to estimate the total upgrade cost to a port over the period 2014-2030 based on a set of regional project build-out scenarios. Port fee information was gathered from each port allowing an estimate of the potential revenue to the port under this same set of scenarios. The comparison of these revenue and improvement cost figures provides an initial indication of the level of offshore wind port readiness. To facilitate a more in-depth infrastructure analysis, six ports from different geographic regions, with varied levels of interest and preparedness towards offshore wind, were evaluated by modeling a range of installation strategies and port use types to identify gaps in capability and potential opportunities for economic development. Commonalities, trends, and specific examples from these case studies are presented and provide a summary of the current state of offshore wind port readiness in the U.S. and also illustrate the direction some ports have chosen to take to prepare for offshore wind projects. For example, the land area required for wind turbine and foundation manufacturing is substantial, particularly due to the large size of offshore wind components. Also, the necessary bearing capacities of the quayside and storage area are typically greater for offshore wind components than for more conventiona

  12. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Energy Finance (WEF), a free online cost of energy calculator developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory that provides quick, detailed economic evaluation of potential utility-scale wind energy projects. The brochure lists the features of the tool, the inputs and outputs that a user can expect, visuals of the screens and a Cash Flow Results table, and contact information.

  13. Howard County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets up provisions for allowing small wind energy systems in various zoning districts.

  14. Queer Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Randi; Tsutsui, William

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadcast Transcript: Chindogu. Did someone say "Bless you?" No need. This is a Japanese word that means "queer tools" and it was coined to describe the Japanese penchant for unusual inventions. From toilet paper rolls that attach to the head...

  15. Workflow Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at NERSC go here. Galaxy - Galaxy is a web based workflow tool that is use by the genomics community. It allows you to define job dependencies via a web based workflow engine....

  16. Tools | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tools JCESR Logos Logos are available for download in jpg format. To view the full-size logo file, click the description under the version of the logo you are interested in. When...

  17. EERE's State & Local Energy Data Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shambarger, Erick; DeCesaro, Jennifer

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    EERE's State and Local Energy Data (SLED) Tool provides basic energy market information that can help state and local governments plan and implement clean energy projects, including electricity generation; fuel sources and costs; applicable policies, regulations, and financial incentives; and renewable energy resource potential. Watch this video to learn more about the tool and hear testimonials from real users about the benefits of using this tool.

  18. EERE's State & Local Energy Data Tool

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Shambarger, Erick; DeCesaro, Jennifer

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    EERE's State and Local Energy Data (SLED) Tool provides basic energy market information that can help state and local governments plan and implement clean energy projects, including electricity generation; fuel sources and costs; applicable policies, regulations, and financial incentives; and renewable energy resource potential. Watch this video to learn more about the tool and hear testimonials from real users about the benefits of using this tool.

  19. BNL Direct Wind Superconducting Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, B.; Anerella, M.; Escallier, J.; Ghosh, A.; Jain, A.; Marone, A.; Muratore, A.; Wanderer, P.

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    BNL developed Direct Wind magnet technology is used to create a variety of complex multi-functional multi-layer superconducting coil structures without the need for creating custom production tooling and fixturing for each new project. Our Direct Wind process naturally integrates prestress into the coil structure so external coil collars and yokes are not needed; the final coil package transverse size can then be very compact. Direct Wind magnets are produced with very good field quality via corrections applied during the course of coil winding. The HERA-II and BEPC-II Interaction Region (IR) magnet, J-PARC corrector and Alpha antihydrogen magnetic trap magnets and our BTeV corrector magnet design are discussed here along with a full length ILC IR prototype magnet presently in production and the coils that were wound for an ATF2 upgrade at KEK. A new IR septum magnet design concept for a 6.2 T combined-function IR magnet for eRHIC, a future RHIC upgrade, is introduced here.

  20. Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  1. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  2. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  3. Ris-R-1380(EN) Wind Power Projects in the CDM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř-R-1380(EN) Wind Power Projects in the CDM: Methodologies and Tools for Baselines, Carbon, lenders, and CDM host countries involved in wind power projects in the CDM. The report explores that are routinely covered in a standard wind power project assessment. The report tests, compares, and recommends

  4. Wind Turbine Bearing Failure Detection Using Generator Stator Current Homopolar Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wind Turbine Bearing Failure Detection Using Generator Stator Current Homopolar Component Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) as a tool for failure detection in wind turbine generators for stationary and non stationary cases. Index Terms-Wind turbine, induction generator, bearing failure, ensemble

  5. A Comparative Study of Time-Frequency Representations for Fault Detection in Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Comparative Study of Time-Frequency Representations for Fault Detection in Wind Turbine El of wind energy, minimization and prediction of maintenance operations in wind turbine is of key importance. In variable speed turbine generator, advanced signal processing tools are required to detect and diagnose

  6. Energy Policy 35 (2007) 91111 Simulating price patterns for tradable green certificates to promote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy 35 (2007) 91­111 Simulating price patterns for tradable green certificates to promote to these high prices with construction of new wind capacity. After a few years, wind generation meets the market opens. Investors react to these high prices with construction of new wind capacity, and total

  7. English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    English Language Policy 1 English Language Policy Abstract This policy sets out UTS's requirements their courses of study. Dates Policy or amendment approved Policy or amendment takes effect Policy is due for review (up to 5 years) 03/11/2010 22/11/2010 11/2015 Policy amendment approved 02/11/2011 Approved

  8. Password Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Password Policy. All of the following sets of rules must be met: passwords must be between 8 and 127 characters inclusive; passwords must contain at least one

  9. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15300 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  10. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 15910 Calculator Policy. ONLY a TI-30Xa scientific calculator is allowed on quizzes and exams. If you have questions, please email the course coordinator ...

