Sample records for wind ocean thermal

  1. Lyapunov Exponents of a Simple Stochastic Model of the Thermally and Wind-Driven Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monahan, Adam Hugh

    August 8, 2002 Present Address: School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC,Victoria BC, Canada, V8P 5C2 0 #12;Abstract A reformulation of the simple model

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  7. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M . , and Yang, E. , 2007: Mesoscale eddies drive increasedIV The interaction of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1.ocean in presence of mesoscale eddies. Geophysical Research

  8. Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silverthorne, Katherine E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

  9. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

  15. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

  16. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  19. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  20. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  1. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

  4. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  6. Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, J. T., and L. Thompson (2006), Effect of ocean surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind power input to the ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L09604, doi:10.1029/2006GL025784. 1. Introduction [2

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedSands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  8. High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwala, Samar

    1 High wind evaluation in the Southern Ocean Xiaojun Yuan Lamont-Doherty of Earth Observatory based scatterometer instruments provide crucial surface wind measurements with high resolution over winds at high wind bands because these regions host the strongest wind fields at the ocean surface

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment. 1978. Renewable ocean energy sources, Part I.on aquaculture and ocean energy systems for the county of310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversion

  10. Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wavelet Spectrum Analysis and Ocean Wind Waves Paul C. Liu Abstract. Wavelet spectrum analysis characteristics. These insights are due to the nature of the wavelet transform that would not be immediately or decay, is Wavelets in Geophysics 151 Efi Foufoula-Georgiou and Praveen Kumar (eds.), pp. 151-166. ISBN 0

  11. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Xiaoming

    The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using available observations, focusing on the role of the synoptically ...

  12. Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft

  14. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. , and M.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)

  15. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ZENDER: GLOBAL OCEAN WIND POWER POTENTIAL Serpetzoglou, E. ,Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCATEstimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT

  16. Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muralidharan, Shylesh

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

  17. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

  18. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1. Introduction 2. Modelparameterization at high wind speeds 1. Introduction 2. DataSupplementary Formulae 1. Wind Stress 2. Rankine Vortex A .

  19. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites toassessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  20. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.recommendations for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  1. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) ProgramAssessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S.for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants. Argonne,

  2. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) program;proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites tooperation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power

  3. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Impact Assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC),Intake Screens for Ocean Thermal Energy M.S. Thesis. Oregon

  4. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (The operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  5. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near-inertial energy in an eddying ocean channel model. Geo-maximum integrated kinetic energy when the ocean was forcedto the the transfer of energy in the ocean from large scales

  6. Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection Energy Conversion The immense size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTECOcean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources off

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

  8. NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

  9. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega · Floating Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC: Georges Claude (Open Cycle OTEC) · 1928 Ougree Experiment, France: Factory Water Outflow (33 °C) & Meuse

  10. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergyTheJump to:Ocean

  11. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    latitudes, tropical storm force winds may be sufficient tolocation where hurricane force winds arrive at the region.shear data. The wind stress used to force these model was

  12. August 2011 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2011 1 Environmental Assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion in Hawaii Available data prompted ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) technology to be re-considered for use in Hawaii for OTEC development. Keywords- Ocean thermal energy conversion, OTEC, renewable energy, Hawaii

  13. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  14. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at several proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)Environmental assessment: ocean thermal energy conversion (FROH A PROPOSED OCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:

  15. On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Helen

    On the Wind Power Input to the Ocean General Circulation XIAOMING ZHAI Atmospheric, Oceanic January 2012, in final form 3 May 2012) ABSTRACT The wind power input to the ocean general circulation is usually calculated from the time-averaged wind products. Here, this wind power input is reexamined using

  16. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

  17. Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU National Center of high-resolution wind in coastal ocean modeling. This paper tests the Coupled OceanAtmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) at the 9-, 27-, and 81-km grid resolutions in simulating wind off the central

  18. SUBMITTED TO GRL 1 Thermal Anisotropies in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    SUBMITTED TO GRL 1 E Thermal Anisotropies in the Solar Wind: vidence of Heating by Interstellar cyclotron instabilit s generated by newly created pickup ions and heats the thermal solar wind protons TO GRL 2 T Introduction he thermal anisotropy of the solar wind is the ratio between the temperatures p

  19. On the role of wind driven ocean dynamics in tropical Atlantic variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Meyre Pereira

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of the tropical Atlantic Ocean to wind stress forcing on seasonal and interannual time scales is examined using an ocean data assimilation product from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), and an ocean general circulation...

  20. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  1. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

  2. Wind speed influence on phytoplankton bloom dynamics in the Southern Ocean Marginal Ice Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitch, Dillon T; Moore, J. Keith

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niebauer, H. J. (1982), Wind and melt driven circulation inJ. K. Moore (2007), Wind speed influence on phytoplanktonby the NASA Ocean Vector Winds Science Team. Data are

  3. On the Patterns of Wind-Power Input to the Ocean Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roquet, Fabien

    Pathways of wind-power input into the ocean general circulation are analyzed using Ekman theory. Direct rates of wind work can be calculated through the wind stress acting on the surface geostrophic flow. However, because ...

  4. Solar wind electron density and temperature over solar cycle 23: Thermal noise measurements on Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    upstream of the Earth?s bow shock. The WIND/WAVES thermal noise receiver was specially designed to measureSolar wind electron density and temperature over solar cycle 23: Thermal noise measurements on Wind the in situ plasma thermal noise spectra, from which the electron density and temperature can be accurately

  5. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Sponsored byApplications Division of Ocean Energy Systems Contract W-nental Assessment, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  7. Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact on an ocean model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Wind stress measurements from the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission and the impact by the QuikSCAT-SeaWinds scatterometer tandem mission (AprilOctober 2003) and their impact on ocean model simulation. The diurnal variability captured by twice-daily scatterometer wind from the tandem mission

  8. Scatterometer observations of wind variations induced by oceanic islands: Implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scatterometer observations of wind variations induced by oceanic islands: Implications for wind-driven of the Hawaiian and Cabo Verde islands on the mean atmospheric flow. A wake of weak winds, flanked by accelerated winds, appears for each major island of both archipelagos. The resulting wind stress curl displays

  9. Evaluating Southern Ocean Response to Wind Forcing Sarah T. Gille \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Evaluating Southern Ocean Response to Wind Forcing Sarah T. Gille \\Lambda School of Environmental author: Gille 1 Evaluating Southern Ocean Response to Wind Forcing Sarah T. Gille \\Lambda School Circumpolar Current (ACC) responds to changes in wind forcing, cross coherences are calculated between

  10. Assessing ocean-model sensitivity to wind forcing uncertainties I. Andreu Burillo,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assessing ocean-model sensitivity to wind forcing uncertainties I. Andreu Burillo,1 G. Caniaux,1 M-equation open-ocean model, induced by uncertainties in wind forcing. Statistics calculated from an ensemble-model sensitivity to wind forcing uncertainties, Geophys. Res. Lett., 29(18), 1858, doi:10.1029/2001GL014473, 2002

  11. The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    The Estimated Global Ocean Wind Power Potential from QuikSCAT Observations, Accounting for Turbine: (949) 824-3256 Abstract For the first time, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub height, usable portion of the wind speed distri- bution

  12. Correlations in thermal comfort and natural wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Ki-Nam; Song, Doosam; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic ?uctuation in natural wind and its application toof natural and mechanical wind in built environment usingcharacteristics of natural wind. Refrigeration 71 (821),

  13. title: On a Wind-Driven, Double-Gyre, Quasi-Geostrophic Ocean ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    title: On a Wind-Driven, Double-Gyre, Quasi-Geostrophic Ocean Model: Numerical Simulations and Structuraln Analysis Authors: Jie Shen, T. Tachim Medjo and...

  14. Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans Naoki 9 July 2008; published 30 September 2008. [1] The distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans, J. Geophys. Res., 113, C09034, doi:10.1029/2008JC004768. 1

  15. Wind ringing of the ocean in presence of mesoscale eddies P. Klein and G. Lapeyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapeyre, Guillaume

    Wind ringing of the ocean in presence of mesoscale eddies P. Klein and G. Lapeyre Laboratoire de scales related to oceanic mesoscale eddies. Results show that a turbulent eddy field does not affect Oceanography: Physical: Eddies and mesoscale processes; 4572 Oceanography: Physical: Upper ocean processes

  16. E. Guilyardi G. Madec L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guilyardi, Eric

    inertia and to its opacity, the ocean stores vast amounts of energy, away from a direct contactE. Guilyardi á G. Madec á L. Terray The role of lateral ocean physics in the upper ocean thermal balance of a coupled ocean-atmosphere GCM Received: 24 January 2000 / Accepted: 11 September 2000 Abstract

  17. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)M.S. et al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco-

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in-

  20. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:al. , (1979) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, Eco- logical

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYcruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)at Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  3. Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing] A global simulation of the ocean response to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing has been run during the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing - comparisons

  4. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    Click Here for Full Article Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations. Zender (2010), Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting, global ocean usable wind power is evaluated for modern offshore turbine characteristics including hub

  5. Eddy Heat Flux in the Southern Ocean: Response to Variable Wind Forcing ANDREW MCC. HOGG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    Eddy Heat Flux in the Southern Ocean: Response to Variable Wind Forcing ANDREW MCC. HOGG Australian processes. The authors also test the model response to long-term changes in wind forcing, including steadily1925.1 2008 American Meteorological Society #12;Given the dominant role of wind forcing in the South

  6. www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nrvg, Kjetil

    1 www.cesos.ntnu.no Author Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Offshore Wind Turbine Operation Structures Deep Water Offshore Wind Economic Production Cost WT Life Time : 20 Years Introduction Vast icing for offshore Wind Turbines ? Wherever there is sea icing ! Temperature bellow zero degree

  7. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,Pryor (2003), Can satellite sampling of offshore wind speedsrealistically represent wind speed distributions? , J. Appl.

  8. On the Patterns of Wind-Power Input to the Ocean Circulation FABIEN ROQUET AND CARL WUNSCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    On the Patterns of Wind-Power Input to the Ocean Circulation FABIEN ROQUET AND CARL WUNSCH received 1 February 2011, in final form 12 July 2011) ABSTRACT Pathways of wind-power input into the ocean pumping, with a pattern determined by the wind curl rather than the wind itself. Regions of power

  9. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,2009), Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layerCO 2 reductions via offshore wind power matched to inherent

  10. Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

  12. The Global Characteristics of the Wavenumber Spectrum of Ocean Surface Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yongsheng

    The wavenumber spectra of wind kinetic energy over the ocean from Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) observations have revealed complex spatial variability in the wavelength range of 10003000 km, with spectral slopes varying ...

  13. Global ocean wind power sensitivity to surface layer stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. , 110,W. Tang, and X. Xie (2008), Wind power distribution over theApproach to Short-Term Wind Power Prediction, 1st ed. ,

  14. WINDSAT RETRIEVAL OF OCEAN SURFACE WIND SPEEDS IN TROPICAL CYCLONES Amanda Mims, Rachael Kroodsma, Christopher Ruf, Darren McKague

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    of emissivity on wind speed up to category 3 hurricane-force winds. 1. INTRODUCTION The microwave emissivity and horizontally polarized emissivity versus wind speed at hurricane force winds. 2. SATELLITE AND GROUNDBASEDWINDSAT RETRIEVAL OF OCEAN SURFACE WIND SPEEDS IN TROPICAL CYCLONES Amanda Mims, Rachael Kroodsma

  15. MEASUREMENT OF WIND SPEED FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A; Robert Kurzeja, R; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Cary Tuckfield, C; Malcolm Pendergast, M

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) collected thermal imagery and ground truth data at two commercial power plant cooling lakes to investigate the applicability of laboratory empirical correlations between surface heat flux and wind speed, and statistics derived from thermal imagery. SRNL demonstrated in a previous paper [1] that a linear relationship exists between the standard deviation of image temperature and surface heat flux. In this paper, SRNL will show that the skewness of the temperature distribution derived from cooling lake thermal images correlates with instantaneous wind speed measured at the same location. SRNL collected thermal imagery, surface meteorology and water temperatures from helicopters and boats at the Comanche Peak and H. B. Robinson nuclear power plant cooling lakes. SRNL found that decreasing skewness correlated with increasing wind speed, as was the case for the laboratory experiments. Simple linear and orthogonal regression models both explained about 50% of the variance in the skewness - wind speed plots. A nonlinear (logistic) regression model produced a better fit to the data, apparently because the thermal convection and resulting skewness are related to wind speed in a highly nonlinear way in nearly calm and in windy conditions.

