Sample records for wind electricity generation

  1. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

  2. Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    not exacerbate the global warming problem. However, renewable energy is inherently intermittent and variableManaging Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper, and to meet increasing electricity demand without harming the environment. Two of the most promising solutions

  3. Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and solar energy--is free, abundant, and most importantly, does not exacerbate the global warming problemManaging Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper.S. strive to reduce reliance on the import of fossil fuels, and to meet increasing electricity demand

  4. Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

  5. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Facilities. ” American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns onthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWind

  6. The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerty, John Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

  7. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWindValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of Solarthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References Gipe, P.

  8. A stochastic framework for uncertainty analysis in electric power transmission systems with wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of generating units, the transfer of electric power over networks of transmission lines and, finally1 A stochastic framework for uncertainty analysis in electric power transmission systems with wind an electric transmission network with wind power generation and their impact on its reliability. A stochastic

  9. Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issaeva, Natalia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

  10. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Price Reduction Offsetting demand for natural gas in the electricity sector by increasing wind energy’price reductions, and water savings. Index Terms—power system modeling, wind energywind energy to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

  11. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transmission to deliver wind generation to load centers. Toof integrating variable wind generation into the electricityfrom wind. Annual wind energy generation was specified in

  12. If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

  13. Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be...

  14. Talkin’ Bout Wind Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

  15. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  16. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and S. Bretz, "Wind Generation in the Future Competitiveenergy sources, wind power generation I. I NTRODUCTION Windwind alone. Index Terms—energy resources, power generation

  17. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    10 kW wind turbine on a 30m tower was installed and five different scenarios were calculated for both locations. Wind speeds for both locations were collected and analyzed to find the closest fitting distribution to incorporate the appropriate risk...

  18. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to locating wind farms in the UK," RenewableV. G. Rau, "Optimum siting of wind turbine generators," IEEEoptimal planning for wind energy conver- sion systems over

  19. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    value of re- newable electricity; and customer surveys ofCalifornia or Northwestern electricity demand. This may bebetween wind speed and electricity demand," Solar Energy,

  20. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  1. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and corresponding direct electricity sector costs, includingand avoids electricity-sector water consumption. At the sameNew Wind Fig. 5. Electricity sector capacity by technology

  2. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electric power from potential wind farm locations inergy 1.5 MW wind turbine to calculate the potential powerpotential difference in wholesale market value between better- correlated and poorly correlated wind

  3. Using Electric Vehicles to Mitigate Imbalance Requirements Associated with an Increased Penetration of Wind Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of variable renewable generation sources continues to be a significant area of focus for power system planning. Renewable portfolio standards and initiatives to reduce the dependency on foreign energy sources drive much of the deployment. Unfortunately, renewable energy generation sources like wind and solar tend to be highly variable in nature. To counter the energy imbalance caused by this variability, wind generation often requires additional balancing resources to compensate for the variability in the electricity production. With the expected electrification of transportation, electric vehicles may offer a new load resource for meeting all, or part, of the imbalance created by the renewable generation. This paper investigates a regulation-services-based battery charging method on a population of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles to meet the power imbalance requirements associated with the introduction of 11 GW of additional wind generation into the Northwest Power Pool. It quantifies the number of vehicles required to meet the imbalance requirements under various charging assumptions.

  4. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of about 80 GW of coal-based generation technologyand reduces coal-based electricity generation by 18%.to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation

  5. Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

  6. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H; Fripp, Matthias

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production is variable, but also has diurnal and seasonal patterns. These patterns differ between sites, potentially making electric power from some wind sites more valuable for meeting customer loads or selling in wholesale power markets. This paper investigates whether the timing of wind significantly affects the value of electricity from sites in California and the Northwestern United States. We use both measured and modeled wind data and estimate the time-varying value of wind power with both financial and load-based metrics. We find that the potential difference in wholesale market value between better-correlated and poorly correlated wind sites is modest, on the order of 5-10 percent. A load-based metric, power production during the top 10 percent of peak load hours, varies more strongly between sites, suggesting that the capacity value of different wind projects could vary by as much as 50 percent based on the timing of wind alone.

  7. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schwartz. 1993. Wind Energy Potential in the United States .for estimates of wind power potential. ” Journal of Appliedof electric power from potential wind farm locations in

  8. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electric power from potential wind farm locations infactor across different potential wind sites are about sevenreflects the potential effects of temporal wind patterns on

  9. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-GeneratedElectricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this paper, we use wind speed data from three different sources to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwestern United States. By ''value'', we refer to either the contribution of wind power to meeting the electric system's peak loads, or the financial value of wind power in electricity markets. Sites for wind power projects are often screened or compared based on the annual average power production that would be expected from wind turbines at each site (Baban and Parry 2001; Brower et al. 2004; Jangamshetti and Rau 2001; Nielsen et al. 2002; Roy 2002; Schwartz 1999). However, at many locations, variations in wind speeds during the day and year are correlated with variations in the electric power system's load and wholesale market prices (Burton et al. 2001; Carlin 1983; Kennedy and Rogers 2003; Man Bae and Devine 1978; Sezgen et al. 1998); this correlation may raise or lower the value of wind power generated at each location. A number of previous reports address this issue somewhat indirectly by studying the contribution of individual wind power sites to the reliability or economic operation of the electric grid, using hourly wind speed data (Fleten et al.; Kahn 1991; Kirby et al. 2003; Milligan 2002; van Wijk et al. 1992). However, we have not identified any previous study that examines the effect of variations in wind timing across a broad geographical area on wholesale market value or capacity contribution of those different wind power sites. We have done so, to determine whether it is important to consider wind-timing when planning wind power development, and to try to identify locations where timing would have a more positive or negative effect. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in California and the Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming) with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. We also assess whether modeled wind data from TrueWind Solutions, LLC, can help answer such questions, by comparing results found using the TrueWind data to those found using anemometers or wind farm power production data. This paper summarizes results that are presented in more detail in a recent report from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Fripp and Wiser 2006). The full report is available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/re-pubs.html.

  10. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  11. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  12. Dynamic modelling of generation capacity investment in electricity markets with high wind penetration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eager, Daniel

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of liberalised electricity markets to trigger investment in the generation capacity required to maintain an acceptable level of security of supply risk has been - and will continue to be - a topic of much ...

  13. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to locating wind farms in the UK," Renewablepower production at existing wind farms. Each of these is anpower from potential wind farm locations in California and

  14. Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Y Patil; D S Chavan

    Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

  15. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (1998). Wind Generation in the Future Competitivegeneration system, as well as computational resources that would make it prohibitive for estimating the capacity value of wind

  16. Towards Smart Integration of Wind Generation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Towards Smart Integration of Wind Generation. G. Giebela , P. Meiboma , P. Pinsonb , and G for the management of electricity grids with large-scale wind generation and to get a better handle on extreme events that integrate the full information on the expected wind generation. In order to demonstrate the value

  17. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technologyare modeled by WinDS, the costs of building transmission

  18. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capac- ityas the capacity factor of the wind power plant during the 10Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and Issues," IEEE Power &

  19. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-Term Market Penetration of Wind in the United States. ”2003. U.S. Department of Energy (2008). 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.

  20. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand in future years. Technology cost and performanceAssumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technology

  1. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    curve for wind energy: energy costs including connection toavailable to transport wind energy, the cost of feeder linesWind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs

  2. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 600 GW of potential wind capacity is available forafter 2006 (No New Wind) to quantify the potential costs andThe potential benefits associated with using wind energy to

  3. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Farm Production: We used hourly power production data from the Altamont, Tehachapi and San GorgonioSan Gorgonio resource areas, we also show the effects calculated using the total output from all wind farms

  4. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, private communi- cation, March 12, 2004. WECC, "WECC 2006 Power Supply Assessment," Western Electricity

  5. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar in the new home construction market; the risk mitigation value of re- newable electricity; and customer

  6. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical and control system losses, blade contamination, weather (icing, lightning, etc. ), wake effects, turbulence, and turbine outages [

  7. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

  8. The effects of energy storage properties and forecast accuracy on mitigating variability in wind power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaworsky, Christina A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power is increasing worldwide. Wind power can offset traditional fossil fuel generators which is beneficial to the environment. However, wind generation is unpredictable. Wind speeds have ...

  9. 3/5/2014 TinyMicro Wind Turbines Generate Electricity| New Energyand Fuel http://newenergyandfuel.com/http:/newenergyandfuel/com/2014/01/16/tiny-micro-wind-turbines-generate-electricity/ 1/12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Off Topic Plans Politics Power Units Fuel Cells Hybrid Electric Piezoelectrics Solar Artificial Photosynthesis Solar Panels Space Based Solar Thermal Solar Wind Power Storage Batteries Super Capacitors Thermal.W. Styles Energy Outlook Green Biz Green Car Congress Maria Energia Marketing Green MIT's Technology Review

  10. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation by 18%. Natural gas combustion turbine capacitycombined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbinenuclear plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, and

  11. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation by 18%. Natural gas combustion turbine capacitycycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gasnuclear plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, and

  12. Wind and solar power electric generation to see strong growth over the next two years

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 Oil demand expected2Wind and solar

  13. If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP Wind Farm Jump to:ILabPointIdahoIdealabwhat does it

  14. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flat through Coal plant capital cost ($2120/kW in 2005)costs and performance for other generation technologies such as pulverized coal plants,Coal plant performance improves by about 5% between 2005 and 2030 Nuclear plant capital cost (

  15. Coupling Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage: A Time-Series Application of the Super Electric Energy System #12;Coupling Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage: A Time Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage: A Time-Series Application of the SuperOPF." (PSERC

  16. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  17. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

  18. Wind energy as a significant source of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, R.G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

  19. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from operating wind farms in the Altamont, San Gorgonio anddata from wind farms in Altamont, Tehachapi and San Gorgoniofrom wind farms in the Altamont, Tehachapi and San Gorgonio

  20. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992). “Capacity credit of wind power in the Netherlands. ”modeling as a tool for wind resource assessment andBurton, T. , et al. (2001). Wind Energy Handbook, John

  1. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    towers or operational wind farms are needed to resolveapproach to locating wind farms in the UK. ” Renewablepower from potential wind farm locations in California and

  2. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 2.2.3 Wind Farm Production1. Rated Capacity of Wind Farms for which Monthly Productionpower from potential wind farm locations in California and

  3. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capacitycapacity factor of the wind power plant during the top 10

  4. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  5. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  6. Improved Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: Superconducting Wires for Direct-Drive Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: Brookhaven National Laboratory will develop a low-cost superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. Brookhaven National Laboratory will develop a high-performance superconducting wire that can handle significantly more electrical current, and will demonstrate an advanced manufacturing process that has the potential to yield a several-fold reduction in wire costs while using a using negligible amount of rare earth material. This design has the potential to make a wind turbine generator lighter, more powerful, and more efficient, particularly for offshore applications.

  7. Generating electricity from viruses

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  8. Generating electricity from viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  9. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Farm Production: We used historical hourly power production data from the Altamont, Tehachapi and San GorgonioSan Gorgonio resource areas, we also show the effects calculated using the total output from all wind farms

  10. Contracting for wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newbery, David

    The UK Government proposes offering long-term Feed-in-Tariffs (FiTs) to low-carbon generation to reduce risk and encourage new entrants. Their preference is for a Contract-for-Difference (CfD) or a premium FiT (pFiT) for all generation regardless...

  11. Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Objective · Introduce students to the concept of alternative energy. · Explain the math and scientific principles behind engineering wind turbines. Standards and how it applies to wind energy · About how surface area and shape effects wind turbine efficiency

  12. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Analysis, Phase 1. CWEC-2003-06. Davis, California: California Windanalysis of the effect of wind timing and variability on the system integration costs

  13. Wind turbine/generator set and method of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  14. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical and control system losses, blade contamination, weather, wake effects, turbulence, and turbine outages (

  15. Class Generation for Numerical Wind Atlases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Class Generation for Numerical Wind Atlases Risø National Laboratory Wind Energy Department and The Technical University of Denmark Informatics and Mathematical Modelling Department Nicholas J. Cutler s000144 Constructing a Numerical Wind Atlas 5 2.1 Introduction

  16. Revenue Maximization of Electricity Generation for a Wind Turbine Integrated with a Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Energy Storage System Mohsen Saadat, Farzad A. Shirazi, Perry Y. Li Abstract-- A high-level supervisory controller is developed for a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system integrated with a wind turbine the effect of storage system sizing on the maximum revenue. I. INTRODUCTION Large-scale cost effective energy

  17. Decentralized Control to Augment LVRT Capability of Wind Generators with STATCOM/ESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Decentralized Control to Augment LVRT Capability of Wind Generators with STATCOM/ESS M. J. Hossain drop at the wind generator terminal. Because of the voltage dip, the output electrical power of the induction generators, which could cause a large inrush current in the wind generators. M. J. Hossain, H. R

  18. Electricity Generation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,6). Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA are two DMRB capable of electricity generationElectricity Generation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris DX-1 D E F E N G X I N G , , Y I Z U O manuscript received March 20, 2008. Accepted March 25, 2008. Bacteria able to generate electricity

  19. An economic analysis of the production of hydrogen from wind-generated electricity for use in transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in transport applications Paper published in : Energy Policy, vol. 39, n° 5, May 2011, pp. 2957-2965 Authors P in the framework of the HyFrance 3 project concerns hydrogen for transport applications. Different technical-generation biofuels production which present contrasted hydrogen use characteristics. This analysis reveals

  20. Wind Generation Feasibility Study in Bethel, AK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Humphrey, YKHC; Lance Kincaid, EMCOR Energy & Technologies

    2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report studies the wind resources in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) region, located in southwestern Alaska, and the applicability of wind generation technologies to YKHC facilities.

  1. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scale  Integration  of  Wind  Generation Including Network Scale  Integration  of  Wind  Generation Including Network with Large  Penetration of Wind Generation: Wind energy is 

  2. New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators New Superconducting Magnet Will Lead to Next Generation of Wind Turbine Generators September 12,...

  3. Incorporating Wind Generation in Cap and Trade Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bluestein, J.; Salerno, E.; Bird, L.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cap and trade programs are increasingly being used to reduce emissions from electricity generation in the United States. Cap and trade programs primarily target emitting generators, but programs have also included renewable generators, such as wind generators. States cite several reasons why they have considered the policy option of including renewable generators in cap and trade programs: to provide an incentive for lower-emitting generation, to achieve emissions reductions in non-capped pollutants, and to gain local economic benefits associated with renewable energy projects. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency also notes these rationales for considering this policy alternative, and the National Association of Regulatory Commissioners (NARUC) passed a resolution supporting the inclusion of renewable energy in cap and trade programs. This report explores why states consider this policy option, what participation could mean for wind generators, and how wind generation can most effectively be included in state, federal, and regional cap and trade programs.

  4. ERCOT's Dynamic Model of Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donoho, K.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By the end of 2003, the total installed wind farm capacity in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system was approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) and the total in the United States was about 5 GW. As the number of wind turbines installed throughout the United States increases, there is a greater need for dynamic wind turbine generator models that can properly model entire power systems for different types of analysis. This paper describes the ERCOT dynamic models and simulations of a simple network with different types of wind turbine models currently available.

  5. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  6. Previous Wind Power Announcements (generation/wind)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergyEnergytransmission-rates Sign In About |Wind

  7. Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the exception of hydroelectric and nuclear facilities, must obtain a certificate of registration from the Department of Public...