  11. Calculator Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    MA 16010 -- CALCULATOR POLICY. A ONE-LINE scientific calculator is REQUIRED. No other calculator is allowed. RECOMMENDED: TI-30Xa calculator

  12. Energy Policy ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    to the locational marginal prices of several pricing points in the New England, New York, and PJM electricityEnergy Policy ] (

  13. Energy Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is focusing on an all-of-the-above energy policy, investing in all sources of American energy.

  14. Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis 2014 Collegiate Teams Boise State...

  15. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  16. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  17. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  18. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a new vision for wind energy through 2050. Taking into account all facets of wind energy (land-based, offshore, distributed), the new Wind Vision Report defines the...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Tool for Siting Planning and Encroachmen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nation-al Air Space (NAS) radar system, which has led to a blanket rejection of several wind-farm developments. To improve the siting and ... Tool for Siting, Planning, and...

  20. Sandia Energy - Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind Software Downloads Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Sandia Wind...

  1. Syllabus Natural Resource Policy & Economics 1 Natural Resource Policy & Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    resource policies using basic economic tools (e.g., graphical welfare analysis), and by applying ecological: The Eighth Fold Path to More Effective Problem Solving. Chatham House Publishers, New York. 3. Bowles, S Ecological Perspective on the Valuation of Ecosystem Services," Biological Conservation, 120:549-565. 6

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Staff On March 24, 2011, in Wind Energy On November 10, 2010, in Wind Plant Opt. Rotor Innovation Materials, Reliability & Standards Siting & Barrier Mitigation...

  3. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary

  5. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  6. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power'sthe Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  11. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  15. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  18. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  20. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  1. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. ” Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,Canada (8%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  2. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billyof 2012, global cumulative offshore wind capacity stood ats (DOE’s) investments in offshore wind energy research and

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 81 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  4. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 88 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  5. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  6. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.Newark, DE. 16 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (

  7. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. In March 2011, NRG Bluewater Wind?s Delaware projectPurchaser Delmarva NRG Bluewater Wind (Delaware) Universitythe project, while NRG Bluewater would retain the remaining

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  9. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA March 26th 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June 1st 2004- May 31st 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions......................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions.......

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 ­ February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed D

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts March 24th to May 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 ­ February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Di

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts December, 2006 1st to February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts June 1, 2006 - August 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Di

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA March 2007 ­ May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA September ­ November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts September 1, 2006 - November 30, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions..................

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI March 1, 2007 ­ May 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Sep 1st 2004 to Nov 30th 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA June ­ August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Lynn, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts September 1st to November 30th , 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts June 1st to August 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributi

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2004 ­ November 30, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution.............

  16. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA March 1st , 2007 ­ May 31st , 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI September 1, 2007 ­ November 30, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA April 14 ­ May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Dec 1st 2004 to Feb 28th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology ...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA March 1st 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA June 1st 2006 to July 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI June 1, 2007 ­ August 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies show that wind energy integration costs are below $do not represent wind energy generation costs. This sectioncomponent of the overall cost of wind energy, but can vary

  7. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not represent wind energy generation costs. Based on thisproduction-cost reduction value of wind energy, without anwith wind energy. Generally, these costs are associated with

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribut

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity), with 17% of all potential wind energy generationthat roughly 17% of potential wind energy generation withinexample, roughly 1% of potential wind energy output in 2009

  11. Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    of the hurricane surface winds from NOAA and U.S. Air Force Weather Squadron aircraft flights. Further, results1 Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons Pet Laupattarakasem and W This paper presents a new hurricane ocean vector wind (OVW) product known as Q-Winds produced from the SeaWinds

  12. Workflow Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to &83 3.3 Table3WorkToolsTools

  13. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  14. Incorporating Wind Generation in Cap and Trade Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluestein, J.; Salerno, E.; Bird, L.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cap and trade programs are increasingly being used to reduce emissions from electricity generation in the United States. Cap and trade programs primarily target emitting generators, but programs have also included renewable generators, such as wind generators. States cite several reasons why they have considered the policy option of including renewable generators in cap and trade programs: to provide an incentive for lower-emitting generation, to achieve emissions reductions in non-capped pollutants, and to gain local economic benefits associated with renewable energy projects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also notes these rationales for considering this policy alternative, and the National Association of Regulatory Commissioners (NARUC) passed a resolution supporting the inclusion of renewable energy in cap and trade programs. This report explores why states consider this policy option, what participation could mean for wind generators, and how wind generation can most effectively be included in state, federal, and regional cap and trade programs.