  16. Overturning and wind driven circulation in a low-order ocean-atmosphere model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Veen, Lennaert

    july 2002 Abstract A low-order ocean-atmosphere model is presented which combines coupling through heat exchange at the interface and wind stress forcing. The coupling terms are derived from the boundary conditions and the forcing terms of the constituents. Both the ocean and the atmosphere model are based

  17. Comparison of wind stress algorithms, datasets and oceanic power input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Shaoyu

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    If the ocean is in a statistically steady state, energy balance is a strong constraint, suggesting that the energy input into the world ocean is dissipated simultaneously at the same rate. Energy conservation is one of the ...

  18. Track 2: Sustainable Energy I. Renewable Energy: Wind and Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    turbines.!!!! Ocean Thermal Energy Technology Comes to Dry Land Jeremy Feakins, Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems !! Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems is scaling up ocean thermal energy conversion the sun to shine or the wind to blow. It extracts solar energy collected in tropical oceans and converts

  19. 2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion COUNTRY NOTES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion 573 and personal communication. Valuable inputs were provided by Don Lennard of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion organisation. Australia At an ocean energy workshop held in Townsville, northern Queensland in September 2005

  20. Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jirka, Gerhard H.

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

  1. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental of the Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. ,of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference. Sponsored by the

  3. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to:

  5. COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Constance J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thefishery resources at potential OTEC sites. At this time, thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperational

  6. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Luis A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) by Luis A. Vega, Ph.D. Published by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Chapter 7 of "Ocean Energy Recovery: The State of the Art" 1992 #12;Published in Ocean Energy Recovery, pp 152-181, ASCE (1992) ii Table of Contents Tables /Figures

  7. The Dependence of Southern Ocean Meridional Overturning on Wind Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernathey, Ryan Patrick

    An eddy-resolving numerical model of a zonal flow, meant to resemble the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, is described and analyzed using the framework of J. Marshall and T. Radko. In addition to wind and buoyancy forcing ...

  8. On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean XIAOMING-inertial energy available for ocean mixing at depth is, at most, 0.1 TW. This confirms a recent suggestion energy source for the diapycnal mixing in the ocean required to maintain the meridional over- turning

  9. Estimates of wind energy input to the Ekman layer in the Southern Ocean from surface drifter data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Estimates of wind energy input to the Ekman layer in the Southern Ocean from surface drifter data March 2009; published 5 June 2009. [1] The energy input to the upper ocean Ekman layer is assessed velocities, with an adjustment to account for the vertical structure of the upper ocean. The energy input

  10. Thermal stability of thin disk with magnetically driven winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Shuang-Liang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absence of thermal instability in the high/soft state of black hole X-ray binaries, in disagreement with the standard thin disk theory, is a long-standing riddle for theoretical astronomers. We have tried to resolve this question by studying the thermal stability of a thin disk with magnetically driven winds in the $\\dot{M}- \\Sigma$ plane. It is found that disk winds can greatly decrease the disk temperature and thus help the disk become more stable at a given accretion rate. The critical accretion rate $\\dot{M}_{\\rm crit}$ corresponding to the thermal instability threshold is increased significantly in the presence of disk winds. For $\\alpha=0.01$ and $B_{\\rm \\phi}=10B_{\\rm _p}$, the disk is quite stable even for a very weak initial poloidal magnetic field [$\\beta_{\\rm p,0}\\sim 2000, \\beta_{\\rm p}=(P_{\\rm {gas}}+P_{\\rm rad})/(B_{\\rm p}^2/8\\pi)$]. But when $B_{\\rm \\phi}=B_{\\rm _p}$ or $B_{\\rm \\phi}=0.1B_{\\rm _p}$, a somewhat stronger (but still weak) field ($\\beta_{\\rm p,0}\\sim 200$ or $\\beta_{\\rm p,0}\\si...

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense New Ventures #12;What is OTEC? OTEC B fiOTEC Benefits: Large Renewable Energy Source 3-5 Terawatts Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

  12. WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ? latitude. Near 30? latitude, the maximum oceanic response to sea breeze moves offshore slowly because of the near-zero group speed of Poincare waves at this latitude. The lateral energy flux convergence plus the energy input from the wind is maximum near...

  13. Zhiyu Jiang, Department of Marine Technology & Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Dynamic response of wind turbines in fault and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nrvg, Kjetil

    response of wind turbines in fault and shutdown conditions Zhiyu Jiang Deptartment of Marine Technology://www.newscientist.com/blogs/onepercent/2011/12/why-did-a-wind-turbine-self-co.html #12;3 Zhiyu Jiang, Department of Marine Technology & Centre & Centre for Ships and Ocean Structures Control and protection of wind turbines Emergency shutdown Pitch

  14. Journal of Marine Research. 47, 81-109, 1989 The response of the coastal ocean to strong offshore winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the response of the coastal ocean to strong offshore winds: a linear 11/2-layer model, and a nonlinear 11 the wind strengthens there is an ageostrophic current (not Ekman drift) that is directed offshore toward its initial state. Throughout the wind event, cyclonic and anticyclonic gyres spin up offshore

  15. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  16. Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Solar wind electron temperature and density measurements on the Solar Orbiter with thermal noise of the plasma thermal noise analysis for the Solar Orbiter, in order to get accurate measurements of the total of their small mass and therefore large thermal speed, the solar wind electrons are expected to play a major role

  17. Interaction between surface wind and ocean circulation in the Carolina Capes in a coupled low-order model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, L.; Pietrafesa, L.J.; Raman, S.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between surface winds and ocean currents over an east-coast continental shelf are studied using a simple mathematical model. The model physics include cross-shelf advection of sea surface temperature (SST) by Ekman drift, upwelling due to Ekman transport divergence, differential heating of the low-level atmosphere by a cross-shelf SST gradient, and the Coriolis effect. Additionally, the effects of diabatic cooling of surface waters due to air-sea heat exchange and of the vertical density stratification on the thickness of the upper ocean Ekman layer are considered. The model results are qualitatively consistent with observed wind-driven coastal ocean circulation and surface wind signatures induced by SST. This simple model also demonstrates that two-way air-sea interaction plays a significant role in the subtidal frequency variability of coastal ocean circulation and mesoscale variability of surface wind fields over coastal waters.

  18. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds. During E weather small craft anchor 0.5 mile offshoreOffshore of Bahia de Tallaboa a current of 0.5 knot has been observed setting :\\E across and against the E wind.winds, and 100 em sec (2 knot) surface currents. Living quarters will be provided in offshore

  20. Rapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface mixed layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jerome A.

    mixed-layer energy [D'Asaro et al., 1995]. In this study we show that, even under weak wind and waveRapid generation of high-frequency internal waves beneath a wind and wave forced oceanic surface Received 7 March 2008; revised 9 May 2008; accepted 2 June 2008; published 8 July 2008. [1] High

  1. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    sites. The first large offshore wind farms are currently being built in several countries in EuropeImportance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for offshore wind resource assessment National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Abstract The economic feasibility of offshore wind power utilisation

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sheet] map I - 732). General Electric Company. Ocean thermalby Washom et al. General Electric (1977), Francis (1977),selected is based on General Electric estimated the ammonia

  3. Propagation of three--dimensional Alfv'en waves in a stratified, thermally conducting solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Propagation of three--dimensional Alfv'en waves in a stratified, thermally conducting solar wind S to the well--known thermal expansion of the solar corona [Parker, 1958, 1963, 1991]. In particular Alfv'en waves in the solar atmosphere and wind, taking into account relevant physical effects

  4. Wind, Thermal, and Earthquake Monitoring of the Watts Towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Jackson

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the code-level wind forces (Goldstone, 1963). The forcethe full force of the northerly Santa Ana winds. In Aprilof forces and overall displacement under seismic and wind

  5. Potential environmental consequences of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants. A workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J.J. (ed.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of generating electrical power from the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean waters was advanced over a century ago. A pilot plant was constructed in the Caribbean during the 1920's but commercialization did not follow. The US Department of Energy (DOE) earlier planned to construct a single operational 10MWe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant by 1986. However, Public Law P.L.-96-310, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Research, Development and Demonstration Act, and P.L.-96-320, the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980, now call for acceleration of the development of OTEC plants, with capacities of 100 MWe in 1986, 500 MWe in 1989, and 10,000 MWe by 1999 and provide for licensing and permitting and loan guarantees after the technology has been demonstrated.

  6. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    winds. During E weather small craft anchor 0.5 mile offshorewinds, and 100-cm sec surface currents. Living quarters will be provided in offshore

  7. USE OF MIXTURES AS WORKING FLUIDS IN OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CYCLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan Zafar Iqbal; Kenneth E. Starling

    Mixtures offer potential advantages over pure compounds as working fluids in ocean thermal energy conversion cycles. Power plant capital costs per unit of energy output can be reduced using mixtures because of increased thermal efficiency and/or decreased heat exchanger size requirements. Mixtures

  8. Relationships between El Nino and the westerly winds in the South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salva Pando, Antonio Jaime

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDUATDRIAL CCUNTERCURIT ~egg///'- i ' /7' I TWEET WIND DRIFT ~ F Co Fig. 6 . Ma)or surface currents of the Pacific Ocean during southern hemisphere summer, (Pickard, 1970). 50 N 40 30 20 10 N DEC-JAN. PER MAR ~ APRIL - MAY JUNE JULY- AUG I Ak... and following the onset. These periods are referred to in terms of the year of the terminal three months, Jan-peb-Mar, e. g. , August 1952 to March 1953 is the 1953 period. The monthly values within each period were examined to determine the nature...

  9. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11 JulyOceanOcean

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean » Ocean

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the external fluid mechanics of OTEC plants: report coveringocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants by mid-1980's.1980. A baseline design of a 40-MW OTEC Pilot Johns Hopkins

  12. Transport across 48N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction The partition of energy and freshwater flux between the ocean and the atmosphere and among various decomposition of ocean heat transport into thermal wind, gyre, and Ekman components for a rough estimateTransport across 48°N in the Atlantic Ocean RICK LUMPKIN NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic

  13. Heat exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) - electronics subsystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lott, D.F.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronics systems supporting the development of biofouling countermeasures for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) are described. Discussed are the thermistor/thermopile amplifiers, heaters, flowmeters, temperature measurement, control systems for chlorination, flow driven brushes, and recirculating sponge rubber balls. The operation and troubleshooting of each electronic subsystem is documented.

  14. atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    atmosphere-ocean thermal contrast First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Baroclinic Adjustment...

  15. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse to Time-BasedDecemberProgramsFleetWestOcean »

  16. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

  17. Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendra K. Verma

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [{\\it Verma et al.}, 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron's thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of {\\it Braginskii}. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity.

