Sample records for wind electric systems

  1. Wind farm electrical system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdman, William L.; Lettenmaier, Terry M.

    2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach to wind farm design using variable speed wind turbines with low pulse number electrical output. The output of multiple wind turbines are aggregated to create a high pulse number electrical output at a point of common coupling with a utility grid network. Power quality at each individual wind turbine falls short of utility standards, but the aggregated output at the point of common coupling is within acceptable tolerances for utility power quality. The approach for aggregating low pulse number electrical output from multiple wind turbines relies upon a pad mounted transformer at each wind turbine that performs phase multiplication on the output of each wind turbine. Phase multiplication converts a modified square wave from the wind turbine into a 6 pulse output. Phase shifting of the 6 pulse output from each wind turbine allows the aggregated output of multiple wind turbines to be a 24 pulse approximation of a sine wave. Additional filtering and VAR control is embedded within the wind farm to take advantage of the wind farm's electrical impedence characteristics to further enhance power quality at the point of common coupling.

  2. Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and...

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology| National NuclearWind Electric Systems

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New York Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Idaho Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A New Mexico Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A South Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Alaska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Vermont Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maryland Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Washington Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Dakota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Minnesota Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Illinois Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Pennsylvania Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Maine Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Colorado Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  6. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Kansas Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide (revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  8. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  9. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  10. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  11. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Michigan Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  12. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nevada Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nevada Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nebraska Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Nebraska Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  15. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  16. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Missouri Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Missouri Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  17. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Hawaii Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  18. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  19. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Virginia Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Virginia Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  20. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Montana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  1. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  2. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oklahoma Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  3. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Utah Consumer's Guide provides Utah consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: An Oregon Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  5. Electrical Collection and Transmission Systems for Offshore Wind Power: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, J.; Bowen, A.; Fingersh, L.J.; Wan, Y.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrical systems needed for offshore wind farms to collect power from wind turbines--and transmit it to shore--will be a significant cost element of these systems. This paper describes the development of a simplified model of the cost and performance of such systems.

  6. Systems and methods for an integrated electrical sub-system powered by wind energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yan (Ballston Lake, NY); Garces, Luis Jose (Niskayuna, NY)

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Various embodiments relate to systems and methods related to an integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system including a wind power source, an electrically-powered sub-system coupled to and at least partially powered by the wind power source, the electrically-powered sub-system being coupled to the wind power source through power converters, and a supervisory controller coupled to the wind power source and the electrically-powered sub-system to monitor and manage the integrated electrically-powered sub-system and wind power system.

  7. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics.

  8. Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issaeva, Natalia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

  9. An alternative isolated wind electric pumping system using induction machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, M.S.; Lyra, R.O.C.; Silva, S.R.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An isolated variable speed variable frequency wind electric pumping system is proposed. Induction machines are used both in the generation unit as well as in the pumping unit and a static VAR compensator is used for providing the magnetizing currents of both machines. An indirect induction generator stator flux control strategy is adopted. System steady state and dynamic operation is studied basing on simulation and experimental results.

  10. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

  11. Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

  12. A stochastic framework for uncertainty analysis in electric power transmission systems with wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of generating units, the transfer of electric power over networks of transmission lines and, finally1 A stochastic framework for uncertainty analysis in electric power transmission systems with wind an electric transmission network with wind power generation and their impact on its reliability. A stochastic

  13. Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority (Revised) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A Guide Produced for the Tennessee Valley Authority provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  14. Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a regional wind resource map and a list of incentives and contacts for more information.

  15. COE projection for the modular WARP{trademark} wind power system for wind farms and electric utility power transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power has emerged as an attractive alternative source of electricity for utilities. Turbine operating experience from wind farms has provided corroborating data of wind power potential for electric utility application. Now, a patented modular wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP{trademark}) Windframe{trademark}, forms the basis for next generation megawatt scale wind farm and/or distributed wind power plants. When arranged in tall vertically clustered TARP{trademark} module stacks, such power plant units are designated Wind Amplified Rotor Platform (WARP{trademark}) Systems. While heavily building on proven technology, these systems are projected to surpass current technology windmills in terms of performance, user-friendly operation and ease of maintenance. In its unique generation and transmission configuration, the WARP{trademark}-GT System combines both electricity generation through wind energy conversion and electric power transmission. Furthermore, environmental benefits include dramatically less land requirement, architectural appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and virtual elimination of bird mortality potential. Cost-of-energy (COE) is projected to be from under $0.02/kWh to less than $0.05/kWh in good to moderate wind resource sites.