  15. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  16. Wind power today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

  17. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  18. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  19. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  20. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

  1. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  2. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA?s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI?s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 9 wind turbineswind energy continues to decline as a result of lower wind turbine

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI’s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbinesTurbine Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind Energy

  4. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  5. UMASS MINI-CODES FOR WIND ENERGY ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS J. F. Manwell, A. L. Rogers, J. G. McGowan, U. Abdulwaid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    UMASS MINI-CODES FOR WIND ENERGY ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS J. F. Manwell, A. L. Rogers, J. G. Mc that these codes will be used for educational purposes, or for general use by the wind energy engineering community. ~TRODUCTIO~ BACKGROUND Computer codes are a valuable tool for practicing wind energy engineers. Wind

  6. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  7. Wind Energy Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the...

  8. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  9. Airplane and the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airplane and the wind. An airplane starts from the point A and flies to B. The speed of the airplane with respect to the air is v (constant). There is also a wind of

  10. See the Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See the Wind Grades: 5-8 , 9-12 Topic: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency...

  11. Wind JOC Conference - Wind Control Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Wind Control Changes JOC August 10, 2012 Presentation updated on July 30, 2012 at 11:00 AM B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 Wind Control Changes B O N...

  12. Quality Policy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Policy It is the policy of the Department of Energy to establish quality requirements to ensure that risks and environmental impacts are minimized and that safety, reliability, and performance are maximized through the application of effective management systems commensurate with the risks posed by the facility or activity and its work. The Department implements this policy through the QA Order and the QA rule directives to ensure quality assurance requirements are clearly specified for the broad spectrum of work performed by DOE and its contractors.

  13. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Wind Engineering, 28:Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. ” Journal of Solar

  14. Wind turbine reliability : a database and analysis approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linsday, James (ARES Corporation); Briand, Daniel; Hill, Roger Ray; Stinebaugh, Jennifer A.; Benjamin, Allan S. (ARES Corporation)

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US wind Industry has experienced remarkable growth since the turn of the century. At the same time, the physical size and electrical generation capabilities of wind turbines has also experienced remarkable growth. As the market continues to expand, and as wind generation continues to gain a significant share of the generation portfolio, the reliability of wind turbine technology becomes increasingly important. This report addresses how operations and maintenance costs are related to unreliability - that is the failures experienced by systems and components. Reliability tools are demonstrated, data needed to understand and catalog failure events is described, and practical wind turbine reliability models are illustrated, including preliminary results. This report also presents a continuing process of how to proceed with controlling industry requirements, needs, and expectations related to Reliability, Availability, Maintainability, and Safety. A simply stated goal of this process is to better understand and to improve the operable reliability of wind turbine installations.

  15. ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ADMINISTRATIVE UNIVERSITY POLICY FACULTY UNIVERSITY POLICY STUDENT UNIVERSITY POLICY Issue stakeholder list "Log-In" of Proposed University Policy with the University Compliance Committee (UCC) UCC identifies which track (i.e., Administrative, Faculty, or Student) the proposed University Policy

  16. Kent County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance establishes provisions and standards for small wind energy systems in various zoning districts in Kent County, Maryland.

  17. Wind Webinar Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy.

  18. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation and frequency response services charge to wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service rate for wind energy

  19. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.

  20. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space constraints. Ohio: The Lake Erie Energy DevelopmentGreat Lakes Ohio Wind, and Great Lakes Wind Energy LLC. In

  1. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of larger balancing areas, the use of regional wind powerbalancing areas. The successful use of regional wind power

  2. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directly charging wind power projects for balancing servicesin smaller balancing areas. The successful use of wind power

  3. Combining a Renewable Portfolio Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy: A General Equilibrium Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    renewable sources such as wind, solar, and biomass. I use a computable general equilibrium (CGE) modelCombining a Renewable Portfolio Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy: A General Equilibrium, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 Combining a Renewable Portfolio Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy

  4. Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy Considerations At Microsoft, we see information technology (IT) as a key tool to help address the daunting en-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy in energy conservation and integration of more renewable and zero-carbon energy sources into our economy. Microsoft envisions a clean energy ecosystem where information technology: · Empowers people

  5. Viability of Small Wind Distributed Generation for Farmers Who Irrigate (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, B.; Forsyth, T.; Johnson, S.; Healow, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 14% of U.S. farms are irrigated, representing 55 million acres of irrigated land. Irrigation on these farms is a major energy user in the United States, accounting for one-third of water withdrawals and 137 billion gallons per day. More than half of the Irrigation systems use electric energy. Wind energy can be a good choice for meeting irrigation energy needs. Nine of the top 10 irrigation states (California, Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas, Washington, and Oregon) have good to excellent wind resources. Many rural areas have sufficient wind speeds to make wind an attractive alternative, and farms and ranches can often install a wind energy system without impacting their ability to plant crops and graze livestock. Additionally, the rising and uncertain future costs of diesel, natural gas, and even electricity increase the potential effectiveness for wind energy and its predictable and competitive cost. In general, wind-powered electric generation systems generate more energy in the winter months than in the summer months when most crops need the water. Therefore, those states that have a supportive net metering policy can dramatically impact the viability of an onsite wind turbine. This poster presentation highlights case studies that show favorable and unfavorable policies that impact the growth of small wind in this important sector and demonstrate how net metering policies affect the viability of distributed wind generation for farmers who irrigate.