  18. A Study of Thermal Wind in the Vicinity of a Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Newton William

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THERMAL WIND IN THE VICINITY OF A JET STREAM A Thesis Newton W. Cunningham Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May I960 MAJOR SUBJECT - METEOROLOGY A STUDY OF THERMAL WIND IN THE VICINITY OF A JET STREAM A Thesis Newton W. Cunningham Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of mmittee f , / Head of Department May 3960 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Tbe...

  19. A Study of Thermal Wind in the Vicinity of a Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Newton William

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A STUDY OF THERMAL WIND IN THE VICINITY OF A JET STREAM A Thesis Newton W. Cunningham Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May I960 MAJOR SUBJECT - METEOROLOGY A STUDY OF THERMAL WIND IN THE VICINITY OF A JET STREAM A Thesis Newton W. Cunningham Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of mmittee f , / Head of Department May 3960 ACKNOWLEDGMENT Tbe...

  20. Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

  1. Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

  2. Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, David J. (David James)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

  3. Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

  4. On the Influence of Supernova Remnant Thermal Energy in Powering Galactic Winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brad K. Gibson

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental tenet of the classical supernovae-driven wind model of elliptical galaxies is that the residual thermal energy of all supernovae remnants (SNRs) provide sufficient energy to overcome the binding energy of the remaining interstellar gas, thereby driving a global galactic wind. We re-examine model predictions of this epoch of wind ejection t_GW, highlighting a heretofore underappreciated sensitivity to the adopted remnant thermal energy formalism, and illustrating cases in which previous work may have substantially overestimated t_GW. Arguments based upon chemical evolution alone, put forth to reject the hypothesis of dark matter distributions similar to the luminous component in spheroids, are shown to be tenuous. Finally, the predicted enrichment of intracluster gas during the wind phase of cluster ellipticals, and its relation to the selected SNR interior thermal energy evolutionary scheme, is addressed. Despite the success of previous wind models, our results still call into question the correctness of the simple analytical approach used thus far, and imply that a more appropriate technique should be adopted in the future.

  5. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  6. Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: Charting Wind, Thermal, Hydro Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Check out Bonneville Power Administrations new near real-time energy monitoring it displays the output of all wind, thermal and hydro generation in the agencys balancing authority against its load. Updated every five minutes, its a great resource for universities, research laboratories and other utilities.

  7. Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

  8. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martel, Laura; Smith, Paul; Rizea, Steven; Van Ryzin, Joe; Morgan, Charles; Noland, Gary; Pavlosky, Rick; Thomas, Michael

    2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawai?¢????i and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the predicted economies of scale as technology and efficiency improvements are realized and larger more economical plants deployed. Utilizing global high resolution OTEC resource assessment from the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project (an independent DOE project), Global Energy Supply Curves were generated for Grid Connected and Energy Carrier OTEC plants deployed in 2045 when the predicted technology and efficiencies improvements are fully realized. The Global Energy Supply Curves present the LCOE versus capacity in ascending order with the richest, lowest cost resource locations being harvested first. These curves demonstrate the vast ocean thermal resource and potential OTEC capacity that can be harvested with little change in LCOE.

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commins, M.L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofBiofoul- ing and Corrosion of OTEC plants ~ Selected Sites.Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  10. East Pacific ocean eddies and their relationship to subseasonal variability in Central American wind jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Bo

    wind jets Chueh-Hsin Chang,1,2 Shang-Ping Xie,1,3 Niklas Schneider,3,4 Bo Qiu,4 Justin Small,5 Wei-tilted bands on the northwest flank of the Tehuantepec and Papagayo wind jets and collocated-variance bands at a speed of 913 cm/s. Wind fluctuations are important for eddy formation in the Gulf

  11. Influence of upper-ocean stratification on tropical cyclone-induced surface cooling in the Bay of Bengal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in oceanic stratification rather than to differences in TC wind energy input. During the postmonsoon season, a deeper thermal stratification combined with a considerable upper-ocean freshening strongly inhibits that TCs primarily draw their energy from evaporation at the ocean surface [Riehl, 1950]. TCs generally

  12. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Association (2009), American Wind Energy Asso-ciation annual wind industry report: Year ending 2008,2005), Evaluation of global wind power, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  13. Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

  14. Importance of thermal effects and sea surface roughness for wind resource and wind shear at offshore sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    at offshore sites Bernhard Lange*, Sren Larsen# , Jrgen Hjstrup# , Rebecca Barthelmie# *ForWind - Centre of offshore wind power utilisation depends on the favourable wind conditions offshore as compared to sites for this flow. It's applicability for wind power prediction at offshore sites is investigated using data from

  15. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

    2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

  16. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    has more than 30 offshore wind farms in operation oraway to be unheard, offshore wind farms can contain larger,turbines considered, offshore wind farms consisting of the

  17. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. (2005), California Wind Resources, CEC publication # CEC-level inversions with surface wind and temperature at PointD. W. Stuart (1986), Mesoscale wind variability near Point

  18. Estimated global ocean wind power potential from QuikSCAT observations, accounting for turbine characteristics and siting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capps, Scott B; Zender, Charles S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the environmental benefit of wind farms [Martinez et al. ,than 30 offshore wind farms in operation or constructionto be unheard, offshore wind farms can contain larger, more

  19. HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT U.S.A * selnimri@mail.ucf.edu 2 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA 3 Space model has been developed to support the analysis and design of the new airborne Hurricane Imaging

  20. Sensitivity of the ocean's deep overturning circulation to easterly Antarctic winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew

    and carbon [Lumpkin and Speer, 2007]. It is central to our understanding of both the modern climate and Speer [2012] have recently highlighted the essential role of wind-driven upwell- ing in the Southern), or transported south towards the Antarctic continental shelf [Speer et al., 2000]. In certain regions, largely

  1. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wastedenergy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heatthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  2. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

  3. WIND-DRIVEN NEAR INERTIAL OCEAN RESPONSE AND MIXING AT THE CRITICAL LATITUDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Xiaoqian

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    power spectrum (unitles) of the normalized 10-m east-west wind component at NDBC buoy station PTAT2 (97.05?W, 27.83?N). Only significant values are plotted, which are greater than 95% confidence for a red-noise proces with a... series............................ 17 2.1.3. Hydrographic data............................ 20 2.2. Data methods: wavelet analysis....................... 20 2.2.1. Wavelet power spectrum...

  4. Technical and economic feasibility of a Thermal Gradient Utilization Cycle (TGUC) power plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiji, Ashok

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Conversion unit mass mass flow rate life of system Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power pressure heat flow Rl R4 TGUC TP T2 total primary energy subsidy expressed as BTU input per 1000 BTU output thermal energy subsidy expressed... has grown in energy technologies that use renewable resources such as solar (thermal conversion, ocean thermal energy conversion, photovoltaics, wind and biomass conversion), geothermal and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) . A new concept that can...

  5. Fisheries Research 83 (2007) 133144 Remotely sensed local oceanic thermal features and their influence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Graham

    and upwelling areas (either permanent or wind-generated) (Koubbi et al., 1991; Brunet et al., 1992; Olson et al

  6. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Primer L. A. Vega, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    It is estimated that, in an annual basis, the amount solar energy absorbed by the oceans is equivalent to at least amount of ocean solar energy does not pose an adverse environmental impact we must first identify of U.S. companies produced more than 50 kW of gross power, with a net output of up to 18 kW from

  7. The soft and hard X-rays thermal emission from star cluster winds with a supernova explosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castellanos-Ramirez, A; Esquivel, A; Toledo-Roy, J C; Olivares, J; Velazquez, P F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Massive young star clusters contain dozens or hundreds of massive stars that inject mechanical energy in the form of winds and supernova explosions, producing an outflow which expands into their surrounding medium, shocking it and forming structures called superbubbles. The regions of shocked material can have temperatures in excess of 10$^6$ K, and emit mainly in thermal X-rays (soft and hard). This X-ray emission is strongly affected by the action of thermal conduction, as well as by the metallicity of the material injected by the massive stars. We present three-dimensional numerical simulations exploring these two effects, metallicity of the stellar winds and supernova explosions, as well as thermal conduction.

  8. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  9. On the Variability of Wind Power Input to the Oceans with a Focus on the Subpolar North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Xiaoming

    Variations in power input to the ocean using a recent global reanalysis extending back to 1871 show a strong trend in the net power input since then, a trend dominated by the Southern Ocean region. This trend is interpreted ...

  10. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States Department of Energy W-7405-ENG-48. under contractof Energy undf3r Contract W-7405-ENG-48 DISCLAIMER ThisOcean Energy Systems Contract W-7405-ENG-48 August 1980 This

  11. Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    of the hurricane surface winds from NOAA and U.S. Air Force Weather Squadron aircraft flights. Further, results1 Q-Winds satellite hurricane wind retrievals and H*Wind comparisons Pet Laupattarakasem and W This paper presents a new hurricane ocean vector wind (OVW) product known as Q-Winds produced from the SeaWinds

  12. Winding Trail

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past decade, the demand for clean renewable energy continues to rise drastically in Europe, the US, and other countries. Wind energy in the ocean can possibly be one of those future renewable clean energy sources as long...

  13. A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department of Energy,aspects of the screens for OTEC intake systems. U.S. Energy

  14. Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind-thermal Generation Units ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    time t (MW) wps,t. Percent of wind farm capacity available at scenario s and time t .... speeds at foreseen onshore and offshore wind farms locations is proposed.

  15. Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Baroclinic Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghil, Michael

    oscillatory modes dominate. As the two layers become nearly equal, antisymmetric oscillatory modes become of the atmospheric marine boundary layer (AMBL) to oceanic fronts has been studied in observations, as well's dynamics depends on the layer-depth ratio. When the model is nearly equivalent-barotropic, symmetric

  16. Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosch-Ramon, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets have rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense clumps. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interaction...

  17. Constraining Wind Stress Products with Sea Surface Height Observations and Implications for Pacific Ocean Sea Level Trend Attribution*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    Ocean Sea Level Trend Attribution* SHAYNE MCGREGOR, ALEXANDER SEN GUPTA, AND MATTHEW H. ENGLAND Climate are available that are commonly used to examine climate vari- ability or trends and as boundary conditions.e., upper ocean heat content redistribution) versus global mean sea level change (i.e., including

  18. Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): Luis A. Vega Ph.D., National Marine Renewable Energy Center at the University of Hawai'i

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OTC 21016 Economics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC): An Update Luis A. Vega Ph and we will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply. This situation justifies re-evaluating OTEC should begin to implement the first generation of OTEC plantships providing electricity, via submarine

  19. Tidal and Wind Mixing versus Thermal Stratification in the South Atlantic Bight.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    overcome the tendency for tidal power to produce a well-mixed system". Additionally, they expressed some are explored using a potential energy formulation for the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). The efficiency of wind

  20. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  1. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

  2. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

  3. On the Variability of Wind Power Input to the Oceans with a Focus on the Subpolar North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    WUNSCH Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology on the North Atlantic Ocean, where the database is somewhat more secure, it is found that the input power with both the eddy kinetic energy there and the Atlantic multidecadal oscillation (AMO), although

  4. Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

  5. Measurement of the Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Rooftop Lawns in a Hot-Climate Wind Tunnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rooftop lawn. A hot-climate wind tunnel experiment was carried out in order to obtain and analyze the heat and moisture transport in the rooftop lawn. Furthermore, a calculation with the energy conservation equation was carried out using the results...