  16. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Price Reduction Offsetting demand for natural gas in the electricity sector by increasing wind energy’price reductions, and water savings. Index Terms—power system modeling, wind energywind energy to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

  17. Planning a Small Wind Electric System | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMakeEducationRemediationDepartmenta Small Wind Electric

  18. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and corresponding direct electricity sector costs, includingand avoids electricity-sector water consumption. At the sameNew Wind Fig. 5. Electricity sector capacity by technology

  19. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  20. WARP: A modular wind power system for distributed electric utility application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weisbrich, A.L. [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States)] [ENECO, West Simsbury, CT (United States); Ostrow, S.L.; Padalino, J.P. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)] [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steady development of wind turbine technology, and the accumulation of wind farm operating experience, have resulted in the emergence of wind power as a potentially attractive source of electricity for utilities. Since wind turbines are inherently modular, with medium-sized units typically in the range of a few hundred kilowatts each, they lend themselves well to distributed generation service. A patented wind power technology, the Toroidal Accelerator Rotor Platform (TARP) Windframe, forms the basis for a proposed network-distributed, wind power plant combining electric generation and transmission. While heavily building on proven wind turbine technology, this system is projected to surpass traditional configuration windmills through a unique distribution/transmission combination, superior performance, user-friendly operation and maintenance, and high availability and reliability. Furthermore, its environmental benefits include little new land requirements, relatively attractive appearance, lower noise and EMI/TV interference, and reduced avian (bird) mortality potential. Its cost of energy is projected to be very competitive, in the range of from approximately 2{cents}/kWh to 5{cents}/kWh, depending on the wind resource.

  1. Wind/Hybrid Electricity Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Lori

    2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is widely recognized as the most efficient and cost effective form of new renewable energy available in the Midwest. New utility-scale wind farms (arrays of large turbines in high wind areas producing sufficient energy to serve thousands of homes) rival the cost of building new conventional forms of combustion energy plants, gas, diesel and coal power plants. Wind energy is not subject to the inflationary cost of fossil fuels. Wind energy can also be very attractive to residential and commercial electric customers in high wind areas who would like to be more self-sufficient for their energy needs. And wind energy is friendly to the environment at a time when there is increasing concern about pollution and climate change. However, wind energy is an intermittent source of power. Most wind turbines start producing small amounts of electricity at about 8-10 mph (4 meters per second) of wind speed. The turbine does not reach its rated output until the wind reaches about 26-28 mph (12 m/s). So what do you do for power when the output of the wind turbine is not sufficient to meet the demand for energy? This paper will discuss wind hybrid technology options that mix wind with other power sources and storage devices to help solve this problem. This will be done on a variety of scales on the impact of wind energy on the utility system as a whole, and on the commercial and small-scale residential applications. The average cost and cost-benefit of each application along with references to manufacturers will be given. Emerging technologies that promise to shape the future of renewable energy will be explored as well.

  2. Hybrid Wind and Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of Blythe Solar PowerCommercialEnergySandy-Nor'easterHybrid Wind and Solar

  3. Sistemas Eolicos Pequenos para Generacion de Electridad (Spanish version of Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Spanish version of the popular Small Wind Electric Systems: A U.S. Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and economics. Topics include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.

  4. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  5. Wind system value analysis for electric utilities: a comparison of four methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, J.; Percival, D.; Flaim, T.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been several studies of how much Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) are worth to electric utilities. When attempting to compare the different results of these studies, questions arose concerning the effect of the different methodologies and models on the determined WECS values. This paper will report on the only known effort that used more than a single methodology for the value analysis of WECS to a specific utility. This paper will present and compare the WECS utility value analysis methodologies of Aerospace Corp., JBF Scientific Corp., and the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). Results of the application of these three methodologies were found for two large utilities. Breakeven values (the amount a utility can pay for a wind turbine over its lifetime and still breakeven economically) were found to be from $1600 to $2400 per kW of wind capacity in 1980 dollars. The reasons for variation in the results are discussed.

  6. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    curve for wind energy: energy costs including connection toavailable to transport wind energy, the cost of feeder linesWind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs

  7. Impact of dispersed solar and wind systems on electric distribution planning and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, R.W.; Patton, R.; Curtice, D.H.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale dispersed solar photovoltaic and wind generation (DSW) will affect the generation, transmission, and distribution systems of an electric utility. This study examines the technical and economic impacts of dispersing DSW devices within the distribution system. Dispersed intermittent generation is included. Effects of DSW devices on capital investments, reliability, operating and maintenance costs, protection requirements, and communication and control requirements are examined. A DSW operation model is developed to help determine the dependable capacity of fluctuating solar photovoltaic and wind generation as part of the distribution planning process. Specific case studies using distribution system data and renewable resource data for Southern California Edison Company and Consumers Power Company are analyzed to gain insights into the effects of interconnecting DSW devices. The DSW devices were found to offer some distribution investment savings, depending on their availability during peak loads. For a summer-peaking utility, for example, dispersing photovoltaic systems is more likely to defer distribution capital investments than dispersing wind systems. Dispersing storage devices to increase DSW's dependable capacity for distribution systems needs is not economically attractive. Substation placement of DSW and storage devices is found to be more cost effective than feeder or customer placement. Examination of the effects of DSW on distribution system operation showed that small customer-owned DSW devices are not likely to disrupt present time-current distribution protection coordination. Present maintenance work procedures, are adequate to ensure workmen's safety. Regulating voltages within appropriate limits will become more complex with intermittent generation along the distribution feeders.