  6. Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the National Renewable Energy Library and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The SWERA Programme provides easy access to credible renewable energy data to stimulate investment in, and development of, renewable energy technologies. The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) started in 2001 to advance the large-scale use of renewable energy technologies by increasing the availability and accessibility of high-quality solar and wind resource information. SWERA began as a pilot project with funding from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and managed by the United Nations Environment Programme's (UNEP) Division of Technology, Industry and Economics (DTIE) in collaboration with more than 25 partners around the world. With the success of the project in 13 pilot countries SWERA expanded in 2006 into a full programme. Its expanded mission is to provide high quality information on renewable energy resources for countries and regions around the world, along with the tools needed to apply these data in ways that facilitate renewable energy policies and investments.[from the SWERA Guide at http://swera.unep.net/index.php?id=sweraguide_chp1] DOE and, in particular, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been a functioning partner from the beginning. NREL was part of the original technical team involved in mapping, database, and GIS activities. Solar, wind, and meteorological data for selected countries can be accessed through a variety of different tools and interfaces.

  7. Downhole tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Muradov, Andrei; Pixton, David S.; Dahlgren, Scott Steven; Briscoe, Michael A.

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A double shouldered downhole tool connection comprises box and pin connections having mating threads intermediate mating primary and secondary shoulders. The connection further comprises a secondary shoulder component retained in the box connection intermediate a floating component and the primary shoulders. The secondary shoulder component and the pin connection cooperate to transfer a portion of makeup load to the box connection. The downhole tool may be selected from the group consisting of drill pipe, drill collars, production pipe, and reamers. The floating component may be selected from the group consisting of electronics modules, generators, gyroscopes, power sources, and stators. The secondary shoulder component may comprises an interface to the box connection selected from the group consisting of radial grooves, axial grooves, tapered grooves, radial protrusions, axial protrusions, tapered protrusions, shoulders, and threads.

  8. Use of wind power forecasting in operational decisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botterud, A.; Zhi, Z.; Wang, J.; Bessa, R.J.; Keko, H.; Mendes, J.; Sumaili, J.; Miranda, V. (Decision and Information Sciences); (INESC Porto)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid expansion of wind power gives rise to a number of challenges for power system operators and electricity market participants. The key operational challenge is to efficiently handle the uncertainty and variability of wind power when balancing supply and demand in ths system. In this report, we analyze how wind power forecasting can serve as an efficient tool toward this end. We discuss the current status of wind power forecasting in U.S. electricity markets and develop several methodologies and modeling tools for the use of wind power forecasting in operational decisions, from the perspectives of the system operator as well as the wind power producer. In particular, we focus on the use of probabilistic forecasts in operational decisions. Driven by increasing prices for fossil fuels and concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, wind power, as a renewable and clean source of energy, is rapidly being introduced into the existing electricity supply portfolio in many parts of the world. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has analyzed a scenario in which wind power meets 20% of the U.S. electricity demand by 2030, which means that the U.S. wind power capacity would have to reach more than 300 gigawatts (GW). The European Union is pursuing a target of 20/20/20, which aims to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 20%, increase the amount of renewable energy to 20% of the energy supply, and improve energy efficiency by 20% by 2020 as compared to 1990. Meanwhile, China is the leading country in terms of installed wind capacity, and had 45 GW of installed wind power capacity out of about 200 GW on a global level at the end of 2010. The rapid increase in the penetration of wind power into power systems introduces more variability and uncertainty in the electricity generation portfolio, and these factors are the key challenges when it comes to integrating wind power into the electric power grid. Wind power forecasting (WPF) is an important tool to help efficiently address this challenge, and significant efforts have been invested in developing more accurate wind power forecasts. In this report, we document our work on the use of wind power forecasting in operational decisions.

  9. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  10. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  11. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  12. Wind Turbine Competition Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    Wind Turbine Competition Introduction: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, SHPE at UTK, wishes to invite you to participate in our first `Wind Turbine' competition as part of Engineer's Week). You will be evaluated by how much power your wind turbine generates at the medium setting of our fan

  13. Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples geoff@clearpathenergyllc.com #12;Frequently Unanswered Ques?ons · Why don't "they" build more offshore wind? · Why not make States Cape Wind PPA at 18 c/kWh #12;The cycle of non-innova?on Offshore

  14. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  15. Department of Energy Awards $43 Million to Spur Offshore Wind Energy, Wind Program Newsletter, September 2011 Edition (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EERE Wind Program Quarterly Newsletter - September 2011. In September, the U.S. Department of Energy announced that it will award $43 million over the next five years to 41 projects across 20 states to speed technical innovations, lower costs, and shorten the timeline for deploying offshore wind energy systems. The projects will advance wind turbine design tools and hardware, improve information about U.S. offshore wind resources, and accelerate the deployment of offshore wind by reducing market barriers such as supply chain development, transmission and infrastructure. The projects announced in September focus on approaches to advancing offshore technology and removing market barriers to responsible offshore wind energy deployment. Funding is subject to Congressional appropriations.