  8. October 11, 2011 Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    ;#12;#12;#12;#12;#12;RPS: Renewable Portfolio Standard · Renewable: solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro, wind · 75% expected

  9. The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems Yassine Amirat, Mohamed Benbouzid, Bachir Bensaker and René Wamkeue Abstract--Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) have become. I. INTRODUCTION Wind energy conversion is the fastest-growing source of new electric generation

  10. Dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)] [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  11. Method for protecting an electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuehnle, Barry W. (Ammon, ID); Roberts, Jeffrey B. (Ammon, ID); Folkers, Ralph W. (Ammon, ID)

    2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for protecting an electrical generator which includes providing an electrical generator which is normally synchronously operated with an electrical power grid; providing a synchronizing signal from the electrical generator; establishing a reference signal; and electrically isolating the electrical generator from the electrical power grid if the synchronizing signal is not in phase with the reference signal.

  12. An alternative isolated wind electric pumping system using induction machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.S.; Lyra, R.O.C.; Silva, S.R.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated variable speed variable frequency wind electric pumping system is proposed. Induction machines are used both in the generation unit as well as in the pumping unit and a static VAR compensator is used for providing the magnetizing currents of both machines. An indirect induction generator stator flux control strategy is adopted. System steady state and dynamic operation is studied basing on simulation and experimental results.

  13. Renewable Electricity Generation Success Stories | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Read more water success stories Wind February 18, 2015 Mapping the Frontier of New Wind Power Potential June 17, 2014 Enhanced Efficiency of Wind-Diesel Power Generation in...

  14. Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat (Niskayuna, NY); Barnes, Gary R. (Delanson, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha D. (Rexford, NY); Jansen, Patrick L. (Scotia, NY); Bouchard, Jr., Charles G. (Schenectady, NY); Jarczynski, Emil D. (Scotia, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Cambridge, MA)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

  15. Liquid soap film generates electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Amjadi; Sadegh Feiz; Reza Montazeri Namin

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed that a rotating liquid soap film generates electricity when placed between two non-contact electrodes with a sufficiently large potential difference. In our experiments suspended liquid film (water + soap film) is formed on the surface of a circular frame, which is forced to rotate in the $x-y$ horizontal plane by a motor. This system is located at the center of two capacitor-like vertical plates to apply an external electric voltage difference in the $x-$direction. The produced electric current is collected from the liquid film using two conducting electrodes that are separated in the $y-$direction. We previously reported that a liquid film in an external electric field rotates when an electric current passes through it, naming it the liquid film motor (LFM). In this paper we report a novel technique, in which a similar device can be used as an electric generator, converting the rotating mechanical energy to electrical energy. The liquid film electric generator (LFEG) is in stark contrast to the LFM, both of which could be designed similarly in very small scales like micro scales with different applications. Although the device is comparable to commercial electric motors or electric generators, there is a significant difference in their working principles. Usually in an electric motor or generator the magnetic field causes the driving force, while in a LFM or LFEG the Coulomb force is the driving force. This fact is also interesting from the Bio-science point of view and brings a similarity to bio motors. Here we have investigated the electrical characteristics of such a generator for the first time experimentally and modelled the phenomenon with electroconvection governing equations. A numerical simulation is performed using the local approximation for the charge-potential relation and results are in qualitative agreement with experiments.

  16. Risk implications of the deployment of renewables for investments in electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisternes, Fernando J. de (Fernando José de Sisternes Jiménez)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the potential risk implications that a large penetration of intermittent renewable electricity generation -such as wind and solar power- may have on the future electricity generation technology mix, ...

  17. Innovative Applications of O.R. Scheduling electric power production at a wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Innovative Applications of O.R. Scheduling electric power production at a wind farm Zijun Zhang computations Wind farm Particle swarm optimization Small world network a b s t r a c t We present a model for scheduling power generation at a wind farm, and introduce a particle swarm optimization algorithm

  18. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind Integration and Conservation Council Wind Integration Costs · Reserving capacity for within-hour balancing is costly the system without the need to reserve flexible capacity for within-hour balancing of wind generation #12;3 5

  19. Structural optimisation of permanent magnet direct drive generators for 5MW wind turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zavvos, Aristeidis

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on permanent magnet "direct drive" electrical generators for wind turbines with large power output. A variety of such generator topologies is reviewed, tested and optimised in an attempt to increase ...

  20. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DE-AC05-76RL01830 Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric...

  1. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  2. Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs Student Competition Prepares the Next Generation of Wind Energy Entrepreneurs April 11, 2013 - 11:32am Addthis...

  3. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  4. Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

  5. Variable speed wind turbine generator with zero-sequence filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, E.

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility. 14 figs.

  6. Variable speed wind turbine generator with zero-sequence filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility.

  7. Variable Speed Wind Turbine Generator with Zero-sequence Filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muljadi, Eduard (Golden, CO)

    1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable speed wind turbine generator system to convert mechanical power into electrical power or energy and to recover the electrical power or energy in the form of three phase alternating current and return the power or energy to a utility or other load with single phase sinusoidal waveform at sixty (60) hertz and unity power factor includes an excitation controller for generating three phase commanded current, a generator, and a zero sequence filter. Each commanded current signal includes two components: a positive sequence variable frequency current signal to provide the balanced three phase excitation currents required in the stator windings of the generator to generate the rotating magnetic field needed to recover an optimum level of real power from the generator; and a zero frequency sixty (60) hertz current signal to allow the real power generated by the generator to be supplied to the utility. The positive sequence current signals are balanced three phase signals and are prevented from entering the utility by the zero sequence filter. The zero sequence current signals have zero phase displacement from each other and are prevented from entering the generator by the star connected stator windings. The zero sequence filter allows the zero sequence current signals to pass through to deliver power to the utility.

  8. Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, R.G.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

  9. Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as intermittent) output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

  10. Wind Power (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWind Industry SoarsWind

  11. Email To Friend Steam Electricity Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . keymanengravables.com Steam Turbine Generator Info, Pictures And Deals For Steam turbine generator ediscountshoppingBack One Email To Friend Steam Electricity Generator Need Steam Electricity Generator? See Steam Electricity Generator. greenshieldsindustrial.com Steam Generators Deals on Steam Generators Find what you

  12. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  13. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  14. Abstract--Wind power generation is growing rapidly. However, maintaining the wind turbine connection to grid is a real

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    by the year 2020 [2]. Wind turbines can operate either with a fixed speed or a variable speed. In the case and then as fluctuations in the electrical power on the grid. The variable-speed turbine operation offers several major acoustical [3]. Among variable speed constant-frequency wind turbines, the doubly fed induction generator

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: Electric Power Generation and Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    InterconnectsElectric Power Generation and Water Use Data Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data Electric Power Generation and Water Use Data Electric Power Generation and...

  16. Multi-winding homopolar electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Neste, Charles W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-winding homopolar electric machine and method for converting between mechanical energy and electrical energy. The electric machine includes a shaft defining an axis of rotation, first and second magnets, a shielding portion, and a conductor. First and second magnets are coaxial with the shaft and include a charged pole surface and an oppositely charged pole surface, the charged pole surfaces facing one another to form a repulsive field therebetween. The shield portion extends between the magnets to confine at least a portion of the repulsive field to between the first and second magnets. The conductor extends between first and second end contacts and is toroidally coiled about the first and second magnets and the shield portion to develop a voltage across the first and second end contacts in response to rotation of the electric machine about the axis of rotation.

  17. The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power depends mainly on the wind speeds and the turbine make and model. Definition: Simple Payback The "Simple period of a small wind power project. All the figures are per turbine, so it can be used for a one, two

  18. Analysis of Wind Power Generation of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 1 ANALYSIS OF WIND POWER GENERATION OF TEXAS April 2007 Zi ?Betty? Liu, Ph.D., Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E., Kris Subbarao, Ph.D., P.E., Juan-Carlos Baltazar, Ph.D. Energy Systems Laboratory... from Jul 2002 to Jan 2003 Degradation Analysis - On average, no degradation observed for nine wind farms analyzed over 4-year period. Application of Method 1 to New Site- Sweetwater I Wind Farm ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 3...

  19. Electrical Power Grid Delivery Dynamic Analysis: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana K. Grauer; Michael E. Reed

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

  20. Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Brandon Keith Mauch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Grids Brandon Keith Mauch Co for the modeled wind- CAES system would not cover annualized capital costs. We also estimate market prices-ahead market is roughly $100, with large variability due to electric power prices. Wind power forecast errors

  1. Next-Generation Wind Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and reliability of next-generation wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy. The program's research efforts have helped to increase the average capacity...

  2. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sites suited for wind power generation. At that time manyprice. Electricity generation [GWh/year] Wind onshore HydroElectricity generation [GWh/year] Wind onshore Biogas

  3. Apparatuses and methods for generating electric fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R; McJunkin, Timothy R; Tremblay, Paul L

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses and methods relating to generating an electric field are disclosed. An electric field generator may include a semiconductive material configured in a physical shape substantially different from a shape of an electric field to be generated thereby. The electric field is generated when a voltage drop exists across the semiconductive material. A method for generating an electric field may include applying a voltage to a shaped semiconductive material to generate a complex, substantially nonlinear electric field. The shape of the complex, substantially nonlinear electric field may be configured for directing charged particles to a desired location. Other apparatuses and methods are disclosed.

  4. Candidate wind turbine generator site: annual data summary, January 1981-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandusky, W.F.; Buck, J.W.; Renne, D.S.; Hadley, D.L.; Abbey, O.B.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarized hourly meteorological data for 34 candidate and wind turbine generator sites for calendar year 1981 are presented. These data are collected for the purpose of evaluating the wind energy potential at these sites and are used to assist in selection of potential sites for installation and testing of large wind turbines in electric utility systems. For each site, wind speed, direction, and distribution data are given in eight tables. Use of information from these tables, with information about specific wind turbines, should allow the user to estimate the potential for wind energy production at each site.

  5. Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

  6. Facilitating wind development: the importance of electric industry structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan; Milligan, Michael

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOs and RTOs, with their day-ahead and real-time markets, large geographies to aggregate diverse wind resources, large loads to aggregate with wind, large generation pools that tap conventional-generator flexibility, and regional transmission planning efforts, offer the best environments for wind generation to develop. (author)

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology| National NuclearWind Electric Systems

  8. Wind Power Forecasting andWind Power Forecasting and Electricity Market Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    forecasting methods and better integration of advanced wind power forecasts into system and plant operations and wind power plants) ­ Review and assess current practices Propose and test new and improved approachesWind Power Forecasting andWind Power Forecasting and Electricity Market Operations Audun Botterud

  9. Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

  10. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  11. Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and...

  12. Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General analysis, and public education in global environmental change. It seeks to provide leadership;1 Electricity Generation and Emissions Reduction Decisions under Policy Uncertainty: A General Equilibrium

  13. Viability of Small Wind Distributed Generation for Farmers Who Irrigate (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, B.; Forsyth, T.; Johnson, S.; Healow, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 14% of U.S. farms are irrigated, representing 55 million acres of irrigated land. Irrigation on these farms is a major energy user in the United States, accounting for one-third of water withdrawals and 137 billion gallons per day. More than half of the Irrigation systems use electric energy. Wind energy can be a good choice for meeting irrigation energy needs. Nine of the top 10 irrigation states (California, Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas, Washington, and Oregon) have good to excellent wind resources. Many rural areas have sufficient wind speeds to make wind an attractive alternative, and farms and ranches can often install a wind energy system without impacting their ability to plant crops and graze livestock. Additionally, the rising and uncertain future costs of diesel, natural gas, and even electricity increase the potential effectiveness for wind energy and its predictable and competitive cost. In general, wind-powered electric generation systems generate more energy in the winter months than in the summer months when most crops need the water. Therefore, those states that have a supportive net metering policy can dramatically impact the viability of an onsite wind turbine. This poster presentation highlights case studies that show favorable and unfavorable policies that impact the growth of small wind in this important sector and demonstrate how net metering policies affect the viability of distributed wind generation for farmers who irrigate.

  14. A doubly-fed permanent magnet generator for wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew J. (Andrew Joseph), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimum extraction of energy from a wind turbine requires that turbine speed vary with wind speed. Existing solutions to produce constant-frequency electrical output under windspeed variations are undesirable due to ...

  15. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scale additions of wind generation. The objectives of thisof large amounts of wind generation confronts the grid withhave been important as wind generation has gone from being a

  16. Empirical Analysis of the Variability of Wind Generation in India: Implications for Grid Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sharing the load and wind generation data. We thank Sushil2008. “Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillaryof the Variability of Wind Generation in India: Implications

  17. Pitch-controlled variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is a viable option to complement other types of pollution-free generation. In the early development of wind energy, the majority of wind turbines were operated at constant speed. Recently, the number of variable-speed wind turbines installed in wind farms has increased and more wind turbine manufacturers are making variable-speed wind turbines. This paper covers the operation of variable-speed wind turbines with pitch control. The system the authors considered is controlled to generate maximum energy while minimizing loads. The maximization of energy was only carried out on a static basis and only drive train loads were considered as a constraint. In medium wind speeds, the generator and power converter control the wind turbine to capture maximum energy from the wind. In the high wind speed region, the wind turbine is controlled to maintain the aerodynamic power produced by the wind turbine. Two methods to adjust the aerodynamic power were investigated: pitch control and generator load control, both of which are employed to control the operation of the wind turbine. The analysis and simulation shows that the wind turbine can be operated at its optimum energy capture while minimizing the load on the wind turbine for a wide range of wind speeds.

  18. RIS-M-2411 A NOTE ON WIND GENERATOR INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;~ y . RISÃ?-M-2411 A NOTE ON WIND GENERATOR INTERACTION N.O. Jensen Abstract. A simple model for the wake behind a wind generator is given. The model is compared to some full scale experimen- tal results. The model is then used in an example where the production from a circular cluster of 10 wind generators

  19. Methods and apparatus for cooling wind turbine generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Schenectady, NY); Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Alplaus, NY); Carl, Jr., Ralph James (Clifton Park, NY)

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine generator includes a stator having a core and a plurality of stator windings circumferentially spaced about a generator longitudinal axis. A rotor is rotatable about the generator longitudinal axis, and the rotor includes a plurality of magnetic elements coupled to the rotor and cooperating with the stator windings. The magnetic elements are configured to generate a magnetic field and the stator windings are configured to interact with the magnetic field to generate a voltage in the stator windings. A heat pipe assembly thermally engaging one of the stator and the rotor to dissipate heat generated in the stator or rotor.

  20. Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection Willett Kemptona,1 , Felipe M regional estimate, Kempton et al. (2) calculated that two-thirds of the offshore wind power off the U in the U.S. Atlantic region is already underway. Fig. 1 shows as black squares offshore wind developments

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  9. Synchrophasor Applications for Wind Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Zhang, Y. C.; Allen, A.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Wan, Y. H.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. power industry is undertaking several initiatives that will improve the operations of the electric power grid. One of those is the implementation of wide-area measurements using phasor measurement units to dynamically monitor the operations and status of the network and provide advanced situational awareness and stability assessment. The overviews of synchrophasors and stability analyses in this report are intended to present the potential future applications of synchrophasors for power system operations under high penetrations of wind and other renewable energy sources.

  10. Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project: June 17, 1997--April 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GE Wind Energy, LLC

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the technical results of the Next Generation Turbine Development Project conducted by GE Wind Energy LLC. This project is jointly funded by GE and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.The goal of this project is for DOE to assist the U.S. wind industry in exploring new concepts and applications of cutting-edge technology in pursuit of the specific objective of developing a wind turbine that can generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy of $0.025/kWh at sites with an average wind speed of 15 mph (at 10 m height).