  6. Experiments on oxygen desorption from surface warm seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.A.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the results of scoping deaeration experiments conducted with warm surface seawater under open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). Concentrations of dissolved oxygen in seawater at three locations (in the supply water, water leaving a predeaerator, and discharge water from an evaporator) were measured and used to estimate oxygen desorption levels. The results suggest that 7% to 60% of dissolved oxygen in the supply water was desorbed from seawater in the predeaerator for pressures ranging from 9 to 35 kPa. Bubble injection in the upcomer increased the oxygen desorption rate by 20% to 60%. The dependence of oxygen desorption with flow rate could not be determined. The data also indicated that at typical OC-OTEC evaporator pressures when flashing occurred, 75% to 95% of dissolved oxygen was desorbed overall from the warm seawater. The uncertainty in results is larger than one would desire. These uncertainties are attributed to the uncertainties and difficulties in the dissolved oxygen measurements. Methods to improve the measurements for future gas desorption studies for warm surface and cold deep seawater under OC-OTEC conditions are recommended. 14 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

  8. Wind and tidal response of a semi-enclosed bay, Baha Concepcin, Baja California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponte, Aurlien L. S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observed response to diurnal winds . . . . . 4.1Thermal wind balance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .level response to wind . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 Current

  9. The Future of Offshore Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Future of Offshore Wind Energy #12;2 #12;3 Offshore Wind Works Offshore wind parks: 28 in 10 countries Operational since 1991 Current installed capacity: 1,250 MW Offshore wind parks in the waters around Europe #12;4 US Offshore Wind Projects Proposed Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico Cape Wind

  10. Parametric design of floating wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tracy, Christopher (Christopher Henry)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the price of energy increases and wind turbine technology matures, it is evident that cost effective designs for floating wind turbines are needed. The next frontier for wind power is the ocean, yet development in near ...

  11. Measurements of gas sorption from seawater and the influence of gas release on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, T.R.; Althof, J.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technical community has questioned the validity and cost-effectiveness of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems because of the unknown effect of noncondensable gas on heat exchanger performance and the power needed to run vacuum equipment to remove this gas. To date, studies of seawater gas desorption have not been prototypical for system level analysis. This study gives preliminary gas desorption data on a vertical spout, direct contact evaporator and multiple condenser geometries. Results indicate that dissolved gas can be substantially removed before the seawater enters the heat exchange process, reducing the uncertainty and effect of inert gas on heat exchanger performance.

  12. Changes in the ocean mixed layer following extraordinary atmospheric forcing. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mettlach, T.R.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional ocean planetary boundary-layer model is used to predict the evolution of the thermal structure of the ocean mixed layer at six locations in the ocean following the hypothetical effects on the atmosphere of a major nuclear war. The inputs to the ocean model are the heat and momentum fluxes computed from a 3D climate model designed to simulate nuclear winter effects in the atmosphere. The experiment gives evidence that the summertime mixed layer can cool 5 C within 30 days and that the effect of increased wind along coastal regions due to sudden ocean-land temperture differences will deepen the mixed layer 20 to 30 meters. The scientific literature on the subject of nuclear winter is reviewed and interpreted to trace the evolution of the nuclear winter hypothesis and to assess the quality of the results of the mixed layer experiment.

  13. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  14. Comparison of API & IEC Standards for Offshore Wind Turbine Applications in the U.S. Atlantic Ocean: Phase II; March 9, 2009 - September 9, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, A.; Dolan, D.; Gur, T.; Soyoz, S.; Alpdogan, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report compares two design guidelines for offshore wind turbines: Recommended Practice for Planning, Designing, and Constructing Fixed Offshore Platform Structures and the International Electrotechnical Commission 61400-3 Design Requirements for Offshore Wind Turbines.

  15. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  16. assessing cumulative thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models which can be expressed via Ceragioli, Francesca 9 Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion MIT - DSpace Summary: Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a...

  17. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Surface Wind Speed Distributions: Implications for Climate and Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zender, Charles

    and Wind Power DISSERTATION submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.3 Global Ocean Wind Power and Surface Layer Stability . . . . . . . . 23 1.3.1 Global Winds . . . . . . 27 1.4 Usable Offshore Wind Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 1.4.1 Wind Turbine

  18. Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Commins, M. L; Duncan, C. P.; Estrella, D. J.; Frisch, J. D.; Horne, A. J.; Jones, K.; Johnson, P. W.; Oldson, J. C.; Quinby-Hunt, M. S.; Ryan, C. J.; Sandusky, J. C.; Tatro, M.; Wilde, P.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

  19. Local and synoptic mechanisms causing Southern Californias Santa Ana winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Mimi; Hall, Alex

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Californias Santa Ana winds Oceans (Fig. 2). The timem s -1 ) Fig. 4 a Average winds for the Santa Ana cluster,2006). Arrows show total wind, color contours show wind

  20. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

    2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

  1. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. Otec Plume Biochemical Simulation of a 100MW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent

  2. Ocean Sci., 5, 115139, 2009 www.ocean-sci.net/5/115/2009/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is believed to be a primary location of surface ocean mixing as a result of wind energy input December 2008 Published in Ocean Sci. Discuss.: 12 February 2009 Revised: 24 April 2009 Accepted: 8 May response to wind stress forcing are assessed by com- paring surface drifter observations from the Southern

  3. Remote sensing of total integrated water vapor, wind speed, and cloud liquid water over the ocean using the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Norman Willis William

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified D-matrix retrieval method is the basis of the refined total integrated water vapor (TIWV), total integrated cloud liquid water (CLW), and surface wind speed (WS) retrieval methods that are developed. The 85 GHZ polarization difference...

  4. atlantic ocean samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  5. atlantic ocean woce: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  6. atlantic ocean bottom: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    North Atlantic Oscillation Atlantic ocean as a heat reservoir 10 3.1 The reduced thermal damping argument . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  7. Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

  8. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

  9. Wind- and thermal-driven air flows and the buoyancy and advection effects on air exchange within urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnusson, Sigurur Ptur

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human exposure to air pollutants and thermal stress in urban areas are public health concerns. The year 2008 was the first year when more than half of the human population lived in urban areas. Studies of the urban air ...

  10. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  11. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  12. 11march2007 Blowing in the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genton, Marc G.

    in Scotland, the largest in the USA is planned for southern California, and the biggest offshore wind farm in development) can take advantage of stronger ocean breezes. Just over 15 offshore wind farms are currently a planned 1000 MW at a capital cost of 2 bil- lion. Most offshore wind farms are located in water less than

  13. NYSERDA-Wind Energy Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: Energy ResourcesOcean Energy ThermalEnergy, Inc.056NYSERDA-Wind

  14. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  15. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000: A Coupled Air-Sea Mesoscale Model: Experiments inWind Stress Curl from a Mesoscale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev. ,2006: Effect of Ocean Mesoscale Variability on the Mean

  16. Feasibility and preliminary design study for a high velocity, low density wind tunnel utilizing the thermal creep effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen, Alton Lee

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Average molecular velocity Cartesian length co-ordinate Thermal accomodation co-efficient Constant used in Appendix I Element of volume in velocity space Angular displacement Viscosity co-efficient Gas density cm cm/sec cm/sec cm/sec cm... on spheres in a rarefied gas as a means of making correc- tions to the results of Millikan's oil drop experiment. 4 Sanger's work was followed by a paper in which Tsien out- lined the field of low density, high speed gas dynamics. In this work, Tsien used...

  17. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    . NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

  18. Estimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) relies on the availability of temperature differencesEstimation of OTEC Global Resources with an Ocean General Circulation Model Krishnakumar Rajagopalan Postdoctoral Fellow Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawai'i Abstract

  19. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  20. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    loads from the wind inflow through rotor aerodynamics, drive train and power electronics is stillWIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary wind inflow conditions M. R. Luhur, J. Peinke, J. Schneemann and M. Wchter ForWind-Center for Wind

  1. Wavelet Analysis for Wind Fields Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leite, Gladeston C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SAR images of the ocean using wavelet analysis. Canadian J.images: A new approach using wavelet transform. Canadian J.S. ; De Biasio, F. A wavelet-based technique for sea wind

  2. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

  3. Is the deep Indian Ocean MOC sustained by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    % of the world ocean. [3] Here, the energy budget of the deep Indian Ocean MOC is assessed using a range of the Indian Ocean overturning circulation with estimates of energy sources (winds, tides, and geostrophic are capable of carrying energy from ocean boundaries into the interior, and are generally considered

  4. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofouling and Corrosion of OTEC Plants at Selected Sites.the Placement of a Moored OTEC Plant. Atlantic OceanographicThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  5. Final Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters DOE AWARD NO. DE sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) uses large flowsFinal Technical Report Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy

  6. SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    SCALAR WIND SPEED AND DIRECTION TROPICAL CYCLONE RETRIEVALS FOR CONICAL SCANNING SCATTEROMETERS--Scatterometer measurements of ocean vector winds (OVW) are significantly degraded in the presence of the precipitation, especially in tropical cyclones. This paper presents a new ocean hurricane/typhoon wind vector retrieval

  7. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryJuly-August 2009 Volume13,Number4 AOML is an environmental research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hurricanes with winds above 110 mph (categories 3, 4, and 5 on the Saffir- Simpon hurricane scale). In May been shown to curb hurricane activity in the Atlantic basin by increasing vertical wind shear, which of the Lesser Antilles. Ocean Surface Wind Product Derived from Satellite Data A new ocean surface wind product

  8. Logarithmic Wind Profile: A Stability Wind Shear Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sakagami, Yoshiaki; Haas, Reinaldo; Passos, Julio C; Taves, Frederico F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stability wind shear term of logarithmic wind profile based on the terms of turbulent kinetic energy equation is proposed. The fraction influenced by thermal stratification is considered in the shear production term. This thermally affected shear is compared with buoyant term resulting in a stability wind shear term. It is also considered Reynolds stress as a sum of two components associated with wind shear from mechanical and thermal stratification process. The stability wind shear is responsible to Reynolds stress of thermal stratification term, and also to Reynolds stress of mechanical term at no neutral condition. The wind profile and its derivative are validated with data from Pedra do Sal experiment in a flat terrain and 300m from shoreline located in northeast coast of Brazil. It is close to the Equator line, so the meteorological condition are strongly influenced by trade winds and sea breeze. The site has one 100m tower with five instrumented levels, one 3D sonic anemometer, and a medium-range wind...

  9. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar radiation, and the geothermal energy. [16] Fig. 1.1.thermal energy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from athermal energy, geothermal energy, ocean thermal energy,

  10. andean uplift ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 419 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  11. antartic ocean radiocarbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 362 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  12. ENERGY ANALYSIS PROGRAM FY-1979.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trade winds, biomass, ocean thermal energy gradients, andfrom biomass ocean thermal energy conversion geothermalelectric plants, ocean thermal energy plants (OTEC) and

  13. ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cairns, E.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trade winds, biomass, ocean thermal energy gradients, andfrom biomass ocean thermal energy conversion geothermalelectric plants, ocean thermal energy plants (OTEC) and

  14. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  15. Modeling wind forcing in phase resolving simulation of nonlinear wind waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalmikov, Alexander G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind waves in the ocean are a product of complex interaction of turbulent air flow with gravity driven water surface. The coupling is strong and the waves are non-stationary, irregular and highly nonlinear, which restricts ...

  16. Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment grants of services, feasibility study grants, a...

  17. Estimates of Cabbeling in the Global Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Raymond W.

    Owing to the larger thermal expansion coefficient at higher temperatures, more buoyancy is put into the ocean by heating than is removed by cooling at low temperatures. The authors show that, even with globally balanced ...

  18. innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    innovati nNREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore

  19. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  20. Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Seong-Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The long term response of a plume associated with freshwater penetration into ambient, ocean water under upwelling favorable winds is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in an idealized domain. Three different cases were examined...