  16. Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind· vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you· made! The biggest differences

  17. Aeroacoustic Testing of Wind Turbine Airfoils: February 20, 2004 - February 19, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devenport, W.; Burdisso, R. A.; Camargo, H.; Crede, E.; Remillieux, M.; Rasnick, M.; Van Seeters, P.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), working through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is engaged in a comprehensive research effort to improve the understanding of wind turbine aeroacoustics. The motivation for this effort is the desire to exploit the large expanse of low wind speed sites that tend to be close to U.S. load centers. Quiet wind turbines are an inducement to widespread deployment, so the goal of NREL's aeroacoustic research is to develop tools that the U.S. wind industry can use in developing and deploying highly efficient, quiet wind turbines at low wind speed sites. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is implementing a multifaceted approach that includes wind tunnel tests, field tests, and theoretical analyses in direct support of low wind speed turbine development by its industry partners. NWTC researchers are working hand in hand with engineers in industry to ensure that research findings are available to support ongoing design decisions.

  18. REVISION POLICY

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    REVISION POLICY March 2007 Data are collected at the million cubic feet per month level and all calculations mentioned below are carried out at that precision. However, the data...

  19. Credit Trading and Wind Power: Issues and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Rackstraw, John Palmisano

    2001-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 This paper focuses on credits that are derived from wind energy technology, but the same concepts apply to other renewable energy technologies as well. Credit trading can be applied to a wide variety of policies, programs and private market activities and represents a means of tapping into revenue streams that heretofore have largely excluded wind and other renewables. In addition, credit trading can help to ''create'' new revenue streams for wind and other renewables by helping to grow new markets.

  20. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  1. Wind Power Price Trends in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For the fourth year in a row, the United States led the world in adding new wind power capacity in 2008, and also surpassed Germany to take the lead in terms of cumulative installed wind capacity. The rapid growth of wind power in the U.S. over the past decade (Figure 1) has been driven by a combination of increasingly supportive policies (including the Federal production tax credit (PTC) and a growing number of state renewables portfolio standards), uncertainty over the future fuel costs and environmental liabilities of natural gas and coal-fired power plants, and wind's competitive position among generation resources. This article focuses on just the last of these drivers - i.e., trends in U.S. wind power prices - over the period of strong capacity growth since 1998.

  2. Wind energy applications guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  3. Wind resource characterization results to support the Sandia Wind Farm Feasibility Study : August 2008 through March 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deola, Regina Anne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories Wind Technology Department is investigating the feasibility of using local wind resources to meet the requirements of Executive Order 13423 and DOE Order 430.2B. These Orders, along with the DOE TEAM initiative, identify the use of on-site renewable energy projects to meet specified renewable energy goals over the next 3 to 5 years. A temporary 30-meter meteorological tower was used to perform interim monitoring while the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for the larger Wind Feasibility Project ensued. This report presents the analysis of the data collected from the 30-meter meteorological tower.

  4. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  5. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  6. West Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff,Holt WindInformationWestWinds Wind

  7. Long-Term National Impacts of State-Level Policies: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Short, W.; Denholm, P.; Heimiller, D.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents analysis conducted with the Wind Deployment System Model (WinDS) -- a model of capacity expansion in the U.S. electric sector. With 358 regions covering the United States, detailed transmission system representation, and an explicit treatment of wind intermittency and ancillary services, WinDS is uniquely positioned to evaluate the market impacts of specific state-level policies. This paper provides analysis results regarding the impact of existing state-level policies designed to promote wind-capacity expansion, including state portfolio standards, mandates, and tax credits. The results show the amount of wind deployment due to current state-level incentives as well as examine their lasting impact on the national wind industry. For example, state-level mandates increase industry size and lower costs, which result in wind capacity increases in states without mandates and greater market growth even after the policies expire. Although these policies are enacted by individual states, the cumulative effect must be examined at a national level. Finally, this paper examines the impact on wind-capacity growth by increasing the penalty associated with the state-level renewable portfolio standards (RPS). The results show national and regional wind energy deployment and generation through 2050.

  8. Workflow Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to &83 3.3 Table3WorkTools

  9. 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Mann; Christine Risch

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for '20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia'. The objective of this project was to examine the obstacles and constraints to the development of wind energy in West Virginia as well as the obstacles and constraints to the achievement of the national goal of 20% wind by 2030. For the portion contracted with WVU, there were four tasks in this examination of obstacles and constraints. Task 1 involved the establishment of a Wind Resource Council. Task 2 involved conducting limited research activities. These activities involved an ongoing review of wind energy documents including documents regarding the potential for wind farms being located on reclaimed surface mining sites as well as other brownfield sites. The Principal Investigator also examined the results of the Marshall University SODAR assessment of the potential for placing wind farms on reclaimed surface mining sites. Task 3 involved the conducting of outreach activities. These activities involved working with the members of the Wind Resource Council, the staff of the Regional Wind Energy Institute, and the staff of Penn Future. This task also involved the examination of the importance of transmission for wind energy development. The Principal Investigator kept informed as to transmission developments in the Eastern United States. The Principal Investigator coordinated outreach activities with the activities at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University. Task 4 involved providing technical assistance. This task involved the provision of information to various parties interested in wind energy development. The Principal Investigator was available to answer requests from interested parties regarding in formation regarding both utility scale as well as small wind development in West Virginia. Most of the information requested regarded either the permitting process for wind facilities of various sizes in the state or information regarding the wind potential in various parts of the state. This report describes four sub-categories of work done by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University under this contract. The four sub-projects are: (1) research on the impacts of wind turbines on residential property values; (2) research on the integration of wind energy in regional transmission systems; (3) review of state-based wind legislation in consideration of model new policy options for West Virginia; and (4) promotion of wind facilities on former surface mine sites through development of a database of potential sites.