  11. Designing of Hybrid Power Generation System using Wind energy- Photovoltaic Solar energy- Solar energy with Nanoantenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All the natural wastage energies are used for production of Electricity. Thus, the Electrical Power or Electricity is available with a minimum cost and pollution free to anywhere in the world at all times. This process reveals a unique step in electricity generation and availability from natural resources without hampering the ecological balance. This paper describes a new and evolving Electrical Power Generation System by integrating simultaneously photovoltaic Solar Energy, solar Energy with Nano-antenna, Wind Energy and non conventional energy sources. We can have an uninterrupted power supply irrespective of the natural condition without any sort of environmental pollution. Moreover this process yields the least production cost for electricity generation. Utilization of lightning energy for generation of electricity reveals a new step. The set-up consists of combination of photo-voltaic solar-cell array & Nano-anteena array, a mast mounted wind generator, lead-acid storage batteries, an inverter unit to convert DC power to AC power, electrical lighting loads and electrical heating loads, several fuse and junction boxes and associated wiring, and test instruments for measuring voltages, currents, power factors, and harmonic contamination data throughout the system. This hybrid solar-wind power generating system will extensively use in the Industries and also in external use like home appliance.

  12. Drag Forces, Neutral Wind and Electric Conductivity Changes in the Ionospheric E Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenovski, Petko

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrals in the Earth environment are in fact free and subjected to drag forces (by ions). In this study we show that drag or friction forces in the ionosphere-thermosphere system initiate changes in the plasma flow, neutral wind, and the conductivity, as well. Ions and electrons embedded in neutral wind field of velocity u acquire drifts perpendicular both to the initial neutral wind velocity and to the ambient magnetic field producing a perpendicular electric current. This perpendicular electric current is defined by a conductivity derived previously and the polarization electric field u x B. Self-consistently, the free neutrals acquires an additional neutral velocity component perpendicular to the initial neutral wind velocity u. The Pedersen and Hall currents wane within a specific time inversely proportional to neutral-ion collision frequency. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of electric current generation, distribution and closure in weakly ionized plasmas where charged particle...

  13. Washington University Can the Sound Generated by Modern Wind Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, Alec N.

    Washington University Can the Sound Generated by Modern Wind Turbines Affect the Health of Those turbines haveWind turbines have been getting biggerbeen getting bigger and bigger....and bigger.... Lars Needs Wind turbines are "green" and areWind turbines are "green" and are contributing to our energy

  14. GENERATION OF ELECTRIC Hesham E. Shaalan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    exhaust gases are delivered to a heat-recovery steam generator to produce steam that is used to drive.1 Optimum Electric-Power Generating Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.7 Annual Capacity.21 Hydropower Generating Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.23 Largest Units

  15. Abstract--In doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind energy conversion systems (WECS), the DFIG is interfaced to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Abstract--In doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind energy conversion systems (WECS of wind energy is growing rapidly and it is expected to provide ten percent of the global electricity a popular candidate in the wind energy conversion systems (WECS) due to its advantages [2-5]. When compared

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide (revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nevada Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nevada Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nebraska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nebraska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Missouri Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Missouri Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Virginia Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Virginia Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides Utah consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  9. Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  10. Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines --mechanisms of generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low frequency noise from MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Helge MW wind turbines -- mechanisms of generation and its modeling Department: Department of Wind Energy turbine has been simulated with a noise prediction model from NASA in US. Running the model

  11. Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Wind Energy in Indian Country: Turning to Wind for the Seventh Generation by Andrew D. Mills: ___________________________________________ Jane Stahlhut Date #12;Wind Energy in Indian Country A.D. Mills Abstract - ii - Abstract Utility-scale wind projects are increasingly being developed in rural areas of the United States. In the West

  12. Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable...

  13. The Economics of Steam Electric Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ophaug, R. A.; Birget, C. D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The economics of combining steam and electric generation for companies requiring both steam and electric services develop a challenge which few engineers and economists can realize. This paper outlines the general approach to this challenge...

  14. Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the Montana electric utility industry that allows...

  15. Helping Policymakers Evaluate Distributed Wind Options | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    distributed wind-wind turbines installed at homes, farms, and busi-nesses. Distributed wind allows Americans to generate their own clean electricity and cut their energy bills,...

  16. Policymakers' Guidebook for Geothermal Electricity Generation (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides an overview of the NREL Geothermal Policymakers' Guidebook for Electricity Generation with information directing people to the Web site for more in-depth information.

  17. Sandia National Laboratories: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Generating System Sandia Report Presents Analysis of Glare Impacts of Ivanpah Solar Power Site On August 7, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, News, News &...

  18. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  19. Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

  20. The Inside of a Wind Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wind turbines harness the power of the wind and use it to generate electricity. Simply stated, a wind turbine works the opposite of a fan. Instead of using electricity to make wind, like a fan,...

  1. Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Power Grid Delivery: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana K. Grauer

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics.

  3. Electrical Collection and Transmission Systems for Offshore Wind Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.; Bowen, A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Wan, Y.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical systems needed for offshore wind farms to collect power from wind turbines--and transmit it to shore--will be a significant cost element of these systems. This paper describes the development of a simplified model of the cost and performance of such systems.

  4. WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States)] [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  5. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  6. Floating Offshore Wind Technology Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floating Offshore Wind Technology Jeff King Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 1 to site) Potential interconnection to future offshore PNWCA intertie 4 #12;5 Ave wind speed >= 10 m. (2010) Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  7. Generation of large-scale winds in horizontally anisotropic convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Hardenberg, J; Provenzale, A; Spiegel, E A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We simulate three-dimensional, horizontally periodic Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection between free-slip horizontal plates, rotating about a horizontal axis. When both the temperature difference between the plates and the rotation rate are sufficiently large, a strong horizontal wind is generated that is perpendicular to both the rotation vector and the gravity vector. The wind is turbulent, large-scale, and vertically sheared. Horizontal anisotropy, engendered here by rotation, appears necessary for such wind generation. Most of the kinetic energy of the flow resides in the wind, and the vertical turbulent heat flux is much lower on average than when there is no wind.

  8. Wind turbine/generator set having a stator cooling system located between stator frame and active coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  9. National-Scale Wind Resource Assessment for Power Generation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, E. I.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the current standards for conducting a national-scale wind resource assessment for power generation, along with the risk/benefit considerations to be considered when beginning a wind resource assessment. The presentation describes changes in turbine technology and viable wind deployment due to more modern turbine technology and taller towers and shows how the Philippines national wind resource assessment evolved over time to reflect changes that arise from updated technologies and taller towers.

  10. Stator for a rotating electrical machine having multiple control windings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manoj R. (Latham, NY); Lewandowski, Chad R. (Amsterdam, NY)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating electric machine is provided which includes multiple independent control windings for compensating for rotor imbalances and for levitating/centering the rotor. The multiple independent control windings are placed at different axial locations along the rotor to oppose forces created by imbalances at different axial locations along the rotor. The multiple control windings can also be used to levitate/center the rotor with a relatively small magnetic field per unit area since the rotor and/or the main power winding provides the bias field.

  11. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown Fact 844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

  12. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  13. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  14. Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houston’s innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to today’s superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

  15. Analysis of Wind Power Generation of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar, J. C.

    from Jul 2002 to Jan 2003 Degradation Analysis - On average, no degradation observed for nine wind farms analyzed over 4-year period. Application of Method 1 to New Site- Sweetwater I Wind Farm ? Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University Page 3...&M University Page 10 Weather Data: NOAA- ABI 1999 and 2005 Hourly Wind Speed NOAA -ABI Hourly Wind Speed -1999 0 10 20 30 40 Jan-99 Feb-99 M ar-99 Apr-99 M ay-99 Jun-99 Jul-99 Aug-99 Sep-99 Oct-99 Nov-99 Dec-99 W in d Spe ed [m ph ] NOAA -ABI Hourly Wind...

  16. Economic modeling of intermittency in wind power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Alan Yung Chen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity sector is a major source of carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to global climate change. Over the past decade wind energy has steadily emerged as a potential source for large-scale, low carbon energy. ...

  17. Wind/PV Generation for Frequency Regulation and Oscillation Damping in the Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yong [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Gracia, Jose R [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the control of renewable energy sources, including the variable-speed wind generators and solar photovoltaic (PV) generators, for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping in the U.S. Eastern Interconnection (EI). In this report, based on the user-defined wind/PV generator electrical control model and the 16,000-bus Eastern Interconnection dynamic model, the additional controllers for frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are developed and incorporated and the potential contributions of renewable energy sources to the EI system frequency regulation and inter-area oscillation damping are evaluated.

  18. Criterion for Generation of Winds from Magnetized Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osamu Kaburaki

    2001-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic model is proposed for non-radiating accretion flows accompanied by up or down winds in a global magnetic field. Physical quantities in this model solution are written in variable-separated forms, and their radial parts are simple power law functions including one parameter for wind strength. Several, mathematically equivalent but physically different expressions of the criterion for wind generation are obtained. It is suggested also that the generation of wind is a consequence of the intervention of some mechanism that redistributes the locally available gravitational energy, and that the Bernoulli sum can be a good indicator of the existence of such mechanisms.

  19. Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric power generating facilities with a combined capacity greater than 25 MW, as well as associated transmission lines, may not be constructed or begin operation prior to the issuance of a...

  20. Renewable Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    This paper provides an overview of the use of renewable energy sources to generate electricity in the United States and a critical analysis of the federal and state policies that have supported the deployment of renewable ...

  1. Entanglement Generation by Electric Field Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zahra Ebadi; Behrouz Mirza

    2014-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

  2. University of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    . The information and analyses presented herein is based on wind development best practices, commercially available Generation At the University of Delaware iii DISCLAIMER This report is presented in response to the contract-1 12 Month Electricity Usage Data 21 Figure 3-2 Average Demand by Month 21 Figure 3-3 PPCA Charge

  3. Operational-Condition-Independent Criteria Dedicated to Monitoring Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, W.; Sheng, S.; Court, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To date the existing wind turbine condition monitoring technologies and commercially available systems have not been fully accepted for improving wind turbine availability and reducing their operation and maintenance costs. One of the main reasons is that wind turbines are subject to constantly varying loads and operate at variable rotational speeds. As a consequence, the influences of turbine faults and the effects of varying load and speed are coupled together in wind turbine condition monitoring signals. So, there is an urgent need to either introduce some operational condition de-coupling procedures into the current wind turbine condition monitoring techniques or develop a new operational condition independent wind turbine condition monitoring technique to maintain high turbine availability and achieve the expected economic benefits from wind. The purpose of this paper is to develop such a technique. In the paper, three operational condition independent criteria are developed dedicated for monitoring the operation and health condition of wind turbine generators. All proposed criteria have been tested through both simulated and practical experiments. The experiments have shown that these criteria provide a solution for detecting both mechanical and electrical faults occurring in wind turbine generators.

  4. Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

  5. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Increased Wind Generation 9. Siemens Power Technologieswith Increased Wind Generation Acknowledgments The workall three levels of wind generation, all frequency nadirs

  6. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of Wind Power Generation Working Group. ” IECwith Increased Wind Generation 9. Siemens Power Technologiesit Relates to Wind-Powered Generation. LBNL-XXXX. Berkeley:

  7. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update, Basedperformed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group and theTo model the interactions between wind generators and the

  8. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. “North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update,work performed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group andIEEE Dynamic Performance of Wind Power Generation Working

  9. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control as it Relates to Wind- Powered Generation AppendixControl as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation JohnControl as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation LBNL-XXXXX

  10. Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Multiple

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 – 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the project’s proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

  11. Role of Energy Storage with Renewable Electricity Generation (Report Summary) (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar, have vast potential to reduce dependence on fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions in the electric sector. Climate change concerns, state initiatives including renewable portfolio standards, and consumer efforts are resulting in increased deployments of both technologies. Both solar photovoltaics (PV) and wind energy have variable and uncertain (sometimes referred to as "intermittent") output, which are unlike the dispatchable sources used for the majority of electricity generation in the United States. The variability of these sources has led to concerns regarding the reliability of an electric grid that derives a large fraction of its energy from these sources as well as the cost of reliably integrating large amounts of variable generation into the electric grid. In this report, we explore the role of energy storage in the electricity grid, focusing on the effects of large-scale deployment of variable renewable sources (primarily wind and solar energy).

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  13. Bioaugmentation for Electricity Generation from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that it is possible to directly generate electricity from waste corn stover in MFCs through bioaugmentation using of an MFC, bacteria break down organic matter and release electrons to the electrode. Most MFC tests used by Zuo et al., 501 ( 20 mW/m2 was generated from a paper recycling wastewater containing cellulose

  14. Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling Renewable Power Options for Electricity Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and...

  15. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

  16. Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California Renewable Generation and Interconnection to the Electrical Grid in Southern California Presentation...

  17. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet),...

  18. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board...

  19. Renewable Electricity Generation and Delivery at the Sacramento...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generation and Delivery at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Renewable Electricity Generation and Delivery at the Sacramento Municipal Utility District Dairy...

  20. Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B.Sc., University of Wisconsin ­ Madison, 2003 Supervisory and small power systems. However, the variability due to the stochastic nature of the wind resource

  1. WindTurbineGenerator Introduction of the Renewable Micro-Grid Test-Bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Simulator Wind Turbine: PMSM, 3kW, 8.3A Wind Generator: PMSM, 3kW, 8.3A 3 AC/DC Converter & DC/AC Inverter Wind Turbine: Torque or Speed Control Wind Generator: PQ Control Cubicle #4: Energy Storage Generator #1 3kW, 8.3A Wind Turbine #1 3kW, 8.3A Wind Turbine #2 3kW Wind Generator #2 3kW RS232

  2. Xcel Energy Wind and Biomass Generation Mandate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Minnesota law (Minn. Stat. § 216B.2423) requires Xcel Energy to build or contract for 225 megawatts (MW) of installed wind-energy capacity in the state by December 31, 1998, and to build or...

  3. Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, B.; Jenkin, T.; Lipowicz, D.; Arent, D. J.; Cooke, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Does large scale penetration of renewable generation such as wind and solar power pose economic and operational burdens on the electricity system? A number of studies have pointed to the potential benefits of renewable generation as a hedge against the volatility and potential escalation of fossil fuel prices. Research also suggests that the lack of correlation of renewable energy costs with fossil fuel prices means that adding large amounts of wind or solar generation may also reduce the volatility of system-wide electricity costs. Such variance reduction of system costs may be of significant value to consumers due to risk aversion. The analysis in this report recognizes that the potential value of risk mitigation associated with wind generation and natural gas generation may depend on whether one considers the consumer's perspective or the investor's perspective and whether the market is regulated or deregulated. We analyze the risk and return trade-offs for wind and natural gas generation for deregulated markets based on hourly prices and load over a 10-year period using historical data in the PJM Interconnection (PJM) from 1999 to 2008. Similar analysis is then simulated and evaluated for regulated markets under certain assumptions.

  4. Systems and methods for an integrated electrical sub-system powered by wind energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yan (Ballston Lake, NY); Garces, Luis Jose (Niskayuna, NY)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Various embodiments relate to systems and methods related to an integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system including a wind power source, an electrically-powered sub-system coupled to and at least partially powered by the wind power source, the electrically-powered sub-system being coupled to the wind power source through power converters, and a supervisory controller coupled to the wind power source and the electrically-powered sub-system to monitor and manage the integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system.

  5. Electrical motor/generator drive apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui Jia

    2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure includes electrical motor/generator drive systems and methods that significantly reduce inverter direct-current (DC) bus ripple currents and thus the volume and cost of a capacitor. The drive methodology is based on a segmented drive system that does not add switches or passive components but involves reconfiguring inverter switches and motor stator winding connections in a way that allows the formation of multiple, independent drive units and the use of simple alternated switching and optimized Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) schemes to eliminate or significantly reduce the capacitor ripple current.