  1. Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Seong-Ho

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The long term response of a plume associated with freshwater penetration into ambient, ocean water under upwelling favorable winds is studied using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) in an idealized domain. Three different cases were examined...

  2. A nonlinear wave load model for extreme and fatigue responses of offshore floating wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sungho, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean energy is one of the most important sources of alternative energy and offshore floating wind turbines are considered viable and economical means of harnessing ocean energy. The accurate prediction of nonlinear ...

  3. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Is the Indian Ocean MOC driven by breaking internal waves?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naveira Garabato, Alberto

    of the ocean and that internal wave energy levels in the interior Indian Ocean are too weak to sustain, covering less than 20% of the world ocean. We assess the energy budget of the Indian Ocean MOC based circulation with published estimates of the energy put into the deep Indian Ocean by winds and tides. The main

  4. WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the near wake. In conclusion, WiTTS performs satisfactorily in the rotor region of wind turbine wakes under neutral stability. Copyright 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS wind turbine wake; wake model; self in wind farms along several rows and columns. Because wind turbines generate wakes that propagate downwind

  5. The Energetics of Ocean Heat Transport ANAND GNANADESIKAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallis, Geoff

    between mechanical energy supply and thermal energy transport associated with the ocean circulation modeling studies of ocean tide generation and energy conversion (Simmons et al. 2004; Arbic et al. 2004a of recent papers have argued that the mechanical energy budget of the ocean places constraints on how

  6. 12.003 Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans, Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    The laws of classical mechanics and thermodynamics are used to explore how the properties of fluids on a rotating Earth manifest themselves in, and help shape, the global patterns of atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and ...

  7. Ann. Geophysicae 14, 1088--1094 (1996) EGS --Springer-Verlag 1996 Thermal, pressure and wind fields at ground level in the area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is of particular importance, as considerable energy exchanges take place between ocean and atmosphere. Mesoscale to Terra Nova Bay, the formation of mesoscale vortices is very frequent. Model studies have shown- ity have been simulated by mesoscale models (Galle e and Schayes, 1994; Galle e, 1995). It has been

  8. Time-frequency Study of Nearshore Wind and Wave Processes Primary Investigator: Paul Liu -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    represent a primary driving force for dynamic processes in the oceans and lakes. As long as wind wavesTime-frequency Study of Nearshore Wind and Wave Processes Primary Investigator: Paul Liu - NOAA, Chen H. Tsai - National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung Overview Surface wind-generated gravity waves

  9. Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten Nielsen,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offshore wind resources from satellite SAR Charlotte Bay Hasager, Merete Bruun Christiansen, Morten ocean wind maps were described. For offshore wind resource estimation based on satellite observations and the near-coastal zone (up to 40 km offshore) is not mapped. In contrast, Envisat ASAR wind maps can

  10. How Much Energy Is Transferred from the Winds to the Thermocline on ENSO Time Scales?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the winds (via wind power) and changes in the storage of available potential energy in the tropical ocean~o is characterized by a decrease in wind power that leads to a decrease in available potential energy, and hence to an increase in the available potential energy and a steeper thermocline. The wind power alters the available

  11. 786 IEEE JOURNAL OF OCEANIC ENGINEERING, VOL. 32, NO. 4, OCTOBER 2007 Peer-Reviewed Technical Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    acknowledged as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity gradients have been suggested. Ocean thermal energy conversion is possible in locations with large temperature

  12. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  13. Stellar Winds on the Main-Sequence I: Wind Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Lftinger, T; Toth, G; Brott, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We develop a method for estimating the properties of stellar winds for low-mass main-sequence stars between masses of 0.4 and 1.1 solar masses at a range of distances from the star. Methods: We use 1D thermal pressure driven hydrodynamic wind models run using the Versatile Advection Code. Using in situ measurements of the solar wind, we produce models for the slow and fast components of the solar wind. We consider two radically different methods for scaling the base temperature of the wind to other stars: in Model A, we assume that wind temperatures are fundamentally linked to coronal temperatures, and in Model B, we assume that the sound speed at the base of the wind is a fixed fraction of the escape velocity. In Paper II of this series, we use observationally constrained rotational evolution models to derive wind mass loss rates. Results: Our model for the solar wind provides an excellent description of the real solar wind far from the solar surface, but is unrealistic within the solar corona. We run ...

  14. Wind Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers wind energy at the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

  15. Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Tropical Cyclone Forecast Models Using GODAE Nowcasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shay, Lynn K. "Nick"

    in available thermal energy associated with energetic boundary currents and ocean eddies require their accurate temperature (SST) cooling. The potential for the ocean to support intensification depends on the thermal energy available to the storm, which in turn depends on both the temperature and thickness of the upper-ocean

  16. Warm ocean anomaly, air sea fluxes, and the rapid intensification of tropical cyclone Nargis (2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    's coasts great danger. As ocean is the energy source for intensification [Emanuel, 1999; Shay et al., 2000; Lin et al., 2005, 2008; Wu et al., 2007; I.-I. Lin et al., Upper ocean thermal structure to Monthly Weather Review, 2008], in this work we investigate the role of upper ocean thermal structure (UOTS

  17. Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields in the tropical belt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Satellite observations of mesoscale ocean features and copropagating atmospheric surface fields speed and sea surface temperature (SST) over mesoscale ocean features in certain frontal regions. The aim of this study is to determine to what extent mesoscale ocean dynamics modifies the surface wind

  18. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Answers to Project 8: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    mkgmkg m = m0292.0= b) How long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? First weOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Answers to Project 8: Waves 1. A two layer internal wave is 1028 kg/m3, and the density is 1029 kg/m3 in the lower layer. a) A wind event generates an upwelling

  19. www.wasp.dk Long-term (1-20 years) prediction of wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;4 www.wasp.dk European Wind Atlas www.wasp.dk Geostrophic winds #12;5 www.wasp.dk Thermal winds www.wasp.dk Background · European Wind Atlas, Vol. II: Measurements and Modelling in Complex Terrain. Multi-partner EU). Exploring the limits of WAsP: the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program. Proc. 1996 European Union

  20. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Toksook Bay, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Toksook Bay, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  1. 11971197AUGUST 2007AMERICAN METEOROLOGICAL SOCIETY | The Global Ocean Data Assimilation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merchant, Chris

    , and individual seafarers for better knowledge of the ever-changing conditions in the sea. SST is an ocean, anditisneededasakeyinputtoforecastingsystemstoconstrainthemodeledupper- ocean circulation and thermal structure, and for the exchange of energy SSTs off the East Asian

  2. Optimization Online - Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Soroudi

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 3, 2015 ... Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind-thermal Generation Units in an Electric Utility. Alireza Soroudi (alireza.soroudi ***at*** ucd.ie)

  3. Tracking large tabular icebergs using the SeaWinds Ku-band microwave scatterometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    . Originally designed to measure wind speed and direction over the ocean, SeaWinds is a microwave scatterometer. For instance, iceberg positions affect shipping lanes, outline ocean currents, and influence biological. Optical sensors produce high-resolution images but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  5. NREL Computer Models Integrate Wind Turbines with Floating Platforms (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Far off the shores of energy-hungry coastal cities, powerful winds blow over the open ocean, where the water is too deep for today's seabed-mounted offshore wind turbines. For the United States to tap into these vast offshore wind energy resources, wind turbines must be mounted on floating platforms to be cost effective. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are supporting that development with computer models that allow detailed analyses of such floating wind turbines.

  6. Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error Paul E. Johnson and David G . Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Wind Bias from Sub-optimal Estimation Due to Geophysical Modeling Error -Wind I Paul E. Johnson (which relates the wind to the normalized radar cross section, NRCS, of the ocean surface) is uncertainty in the NRCS for given wind conditions. When the estimated variability is in- cluded in the maximum likelihood

  7. Climatology, Variability and Extrema of Ocean Waves -The Web-based KNMI/ERA-40 Wave Atlas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    the main features of the atlas. The atlas contains some explanatory text, a basic description of the wind book of Hogben et al. (1986) and the Atlas of the ocean wind and wave climate of Young and HollandClimatology, Variability and Extrema of Ocean Waves - The Web-based KNMI/ERA-40 Wave Atlas Andreas

  8. Observations from 1 km beneath to 25 km above the sea surface reveal the complex interactions in Indian Ocean westerly wind bursts associated with the MaddenJulian oscillation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Richard H.

    velocity profile measurements using W-band Doppler radar and high-resolution Doppler lidar; continuousC-bandDopplerradarscansmeasuring radial velocity and radar reflectivity; particle size distributions and chemical composi- tion of aeros by a sustained period of warming moderated by the cooling effect of ocean turbulence. Our pur- pose here

  9. Offshore Wind Power USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

  10. ARMA systems in wind engineering Yousun Li and A. Kareem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    ARMA systems in wind engineering Yousun Li and A. Kareem Structural Aerodynamics and Ocean System The time domain solution of the equations of motion of structures subjected to a stochastic wind field histories of the aerodynamic force. Recently, autoregressive and moving average (ARMA) recursive models have

  11. * C. Ruf, Dept. of AOSS, Univ. of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, cruf@umich.edu 14B.4 THE DEPENDENCE OF THE MICROWAVE EMISSIVITY OF THE OCEAN ON HURRICANE FORCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    @umich.edu 14B.4 THE DEPENDENCE OF THE MICROWAVE EMISSIVITY OF THE OCEAN ON HURRICANE FORCE WIND SPEED Chris Ruf, 2006; Brown et al., 2006). Its sensitivity to wind direction in much higher (hurricane force) winds has-behaved and monotonic dependence of emissivity on wind speed even in hurricane force winds. Section 2 presents

  12. aircraft-and satellite-based ocean: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    design. Topics Covered 1 Frandsen, Jannette B. 339 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS University of California eScholarship...

  13. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  14. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  15. Improving simulations of the upper ocean by inclusion of surface waves in the MellorYamada turbulence scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    mixing. Surface waves can enhance turbulence kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean via wave interaction on the MellorYamada scheme and upper ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each scheme. The behaviors of the MellorYamada scheme, as well as the simulated upper ocean thermal structure

  16. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 0, NO. 0, PAGES 0-0, M 0, 2001 On the Pacific Ocean regime shift variability of Pacific Ocean upper ocean heat content is examined for the 1948-1998 period using gridded-wide phenomenon affecting the thermal structure from 60 S to 70 N. EOF analysis of the Pacific Ocean heat content

  17. Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turbulent heating of the corona and solar wind: the heliospheric dark energy problem Stuart D. Bale and Solar Wind There are very few collisions in the solar wind Not in thermal equilibrium Large' Photospheric blackbody ~5000-6000K Sunspots and `active regions' #12;Impulsive Solar Activity - `Carrington

  18. Using computational tools to factor wind into architectural environment design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and an acceptable thermal comfort level, by means of passive cooling or natural ventilation. On the other hand, wind tools to factor wind into architectural environment design," Energy and Buildings, 36, 1197-1209. #121 Using computational tools to factor wind into architectural environment design Qingyan (Yan) Chen

  19. On the Use of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Measurements of Surface Winds for Marine Weather Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    the accuracies of surface wind fields in the National Centers for Envi- ronmental Prediction (NCEP) and EuropeanOn the Use of QuikSCAT Scatterometer Measurements of Surface Winds for Marine Weather Prediction ocean vector winds for marine weather prediction is investigated from two Northern Hemisphere case

  20. Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 21 - Coastal Wind Mapping from Satellite SAR: Possibilities and Limitations Charlotte Bay Hasager and Merete Bruun Christiansen Ris National Laboratory, Wind Energy Department, Meteorology Program, VEA-118 Abstract Satellite remote sensing of ocean wind fields from Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) observations