  10. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline · Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3.brainybetty.com 11 wind farm at ChangHwa Coastal Industrial Park 70m wind tower 70m 50m 30m 10m #12;1 2 3 4 5 1 (70M

  11. CHANGES OF SYSTEM OPERATION COSTS DUE TO LARGE-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of EnergyIER Changes of System Operation CostsCHANGES OF SYSTEM OPERATION COSTS DUE TO LARGE-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION Derk Jan SWIDER1 , Rüdiger-Essen, Germany 3 Risoe International Laboratory, Denmark Business and Policy Track: Integrating wind

  12. The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puga, J. Nicolas

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

  13. Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Least Squares Policy Iteration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scherrer, Bruno

    Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Least Squares Policy Iteration Bias-Variance Trade-o in Control Problems Christophe Thiéry and Bruno Scherrer/27 #12; Policy Iteration / Optimistic Policy Iteration Least-Squares Policy Iteration Experiments Markov

  14. EWEC'07 Conference, 7-10 May 2007, Milan, Italy. POW'WOW Virtual Laboratory for Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    EWEC'07 Conference, 7-10 May 2007, Milan, Italy. 1 POW'WOW Virtual Laboratory for Wind Power for the short-term prediction of wind power production. The relevant and common forecast length of these tools purposes. A state of the art on wind power forecasting has been published by Giebel et al [1]. On the other

  15. Paper presented at EWEC 2008, Brussels, Belgium (31 March-03 April) Uncertainty Estimation of Wind Power Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -Antipolis, France Abstract--Short-term wind power forecasting tools providing "single-valued" (spot) predictions associated to the future wind power produc- tion for performing more efficiently functions such as reserves and modelling architec- tures for probabilistic wind power forecasting. Then, a comparison is carried out

  16. Policy Procedure Administrative Directive Policy No.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Policy ­ Procedure ­ Administrative Directive Title: Policy No.: Effective Date or Date of Last President See also: Related Policies, Procedures and Agreements: Relevant Legislation and Regulations: Background and Purpose: CLEAR DATA #12;Policy *A University Policy is a principle-based statement with broad

  17. Data Management Policy | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Data Management Policy Data Management Policy The data management resource information and data release policies below are provided to help researchers understand the data...

  18. The design of effective policies for the promotion of sustainable construction materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kua, Harn Wei, 1971-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research explores the associated effects of policy tools employed to promote sustainable building materials. By comparing the original motivations and intended effects of these policies and their actual outcome, and ...

  19. POLICY FLASH

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergyOutreachPNNL AdvancesPNNL:13, 2013POLICY

  20. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  1. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy assessment and wind farm simulation in Triunfo- Pernambuco, Brazil,wind resources for electrical energy production. Wind resources as- sessment of Brazil

  2. Sandia Energy - Wind & Water Power Newsletter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind & Water Power Newsletter Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind & Water Power Newsletter Wind & Water Power NewsletterTara...

  3. Coming Soon! 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This valuable report will be available this summer! Prepared by the Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the report is a must read, providing a comprehensive overview of United States wind industry: Installation Trends, Industry Trends, Price, Cost, and Performance Trends, Policy and Market Drivers, Future Outlook.

  4. Financial Policy Manual RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Financial Policy Manual Page 1 RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES 2601 Departmental Scope & Responsibility;Financial Policy Manual Page 1 2601 DEPARTMENTAL SCOPE & RESPONSIBILITY Subject: Risk Management & Insurance Effective: December 1986 Revised: May 2011 Last Reviewed: March 2014 Resp. Office: Risk Management

  5. Adapting ORAP to wind plants : industry value and functional requirements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strategic Power Systems (SPS) was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to assess the feasibility of adapting their ORAP (Operational Reliability Analysis Program) tool for deployment to the wind industry. ORAP for Wind is proposed for use as the primary data source for the CREW (Continuous Reliability Enhancement for Wind) database which will be maintained by Sandia to enable reliability analysis of US wind fleet operations. The report primarily addresses the functional requirements of the wind-based system. The SPS ORAP reliability monitoring system has been used successfully for over twenty years to collect RAM (Reliability, Availability, Maintainability) and operations data for benchmarking and analysis of gas and steam turbine performance. This report documents the requirements to adapt the ORAP system for the wind industry. It specifies which existing ORAP design features should be retained, as well as key new requirements for wind. The latter includes alignment with existing and emerging wind industry standards (IEEE 762, ISO 3977 and IEC 61400). There is also a comprehensive list of thirty critical-to-quality (CTQ) functional requirements which must be considered and addressed to establish the optimum design for wind.