  6. Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Supplementary Information Potential for Electricity Generation from Renewable Resources and Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Electrical energy can be generated from renewable resources the annual potential and actual annual production of electrical energy from renewable energy resources. Only

  7. General Electric Company Oahu Wind Integration Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to disruptions in supply. Further, the volatility in oil prices translates into volatility in electricity prices. As oil prices increase, Hawaii consumers face increases in energy prices as well as the price of most was approximately 13% of the State Gross Product. Most of the imported oil is used for transportation fuel

  8. Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

  9. Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

  10. Value of electrical heat boilers and heat pumps for wind power integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Value of electrical heat boilers and heat pumps for wind power integration Peter Meibom Juha of using electrical heat boilers and heat pumps as wind power integration measures relieving the link\\ZRUGV wind power, integration, heat pumps, electric heat boilers ,QWURGXFWLRQ 3UREOHP RYHUYLHZ The Danish

  11. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time of use United States Postal Service v Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs

  12. Next Generation Short-Term Forecasting of Wind Power Overview of the ANEMOS Project.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of difficulties to the power system operation. This is due to the fluctuating nature of wind generation to the management of wind generation. Accurate and reliable forecasting systems of the wind production are widely

  13. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purchase abs. cooling offset electric supply (kW) hourTariffs electric supply (kW) abs. cooling offset purchasecooling offset Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs electric supply (

  14. Property Tax Exemption for Wind Generators (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state of Oklahoma offers a five year ad valorem property tax exemption for certain windpower generators.

  15. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  16. Wind turbine generator with improved operating subassemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (24 Stonepost Rd., Glastonbury, CT 06033)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine includes a yaw spring return assembly to return the nacelle from a position to which it has been rotated by yawing forces, thus preventing excessive twisting of the power cables and control cables. It also includes negative coning restrainers to limit the bending of the flexible arms of the rotor towards the tower, and stop means on the rotor shaft to orient the blades in a vertical position during periods when the unit is upwind when the wind commences. A pendulum pitch control mechanism is improved by orienting the pivot axis for the pendulum arm at an angle to the longitudinal axis of its support arm, and excessive creep is of the synthetic resin flexible beam support for the blades is prevented by a restraining cable which limits the extent of pivoting of the pendulum during normal operation but which will permit further pivoting under abnormal conditions to cause the rotor to stall.

  17. An Automatic Load Sharing Approach for a DFIG Based Wind Generator in a Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    An Automatic Load Sharing Approach for a DFIG Based Wind Generator in a Microgrid M. A. Barik and H generator. An automatic load sharing approach for a doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind wind velocity. The load demand for the wind generator is determined based on the variation of its

  18. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder, E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A., E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Sivapalan, Subarna, E-mail: subarna-sivapalan@petronas.com.my [Department of Management and Humanities, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  19. Reliability Evaluation of Electric Power Generation Systems with Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samadi, Saeed

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional power generators are fueled by natural gas, steam, or water flow. These generators can respond to fluctuating load by varying the fuel input that is done by a valve control. Renewable power generators such as wind or solar, however...

  20. Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to today’s best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

  1. Electric current generation in distorted graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ana Julia Mizher; Alfredo Raya; Cristian Villavicencio

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene-like materials can be effectively described by quantum electrodynamics in 2+1 dimensions. In a pure state these systems exhibit a symmetry between the non-equivalent Dirac points in the honeycomb lattice. The effect of some types of doping or the contact with asymmetric external lattices (for instance a boron nitride layer) break this symmetry via a mechanism of effective mass generation that works differently for each Dirac point. In this work we show that the incorporation of an in-plane external magnetic field on this pseudochiral asymmetric configuration generates a non-dissipative electric current aligned with the magnetic field. This mass structure is associated to a Chern-Simons type of effective action. Together with the presence of a magnetic field generating an electric current, this scenario resembles the chiral magnetic effect in Quantum Chromodynamics.

  2. Assessment of Wind/Solar Co-located Generation in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven M. Wiese

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates the opportunity to load co-located wind and solar generation capacity onto a constrained transmission system while engendering only minimal losses. It quantifies the economic and energy opportunities and costs associated with pursuing this strategy in two Texas locations �¢���� one in west Texas and the other in south Texas. The study builds upon previous work published by the American Solar Energy Society (ASES) which illuminated the potential benefits of negative correlation of wind and solar generation in some locations by quantifying the economic and energy losses which would arise from deployment of solar generation in areas with existing wind generation and constrained transmission capacity. Clean Energy Associates (CEA) obtained and incorporated wind and solar resource data and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT)) load and price data into a model which evaluates varying levels of solar thermal, solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind capacity against an assumed transmission capacity limit at each of the two locations.

  3. Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electricity in a wind farm and subsequent production of Hexample, large remote wind farms that generate electricityvehicles, many large-scale wind farms that could utilize

  4. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  5. Energy 101: Wind Turbines - 2014 Update

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of wind. The video highlights the basic principles at work in wind turbines, and illustrates how the various components work to capture and convert wind energy to electricity. This updated version also includes information on the Energy Department's efforts to advance offshore wind power. Offshore wind energy footage courtesy of Vestas.

  6. The Economics and Feasibility of Electricity Generation using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    benefits of using biogas to generate electricity instead of coal are positive, implying that an otherwiseThe Economics and Feasibility of Electricity Generation using Manure Digesters on Small and Mid of electricity generation using methane from manure digesters on dairy farms under different electricity rate

  7. Third Generation Flywheels for electric storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricci, Michael, R.; Fiske, O. James

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity is critical to our economy, but growth in demand has saturated the power grid causing instability and blackouts. The economic penalty due to lost productivity in the US exceeds $100 billion per year. Opposition to new transmission lines and power plants, environmental restrictions, and an expected $100 billion grid upgrade cost have slowed system improvements. Flywheel electricity storage could provide a more economical, environmentally benign alternative and slash economic losses if units could be scaled up in a cost effective manner to much larger power and capacity than the present maximum of a few hundred kW and a few kWh per flywheel. The goal of this project is to design, construct, and demonstrate a small-scale third generation electricity storage flywheel using a revolutionary architecture scalable to megawatt-hours per unit. First generation flywheels are built from bulk materials such as steel and provide inertia to smooth the motion of mechanical devices such as engines. They can be scaled up to tens of tons or more, but have relatively low energy storage density. Second generation flywheels use similar designs but are fabricated with composite materials such as carbon fiber and epoxy. They are capable of much higher energy storage density but cannot economically be built larger than a few kWh of storage capacity due to structural and stability limitations. LaunchPoint is developing a third generation flywheel — the "Power Ring" — with energy densities as high or higher than second generation flywheels and a totally new architecture scalable to enormous sizes. Electricity storage capacities exceeding 5 megawatt-hours per unit appear both technically feasible and economically attractive. Our design uses a new class of magnetic bearing – a radial gap “shear-force levitator” – that we discovered and patented, and a thin-walled composite hoop rotated at high speed to store kinetic energy. One immediate application is power grid frequency regulation, where Power Rings could cut costs, reduce fuel consumption, eliminate emissions, and reduce the need for new power plants. Other applications include hybrid diesel-electric locomotives, grid power quality, support for renewable energy, spinning reserve, energy management, and facility deferral. Decreased need for new generation and transmission alone could save the nation $2.5 billion per year. Improved grid reliability could cut economic losses due to poor power quality by tens of billions of dollars per year. A large export market for this technology could also develop. Power Ring technology will directly support the EERE mission, and the goals of the Distributed Energy Technologies Subprogram in particular, by helping to reduce blackouts, brownouts, electricity costs, and emissions, by relieving transmission bottlenecks, and by greatly improving grid power quality.

  8. Restructuring, Ownership and Efficiency: The Case of Labor in Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shanefelter, Jennifer Kaiser

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inputs to electricity generation: fuel, capital, materialsand labor. Electricity generation is a fuel-intensive

  9. DOE-DOI Strategy Seeks to Harness U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    offshore wind power in U.S. waters, a major step in harnessing the nation's offshore wind potential. Generating electricity from offshore wind yields multiple benefits for the...

  10. World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Energy Information ... World Net Nuclear Electric ... Dataset Activity Stream World Net Nuclear Electric Power Generation, 1980-2007 International data showing world net...

  11. Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona)- Renewable Energy Purchase Rate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmers Electric Cooperative offers a production incentive to members that install qualifying wind and solar electricity generating systems. Qualifying grid-tied solar and wind energy systems are...

  12. Why do Particle Clouds Generate Electric Charges?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Pähtz; H. J. Herrmann; T. Shinbrot

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Grains in desert sandstorms spontaneously generate strong electrical charges; likewise volcanic dust plumes produce spectacular lightning displays. Charged particle clouds also cause devastating explosions in food, drug and coal processing industries. Despite the wide-ranging importance of granular charging in both nature and industry, even the simplest aspects of its causes remain elusive, because it is difficult to understand how inert grains in contact with little more than other inert grains can generate the large charges observed. Here, we present a simple yet predictive explanation for the charging of granular materials in collisional flows. We argue from very basic considerations that charge transfer can be expected in collisions of identical dielectric grains in the presence of an electric field, and we confirm the model's predictions using discrete-element simulations and a tabletop granular experiment.

  13. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puga, J. Nicolas

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

  15. The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm of capacity factor on the investment phase of a wind farm and on spatial planning in an electricity market, it is now recognized that accurate short-term forecasts of wind farms´ power output over the next few hours

  16. Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave energy an electricity storage for a 5000 inhabitants island supplied by both marine renewables (offshore wind and waves community. Key words: Wave energy, offshore wind turbines, marine energy 1 Introduction Marine renewables

  17. Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision wind-energy is one possible way to ex- tend flight duration for Unmanned Arial Vehicles. Wind-energy sources of wind energy available to exploit for this problem [5]: 1) Vertical air motion, such as thermal

  18. Impact of dispersed solar and wind systems on electric distribution planning and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, R.W.; Patton, R.; Curtice, D.H.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale dispersed solar photovoltaic and wind generation (DSW) will affect the generation, transmission, and distribution systems of an electric utility. This study examines the technical and economic impacts of dispersing DSW devices within the distribution system. Dispersed intermittent generation is included. Effects of DSW devices on capital investments, reliability, operating and maintenance costs, protection requirements, and communication and control requirements are examined. A DSW operation model is developed to help determine the dependable capacity of fluctuating solar photovoltaic and wind generation as part of the distribution planning process. Specific case studies using distribution system data and renewable resource data for Southern California Edison Company and Consumers Power Company are analyzed to gain insights into the effects of interconnecting DSW devices. The DSW devices were found to offer some distribution investment savings, depending on their availability during peak loads. For a summer-peaking utility, for example, dispersing photovoltaic systems is more likely to defer distribution capital investments than dispersing wind systems. Dispersing storage devices to increase DSW's dependable capacity for distribution systems needs is not economically attractive. Substation placement of DSW and storage devices is found to be more cost effective than feeder or customer placement. Examination of the effects of DSW on distribution system operation showed that small customer-owned DSW devices are not likely to disrupt present time-current distribution protection coordination. Present maintenance work procedures, are adequate to ensure workmen's safety. Regulating voltages within appropriate limits will become more complex with intermittent generation along the distribution feeders.

  19. Learning About Wind Turbine Technology, Motors and Generators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subscribe to all future posts Who Steven Wik What Energy Electrical Machines Generators Smart Grid Why Building Subscribe You Might Also Like MunichinteriorV 10 Years ON: From...

  20. Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    .2 Steady-State Performance of Electrical Conductors 22 2.3- Transient Performance of Electrical Conductors and Supports 27 2.4 Applications of Instrument Transformers 43 2.5 The R-X Diagram 47 CHAPTER 3 GENERATOR PROTECTION 52 3.1 Philosophy... Basis Devices 21 Figure 2.3 Shape Correction Factors for Strap Buses 35 Figure 2.4 Ice and Wind Loading on Electrical Conductors 37 Figure 2.5 System Conditions on the R-X Diagram 50 Figure 3.1 Differential Protection for a Wye-Connected Generator...

  1. Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

  2. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  3. Optimization of a Small Passive Wind Turbine Generator with Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    : Multiobjective Optimization, Genetic Algorithms, Wind Energy, Vertical Axis Wind Turbine hal-00763673,version1 #12;2.2. The Wind Turbine Characteristics A Savonius Vertical Axis Wind Turbine of radius R = 0.5 mOptimization of a Small Passive Wind Turbine Generator with Multiobjective Genetic Algorithms A

  4. Planning a Small Wind Electric System | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducationRemediationDepartmenta Small Wind Electric

  5. Self-excited induction generator for variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Gregory, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Broad, D. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering] [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When an induction generator is connected to a utility bus, the voltage and frequency at the terminal of the generator are the same as the voltage and frequency of the utility. The reactive power needed by the induction generator is supplied by the utility and the real power is returned to the utility. The rotor speed varies within a very limited range, and the reactive power requirement must be transported through a long line feeder, thus creating additional transmission losses. The energy captured by a wind turbine can be increased if the rotor speed can be adjusted to follow wind speed variations. For small applications such as battery charging or water pumping, a stand alone operation can be implemented without the need to maintain the output frequency output of the generator. A self- excited induction generator is a good candidate for a stand alone operation where the wind turbine is operated at variable speed. Thus the performance of the wind turbine can be unproved. In this paper, we examine a self-excited induction generator operated in a stand alone mode. A potential application for battery charging is given. The output power of the generator will be controlled to improve the performance of the wind turbine.

  6. The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    243 1 The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems Y. Amirat, M. E. H. Benbouzid, B. Bensaker, R. Wamkeue and H. Mangel Abstract--Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) have become of the studied generators is provided in Fig. 2. II. WIND ENERGY BACKGROUND A. Wind Power Conversion

  7. Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

  8. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  9. LANDFORMS GENERATED BY WIND EROSION OF NAVAJO SANDSTONE OUTCROPS AT THE WAVE (COLORADO PLATEAU, UTAH / ARIZONA BORDER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    LANDFORMS GENERATED BY WIND EROSION OF NAVAJO SANDSTONE OUTCROPS AT THE WAVE (COLORADO PLATEAU that are undercut by wind abrasion. In the photos above and to the left, note the microbially darkened rock surface Bedforms: Direct Evidence for Eolian Abrasion Arizona Utah wind wind wind wind wind wind The Wave "The Wave

  10. August 28, 2012 Page 1 of 2 EEE 473 Electrical Machinery (3) [F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    speed drives, wind generators and electric vehicles. Lecture. Technical Elective. Prerequisite: EEE 360

  11. Strong permanent magnets provide a backbone technology required many products, including computers, electric cars, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    , electric cars, and wind-powered generators. Currently, the strongest permanent magnets contain rare earth

  12. EA-1857: Wind Turbine Power Generation Complex at Idaho National Laboratory

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA would evaluate the environmental impacts of the proposed wind turbine power generation complex at Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho.

  13. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply; Executive Summary (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a 21-page summary of the 200+ page analysis that explores one clearly defined scenario for providing 20% of our nation's electricity demand with wind energy by 2030 and contrasts it to a scenario of no new U.S. wind power capacity.

  14. Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ciency of Electric Generating Plants: A Stochastic Frontierthe existing stock of electricity generating plants. Betweenover 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting

  15. Has Restructuring Improved Operating Efficiency at U.S. Electricity Generating Plants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Kira; Rose, Nancy; Wolfram, Catherine

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Efficiency of Electric Generating Plants: A Stochasticat US Electricity Generating Plants? Kira Markiewicz, Nancyat US Electricity Generating Plants? Kira Markiewicz UC

  16. Reconnection outflow generated turbulence in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vörös, Z; Semenov, V S; Zaqarashvili, T V; Bruno, R; Khodachenko, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petschek-type time-dependent reconnection (TDR) and quasi-stationary reconnection (QSR) models are considered to understand reconnection outflow structures and the features of the associated locally generated turbulence in the solar wind. We show that the outflow structures, such as discontinuites, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable flux tubes or continuous space filling flows cannot be distinguished from one-point WIND measurements. In both models the reconnection outflows can generate more or less spatially extended turbulent boundary layers (TBDs). The structure of an unique extended reconnection outflow is investigated in detail. The analysis of spectral scalings and break locations show that reconnection outflows can control the local field and plasma conditions which may play in favor of one or another turbulent dissipation mechanisms with their characteristic scales and wavenumbers.