  1. Validation of QuikSCAT wind vectors by dropwindsonde data from Dropwindsonde Observations for Typhoon Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majumdar, Sharan

    of winds of hurricane force (32.9 m s1 ) in extratropical cyclones and marine weather over the open oceanValidation of QuikSCAT wind vectors by dropwindsonde data from Dropwindsonde Observations January 2010. [1] The accuracy of 10 m wind vectors derived from the QuikSCAT satellite near tropical

  2. Validating a New Algorithm for Wind Vector Retrieval in Tropical Zachary Hargrove, UNC Asheville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    on buoy and recon data from Air Force over flights. We can use these analyses as our "truth." H*Winds hasValidating a New Algorithm for Wind Vector Retrieval in Tropical Cyclones Zachary Hargrove, UNC to estimate wind speed and direction based on the "roughness" of the ocean. Errors arise when the beam

  3. Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind S.C. Pryor1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Quantifying Errors Associated with Satellite Sampling of Offshore Wind Speeds S.C. Pryor1,2 , R, Bloomington, IN47405, USA. Tel: 1-812-855-5155. Fax: 1-812-855-1661 Email: spryor@indiana.edu 2 Dept. of Wind an attractive proposition for measuring wind speeds over the oceans because in principle they also offer

  4. THE SOLAR WIND INTERACTION WITH VENUS J. G. LUHMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    atmosphere 2.3. Ionosphere 3. Solar Wind at 0.7 AU 4. Solar wind interaction phenomena 4.1. Bow shock 4 dynanricpressurepV2 (p = density,v = velocity)equalsthe thermal pressure.The upstreamthermal pressurenk by the thermal pressureof the ionosphericplasma,after which it continuesalongits antisolarroute. This flow, which

  5. An implicit finite-element model for 3D non-hydrostatic mesoscale ocean M.A. Maidana1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politcnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    An implicit finite-element model for 3D non-hydrostatic mesoscale ocean flows M.A. Maidana1 , J-dimensional, non-hydrostatic mesoscale ocean flows. The model considered here incorporates surface wind stress and the idea of using unstructured grids for modelling mesoscale ocean dynamics sounds very attractive given

  6. Melt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia M.

    We examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a ...

  7. Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

  8. The role of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on the wind-driven mixed layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    The role of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on the wind-driven mixed layer JEFF A. POLTON depth of the wind-driven layer. We show how, for this oceanic regime, the CoriolisStokes forcing.e.belcher@reading.ac.uk #12;ABSTRACT The interaction between the Coriolis force and the Stokes drift associated with ocean

  9. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Mattapoisett Mattapoisett, Massachusetts December 1, 2006 February 28, 2007...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  12. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jrgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  13. Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision wind-energy is one possible way to ex- tend flight duration for Unmanned Arial Vehicles. Wind-energy sources of wind energy available to exploit for this problem [5]: 1) Vertical air motion, such as thermal

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    l l,eve l Ventil.u:ion ( el OTEC H . . ard Level (f) Type ofW.E. and R.N. Manley, 1979. OTEC Commercialization Analysis.Assessment for Operational OTEC Platforms A Progress Report.

  15. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Production, however, is peaking and humanity will face a steadily diminishing petroleum supply and higher make available to its customers. Baseload plant An energy plant devoted to the production of baseload generated by the production of electricity that are not included in the price charged to consumers

  16. Wind Energy | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7401, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 1 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wind potential is over 10,000 gigawatts (GW) in areas with capacity factors at or above 30 percent. For offshore wind, the Department of Interior estimates that over 4,000 GW of offshore wind potential exist in the oceans and Great Lakes. Only a portion of this potential will be necessary for wind energy to supply

  17. Wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

  18. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  19. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  20. Temporal vs. Stochastic Granularity in Thermal Generation Capacity ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    smryan

    2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    [20] S. Jin, A. Botterud, S. Ryan, "Impact of demand response on thermal generation investment with high wind penetration,". Iowa State Univerity, Technical...

  1. Mixing and diapycnal advection in the ocean Louis C. St. Laurent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . Introduction The sun heats the Earth's atmosphere and ocean, driving the winds, evaporation, and rain. These act over global scales to input mechanical energy and variance to the scalar fields of the ocean insight into the mechanisms driving abyssal circulations. Observations of turbulence across the Brazil

  2. A numerical ocean circulation model of the Norwegian and Greenland Seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, David

    A numerical ocean circulation model of the Norwegian and Greenland Seas DAVID P STEVENS School of the Norwegian and Greenland Seas are investigated using a three-dimensional primitive equation ocean circulation and seasonally varying wind and thermohalme forcing. The connections of the Norwegian and Greenland Seas

  3. Delayed upwelling alters nearshore coastal ocean ecosystems in the northern California current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and stronger late-season upwelling are consistent with predictions of the influence of global warming on coastal upwelling regions. climate variability coastal marine ecosystems coastal ocean upwelling marine ecology Equatorward winds along the eastern boundaries of the world's oceans drive offshore surface Ekman

  4. Arctic ocean long-term acoustic monitoring : ambient noise, environmental correlates, and transients north of Barrow, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Ethan H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean namely the thickness and concentration of perennial ice coverage is crucial in allowing the water column to retain thermal energy

  5. Improving simulations of the upper-ocean by inclusion of4 surface waves in the Mellor-Yamada turbulence scheme5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    kinetic energy and mixing of the upper ocean33 via wave breaking and non-breaking wave35 upper-ocean thermal structure are examined and compared with each other using36 one. The behaviors of the Mellor-Yamada39 scheme, as well as the simulated upper-ocean thermal structure

  6. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  7. Coastal Ohio Wind Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsevski, Peter; Afjeh, Abdollah; Jamali, Mohsin; Bingman, Verner

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Coastal Ohio Wind Project intends to address problems that impede deployment of wind turbines in the coastal and offshore regions of Northern Ohio. The project evaluates different wind turbine designs and the potential impact of offshore turbines on migratory and resident birds by developing multidisciplinary research, which involves wildlife biology, electrical and mechanical engineering, and geospatial science. Firstly, the project conducts cost and performance studies of two- and three-blade wind turbines using a turbine design suited for the Great Lakes. The numerical studies comprised an analysis and evaluation of the annual energy production of two- and three-blade wind turbines to determine the levelized cost of energy. This task also involved wind tunnel studies of model wind turbines to quantify the wake flow field of upwind and downwind wind turbine-tower arrangements. The experimental work included a study of a scaled model of an offshore wind turbine platform in a water tunnel. The levelized cost of energy work consisted of the development and application of a cost model to predict the cost of energy produced by a wind turbine system placed offshore. The analysis found that a floating two-blade wind turbine presents the most cost effective alternative for the Great Lakes. The load effects studies showed that the two-blade wind turbine model experiences less torque under all IEC Standard design load cases considered. Other load effects did not show this trend and depending on the design load cases, the two-bladed wind turbine showed higher or lower load effects. The experimental studies of the wake were conducted using smoke flow visualization and hot wire anemometry. Flow visualization studies showed that in the downwind turbine configuration the wake flow was insensitive to the presence of the blade and was very similar to that of the tower alone. On the other hand, in the upwind turbine configuration, increasing the rotor blade angle of attack reduced the wake size and enhanced the vortices in the flow downstream of the turbine-tower compared with the tower alone case. Mean and rms velocity distributions from hot wire anemometer data confirmed that in a downwind configuration, the wake of the tower dominates the flow, thus the flow fields of a tower alone and tower-turbine combinations are nearly the same. For the upwind configuration, the mean velocity shows a narrowing of the wake compared with the tower alone case. The downwind configuration wake persisted longer than that of an upwind configuration; however, it was not possible to quantify this difference because of the size limitation of the wind tunnel downstream of the test section. The water tunnel studies demonstrated that the scale model studies could be used to adequately produce accurate motions to model the motions of a wind turbine platform subject to large waves. It was found that the important factors that affect the platform is whether the platform is submerged or surface piercing. In the former, the loads on the platform will be relatively reduced whereas in the latter case, the structure pierces the wave free surface and gains stiffness and stability. The other important element that affects the movement of the platform is depth of the sea in which the wind turbine will be installed. Furthermore, the wildlife biology component evaluated migratory patterns by different monitoring systems consisting of marine radar, thermal IR camera and acoustic recorders. The types of radar used in the project are weather surveillance radar and marine radar. The weather surveillance radar (1988 Doppler), also known as Next Generation Radar (NEXRAD), provides a network of weather stations in the US. Data generated from this network were used to understand general migratory patterns, migratory stopover habitats, and other patterns caused by the effects of weather conditions. At a local scale our marine radar was used to complement the datasets from NEXRAD and to collect additional monitoring parameters such as passage rates, flight paths, flight directi

  8. The relative importance of tropical variability forced from the North Pacific through ocean pathways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solomon, Amy

    forced through the atmosphere? To address this question, in this study we use an anomaly-coupled model), and with coupling con- fined to the Tropics and wind stress and heat fluxes in the North Pacific specified by output impact the tropics through ocean pathways. These two signals are forced by wind stress and surface heat

  9. Wind Technologies & Evolving Opportunities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers opportunities for wind technology; wind energy market trends; an overview of the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado; wind energy price and cost trends; wind turbine technology improvements; and wind resource characterization improvements.

  10. 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional Energy Job Fair 2015 Iowa Wind Power Conference and Iowa Wind Energy Association Midwest Regional...

  11. Community Wind Handbook/Understand Your Wind Resource and Conduct...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conduct a Preliminary Estimate < Community Wind Handbook Jump to: navigation, search WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHCommunity Wind Handbook WindTurbine-icon.png...

  12. American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar American Wind Energy Association Wind Energy Finance and Investment Seminar October 20, 2014 8:00AM EDT...

  13. Free and forced tropical variability: role of the wind-evaporation-sea surface temperature (WES) feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahajan, Salil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind-Evaporation-Sea Surface Temperature (WES) feedback is believedto play an important role in the tropics, where climate variability is governed byatmosphere-ocean coupled interactions. This dissertation reports on studies to distinctlyisolate...

  14. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,17%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  15. Peter C. Chu Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    , such as using the wind tunnel, we present a new efficient and low cost method to determine the drag, liftPeter C. Chu Chenwu Fan Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory, Naval Postgraduate School, and no fin and no-tail section) conducted at the SRI test site. The cost of this method is much lower than

  16. OceanAtmosphere Interactions on Interannual to Decadal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuille, Mathias

    , and the land surface and the biosphere. Oceanatmosphere interac- tions include exchanges of energy (i.e., radia- tive transfer and heat fluxes), momentum (i.e., wind stress), water (i.e., precipitation temperature shows high power at all time scales. This variation in behavior is the funda- mental cause of many

  17. Methods and apparatus for cooling wind turbine generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Schenectady, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Alplaus, NY); Carl, Jr., Ralph James (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine generator includes a stator having a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis. A rotor is rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis, and the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to the rotor and cooperating with the stator windings. The magnetic elements are configured to generate a magnetic field and the stator windings are configured to interact with the magnetic field to generate a voltage in the stator windings. A heat pipe assembly thermally engaging one of the stator and the rotor to dissipate heat generated in the stator or rotor.

  18. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedequipment-related wind turbine costs, the overall importinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

  19. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Preparedinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand components and wind turbine costs. Excluded from all

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: wind energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Manufacturing Lab Helps Engineers Improve Wind Power On November 15, 2011, in Energy, News, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Wind Energy Researchers at the Wind Energy...