  6. Wind Tunnel Building - 3 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Energy Systems Laboratory 1 A METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAMS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE WIND FARMS IN THE TEXAS ERCOT REGION Zi Liu, Jeff Haberl, Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Kris Subbarao, Charles... on Sweetwater I Wind Farm Capacity Factor Analysis Application to All Wind Farms Uncertainty Analysis Emissions Reduction Summary Energy Systems Laboratory 3 SUMMARYEMISSIONS REDUCTION UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS APPLICATIONMETHODOLOGYINTRODUCTION Background...

  7. Wind Energy and Spatial Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    2/3/2011 1 Wind Energy and Spatial Technology Lori Pelech Why Wind Energy? A clean, renewable 2,600 tons of carbon emissions annually ­ The economy · Approximately 85,000 wind energy workers to Construct a Wind Farm... Geo-Spatial Components of Wind Farm Development Process Selecting a Project Site

  8. Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

  9. Proceedings Nordic Wind Power Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Possible Power for Wind Plant Control Power Fluctuations from Offshore Wind Farms; Model Validation System grounding of wind farm medium voltage cable grids Faults in the Collection Grid of Offshore systems of wind turbines and wind farms. NWPC presents the newest research results related to technical

  10. Sensitivity Analysis of Offshore Wind Cost of Energy (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Ning, A.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Damiami, R.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Veers, P.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    No matter the source, offshore wind energy plant cost estimates are significantly higher than for land-based projects. For instance, a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) review on the 2010 cost of wind energy found baseline cost estimates for onshore wind energy systems to be 71 dollars per megawatt-hour ($/MWh), versus 225 $/MWh for offshore systems. There are many ways that innovation can be used to reduce the high costs of offshore wind energy. However, the use of such innovation impacts the cost of energy because of the highly coupled nature of the system. For example, the deployment of multimegawatt turbines can reduce the number of turbines, thereby reducing the operation and maintenance (O&M) costs associated with vessel acquisition and use. On the other hand, larger turbines may require more specialized vessels and infrastructure to perform the same operations, which could result in higher costs. To better understand the full impact of a design decision on offshore wind energy system performance and cost, a system analysis approach is needed. In 2011-2012, NREL began development of a wind energy systems engineering software tool to support offshore wind energy system analysis. The tool combines engineering and cost models to represent an entire offshore wind energy plant and to perform system cost sensitivity analysis and optimization. Initial results were collected by applying the tool to conduct a sensitivity analysis on a baseline offshore wind energy system using 5-MW and 6-MW NREL reference turbines. Results included information on rotor diameter, hub height, power rating, and maximum allowable tip speeds.

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL PURCHASING POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haase, Markus

    ENVIRONMENTAL PURCHASING POLICY The University of Leeds Environmental Policy includes the following the environmental policy and, in turn, that all suppliers and contractors progressively improve their own environmental performance". In line with this the University's Environmental Purchasing Policy requires

  12. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    hub heights of 110 meters (m) (which are already in wide commercial deployment in Germany and other European countries), the technical potential for wind deployment is...

  13. Allegany County Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets requirements for industrial wind energy conversion systems. These requirements include minimum separation distances, setback requirements, electromagnetic interference analysis ...

  14. Talkin’ Bout Wind Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

  15. Enabling Wind Power Nationwide

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    including natural gas, and competing renewable power resources such as solar photovoltaics. Figure 4-3. Wind turbine hub height trends in Germany from 2007 to 2014 Source:...

  16. Accelerating Offshore Wind Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. Check out our map to see where these projects will be located.

  17. wind_guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guidance to Accompany Non-Availability Waiver of the Recovery Act Buy American Provisions for 5kW and 50kW Wind Turbines

  18. Barstow Wind Turbine Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Barstow Wind Turbine project for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  19. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  20. Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in the world. To stay competitive in this sector, the Energy Department invests in wind projects, both on land and offshore, to advance technology innovations, create job...

  1. Northern Wind Farm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities to accommodate the interconnection. The EA also includes a review of the potential environmental impacts of Northern Wind, LLC, constructing, operating, and...

  2. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A,; Chokani, N.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore winds are generally stronger and more consistent than winds on land, making the offshore environment attractive for wind energy development. A large part of the offshore wind resource is however located in deep water, where floating turbines are the only economical way of harvesting the energy. The design of offshore floating wind turbines relies on the use of modeling tools that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At present, most of these tools include only first-order hydrodynamic theory. However, observations of supposed second-order hydrodynamic responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium suggest that second-order effects might be critical. In this paper, the methodology used by the oil and gas industry has been modified to apply to the analysis of floating wind turbines, and is used to assess the effect of second-order hydrodynamics on floating offshore wind turbines. The method relies on combined use of the frequency-domain tool WAMIT and the time-domain tool FAST. The proposed assessment method has been applied to two different floating wind concepts, a spar and a tension-leg-platform (TLP), both supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. Results showing the hydrodynamic forces and motion response for these systems are presented and analysed, and compared to aerodynamic effects.

  3. Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

  4. DOE Offers Conditional Commitment to Cape Wind Offshore Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    step toward issuing a 150 million loan guarantee to support the construction of the Cape Wind offshore wind project with a conditional commitment to Cape Wind Associates, LLC. The...