  17. Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies Jerry Jackson, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Abstract Electric power failures... available with new building-sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies. This paper evaluates the physical requirements and costs of preemptively installing these new building- sited electric generation technologies to insure...

  18. Wind Turbine Bearing Failure Detection Using Generator Stator Current Homopolar Component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wind Turbine Bearing Failure Detection Using Generator Stator Current Homopolar Component Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) as a tool for failure detection in wind turbine generators for stationary and non stationary cases. Index Terms-Wind turbine, induction generator, bearing failure, ensemble

  19. Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving Dynamometer Stephen Rehmeyer Pepe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving Dynamometer by Stephen Rehmeyer Pepe Sc, Berkeley Spring 2007 #12;Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving Dynamometer Copyright c 2007 by Stephen Rehmeyer Pepe #12;Abstract Testing Small Wind Turbine Generators: Design of a Driving

  20. EEMD-based wind turbine bearing failure detection using the generator stator current homopolar component

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EEMD-based wind turbine bearing failure detection using the generator stator current homopolar turbine generators for stationary and non stationary cases. Keyword: Wind turbine, induction generator on the installed equipment because they are hardly accessible or even inaccessible [1]. 1.1. Wind turbine failure

  1. Method for changing removable bearing for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran (Niskayuna, NY); Jansen, Patrick Lee (Scotia, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya (Rexford, NY)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  2. Removable bearing arrangement for a wind turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat Sampathkumaran; Jansen, Patrick Lee; Gadre, Aniruddha Dattatraya

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator having removable change-out bearings includes a rotor and a stator, locking bolts configured to lock the rotor and stator, a removable bearing sub-assembly having at least one shrunk-on bearing installed, and removable mounting bolts configured to engage the bearing sub-assembly and to allow the removable bearing sub-assembly to be removed when the removable mounting bolts are removed.

  3. Comparative study on fault responses of synchronous generators and wind turbine generators using transient stability index based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Comparative study on fault responses of synchronous generators and wind turbine generators using voltage sag and the slip on fault responses with the TSI between synchronous generators and wind turbine with the second order classical model of the generator and constant impedance load model. Under the structure

  4. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  5. Stochastic Co-optimization for Hydro-Electric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Stochastic Co-optimization for Hydro-Electric Power Generation Shi-Jie Deng, Senior Member, IEEE the optimal scheduling problem faced by a hydro-electric power producer that simultaneously participates in multiple markets. Specifically, the hydro-generator participates in both the electricity spot market

  6. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Zeyer, Timo; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin; Jacobson, Mark Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind and solar PV generation data for the entire contiguous US are calculated, on the basis of 32 years of weather data with temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of 40x40km$^2$, assuming site-suitability-based as well as stochastic wind and solar PV capacity distributions throughout the country. These data are used to investigate a fully renewable electricity system, resting primarily upon wind and solar PV power. We find that the seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar PV comes at around 80% solar PV share, owing to the US summer load peak. By picking this mix, long-term storage requirements can be more than halved compared to a wind only mix. The daily optimal mix lies at about 80% wind share due to the nightly gap in solar PV production. Picking this mix instead of solar only reduces backup energy needs by about 50%. Furthermore, we calculate shifts in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to their differing resour...

  7. EIS-0418: PrairieWinds Project, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve the interconnection request from PrairieWinds for their South Dakota PrairieWinds Project, a 151.5-megawatt (MW) nameplate capacity wind powered generation facility, including 101 General Electric 1.5-MW wind turbine generators, electrical collector lines, collector substation, transmission line, communications system, and wind turbine service access roads.

  8. The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm used criterion of capacity factor on the investment phase of a wind farm and on spatial planning, it is now recognized that accurate short-term forecasts of wind farms´ power output over the next few hours

  9. Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind power

  10. Method for computing efficient electrical indicators for offshore wind turbine monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by offshore deployment of wind farms. The offshore turbines have much lower accessibility(1) so maintenanceMethod for computing efficient electrical indicators for offshore wind turbine monitoring Georgia.cablea, pierre.granjon, christophe.berenguer} @gipsa-lab.grenoble-inp.fr Abstract Offshore wind turbines

  11. Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exotic Electricity Options and the Valuation of Electricity Generation and Transmission Assets a methodology for valuing electricity deriva- tives by constructing replicating portfolios from electricity-storable nature of electricity, which rules out the traditional spot mar- ket, storage-based method of valuing

  12. Production Tax Credit for Renewable Electricity Generation (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, environmental and energy security concerns were addressed at the federal level by several key pieces of energy legislation. Among them, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), P.L. 95-617, required regulated power utilities to purchase alternative electricity generation from qualified generating facilities, including small-scale renewable generators; and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), P.L. 95-618, part of the Energy Tax Act of 1978, provided a 10% federal tax credit on new investment in capital-intensive wind and solar generation technologies.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  15. Evolution of Wholesale Electricity Market Design with Increasing Levels of Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Bloom, A.; Botterud, A.; Townsend, A.; Levin, T.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable generation such as wind and photovoltaic solar power has increased substantially in recent years. Variable generation has unique characteristics compared to the traditional technologies that supply energy in the wholesale electricity markets. These characteristics create unique challenges in planning and operating the power system, and they can also influence the performance and outcomes from electricity markets. This report focuses on two particular issues related to market design: revenue sufficiency for long-term reliability and incentivizing flexibility in short-term operations. The report provides an overview of current design and some designs that have been proposed by industry or researchers.

  16. Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

  17. Integration of decentralized generators with the electric power grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finger, Susan

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops a new methodology for studying the economic interaction of customer-owned electrical generators with the central electric power grid. The purpose of the report is to study the reciprocal effects of the ...

  18. Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    50 kW. Here we present wind generation as a percentage oftotal electricity consumption. Wind generation on this basistime-variability of wind generation is often such that its

  19. Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators A. El the problem of controlling wind energy conversion (WEC) systems involving permanent magnet synchronous is to maximize wind energy extraction which cannot be achieved without letting the wind turbine rotor operate

  20. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Available for Download October 22, 2010 EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5)...

  1. Adapting On-site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Internal combustion reciprocating engine generators (gensets) are regularly deployed at distribution centers, small municipal utilities, and public institutions to provide on-site electricity...

  2. Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Hybrid Vehicles Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  3. Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 15th, 2013 R.Vijayagopal,...

  4. Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and...

  5. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SANDIA REPORT SAND2011-3119 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Joseph W. Pratt,...

  6. Facilitating Wind Development: The Importance of Electric Industry Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates which wholesale elecricity market-structure characteristics best accommodate wind energy development.

  7. Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Gramlich, R.; Goggin, M.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to evaluate which balancing area (BA) characteristics best accommodate wind energy.

  8. Control strategy of a variable speed wind turbine with multipole permanent magnet synchronous generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    values. Keywords: permanent magnet synchronous generator, variable speed wind turbine, direct driven wind). A multipole synchronous generator connected to a power converter can operate at low speeds, so that a gear canControl strategy of a variable speed wind turbine with multipole permanent magnet synchronous

  9. SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS Hans the state of the art of power predictios for wind and solar power plants.with a time horizon of several market there is a need for a forecast of the power production of wind and solar generators with time

  10. Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

  11. Using Electric Vehicles to Meet Balancing Requirements Associated with Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many states are deploying renewable generation sources at a significant rate to meet renewable portfolio standards. As part of this drive to meet renewable generation levels, significant additions of wind generation are planned. Due to the highly variable nature of wind generation, significant energy imbalances on the power system can be created and need to be handled. This report examines the impact on the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP) region for a 2019 expected wind scenario. One method for mitigating these imbalances is to utilize plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) or battery electric vehicles (BEVs) as assets to the grid. PHEVs and BEVs have the potential to meet this demand through both charging and discharging strategies. This report explores the usage of two different charging schemes: V2GHalf and V2GFull. In V2GHalf, PHEV/BEV charging is varied to absorb the additional imbalance from the wind generation, but never feeds power back into the grid. This scenario is highly desirable to automotive manufacturers, who harbor great concerns about battery warranty if vehicle-to-grid discharging is allowed. The second strategy, V2GFull, varies not only the charging of the vehicle battery, but also can vary the discharging of the battery back into the power grid. This scenario is currently less desirable to automotive manufacturers, but provides an additional resource benefit to PHEV/BEVs in meeting the additional imbalance imposed by wind. Key findings in the report relate to the PHEV/BEV population required to meet the additional imbalance when comparing V2GHalf to V2GFull populations, and when comparing home-only-charging and work-and-home-charging scenarios. Utilizing V2GFull strategies over V2GHalf resulted in a nearly 33% reduction in the number of vehicles required. This reduction indicates fewer vehicles are needed to meet the unhandled energy, but they would utilize discharging of the vehicle battery into the grid. This practice currently results in the voiding of automotive manufacturer's battery warranty, and is not feasible for many customers. The second key finding is the change in the required population when PHEV/BEV charging is available at both home and work. Allowing 10% of the vehicle population access to work charging resulted in nearly 80% of the grid benefit. Home-only charging requires, at best, 94% of the current NWPP light duty vehicle fleet to be a PHEV or BEV. With the introduction of full work charging availability, only 8% of the NWPP light duty vehicle fleet is required. Work charging has primarily been associated with mitigating range anxiety in new electric vehicle owners, but these studies indicate they have significant potential for improving grid reliability. The V2GHalf and V2GFull charging strategies of the report utilize grid frequency as an indication of the imbalance requirements. The introduction of public charging stations, as well as the potential for PHEV/BEVs to be used as a resource for renewable generation integration, creates conditions for additional products into the ancillary services market. In the United Kingdom, such a capability would be bid as a frequency product in the ancillary services market. Such a market could create the need for larger, third-party aggregators or services to manage the use of electric vehicles as a grid resource. Ultimately, customer adoption, usage patterns and habits, and feedback from the power and automotive industries will drive the need.

  12. Zhejiang Windey Wind Generating Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Generating Engineering Jump to: navigation, search

  13. Property:PotentialOffshoreWindGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration Jump to:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity Jump to: navigation,

  14. Property:PotentialOnshoreWindGeneration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I GeothermalPotentialBiopowerSolidGeneration Jump to:PotentialOffshoreWindCapacity

  15. Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, examines approaches to providing electrical power on board commercial aircraft using solid oxide fuel (SOFC) technology. The focus of...

  16. High Wind Penetration Impact on U.S. Wind Manufacturing Capacity and Critical Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A.; Hand, M. M.; Blair, N.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used two different models to analyze a number of alternative scenarios of annual wind power capacity expansion to better understand the impacts of high levels of wind generated electricity production on wind energy manufacturing and installation rates.

  17. The role of wind generation in European power sector decarbonization : a general equilibrium analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karkatsouli, Ioanna

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind generation has been growing fast, with onshore wind having a 27% average annual growth rate over the past decade. Motivated by this growth, a comprehensive analysis of both the economic and engineering implications ...

  18. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  19. Reliability evaluation of electric power generation systems including unconventional energy sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lago-Gonzalez, Alex

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    through photovoltaic cells, and wind power generation, proto- types have been built and tested. Commercial operation of these two is expected to start in the late 1980's or early 1990's. For the rest of the alternatives the expected date of operation... appropiate for these units because they may have several derated states. However, due to the short operating experience with these units, there is not enough data available to develop more accurate models. 3. 1 Description of PEPS Photovoltaic electric...

  20. Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight...

  1. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power  flow  relations  for  electric  transmission  lines  (electric power  costs  are  cheap:  if  a  large  power  consumer  is  close  to  the  generator,  the  excess  power  needs associated with transmission line electric grid consists of a network of transmission lines.  Power 

  2. Atmospheric Mercury Deposition Impacts of Future Electric Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a number of scenarios for future emissions from coal-fired electricity generation plants in the UnitedAtmospheric Mercury Deposition Impacts of Future Electric Power Generation Mark D. Cohen Physical on 2000 data submitted to Environment Canada's National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI). Finally

  3. Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, Michael C.

    on a transmission network from net generation nodes to net consumption nodes is governed by the Kirchoff Laws [45Electricity generation with looped transmission networks: Bidding to an ISO Xinmin Hu Daniel Ralph to model markets for delivery of electrical power on looped transmission networks. It analyzes

  4. Commercial Wind Energy Property Valuation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Prior to 2007, wind energy devices generating electricity for commercial sale were assessed differently depending on where they were located. Some counties valued the entire turbine structure ...

  5. Optimal Contract for Wind Power in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlakha, Sachin

    Introduction The insatiable appetite for energy as well as concerns for global warming have led to greater the impact of uncertain production in electricity markets. Current electricity markets consist of primarilyOptimal Contract for Wind Power in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets Desmond W. H. Cai1 Sachin Adlakha2

  6. Two Colorado-Based Electric Cooperatives Selected as 2014 Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    wind power, and together, Tri-State and San Isabel are expanding the use of low-cost wind energy, and supporting job creation and economic development within their service...

  7. Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

  8. Responses of floating wind turbines to wind and wave excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kwang Hyun

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wind power has recently emerged as a promising alternative to conventional electricity generation. However, space requirements and public pressure to place unsightly wind turbines out of visual range make it ...

  9. Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

  10. Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

  11. Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be registered with the Department of Aeronautics if the...

  12. Topic 5: Power System Operation and Planning for Enhanced Wind Generation Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittal, Vijay; Heydt, Gerald T; Ayyanar, Raja; McCalley, James D; Ajjarapu, V; Aliprantis, Dionysios

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project dealt with the development of a range of educational resources dealing with wind energy and wind energy integration in the electric grid. These resources were developed for a variety of audiences including; a) high school student, b) undergraduate electrical engineering students, c) graduate electrical engineering students, and d) practicing engineers in industry. All the developed material is available publicly and the courses developed are being taught at the two participating universities, Arizona State University and Iowa State University.

  13. Wind shear for large wind turbine generators at selected tall tower sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study described in this report is to examine the nature of wind shear profiles and their variability over the height of large horizontal-axis wind turbines and to provide information on wind shear relevant to the design and opertion of large wind turbines. Wind turbine fatigue life and power quality are related through the forcing functions on the blade to the shapes of the wind shear profiles and their fluctuations over the disk of rotation.

  14. RECIPIENT:City of Ann Arbor PROJECT TITLE: Ann Arbor Wind Generator

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ann Arbor PROJECT TITLE: Ann Arbor Wind Generator " ) STATE: MI Funding Opportunity Announcement Number ProcurementInstrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-EE0000447...

  15. Relationship Between Wind Generation and Balancing Energy Market Prices in ERCOT: 2007-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, E.; Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to measure the average marginal effects of wind generation on the balancing-energy market price in ERCOT with the help of econometric analysis.

  16. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Residential Solar and Wind Electricity Sales (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2011 Maryland enacted legislation providing a sales and use tax exemption for sales of electricity from qualifying solar energy and residential wind energy equipment to residential customers...

  17. EECBG Success Story: Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:26am Addthis Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency...