  1. Module Handbook Specialisation Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habel, Annegret

    ;Specialisation Wind Energy, NTU Athens, 2nd Semester Module 1/Wind Energy: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Module name: Wind potential, Aerodynamics & Loading of Wind Turbines Section Classes Evaluation of Wind Energy Potential Wind turbine Aerodynamics Static and dynamic Loading of Wind turbines

  2. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  3. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  4. Wind Integration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to global warmingGlobal »Wind

  5. Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly UserWhat's New Today aboutWind

  6. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  7. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  8. Correlations in thermal comfort and natural wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Ki-Nam; Song, Doosam; Schiavon, Stefano

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power spectral density E(f), according to Hinze (1975): North 5m Micro climate -Barometric pressure (2.3mheight) -Solar

  9. Statistics of Met-Ocean Conditions Between West and Central Gulf of Mexico Based on Field Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Lin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Statistics of met-ocean conditions including wind, current and wave at the location between west and central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are derived based on about three year of field measurements. Two-parameter Weibull distribution has been employed...

  10. Study of directional ocean wavefield evolution and rogue wave occurrence using large-scale phase-resolved nonlinear simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Wenting, 1982-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is challenging to obtain accurate predictions of ocean surface wavefield evolutions due to several complex dynamic processes involved, including nonlinear wave interaction, wave breaking and wind forcing, and also wave ...

  11. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  12. Wind Power Today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

  13. Sunflower Wind Farm EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sunflower Wind Farm EA Sunflower Wind Farm Draft EA (25mb pdf) Note: If you have problems downloading this file, pelase contact Lou Hanebury at (406) 255-2812 Sunflower Wind Farm...

  14. Wind/Hydro Study

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

  15. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  16. Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind turbine reliability issues are often linked to failures of contacting components, such as bearings, gears, and actuators. Therefore, special consideration to tribological design in wind...

  17. Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Micro Wind Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

  18. System-Wide Emissions Implications of Increased Wind Power Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on.html. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, andAssociation Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation,DOI?s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation, and

  20. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    States. Specifically, Bluewater Wind and Delmarva PowerLLC Babcock & Brown Acquisition Bluewater Wind Good Energies

  1. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

  2. Inclusion of a katabatic wind correction in a coarse-resolution global coupled climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goelzer, Heiko

    the ice pack, from which newly formed ice is blown away. Among the 28 coastal polynyas listed along East 2012 Accepted 6 March 2012 Available online 14 March 2012 Keywords: Katabatic winds Sea ice Antarctic sea ice and World Ocean's properties on long timescales are assessed, showing that katabatic winds

  3. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF THE SUPPORT STRUCTURE OF WIND TURBINE USING WIRELESS SENSING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF THE SUPPORT STRUCTURE OF WIND TURBINE USING WIRELESS SENSING SYSTEM, Taipei, Taiwan 2 Department of Hydraulic & Ocean Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan kclu@narlabs.org.tw ABSTRACT The wind turbine heavily depends on the success of the support

  4. Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    Wave-driven wind jets in the marine atmospheric boundary layer Kirsty E. Hanley Stephen E. Belcher;Abstract The interaction between ocean surface waves and the overlying wind leads to a transfer of momentum can also be transferred upwards when long wavelength waves, characteristic of re- motely generated

  5. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

  6. Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

  7. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  8. Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Leasing Areas for the BOEM Maryland Wind Energy Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Elliott, D.; Fields, J.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Draxl, C.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under an interagency agreement with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), is providing technical assistance to identify and delineate leasing areas for offshore wind energy development within the Atlantic Coast Wind Energy Areas (WEAs) established by BOEM. This report focuses on NREL's evaluation of the delineation proposed by the Maryland Energy Administration (MEA) for the Maryland (MD) WEA and two alternative delineations. The objectives of the NREL evaluation were to assess MEA's proposed delineation of the MD WEA, perform independent analysis, and recommend how the MD WEA should be delineated.

  9. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirnivas, S.; Musial, W.; Bailey, B.; Filippelli, M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a deliverable for a project sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) entitled National Offshore Wind Energy Resource and Design Data Campaign -- Analysis and Collaboration (contract number DE-EE0005372; prime contractor -- AWS Truepower). The project objective is to supplement, facilitate, and enhance ongoing multiagency efforts to develop an integrated national offshore wind energy data network. The results of this initiative are intended to 1) produce a comprehensive definition of relevant met-ocean resource assets and needs and design standards, and 2) provide a basis for recommendations for meeting offshore wind energy industry data and design certification requirements.

  10. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  11. ocean energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinked openreduction+ocean energy Home

  12. Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersource History View NewWind FarmMakai Ocean

  13. An aero-elastic flutter based electromagnetic energy harvester with wind speed augmenting funnel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    An aero-elastic flutter based electromagnetic energy harvester with wind speed augmenting funnel been used to convert wind flow energy into mechanical vibration, which is then transformed-scale renewable energy generating systems such as wind turbines, thermal generators, and solar panels, energy

  14. Management and Conservation Article Behavioral Responses of Bats to Operating Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holberton, Rebecca L.

    Management and Conservation Article Behavioral Responses of Bats to Operating Wind Turbines JASON W used thermal infrared (TIR) cameras to assess the flight behavior of bats at wind turbines because with turbine blades, suggesting that bats may be at higher risk of fatality on nights with low wind speeds

  15. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  16. The Role of Wave-Induced CoriolisStokes Forcing on the Wind-Driven Mixed Layer JEFF A. POLTON,* DAVID M. LEWIS, AND STEPHEN E. BELCHER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    The Role of Wave-Induced CoriolisStokes Forcing on the Wind-Driven Mixed Layer JEFF A. POLTON in the direction along wave crests. How this CoriolisStokes forcing affects the mean current profile in a wind. It is shown how, for this oceanic regime, the CoriolisStokes forcing supports a fraction of the applied wind

  17. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earths climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  18. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  19. Howard County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance sets up provisions for allowing small wind energy systems in various zoning districts.

  20. atlantic wind test: Topics by E-print Network

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  1. Ris Energy Report 5 Solar thermal 41 by the end of 2004 about 110 million m2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    area decrease with the size of the system. solar thermal systems connected to a district heating network are therefore more cost-effective than systems for single family houses. solar thermal systems) Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wind Power #12;

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSW) and 40 MWe of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)ocean thermal, Ruderman wind, solar, and geothermal energy,energy sources, such as solar-heated water, indus- trial waste heat, geothermal brines, and ocean thermal

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

  4. Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estimation of Wind Speed in Connection to a Wind Turbine X. Ma #3; , N. K. Poulsen #3; , H. Bindner y December 20, 1995 Abstract The wind speed varies over the rotor plane of wind turbine making the wind speed on the rotor plane will be estimated by using a wind turbine as a wind measuring device

  5. Wind Power Outlook 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

  6. Modelling of partially-resolved oceanic symmetric instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachman, S. D.; Taylor, J. R.

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    27 Contents lists availab Ocean Mo els2008a,b,c; Fox-Kemper et al., 2008; Klein et al., 2008), (3) the Rossby (Ro) and Richardson (Ri) numbers are O1, meaning that balanced models are not appropriate to describe the motion As computational power increases... sign of f (Hoskins, 1974). Fronts in the surface mixed layer of the ocean feature strong lateral density gradients, which in conjunction with wind forcing and/or buoy- ancy fluxes create conditions favorable to the development of SI (Thomas and Taylor...

  7. Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators Collegiate Wind Competition Engages Tomorrow's Wind Energy Innovators January 6, 2014 - 10:00am Addthis 2014 Collegiate Teams Boise State...

  8. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  9. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

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    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  10. Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

  11. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

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    a new vision for wind energy through 2050. Taking into account all facets of wind energy (land-based, offshore, distributed), the new Wind Vision Report defines the...

  12. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

  13. Sandia Energy - Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database

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    Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Resources Wind Software Downloads Sandia Wind Turbine Loads Database Sandia Wind...

  14. OBSERVING SYSTEM SIMULATION EXPERIMENTS ON THE OAH'U REGIONAL OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) site off the south coast of Oah'u as well as the circulation of Mamala analyses of the observing systems were conducted at the outflow plume depth of a potential pilot Ocean

  15. The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Roger

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

  16. Direct numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    investigate the conversion of gravitational energy into viscous heating and the thermal equilibration betweenDirect numerical simulation of an iron rain in the magma ocean H. Ichikawa,1,2 S. Labrosse,1 and K of metal in a magma ocean. The model, using a fully Lagrangian approach called the moving particle semi

  17. Ocean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermal agitation -internal energy of the fluid is typically 10 orders of magnitude greater thanOcean Heat Transport , Overturning Circulations, and some fine-resolution ASOF dynamics P.B. Rhines & S. Häkkinen #12;· Many basic tenets of ocean circulation are being challenged, and they relate

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind Power

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Staff On March 24, 2011, in Wind Energy On November 10, 2010, in Wind Plant Opt. Rotor Innovation Materials, Reliability & Standards Siting & Barrier Mitigation...

  19. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  20. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillary

  1. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on BulkOperations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power's

  2. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operations Impacts of Wind Generation Integration Study.Impacts of Integrating Wind Generation into Idaho Power'sthe Impact of Significant Wind Generation Facilities on Bulk

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  7. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  14. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

  16. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Table 8 Figure 30. Wind Integration Costs at Various LevelsOperations and Maintenance Costs Wind project operations andPublic Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study. Prepared

  17. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wind turbine components (specifically, generators, bladeschangers. Wind turbine components such as blades, towers,Canada (8%). Wind turbine component exports (towers, blades,

  18. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the section on offshore wind; Donna Heimiller and Billyof 2012, global cumulative offshore wind capacity stood ats (DOEs) investments in offshore wind energy research and

  19. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 81 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  20. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    charging wind power projects for balancing services. 88 BPA,in balancing reserves with increased wind power penetrationin balancing reserves with increased wind power penetration

  1. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Xcel Energy. 2011. Wind Induced Coal Plant Cyclingand the Implications of Wind Curtailment for Public Serviceof Colorado 2 GW and 3 GW Wind Integration Cost Study.

  2. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.Newark, DE. 16 pages. Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) (

  3. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. In March 2011, NRG Bluewater Wind?s Delaware projectPurchaser Delmarva NRG Bluewater Wind (Delaware) Universitythe project, while NRG Bluewater would retain the remaining

  4. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2004 February 28, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  6. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA March 26th 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  7. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June 1st 2004- May 31st 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions......................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions.......

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA December 1st , 2006 February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2006 to August 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed D

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts March 24th to May 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  13. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA December 2006 February 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 12 Wind Speed Di

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts December, 2006 1st to February 28th , 2007 Prepared...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts June 1, 2006 - August 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Di

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA March 2007 May 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA September November 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA September 1st 2005 to November 30th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Kingston, MA December 1, 2005 - February 28, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts September 1, 2006 - November 30, 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions..................

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI March 1, 2007 May 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  4. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Sep 1st 2004 to Nov 30th 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  5. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA June August 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  6. WIND DATA REPORT September 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Lynn, MA September 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology Collaborative 75.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Monthly Average Wind Speeds

  7. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts September 1st to November 30th , 2006 Prepared.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  9. WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Truro, Massachusetts June 1st to August 31st , 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  10. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA June 1st 2005 to August 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

  11. WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Brewster, Massachusetts March 1, 2006 - May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributi

  12. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2004 November 30, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution.............