  5. Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tools Tools logofemp.png The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers links to tools that can help agencies reduce energy use and meet federal laws and requirements. Tools...

  6. A DESIGN AND ANALYSIS TOOL FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    PV PLANNER A DESIGN AND ANALYSIS TOOL FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC SYSTEMS Updated User Manual May 2011 University of Delaware #12;Mailing Address: John Byrne Director Center for Energy and Environmental Policy) 831-3098 Website: http://ceep.udel.edu The Center for Energy and Environmental Policy conducts

  7. Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

  8. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  9. UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    UNDP-Catalysing Climate Finance: A Guidebook on Policy and Financing Options to Support Green, Low-Emission and Climate-Resilient Development Jump to: navigation, search Tool...

  10. Kahuku Wind Power (First Wind) | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The project employs the integration of Clipper LibertyTM wind turbine generators and a control system to more efficiently integrate wind power with the utility's power grid....

  11. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar will be attended by representatives in the financial sector, businesses, bankers, government and other nonprofit...

  12. WIND POWER PROGRAM WIND PROGRAM ACCOMPLISHMENTS U.S. Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    capturing more wind than ever before through the installation of innovative offshore wind turbines and systems in U.S. waters, the Atmosphere to Electrons initiative which...

  13. Public Acceptance of Wind: Foundational Study Near US Wind Facilities

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    Group * Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Public Acceptance of Wind Power Ben Hoen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory WindExchange Webinar June 17, 2015...

  14. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 2: Wind Turbine Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development...

  15. Community Wind: Once Again Pushing the Envelope of Project Finance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    bolinger, Mark A.

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, the 'community wind' sector - loosely defined here as consisting of relatively small utility-scale wind power projects that sell power on the wholesale market and that are developed and owned primarily by local investors - has historically served as a 'test bed' or 'proving grounds' for up-and-coming wind turbine manufacturers that are trying to break into the U.S. wind power market. For example, community wind projects - and primarily those located in the state of Minnesota - have deployed the first U.S. installations of wind turbines from Suzlon (in 2003), DeWind (2008), Americas Wind Energy (2008) and later Emergya Wind Technologies (2010), Goldwind (2009), AAER/Pioneer (2009), Nordic Windpower (2010), Unison (2010), and Alstom (2011). Thus far, one of these turbine manufacturers - Suzlon - has subsequently achieved some success in the broader U.S. wind market as well. Just as it has provided a proving grounds for new turbines, so too has the community wind sector served as a laboratory for experimentation with innovative new financing structures. For example, a variation of one of the most common financing arrangements in the U.S. wind market today - the special allocation partnership flip structure (see Figure 1 in Section 2.1) - was first developed by community wind projects in Minnesota more than a decade ago (and is therefore sometimes referred to as the 'Minnesota flip' model) before being adopted by the broader wind market. More recently, a handful of community wind projects built over the past year have been financed via new and creative structures that push the envelope of wind project finance in the U.S. - in many cases, moving beyond the now-standard partnership flip structures involving strategic tax equity investors. These include: (1) a 4.5 MW project in Maine that combines low-cost government debt with local tax equity, (2) a 25.3 MW project in Minnesota using a sale/leaseback structure, (3) a 10.5 MW project in South Dakota financed by an intrastate offering of both debt and equity, (4) a 6 MW project in Washington state that taps into New Markets Tax Credits using an 'inverted' or 'pass-through' lease structure, and (5) a 9 MW project in Oregon that combines a variety of state and federal incentives and loans with unconventional equity from high-net-worth individuals. In most cases, these are first-of-their-kind structures that could serve as useful examples for other projects - both community and commercial wind alike. This report describes each of these innovative new financing structures in some detail, using a case-study approach. The purpose is twofold: (1) to disseminate useful information on these new financial structures, most of which are widely replicable; and (2) to highlight the recent policy changes - many of them temporary unless extended - that have facilitated this innovation. Although the community wind market is currently only a small sub-sector of the U.S. wind market - as defined here, less than 2% of the overall market at the end of 2009 (Wiser and Bolinger 2010) - its small size belies its relevance to the broader market. As such, the information provided in this report has relevance beyond its direct application to the community wind sector. The next two sections of this report briefly summarize how most community wind projects in the U.S. have been financed historically (i.e., prior to this latest wave of innovation) and describe the recent federal policy changes that have enabled a new wave of financial innovation to occur, respectively. Section 4 contains brief case studies of how each of the five projects mentioned above were financed, noting the financial significance of each. Finally, Section 5 concludes by distilling a number of general observations or pertinent lessons learned from the experiences of these five projects.

  16. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  17. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations, for example,the decrease in new wind power plant construction. A GrowingRelative Economics of Wind Power Plants Installed in Recent

  18. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations since 2009and the drop in wind power plant installations since 2009towers used in U.S. wind power plants increases from 80% in

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ET2/TL-08-1474. May 19, 2010 Wind Technologies Market ReportAssociates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little10, 2010. David, A. 2009. Wind Turbines: Industry and Trade

  20. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Associates. 2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. LittlePool. David, A. 2011. U.S. Wind Turbine Trade in a Changing2011. David, A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on