  18. Modeling induction machine winding faults for diagnosis In Electrical Machines Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chapter 2 Modeling induction machine winding faults for diagnosis In Electrical Machines Diagnosis of a winding fault situation, then the time available to the experimenter may vary from a few minutes to a few will see that the controls are perfectly free from imbalances induced by a stator insulation fault, whether

  19. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  20. University of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    University of Delaware Technical Analysis for On-Site Wind Generation Lewes Campus Summary overview of the detailed feasibility study performed for an on-site wind turbine development Sustainable Energy Developments, Inc. (SED) performed a technical assessment for an on-site wind turbine

  1. Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault to the grid connection of wind turbines. The second chapter elucidates recent thinking in the area of grid Risø National Laboratory Vestas Wind Systems A/S #12;#12;I Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed

  2. IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND ENERGY GENERATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    77 CHAPTER 4 IMPACTS TO BIRDS CAUSED BY WIND ENERGY GENERATION 4.1 INTRODUCTION Bird mortality studies reporting on wind energy facilities elsewhere regularly report that bird mortality in the APWRA reports of bird mortality at wind energy facilities, and we extracted from those reports the mortality

  3. Economic Modeling of Intermittency in Wind Power Generation Alan Yung Chen Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the total cost from energy from wind more expensive. Because the model explicitly accounts for the impacts intermittent sources to the system in addition to the cost of generating wind energy This model the past decade wind energy has steadily emerged as a potential source for large-scale, low carbon energy

  4. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  5. A MICROFLUIDIC-ELECTRIC PACKAGE FOR POWER MEMS GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    induction turbine-generator, and demonstrated a maximum output power of 192µW under driven excitation [1]. Holmes et al. have integrated a 7.5mm diameter permanent-magnet generator, an axial-flow polymer turbineA MICROFLUIDIC-ELECTRIC PACKAGE FOR POWER MEMS GENERATORS Florian Herrault, Chang-Hyeon Ji, Seong

  6. Abstract--This paper presents a comparative stability analysis of conventional synchronous generators and wind farms based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    on system stability of replacing conventional generation by DFIG-based wind generation on the IEEE 14-bus the penetration of wind generation is high, it is important to keep these generators on line as much as possible]-[6], different models of DFIG-based wind generator farms are discussed and simulations are performed. The tuning

  7. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #844: Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

  8. Use of Solar and Wind as a Physical Hedge against Price Variability within a Generation Portfolio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkin, T.; Diakov, V.; Drury, E.; Bush, B.; Denholm, P.; Milford, J.; Arent, D.; Margolis, R.; Byrne, R.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a framework to explore the potential use and incremental value of small- to large-scale penetration of solar and wind technologies as a physical hedge against the risk and uncertainty of electricity cost on multi-year to multi-decade timescales. Earlier studies characterizing the impacts of adding renewable energy (RE) to portfolios of electricity generators often used a levelized cost of energy or simplified net cash flow approach. In this study, we expand on previous work by demonstrating the use of an 8760 hourly production cost model (PLEXOS) to analyze the incremental impact of solar and wind penetration under a wide range of penetration scenarios for a region in the Western U.S. We do not attempt to 'optimize' the portfolio in any of these cases. Rather we consider different RE penetration scenarios, that might for example result from the implementation of a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) to explore the dynamics, risk mitigation characteristics and incremental value that RE might add to the system. We also compare the use of RE to alternative mechanisms, such as the use of financial or physical supply contracts to mitigate risk and uncertainty, including consideration of their effectiveness and availability over a variety of timeframes.

  9. Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electric output of the wind generator. Combinations of theseSink (e,g, New England) Wind Generator Under this approach,New York New England Wind Generator REP Wholesale Matching.

  10. electric generation | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel's picturecontestdrought Homegeneration

  11. Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withee, Jon E

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing offshore wind resources for the large scale generation of electricity. Drawing ...

  12. Data Analytics Methods in Wind Turbine Design and Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Giwhyun

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops sophisticated data analytic methods to analyze structural loads on, and power generation of, wind turbines. Wind turbines, which convert the kinetic energy in wind into electrical power, are operated within stochastic...

  13. Data Analytics Methods in Wind Turbine Design and Operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Giwhyun

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation develops sophisticated data analytic methods to analyze structural loads on, and power generation of, wind turbines. Wind turbines, which convert the kinetic energy in wind into electrical power, are operated within stochastic...

  14. Maine: Energy Efficiency Program Helps Generate Town's Electricity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Efficiency program helps municipalities with their energy bills. Thomaston, Maine, was able to install solar panels to generate 13% of the electricity used by the wastewater treatment facility.

  15. Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

  16. Evaluating Policies to Increase Electricity Generation from Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalensee, Richard

    Building on a review of experience in the United States and the European Union, this article advances four main propositions concerning policies aimed at increasing electricity generation from renewable energy. First, who ...

  17. Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

  18. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible...

  19. Alternative electric generation impact simulator : final summary report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruhl, Jim

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a short summary of three related research tasks that were conducted during the project "Alternative Electric Generation Impact Simulator." The first of these tasks combines several different types of ...

  20. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  1. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  2. Designing Micro Wind Turbines for Portable Power Generation Francois Hogan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    to the design of a wind turbine rotor. Number of blades The number of blades does not have a significant impact on the efficiency of a wind turbine. We have chosen a two blade design because of ease of fabrication in order) (2) · This two blade micro wind turbine meets the optimal specifications to ensure good efficiency

  3. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  4. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  5. Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

  6. Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , the intermittent nature of output from wind turbines and solar panels is frequently discussed as a potential obstacle to larger scale application of these tech- nologies. Contributions of 10-20% of electrical energy from individual intermittent technologies create... fixed, exogenously set, strike price. The results are not sensitive to the strike price - but further research is required to assess the impact of multiple types of option contracts with different strike prices. The outline of this paper is as follows...

  7. AIR-FLOW STRUCTURE IN THE VERY CLOSE VICINITY OF WIND GENERATED WATER-WAVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the static pressure, / , the slope of the water waves, the air kinematic viscosity. Wave characteristics wereAIR-FLOW STRUCTURE IN THE VERY CLOSE VICINITY OF WIND GENERATED WATER-WAVES Hubert Branger1 the structure of the air flow in the very close vicinity of the water-surface above wind-generated waves. We

  8. Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

  9. Analyzing Effects of Turbulence on Power Generation Using Wind Plant Monitoring Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affects the power generation of a single wind turbine within an array of turbines. Using monitoring data from a wind power plant, we selected two sets of wind and power data for turbines on the edge of the wind plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine directly faces incoming winds) and (ii) an in-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine is under the wake of other turbines). For each set of data, two surrogate models were then developed to represent the turbine power generation (i) as a function of the wind speed; and (ii) as a function of the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Support vector regression was adopted for the development of the surrogate models. Three types of uncertainties in the turbine power generation were also investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the published/reported power curve, (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) under the same wind conditions, the turbine generates different power between the in-wake and out-of-wake scenarios, (ii) a turbine generally produces more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario, (iii) the power generation is sensitive to turbulence intensity even when the wind speed is greater than the turbine rated speed, and (iv) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  10. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 27, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2012 465 Dynamics of Type-3 Wind Turbine Generator Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    Turbine Generator Models Ian A. Hiskens, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--The influence of wind turbine generators, singular systems, small disturbance analysis, switching deadlock, wind turbine generator modeling. I. INTRODUCTION THE dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators (WTGs) is quite different to that of synchronous

  12. Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    generation to analyse the effects of uncertainty. We find that the costs of balancing wind power were relatively low in the Ger- man system in 2003. They could be reduced even further when a better forecast becomes available, either by implementing a later... . This was to be expected, as start-up and shut-down decisions are the key variables used to balance wind power’s volatility. On the other hand, we find that the increase in generation costs is marginal. This is also plausible as average wind generation is held constant...

  13. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    in order to follow the de- mand, wind and solar PV power output is largely determined by weather conditions Large-scale integration of renewable power generation Wind power generation Solar PV power generation Power transmission a b s t r a c t A future energy system is likely to rely heavily on wind and solar PV

  14. Flying Electric Generators | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area(Sasada, 1988) |Fluor CorpElectric

  15. Electrical faults modeling of the photovoltaic generator Wail Rezgui1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    energy by the photovoltaic phenomena. So, the degradation of these two factors means the presenceElectrical faults modeling of the photovoltaic generator Wail Rezgui1 , Leïla-Hayet Mouss1 , Kinza presented a new methodology for the mathematical modeling of the photovoltaic generator's characteristics

  16. Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    the heat and the force produced from the detonation wave. In previous experimental work, a single that involve coupling a PDE with different systems to drive a generator and produce electricity [2, 3]. One. For instance, it may be possible to design a generator that uses the force created by the pressure rise from

  17. 2/1/2014 Miniature Windmill generating wind energy-wordlessTech http://wordlesstech.com/2014/01/14/miniature-windmill-generating-wind-energy/ 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    and affordable Better rates. Better service. Better Planet! 1Like ShareShareShareMore Wind Generator Motor comparestores.net Find Lowest Prices of August 2014. Home Wind Generators Up to 55% Off Follow us Search

  18. Wind for Schools: Developing Education Programs to Train the Next Generation of the Wind Energy Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Barnett, L.; Miles, J.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the Wind for Schools project elements, including a description of host and collegiate school curricula developed for wind energy and the status of the current projects. The paper also provides focused information on how schools, regions, or countries can become involved or implement similar projects to expand the social acceptance and understanding of wind energy.

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Dynamic wind loads and wake characteristics of a wind turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    installed in onshore or/and offshore wind farms in order to meet the 20% electricity generation goal. WindRESEARCH ARTICLE Dynamic wind loads and wake characteristics of a wind turbine model in an atmospheric boundary layer wind Hui Hu · Zifeng Yang · Partha Sarkar Received: 16 August 2011 / Revised: 1

  20. ISSN 1745-9648 Storing Wind for a Rainy Day

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    generators, with no correlation with wind generation. We estimate the cost of volatility in Denmark's wind generation. We estimate the cost of volatility in Denmark's wind output to equal between 4% and 8% of itsISSN 1745-9648 Storing Wind for a Rainy Day What kind of electricity does Denmark export? Richard

  1. Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies’ Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric distribution companies shall utilize a competitive bidding process for electric generation services. The Department of Public Utility Control will be responsible for setting the criteria...

  2. Empirical Analysis of the Variability of Wind Generation in India: Implications for Grid Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Abhyankar, NIkit; Rao, Poorvi

    2014-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze variability in load and wind generation in India to assess its implications for grid integration of large scale wind projects using actual wind generation and load data from two states in India, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu. We compare the largest variations in load and net load (load ?wind, i.e., load after integrating wind) that the generation fleet has to meet. In Tamil Nadu, where wind capacity is about 53percent of the peak demand, we find that the additional variation added due to wind over the current variation in load is modest; if wind penetration reaches 15percent and 30percent by energy, the additional hourly variation is less than 0.5percent and 4.5percent of the peak demand respectively for 99percent of the time. For wind penetration of 15percent by energy, Tamil Nadu system is found to be capable of meeting the additional ramping requirement for 98.8percent of the time. Potential higher uncertainty in net load compared to load is found to have limited impact on ramping capability requirements of the system if coal plants can me ramped down to 50percent of their capacity. Load and wind aggregation in Tamil Nadu and Karnataka is found to lower the variation by at least 20percent indicating the benefits geographic diversification. These findings suggest modest additional flexible capacity requirements and costs for absorbing variation in wind power and indicate that the potential capacity support (if wind does not generate enough during peak periods) may be the issue that has more bearing on the economics of integrating wind

  3. Southeast Regional Assessment Study: an assessment of the opportunities of solar electric power generation in the Southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to identify and assess opportunities for demonstration and large scale deployment of solar electric facilities in the southeast region and to define the technical, economic, and institutional factors that can contribute to an accelerated use of solar energy for electric power generation. Graphs and tables are presented indicating the solar resource potential, siting opportunities, energy generation and use, and socioeconomic factors of the region by state. Solar electric technologies considered include both central station and dispersed solar electric generating facilities. Central stations studied include solar thermal electric, wind, photovoltaic, ocean thermal gradient, and biomass; dispersed facilities include solar thermal total energy systems, wind, and photovoltaic. The value of solar electric facilities is determined in terms of the value of conventional facilities and the use of conventional fuels which the solar facilities can replace. Suitable cost and risk sharing mechanisms to accelerate the commercialization of solar electric technologies in the Southeast are identified. The major regulatory and legal factors which could impact on the commercialization of solar facilities are reviewed. The most important factors which affect market penetration are reviewed, ways to accelerate the implementation of these technologies are identified, and market entry paths are identified. Conclusions and recommendations are presented. (WHK)

  4. Techno-economic Optimization of Integrating Wind Power into Constrained Electric Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    into a generation mixture with a large percentage of coal capacity can increase emissions for moderate wind load leveling technique, ensuring that generation meets demand in every period. The current research generation sources, while remaining within the network's operating constraints. The model minimizes

  5. 2/1/2014 Miniature Windmill generating wind energy| MyScienceAcademy http://myscienceacademy.org/2014/01/16/miniature-windmill-generating-wind-energy/ 1/3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    2/1/2014 Miniature Windmill generating wind energy| MyScienceAcademy http://myscienceacademy.org/2014/01/16/miniature-windmill-generating-wind-energy/ 1/3 91Like 0 Tweet 1 MINIATURE WINDMILLGENERATING WINDENERGY Researchers have designed a micro-windmill that generates wind energy. This may become

  6. Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William C. Leighty; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

  7. Articles about Distributed Wind | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and is poised for future growth that could double the capacity of renewable electricity generation from resources like wind power by 2020. March 31, 2014 PNNL Reports Distributed...

  8. Hybrid Electro-Mechanical Simulation Tool for Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Muljadi, E.; Jonkman, J.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the use of MATLAB/Simulink to simulate the electrical and grid-related aspects of a WTG and the FAST aero-elastic wind turbine code to simulate the aerodynamic and mechanical aspects of the WTG. The combination of the two enables studies involving both electrical and mechanical aspects of the WTG.

  9. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for interconnection of 250 megawatts (MW) of power to be generated by the proposed Windy Point Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Windy Point Partners, LLC (WPP) propose to construct and operate the proposed Wind Project and has requested interconnection to the FCRTS. The Wind Project will be interconnected at BPA's Rock Creek Substation, which is under construction in Klickitat County, Washington. The Rock Creek Substation will provide transmission access for the Wind Project to BPA's Wautoma-John Day No.1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. BPA's decision to offer terms to interconnect the Wind Project is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 15, 1995). This decision thus is tiered to the BP ROD.

  10. HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

  11. Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses in shallow intertidal basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagherazzi, Sergio

    Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses in shallow, and wind direction on water depth, fetch, and the resulting wave-generated shear stresses. We identify four. Wiberg (2009), Importance of wind conditions, fetch, and water levels on wave-generated shear stresses

  12. Sensorless Control of Doubly-Fed Induction Generator-Based Wind urbines using a High-Order Sliding Mode Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    ­ This paper deals with the sensorless control of a doubly-fed induction generator based wind turbine reaching time, robustness and unmodeled dynamics (generator and turbine). Simulations using the wind of the proposed sensorless control strategy. Keywords: Wind turbine, doubly-fed induction generator, sensorless

  13. Robust STATCOM Control for the Enhancement of Fault Ride-Through Capability of Fixed Speed Wind Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -slip relationships as well as through simulations. The wind generator is a highly nonlinear system, which is modelled power generation. This type of wind generator always consumes reactive power from the grid. WhenRobust STATCOM Control for the Enhancement of Fault Ride-Through Capability of Fixed Speed Wind

  14. A Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the necessary balancing reserves for wind. Hydropower's flexibility and capacity are limited, however, by non-power resources that can adjust their output rapidly to keep power supply in balance with demand. HydropowerA Methodology to Assess the Value of Integrated Hydropower and Wind Generation by Mitch A. Clement

  15. Impacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    development of wind energy tech- nology and the current world-wide status of grid-connected as well as standImpacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems M. J systems and their dynamic behaviours to identify critical issues that limit the large-scale integration

  16. EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EFFECT OF PITCH CONTROL AND POWER CONDITIONING ON POWER QUALITY OF VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE), Curtin University of Technology, WA Abstract: Variable speed wind turbine generators provide the opportunity to capture more power than fixed speed turbines. However the variable speed machine output can

  17. On Impedance Spectroscopy Contribution to Failure Diagnosis in Wind Turbine Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    On Impedance Spectroscopy Contribution to Failure Diagnosis in Wind Turbine Generators Mohamed Becherif1 , El Houssin El Bouchikhi2 and Mohamed Benbouzid2 Abstract ­ Wind turbines proliferation turbines. Indeed, impedance spectroscopy is already used for the diagnosis of batteries, fuel cells

  18. Optimized Hydrogen and Electricity Generation from Wind | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment ofOil'sEnergy8 * October 2006 Optimize

  19. Superconducting generators for large off shore wind turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keysan, Ozan

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes four novel superconducting machine concepts, in the pursuit of finding a suitable design for large offshore wind turbines. The designs should be reliable, modular and light-weight. The main novelty ...