  13. WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT DARTMOUTH, MA December 1st 2005 to February 28th 2006. Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  14. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  15. WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Wellfleet, MA March 1st , 2007 May 31st , 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  16. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI September 1, 2007 November 30, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  17. WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2005 May 31, 2005 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distribution

  18. WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Chester, MA April 14 May 31, 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  19. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA Dec 1st 2004 to Feb 28th 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology ...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  20. WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA March 1st 2005 to May 31st 2005. Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  1. WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Dartmouth, MA June 1st 2006 to July 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distributions

  2. WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Gardner NCCI June 1, 2007 August 31, 2007 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

  3. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies show that wind energy integration costs are below $do not represent wind energy generation costs. This sectioncomponent of the overall cost of wind energy, but can vary

  4. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    do not represent wind energy generation costs. Based on thisproduction-cost reduction value of wind energy, without anwith wind energy. Generally, these costs are associated with

  5. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

  6. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

  7. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

  8. WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND DATA REPORT Nantucket, MA March 1st 2006 to May 31th 2006 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribut

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  10. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capacity), with 17% of all potential wind energy generationthat roughly 17% of potential wind energy generation withinexample, roughly 1% of potential wind energy output in 2009

  11. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  12. Wind Power Career Chat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

  13. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  14. Wind power today

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

  15. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  16. 2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

  17. Iceberg size and orientation estimation using SeaWinds K.M. Stuart, D.G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    processes. For instance, iceberg positions affect shipping lanes, outline ocean currents, and influence but are unable to penetrate cloud cover and are dependent on solar illumination. Despite the high Ocean has also been documented. Even though SeaWinds was never designed to track icebergs, an extensive

  18. Offshore Wind Energy Permitting: A Survey of U.S. Project Developers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a goal to generate 20% of the nations electricity from wind power by 2030. Achieving this 20% Wind Scenario in 2030 requires acceleration of the current rate of wind project development. Offshore wind resources contribute substantially to the nations wind resource, yet to date no offshore wind turbines have been installed in the U.S. Progress developing offshore wind projects has been slowed by technological challenges, uncertainties about impacts to the marine environment, siting and permitting challenges, and viewshed concerns. To address challenges associated with siting and permitting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) surveyed offshore wind project developers about siting and project development processes, their experience with the environmental permitting process, and the role of coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) in development of the offshore wind industry. Based on the responses to survey questions, we identify several priority recommendations to support offshore wind development. Recommendations also include considerations for developing supporting industries in the U.S. and how to use Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) to appropriately consider ocean energy among existing ocean uses. In this report, we summarize findings, discuss the implications, and suggest actions to improve the permitting and siting process.

  19. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  20. Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR.,* L. K. SHAY, AND J. K. BREWSTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides the thermal energy for intensification, errors and biases in the ocean compo- nent of coupled TCEvaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR December 2009) ABSTRACT An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea

  1. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEA?s Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRI?s Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 9 wind turbineswind energy continues to decline as a result of lower wind turbine

  2. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AWEAs Wind Energy Weekly, DOE/EPRIs Turbine Verification10% Wind Energy Penetration New large-scale 8 wind turbinesTurbine Market Report. Washington, D.C. : American Wind Energy

  3. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Plant Optimization Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Wind Plant Optimization Wind Plant OptimizationTara Camacho-Lopez2015-05-29T21:33:21+00:00...

  4. Ship Observations of the Tropical Pacific Ocean along the Coast of South America S. P. DE SZOEKE, C. W. FAIRALL, AND SERGIO PEZOA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the NOAA ship Ronald H. Brown sailed southward within 300 km of the coast of Ecuador and Peru, sampling of upwelling, surface fluxes, and transport, which in turn depend on the wind and solar forcing at the ocean

  5. Water and Climate 2. Circulation of ocean and atmosphere; climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to high latitude and part of that thermal energy is FW: latent heat Gill Atmosphere-Ocean Dynamics integrated vertically (annual mean) ERA40 Atlas ECMWF HIGH: ICTZ, monsoon regions, Amazon.... convergent March 2005 from satellite radiometer AMSR-E. Ranges up to 6.5 cm FW in tropics #12;#12;Relative humidity

  6. Wind Wave Float

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Power Peer Review WindWaveFloat Alla Weinstein Principle Power, Inc. aweinstein@principlepowerinc.com November 1, 2011 2 | Wind and Water Power Program eere.energy.gov...

  7. Wind Energy Act (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Maine Wind Energy Act is a summary of legislative findings that indicate the state's strong interest in promoting the development of wind energy and establish the state's desire to ease the...

  8. Residential Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Gary

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study will explore the use of residential wind power and associated engineering and environmental issues. There is various wind power generating devices available to the consumer. The study will discuss the dependencies of human...

  9. Airplane and the wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Airplane and the wind. An airplane starts from the point A and flies to B. The speed of the airplane with respect to the air is v (constant). There is also a wind of

  10. See the Wind

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    See the Wind Grades: 5-8 , 9-12 Topic: Wind Energy Owner: Kidwind Project This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency...

  11. Wind JOC Conference - Wind Control Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Wind Control Changes JOC August 10, 2012 Presentation updated on July 30, 2012 at 11:00 AM B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N 2 Wind Control Changes B O N...

  12. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prospects for Offshore Wind Farms. Wind Engineering, 28:Techniques for Offshore Wind Farms. Journal of Solar

  13. Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri: EnergyExcellence SeedNunn,andOasys WaterCity,

  14. Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France:Barstow, California: Energy

  15. Kent County- Wind Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance establishes provisions and standards for small wind energy systems in various zoning districts in Kent County, Maryland.

  16. Wind Webinar Text Version

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Download the text version of the audio from the DOE Office of Indian Energy webinar on wind renewable energy.

  17. 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    regulation and frequency response services charge to wind energyRegulation and Frequency Response Service rate for wind energy

  18. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Opinion About Large Offshore Wind Power: Underlying Factors.Delaware Opinion on Offshore Wind Power - Interim Report.

  19. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space constraints. Ohio: The Lake Erie Energy DevelopmentGreat Lakes Ohio Wind, and Great Lakes Wind Energy LLC. In

  20. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of larger balancing areas, the use of regional wind powerbalancing areas. The successful use of regional wind power

  1. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directly charging wind power projects for balancing servicesin smaller balancing areas. The successful use of wind power

  2. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  3. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  4. Wind power outlook 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

  5. Wind Turbine Competition Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

    Wind Turbine Competition Introduction: The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, SHPE at UTK, wishes to invite you to participate in our first `Wind Turbine' competition as part of Engineer's Week). You will be evaluated by how much power your wind turbine generates at the medium setting of our fan

  6. Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Offshore Wind Geoff Sharples geoff@clearpathenergyllc.com #12;Frequently Unanswered Ques?ons Why don't "they" build more offshore wind? Why not make States Cape Wind PPA at 18 c/kWh #12;The cycle of non-innova?on Offshore

  7. CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    CONGRESSIONAL BRIEFING Offshore Wind Lessons Learned from Europe: Reducing Costs and Creating Jobs Thursday, June 12, 2014 Capitol Visitors Center, Room SVC 215 Enough offshore wind capacity to power six the past decade. What has Europe learned that is applicable to a U.S. effort to deploy offshore wind off

  8. EA-1782: University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The University of Delaware has constructed a wind turbine adjacent to its College of Earth, Ocean, and Environment campus in Lewes, Delaware. DOE proposed to provide the University a $1.43 million grant for this Wind Energy Project from funding provided in the Omnibus Appropriations Act of 2009 (Public Law 111-8) and an additional $1 million provided in the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 2010. This EA analyzed the potential environmental impacts of the University of Delawares Wind Energy Project at its Lewes campus and, for purposes of comparison, an alternative that assumes the wind turbine had not been constructed.

  9. Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you made! The biggest differences

  10. Mesoscale coupled ocean-atmosphere interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind powerflux components (wind stress, heat flux and fresh-waterWest Coast Surface Heat Fluxes, Wind Stress, and Wind Stress

  11. Mesoscale Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seo, Hyodae

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    surface currents on wind stress, heat flux, and wind powerflux components (wind stress, heat flux and fresh-waterWest Coast Surface Heat Fluxes, Wind Stress, and Wind Stress

  12. Dynamics of the Thermohaline Circulation under Wind forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongjun Gao; Jinqiao Duan

    2001-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean thermohaline circulation, also called meridional overturning circulation, is caused by water density contrasts. This circulation has large capacity of carrying heat around the globe and it thus affects the energy budget and further affects the climate. We consider a thermohaline circulation model in the meridional plane under external wind forcing. We show that, when there is no wind forcing, the stream function and the density fluctuation (under appropriate metrics) tend to zero exponentially fast as time goes to infinity. With rapidly oscillating wind forcing, we obtain an averaging principle for the thermohaline circulation model. This averaging principle provides convergence results and comparison estimates between the original thermohaline circulation and the averaged thermohaline circulation, where the wind forcing is replaced by its time average. This establishes the validity for using the averaged thermohaline circulation model for numerical simulations at long time scales.

  13. Wind energy applications guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    anon.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

  14. Wind tower service lift

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oliphant, David; Quilter, Jared; Andersen, Todd; Conroy, Thomas

    2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus used for maintaining a wind tower structure wherein the wind tower structure may have a plurality of legs and may be configured to support a wind turbine above the ground in a better position to interface with winds. The lift structure may be configured for carrying objects and have a guide system and drive system for mechanically communicating with a primary cable, rail or other first elongate member attached to the wind tower structure. The drive system and guide system may transmit forces that move the lift relative to the cable and thereby relative to the wind tower structure. A control interface may be included for controlling the amount and direction of the power into the guide system and drive system thereby causing the guide system and drive system to move the lift relative to said first elongate member such that said lift moves relative to said wind tower structure.

  15. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  16. West Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff,Holt WindInformationWestWinds Wind

  17. the risk issue of wind measurement for wind turbine operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

    Sciences, National Taiwan University #12;outline Wind measurement in meteorology and wind farm design-related issues on wind turbine operation 3/31/2011 2 #12;WIND MEASUREMENT IN METEOROLOGY & WIND FARM DESIGN 3.brainybetty.com 11 wind farm at ChangHwa Coastal Industrial Park 70m wind tower 70m 50m 30m 10m #12;1 2 3 4 5 1 (70M

  18. Wind resource assessment: San Nicolas Island, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Olsen, T.L. [Timothy L. Olsen Consulting, (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    San Nicolas Island (SNI) is the site of the Navy Range Instrumentation Test Site which relies on an isolated diesel-powered grid for its energy needs. The island is located in the Pacific Ocean 85 miles southwest of Los Angeles, California and 65 miles south of the Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS), Point Mugu, California. SNI is situated on the continental shelf at latitude N33{degree}14` and longitude W119{degree}27`. It is approximately 9 miles long and 3.6 miles wide and encompasses an area of 13,370 acres of land owned by the Navy in fee title. Winds on San Nicolas are prevailingly northwest and are strong most of the year. The average wind speed is 7.2 m/s (14 knots) and seasonal variation is small. The windiest months, March through July, have wind speeds averaging 8.2 m/s (16 knots). The least windy months, August through February, have wind speeds averaging 6.2 m/s (12 knots).

  19. Relativistic MHD Winds from Rotating Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Bucciantini; T. A. Thompson; J. Arons; E. Quataert

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We solve the time-dependent dynamics of axisymmetric, general relativistic MHD winds from rotating neutron stars. The mass loss rate is obtained self consistently as a solution of the MHD equations, subject to a finite thermal pressure at the stellar surface. Conditions are chosen to be representative of the neutrino driven phase in newly born magnetars, which have been considered as a possible engine for GRBs. We compute the angular momentum and energy losses as a function of $\\sigma$ and compare them with the analytic expectation from the classical theory of pulsar winds. We observe the convergence to the force-free limit in the energy loss and we study the evolution of the closed zone for increasing magnetization. Results also show that the dipolar magnetic field and the presence of a closed zone do not modify significantly the acceleration and collimation properties of the wind.

  20. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the states Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...