  20. The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and wind power in three Canadian jurisdictions, namely British Columbia, Ontario and Alberta. An Optimal baseload mixtures. The large premium paid for displacing hydro or nuclear power with wind power does littleThe Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse

  1. Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Electrical Machines Paper ID 1434 DFIG-Based Wind Turbine Fault Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Based Wind Turbine Fault Diagnosis Using a Specific Discrete Wavelet Transform E. Al-Ahmar1,2 , M for electrical and mechanical fault diagnosis in a DFIG-based wind turbine. The investigated technique unambiguously diagnose faults under transient conditions. Index Terms--Wind turbine, Doubly-Fed Induction

  2. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case of wind electricity in spain. Energy Policy, 36:3345–wind power in a carbon constrained world. Energy Policy, 34:wind power generation capacity in liberalized electricity markets. Energy Policy,

  3. Analysis of Alternative Extensions of the Existing Production Tax Credit for Wind Generators

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Requestor: Ms. Janice Mays, Chief Counsel, Committee on Ways & Means, U.S. House of Representatives This is a letter response requesting analysis of alternative extensions of the existing production tax credit (PTC) that would apply to wind generators only.

  4. Preliminary design and viability consideration of external, shroud-based stators in wind turbine generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoemaker-Trejo, Nathaniel (Nathaniel Joseph)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal-axis wind turbine designs often included gearboxes or large direct-drive generators to compensate for the low peripheral speeds of the turbine hub. To take advantage of high blade tip speeds, an alternative ...

  5. Making the Economic Case for Small-Scale Distributed Wind -- A Screening for Distributed Generation Wind Opportunities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Brown, E.; Dominick, J.; Jurotich, T.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was an offshoot of a previous assessment, which examined the potential for large-scale, greater than 50 MW, wind development on occupied federal agency lands. The study did not find significant commercial wind development opportunities, primarily because of poor wind resource on available and appropriately sized land areas or land use or aesthetic concerns. The few sites that could accommodate a large wind farm failed to have transmission lines in optimum locations required to generate power at competitive wholesale prices. The study did identify a promising but less common distributed generation (DG) development option. This follow-up study documents the NREL/Global Energy Concepts team efforts to identify economic DG wind projects at a select group of occupied federal sites. It employs a screening strategy based on project economics that go beyond quantity of windy land to include state and utility incentives as well as the value of avoided power purchases. It attempts to account for the extra costs and difficulties associated with small projects through the use of project scenarios that are more compatible with federal facilities and existing land uses. These benefits and barriers of DG are discussed, and the screening methodology and results are included. The report concludes with generalizations about the screening method and recommendations for improvement and other potential applications for this methodology.

  6. NERC Presentation: Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of variable electricity eneration. Variable resources are types of electric power generation that rely on an uncontrolled, "variable" fuel (e.g. wind, sunlight, waves, tidal...

  7. Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

  8. Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based on Monte-Carlo simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the literature. In the special case of greenhouses gases (GHG) from wind power electricity, the LCA resultsSimplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based performed by the IPCC [1]. Such result might lead policy makers to consider LCA as an inconclusive method [2

  9. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  10. The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three) study. The new analysis is based on the latest computer models and examines the wind potential at wind responsible for the increased wind potential in the study. Developed in collaboration with renewable energy

  11. Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

  12. ADVANCED INTERNAL COMBUSTION ELECTRICAL GENERATOR Peter Van Blarigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livermore, CA 94550 Abstract In this paper, research on hydrogen internal combustion engines is discussed with industrial partners. The electrical generator is based on developed internal combustion reciprocating engine. In light of these factors, the capabilities of internal combustion engines have been reviewed. In regards

  13. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation from model organic wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation from model organic wastewater in a cassette-008-1516-0 T. Shimoyama :S. Komukai :K. Watanabe Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Marine Biotechnology, Tobitakyu, Chofu, Tokyo 182-0036, Japan B. E. Logan Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation and treatment of paper recycling wastewater) 80:349­355 DOI 10.1007/s00253-008-1546-7 L. Huang School of Environmental and Biological Science of Civil and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA e

  16. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

  17. EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

  18. Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    .3 Transmission Property Rights and Congestion Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.4 How TransmissionPWP-030 Transmission and Generation Investment In a Competitive Electric Power Industry James of California Energy Institute 2539 Channing Way Berkeley, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.berkeley.edu/ucei #12

  19. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Wind Energy Management System EMS Integration Project: Incorporating Wind Generation and Load Forecast Uncertainties into Power Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Guttromson, Ross T.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power system balancing process, which includes the scheduling, real time dispatch (load following) and regulation processes, is traditionally based on deterministic models. Since the conventional generation needs time to be committed and dispatched to a desired megawatt level, the scheduling and load following processes use load and wind and solar power production forecasts to achieve future balance between the conventional generation and energy storage on the one side, and system load, intermittent resources (such as wind and solar generation), and scheduled interchange on the other side. Although in real life the forecasting procedures imply some uncertainty around the load and wind/solar forecasts (caused by forecast errors), only their mean values are actually used in the generation dispatch and commitment procedures. Since the actual load and intermittent generation can deviate from their forecasts, it becomes increasingly unclear (especially, with the increasing penetration of renewable resources) whether the system would be actually able to meet the conventional generation requirements within the look-ahead horizon, what the additional balancing efforts would be needed as we get closer to the real time, and what additional costs would be incurred by those needs. To improve the system control performance characteristics, maintain system reliability, and minimize expenses related to the system balancing functions, it becomes necessary to incorporate the predicted uncertainty ranges into the scheduling, load following, and, in some extent, into the regulation processes. It is also important to address the uncertainty problem comprehensively by including all sources of uncertainty (load, intermittent generation, generators’ forced outages, etc.) into consideration. All aspects of uncertainty such as the imbalance size (which is the same as capacity needed to mitigate the imbalance) and generation ramping requirement must be taken into account. The latter unique features make this work a significant step forward toward the objective of incorporating of wind, solar, load, and other uncertainties into power system operations. Currently, uncertainties associated with wind and load forecasts, as well as uncertainties associated with random generator outages and unexpected disconnection of supply lines, are not taken into account in power grid operation. Thus, operators have little means to weigh the likelihood and magnitude of upcoming events of power imbalance. In this project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), a framework has been developed for incorporating uncertainties associated with wind and load forecast errors, unpredicted ramps, and forced generation disconnections into the energy management system (EMS) as well as generation dispatch and commitment applications. A new approach to evaluate the uncertainty ranges for the required generation performance envelope including balancing capacity, ramping capability, and ramp duration has been proposed. The approach includes three stages: forecast and actual data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of future grid balancing requirements for specified time horizons and confidence levels. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on a histogram analysis, incorporating all sources of uncertainties of both continuous (wind and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and start-up failures) nature. A new method called the “flying brick” technique has been developed to evaluate the look-ahead required generation performance envelope for the worst case scenario within a user-specified confidence level. A self-validation algorithm has been developed to validate the accuracy of the confidence intervals.

  1. Wind Generation Feasibility Study for Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa (Meskwaki Nation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lasley, Larry C. [Sac & Fox Tribe of the Mississippi in Iowa

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    1.2 Overview The Meskwaki Nation will obtain an anemometer tower. Install the tower at the site that has been pre-qualified as the site most likely to produce maximum electric power from the wind. It will collect meteorological data from the tower�s sensors for a one year period, as required for due diligence to identify the site as appropriate for the installation of a wind turbine to provide electric power for the community. Have the collected data analyzed by a meteorologist and a professionally certified wind engineer to produce the reports of expected power generation at the site, for the specific wind turbine(s) under consideration for installation. 1.2.1 Goals of the Tribe The feasibility study reports, including technical and business analyses will be used to obtain contracts and financing required to develop and implement a wind turbine project on the Meskwaki Settlement. Our goal is to produce two (2) mega watts of power and to reduce the cost for electricity currently being paid by the Meskwaki Casino. 1.2.2 Project Objectives Meet the energy needs of the community with clean energy. Bring renewable energy to the settlement in a responsible, affordable manner. Maximize both the economic and the spiritual benefits to the tribe from energy independence. Integrate the Tribe�s energy policies with its economic development goals. Contribute to achieving the Tribe�s long-term goals of self-determination and sovereignty. 1.2.3 Project Location The precise location proposed for the tower is at the following coordinates: 92 Degrees, 38 Minutes, 46.008 Seconds West Longitude 41 Degrees, 59 Minutes, 45.311 Seconds North Latitude. A circle of radius 50.64 meters, enclosing and area of 1.98 acres in PLSS Township T83N, Range R15W, in Iowa. In relative directions, the site is 1,650 feet due west of the intersection of Highway 30 and 305th Street in Tama, Iowa, as approached from the direction of Toledo, Iowa. It is bounded on the north by Highway 30 and on the south by 305th Street, a street which runs along a meandering west-south-west heading from this intersection with Highway 30. In relation to Settlement landmarks, it is 300 meters west of the Meskwaki water tower found in front of the Meskwaki Public Works Department, and is due north of the athletic playing fields of the Meskwaki Settlement School. The accompanying maps (in the Site Resource Maps File) use a red pushpin marker to indicate the exact location, both in the overview frames and in the close-up frame. 1.2.4 Long Term Energy Vision The Meskwaki Tribe is committed to becoming energy self-sufficient, improving the economic condition of the tribe, and maintaining Tribal Values of closeness with Grandmother Earth. The details of the Tribe�s long-term vision continues to evolve. A long term vision exists of: 1) a successful assessment program; 2) a successful first wind turbine project reducing the Tribe�s cost of electricity; 3) creation of a Meskwaki Tribal Power Utility/Coop under the auspices of the new tribal Corporation, as we implement a master plan for economic and business development; 4), and opening the doors for additional wind turbines/renewable energy sources on the community. The additional turbines could lead directly to energy self-sufficiency, or might be the one leg of a multi-leg approach using multiple forms of renewable energy to achieve self-sufficiency. We envision current and future assessment projects providing the data needed to qualify enough renewable energy projects to provide complete coverage for the entire Meskwaki Settlement, including meeting future economic development projects� energy needs. While choosing not to engage in excessive optimism, we can imagine that in the future the Iowa rate-setting bodies will mandate that grid operators pay fair rates (tariffs) to renewable suppliers. We will be ready to expand renewable production of electricity for export, when that time comes. The final report includes the Wind

  2. Has Restructuring Improved Operating Efficiency at U.S. Electricity Generating Plants?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio, Kira; Rose, Nancy; Wolfram, Catherine

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in electricity generation, relative to IOU plants in stateselectricity generation sector restructuring in the United States on plant-plant over the year, measured by annual net megawatt-hours of electricity generation,

  3. Wind Energy for Rural Electric Cooperatives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: EnergyWindCooperatives Jump to:

  4. Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP Wind Farm JumpIllinois Institute for Rural

  5. Hybrid Wind and Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercialEnergySandy-Nor'easterHybrid Wind and Solar

  6. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Mariah Power Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of the first round of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. This duration test report focuses on the Mariah Power Windspire wind turbine.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  8. Qingdao Hengfeng Wind Power Generator Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product: WindProrener SAQingdao

  9. Evaluation and Ranking of Geothermal Resources for Electrical Generation or Electrical Offset in Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R. Gordon

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume contains appendices on: (1) resource assessment - electrical generation computer results; (2) resource assessment summary - direct use computer results; (3) electrical generation (high temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (4) direct utilization (low temperature) resource assessment computer program listing; (5) electrical generation computer program CENTPLANT and related documentation; (6) electrical generation computer program WELLHEAD and related documentation; (7) direct utilization computer program HEATPLAN and related documentation; (8) electrical generation ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; (9) direct utilization ranking computer program GEORANK and related documentation; and (10) life cycle cost analysis computer program and related documentation. (ACR)

  10. Zhenkang County Jineng Electricity Generation Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Generating Engineering

  11. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mance characteristics of wind generator. The wind speed atcharacteristics of the wind generator. When wind speed is

  12. Wind Energy Management System Integration Project Incorporating Wind Generation and Load Forecast Uncertainties into Power Grid Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Huang, Zhenyu; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Guttromson, Ross T.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Chakrabarti, Bhujanga B.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power system balancing process, which includes the scheduling, real time dispatch (load following) and regulation processes, is traditionally based on deterministic models. Since the conventional generation needs time to be committed and dispatched to a desired megawatt level, the scheduling and load following processes use load and wind power production forecasts to achieve future balance between the conventional generation and energy storage on the one side, and system load, intermittent resources (such as wind and solar generation) and scheduled interchange on the other side. Although in real life the forecasting procedures imply some uncertainty around the load and wind forecasts (caused by forecast errors), only their mean values are actually used in the generation dispatch and commitment procedures. Since the actual load and intermittent generation can deviate from their forecasts, it becomes increasingly unclear (especially, with the increasing penetration of renewable resources) whether the system would be actually able to meet the conventional generation requirements within the look-ahead horizon, what the additional balancing efforts would be needed as we get closer to the real time, and what additional costs would be incurred by those needs. In order to improve the system control performance characteristics, maintain system reliability, and minimize expenses related to the system balancing functions, it becomes necessary to incorporate the predicted uncertainty ranges into the scheduling, load following, and, in some extent, into the regulation processes. It is also important to address the uncertainty problem comprehensively, by including all sources of uncertainty (load, intermittent generation, generators’ forced outages, etc.) into consideration. All aspects of uncertainty such as the imbalance size (which is the same as capacity needed to mitigate the imbalance) and generation ramping requirement must be taken into account. The latter unique features make this work a significant step forward toward the objective of incorporating of wind, solar, load, and other uncertainties into power system operations. In this report, a new methodology to predict the uncertainty ranges for the required balancing capacity, ramping capability and ramp duration is presented. Uncertainties created by system load forecast errors, wind and solar forecast errors, generation forced outages are taken into account. The uncertainty ranges are evaluated for different confidence levels of having the actual generation requirements within the corresponding limits. The methodology helps to identify system balancing reserve requirement based on a desired system performance levels, identify system “breaking points”, where the generation system becomes unable to follow the generation requirement curve with the user-specified probability level, and determine the time remaining to these potential events. The approach includes three stages: statistical and actual data acquisition, statistical analysis of retrospective information, and prediction of future grid balancing requirements for specified time horizons and confidence intervals. Assessment of the capacity and ramping requirements is performed using a specially developed probabilistic algorithm based on a histogram analysis incorporating all sources of uncertainty and parameters of a continuous (wind forecast and load forecast errors) and discrete (forced generator outages and failures to start up) nature. Preliminary simulations using California Independent System Operator (California ISO) real life data have shown the effectiveness of the proposed approach. A tool developed based on the new methodology described in this report will be integrated with the California ISO systems. Contractual work is currently in place to integrate the tool with the AREVA EMS system.

  13. Effect of Wind Intermittency on the Electric Grid: Mitigating the Risk of Energy Deficits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Sam O; Nguyen, Scott V

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful implementation of California's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) mandating 33 percent renewable energy generation by 2020 requires inclusion of a robust strategy to mitigate increased risk of energy deficits (blackouts) due to short time-scale (sub 1 hour) intermittencies in renewable energy sources. Of these RPS sources, wind energy has the fastest growth rate--over 25% year-over-year. If these growth trends continue, wind energy could make up 15 percent of California's energy portfolio by 2016 (wRPS15). However, the hour-to-hour variations in wind energy (speed) will create large hourly energy deficits that require installation of other, more predictable, compensation generation capacity and infrastructure. Compensating for the energy deficits of wRPS15 could potentially cost tens of billions in additional dollar-expenditure for fossil and / or nuclear generation capacity. There is a real possibility that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions will miss the California ...

  14. Identification and definition of unbundled electric generation and transmission services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Hirst, E.; Vancoevering, J.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    State and federal regulators, private and public utilities, large and small customers, power brokers and marketers, and others are engaged in major debates about the future structure of the electric industry. Although the outcomes are far from certain, it seems clear that customers will have much greater choices about the electric services they purchase and from whom they buy these services. This report examines the ``ancillary`` services that are today buried within the typical vertically integrated utility. These ancillary services support and make possible the provision of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. These ancillary services include: Management of generating units; reserve generating capacity to follow variations in customer loads, to provide capacity and energy when generating units or transmission lines suddenly fall, to maintain electric-system stability, and to provide local-area security; transmission-system monitoring and control; replacement of real power and energy losses; reactive-power management and voltage regulation; transmission reserves; repair and maintenance of the transmission network; metering, billing, and communications; and assurance of appropriate levels of power quality. Our focus in this report, the first output from a larger Oak Ridge National Laboratory project, is on identification and definition of these services. Later work in this project will examine more closely the costs and pricing options for each service.

  15. Sistemas Eolicos Pequenos para Generacion de Electridad (Spanish version of Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  17. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy analyzed uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  18. Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up, and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy the authors analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. In extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

  19. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the ARE 442 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; van Dam, J.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted on the ARE 442 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Acoustic noise testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including duration, safety and function, power performance, and power quality tests. The acoustic noise test was conducted to the IEC 61400-11 Edition 2.1.

  20. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  1. Laboratory implementation of variable-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinger, D.S. [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States)] [Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, IL (United States); Miller, A.A. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)] [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Robinson, M.C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To improve the performance of wind turbines, various control schemes such as variable speed operation have been proposed. Testing of these control algorithms on a full scale system is very expensive. To test these systems simulation, we developed programs and small scale laboratory experiments. We used this system to verify a control method that attempts to keep the turbine operating at its peak power coefficient. Both the simulations and the experiments verified the principle of operation of this control scheme.

  2. Electricity generation and environmental externalities: Case studies, September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity constitutes a critical input in sustaining the Nation`s economic growth and development and the well-being of its inhabitants. However, there are byproducts of electricity production that have an undesirable effect on the environment. Most of these are emissions introduced by the combustion of fossil fuels, which accounts for nearly 70 percent of the total electricity generated in the United States. The environmental impacts (or damages) caused by these emissions are labeled environmental ``externalities.`` Included in the generic term ``externality`` are benefits or costs resulting as an unintended byproduct of an economic activity that accrue to someone other than the parties involved in the activity. This report provides an overview of the economic foundation of externalities, the Federal and State regulatory approaches, and case studies of the impacts of the externality policies adopted by three States.

  3. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and the exoelectrogen Geobacter sulfurreducens generated electricity, and the power generated using soluble celluloseARTICLE Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Cellulose Coupled With Electricity Generation in a Microbial Fuel.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.22015 ABSTRACT: Electricity can be directly generated by bacteria in microbial fuel

  4. Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and DeliveryInfrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The legacy paradigm for electricity service in most of the electrified world today is based on the centralized generation-transmission-distribution infrastructure that evolved under a regulated environment. More recently, a quest for effective economic investments, responsive markets, and sensitivity to the availability of resources, has led to various degrees of deregulation and unbundling of services. In this context, a new paradigm is emerging wherein electricity generation is intimately embedded with the load in microgrids. Development and decay of the familiar macrogrid is discussed. Three salient features of microgrids are examined to suggest that cohabitation of micro and macro grids is desirable, and that overall energy efficiency can be increased, while power is delivered to loads at appropriate levels of quality.

  5. Multiple Timescale Dispatch and Scheduling for Stochastic Reliability in Smart Grids with Wind Generation Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Miao; Zhang, Junshan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrating volatile renewable energy resources into the bulk power grid is challenging, due to the reliability requirement that at each instant the load and generation in the system remain balanced. In this study, we tackle this challenge for smart grid with integrated wind generation, by leveraging multi-timescale dispatch and scheduling. Specifically, we consider smart grids with two classes of energy users - traditional energy users and opportunistic energy users (e.g., smart meters or smart appliances), and investigate pricing and dispatch at two timescales, via day-ahead scheduling and realtime scheduling. In day-ahead scheduling, with the statistical information on wind generation and energy demands, we characterize the optimal procurement of the energy supply and the day-ahead retail price for the traditional energy users; in realtime scheduling, with the realization of wind generation and the load of traditional energy users, we optimize real-time prices to manage the opportunistic energy users so as...

  6. Engineering innovation to reduce wind power COE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, Curtt Nelson [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    There are enough wind resources in the US to provide 10 times the electric power we currently use, however wind power only accounts for 2% of our total electricity production. One of the main limitations to wind use is cost. Wind power currently costs 5-to-8 cents per kilowatt-hour, which is more than twice the cost of electricity generated by burning coal. Our Intelligent Wind Turbine LDRD Project is applying LANL's leading-edge engineering expertise in modeling and simulation, experimental validation, and advanced sensing technologies to challenges faced in the design and operation of modern wind turbines.

  7. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone,Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

  8. TEC as electric generator in an automobile catalytic converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensson, R. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Holmlid, L. [Univ. of Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern cars use more and more electric power due to more on-board electric systems, e.g., ABS brakes, active suspension systems, electric windows, chair adjustment systems and electronic engine control systems. One possible energy source for electricity generation is to use the waste heat from the car`s engine, which generally is as much as 80% of the total energy from the combustion of the gasoline. Maybe the best location to tap the excess heat is the Catalytic Converter (Cat) in the exhaust system or perhaps at the exhaust pipes close to the engine. The Cat must be kept within a certain temperature interval. Large amounts of heat are dissipated through the wall of the Cat. A Thermionic Energy Converter (TEC) in coaxial form could conveniently be located around the ceramic cartridge of the Cat. Since the TEC is a rather good heat insulator before it reaches its working temperature the Cat will reach working temperature faster, and the final temperature of it can be controlled better when encapsulated in a concentric TEC arrangement. It is also possible to regulate the temperature of the Cat and the TEC by controlling the electrical load of the TEC. The possible working temperatures of present and future Cats appear very suitable for the new low work function collector TEC, which has been demonstrated to work down to 470 K.

  9. Effects of turbulence on power generation for variable-speed wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Buhl, M.L. Jr.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary advantages of variable-speed wind turbines over fixed-speed turbines should be improved aerodynamic efficiency. With variable-speed generation, in order to maintain a constant ratio of wind speed to tip speed, the wind turbine changes rotor speed as the wind speed changes. In this paper we compare a stall-controlled, variable-speed wind turbine to a fixed-speed turbine. The focus of this paper is to investigate the effects of variable speed on energy capture and its ability to control peak power. We also show the impact of turbulence on energy capture in moderate winds. In this report, we use a dynamic simulator to apply different winds to a wind turbine model. This model incorporates typical inertial and aerodynamic performance characteristics. From this study we found a control strategy that makes it possible to operate a stall-controlled turbine using variable speed to optimize energy capture and to control peak power. We also found that turbulence does not have a significant impact on energy capture.

  10. A.W. Blakers, 'Solar and Wind Electricity in Australia', Australian Journal of Environmental Management, Vol 7, pp 223-236, 2000 SOLAR AND WIND ELECTRICITY IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental impact associated with the construction of what amounts to a coastal hydro scheme. Solar energy.blakers@anu.edu.au Abstract This paper examines the renewable generation of electricity in Australia from photovoltaics (PV environmental impacts even when deployed on very large scales. They are the only fully sustainable technologies

  11. Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07) Wind Farm Jump1 Jump to:

  12. Wind system value analysis for electric utilities: a comparison of four methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, J.; Percival, D.; Flaim, T.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been several studies of how much Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) are worth to electric utilities. When attempting to compare the different results of these studies, questions arose concerning the effect of the different methodologies and models on the determined WECS values. This paper will report on the only known effort that used more than a single methodology for the value analysis of WECS to a specific utility. This paper will present and compare the WECS utility value analysis methodologies of Aerospace Corp., JBF Scientific Corp., and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). Results of the application of these three methodologies were found for two large utilities. Breakeven values (the amount a utility can pay for a wind turbine over its lifetime and still breakeven economically) were found to be from $1600 to $2400 per kW of wind capacity in 1980 dollars. The reasons for variation in the results are discussed.

  13. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies,  particularly  wind,  solar  (both  photovoltaic  and  concentrated  solar  power),  geothermal,  biomass,  nuclear,  clean?coal, 

  14. Microgrids in the Evolving Electricity Generation and Delivery Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the electrical system, but unscheduled outages arelevels of electrical service [7]. Outages may be scheduled

  15. Optimization Online - Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Soroudi

    2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 3, 2015 ... Stochastic Real-Time Scheduling of Wind-thermal Generation Units in an Electric Utility. Alireza Soroudi (alireza.soroudi ***at*** ucd.ie)

  16. Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids Co-produced and low-temperature...

  17. Development and Deployment of Generation 3 Plug-In Hybrid Electric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation 3 Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Buses Development and Deployment of Generation 3 Plug-In Hybrid Electric School Buses 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and...

  18. Preliminary Assessment of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Denholm, P.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines a measure that may potentially reduce oil use and also more than proportionately reduce carbon emissions from vehicles. The authors present a very preliminary analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) that can be charged from or discharged to the grid. These vehicles have the potential to reduce gasoline consumption and carbon emissions from vehicles, as well as improve the viability of renewable energy technologies with variable resource availability. This paper is an assessment of the synergisms between plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and wind energy. The authors examine two bounding cases that illuminate this potential synergism.

  19. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix A PACIFIC NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and generating capacity of power plants located in the Northwest is shown in Figure A-1 Capacity and primary NORTHWEST GENERATING RESOURCES This Appendix describes the electric power generating resources describing individual projects. GENERATING CAPACITY Over 460 electricity generating projects are located

  20. Incorporating operational flexibility into electric generation planning : impacts and methods for system design and policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmintier, Bryan S. (Bryan Stephen)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation demonstrates how flexibility in hourly electricity operations can impact long-term planning and analysis for future power systems, particularly those with substantial variable renewables (e.g., wind) or ...

  1. Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    is to perform demand side management (DSM) [1], which aims at matching the consum- ers' electricity demand between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps upDistributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue

  2. Co-generation: a new energy system to generate both steam and electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraway, P.M.; Kloth, T.L.; Bull, A.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discussion is presented of the installation and operation of a co-generation system at Tenneco's Fee ''C'' Lease, whereby hot combustion gas from a turbine fueled by gas or lease crude will be used to generate steam for enhanced recovery, with the same turbine providing the power to generate electricity for sale to a utility. A summary is also given of the history of the project, some of the contractual requirements, the physical layout of the system, component descriptions, environmental considerations, and the composition of the final system.

  3. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  4. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  5. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  7. Abstract--The use of doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs) in large wind energy conversion systems (WECS) has

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    1 Abstract--The use of doubly fed induction generators (DFIGs) in large wind energy conversion-Through, STATCOM, LVRT, VSC, RSC, GSC, Grid codes. I. INTRODUCTION HE use of wind energy is growing rapidly candidate in the wind energy conversion systems (WECS) due to its advantages [2- 5]. When compared to fixed

  8. SiC's Potential Impact on the Design of Wind Generation System , Leon M. Tolbert1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    SiC's Potential Impact on the Design of Wind Generation System Hui Zhang1 , Leon M. Tolbert1 National Laboratory Knoxville, TN 37932 Abstract -- The potential impact of SiC devices on a wind temperatures and frequencies. A conclusion is drawn that the SiC converters can improve the wind system

  9. EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJuly 2011D APPENDIXKahuku Wind Power, LLC, Construction of the|

  10. Secretary Chu Announces New Investments in Cutting-Edge Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and the research will focus on improving both land-based and offshore wind generation. "Wind power has the potential to provide 20 percent of our electricity and create hundreds...

  11. Impacts of Wind and Solar on Fossil-Fueled Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Agan, D.; Lefton, S.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetrations of wind and solar power will impact the operations of the remaining generators on the power system. Regional integration studies have shown that wind and solar may cause fossil-fueled generators to cycle on and off and ramp down to part load more frequently and potentially more rapidly. Increased cycling, deeper load following, and rapid ramping may result in wear-and-tear impacts on fossil-fueled generators that lead to increased capital and maintenance costs, increased equivalent forced outage rates, and degraded performance over time. Heat rates and emissions from fossil-fueled generators may be higher during cycling and ramping than during steady-state operation. Many wind and solar integration studies have not taken these increased cost and emissions impacts into account because data have not been available. This analysis considers the cost and emissions impacts of cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generation to refine assessments of wind and solar impacts on the power system.

  12. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the  modeling  and  analysis  of  electric  power  systems modeling  and  simulation  technologies  both in electric power systems modeling granularity sufficient to identify electric  system 

  13. Computational Needs for the Next Generation Electric Grid Proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birman, Kenneth

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2nd  edition  of  Electrical  Power  System  Applications elements of an electrical power system for the purpose of estimates.   In  electrical  power  system  applications, 

  14. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Various Electricity Tariffs Firestone, R. , Creighton,Under Various Electricity Tariffs Table of Contents Table of3 2.1 Electricity Tariff

  15. Electric Springs A new Smart Grid Technology Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Cheong

    electronics system. · · It can be embedded in an electric appliance such as electric water heater-scale wind and solar power generation · . 7 #12;Future power systems adopt "distributed" power generation (Wind and Solar Power). · ( ). · Electric Springs do not need communication and, collectively

  16. Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Generation | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopee ElectricCommunity-Based EnergyNWSmall

  17. Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Reinhard

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fluctuations. Electricity generation [TWh/year] EU-25 USA4 . Electricity generation [TWh/year] Japan EU-25 USA EU-25USA Japan Wind Waste Solar Biomass Geothermal Figure 2 Historical pattern of electricity

  18. Methods and apparatus for rotor load control in wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine having a rotor, at least one rotor blade, and a plurality of generators, of which a first generator is configured to provide power to an electric grid and a second generator is configured to provide power to the wind turbine during times of grid loss. The wind turbine is configured to utilize power provided by the second generator to reduce loads on the wind turbine during times of grid loss.

  19. Submerged electricity generation plane with marine current-driven motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dehlsen, James G.P.; Dehlsen, James B.; Fleming, Alexander

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An underwater apparatus for generating electric power from ocean currents and deep water tides. A submersible platform including two or more power pods, each having a rotor with fixed-pitch blades, with drivetrains housed in pressure vessels that are connected by a transverse structure providing buoyancy, which can be a wing depressor, hydrofoil, truss, or faired tube. The platform is connected to anchors on the seafloor by forward mooring lines and a vertical mooring line that restricts the depth of the device in the water column. The platform operates using passive, rather than active, depth control. The wing depressor, along with rotor drag loads, ensures the platform seeks the desired operational current velocity. The rotors are directly coupled to a hydraulic pump that drives at least one constant-speed hydraulic-motor generator set and enables hydraulic braking. A fluidic bearing decouples non-torque rotor loads to the main shaft driving the hydraulic pumps.

  20. :,/0$5 Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets :,/0$5 :LQG 3RZHU ,QWHJUDWLRQ LQ /LEHUDOLVHG (OHFWULFLW\\ 0DUNHWV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,/0$5 Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets 1 :,/0$5 :LQG 3RZHU ,QWHJUDWLRQ a cost-effective integration of wind power in large liberalised electricity systems. The main recommendations concern reducing imbalances caused by wind power by bidding closer to delivery hour