  8. The role of hydroelectric generation in electric power systems with large scale wind generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagerty, John Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increasing awareness of the operational challenges created by intermittent generation of electricity from policy-mandated renewable resources, such as wind and solar, has led to increased scrutiny of the public policies ...

  9. Impacts of large quantities of wind energy on the electric power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Yuan, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy has been surging on a global scale. Significant penetration of wind energy is expected to take place in the power system, bringing new challenges because of the variability and uncertainty of this renewable ...

  10. A nuclear wind/solar oil-shale system for variable electricity and liquid fuels production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 012139 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recoverable reserves of oil shale in the United States exceed the total quantity of oil produced to date worldwide. Oil shale contains no oil, rather it contains kerogen which when heated decomposes into oil, gases, and a carbon char. The energy required to heat the kerogen-containing rock to produce the oil is about a quarter of the energy value of the recovered products. If fossil fuels are burned to supply this energy, the greenhouse gas releases are large relative to producing gasoline and diesel from crude oil. The oil shale can be heated underground with steam from nuclear reactors leaving the carbon char underground - a form of carbon sequestration. Because the thermal conductivity of the oil shale is low, the heating process takes months to years. This process characteristic in a system where the reactor dominates the capital costs creates the option to operate the nuclear reactor at base load while providing variable electricity to meet peak electricity demand and heat for the shale oil at times of low electricity demand. This, in turn, may enable the large scale use of renewables such as wind and solar for electricity production because the base-load nuclear plants can provide lower-cost variable backup electricity. Nuclear shale oil may reduce the greenhouse gas releases from using gasoline and diesel in half relative to gasoline and diesel produced from conventional oil. The variable electricity replaces electricity that would have been produced by fossil plants. The carbon credits from replacing fossil fuels for variable electricity production, if assigned to shale oil production, results in a carbon footprint from burning gasoline or diesel from shale oil that may half that of conventional crude oil. The U.S. imports about 10 million barrels of oil per day at a cost of a billion dollars per day. It would require about 200 GW of high-temperature nuclear heat to recover this quantity of shale oil - about two-thirds the thermal output of existing nuclear reactors in the United States. With the added variable electricity production to enable renewables, additional nuclear capacity would be required. (authors)

  11. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Sarah; Andresen, Gorm B; Zeyer, Timo; Schramm, Stefan; Greiner, Martin; Jacobson, Mark Z

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind and solar PV generation data for the entire contiguous US are calculated, on the basis of 32 years of weather data with temporal resolution of one hour and spatial resolution of 40x40km$^2$, assuming site-suitability-based as well as stochastic wind and solar PV capacity distributions throughout the country. These data are used to investigate a fully renewable electricity system, resting primarily upon wind and solar PV power. We find that the seasonal optimal mix of wind and solar PV comes at around 80% solar PV share, owing to the US summer load peak. By picking this mix, long-term storage requirements can be more than halved compared to a wind only mix. The daily optimal mix lies at about 80% wind share due to the nightly gap in solar PV production. Picking this mix instead of solar only reduces backup energy needs by about 50%. Furthermore, we calculate shifts in FERC (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission)-level LCOE (Levelized Costs Of Electricity) for wind and solar PV due to their differing resour...

  12. Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xinxin

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

  13. Wind Speed Forecasting for Power System Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xinxin

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support large-scale integration of wind power into current electric energy system, accurate wind speed forecasting is essential, because the high variation and limited predictability of wind pose profound challenges to the power system...

  14. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transmission to deliver wind generation to load centers. Toof integrating variable wind generation into the electricityfrom wind. Annual wind energy generation was specified in

  15. Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Brandon Keith Mauch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i Managing Wind Power Forecast Uncertainty in Electric Grids Brandon Keith Mauch Co for the modeled wind- CAES system would not cover annualized capital costs. We also estimate market prices-ahead market is roughly $100, with large variability due to electric power prices. Wind power forecast errors

  16. Wind Power Forecasting andWind Power Forecasting and Electricity Market Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    forecasting methods and better integration of advanced wind power forecasts into system and plant operations and wind power plants) ­ Review and assess current practices Propose and test new and improved approachesWind Power Forecasting andWind Power Forecasting and Electricity Market Operations Audun Botterud

  17. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technologyare modeled by WinDS, the costs of building transmission

  18. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-Term Market Penetration of Wind in the United States. ”2003. U.S. Department of Energy (2008). 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.

  19. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand in future years. Technology cost and performanceAssumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technology

  20. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 600 GW of potential wind capacity is available forafter 2006 (No New Wind) to quantify the potential costs andThe potential benefits associated with using wind energy to

  1. How to improve the design of the electrical system in future wind power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    . Two of the Ph.D. projects focus specifically to offshore wind farms and full- scale converter wind known to appear in the collection grid of offshore wind farms. The academic and industrial partners Farms will provide in-depth knowledge of all relevant aspects related to harmonics in offshore wind

  2. Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wind Turbines Electrical and Mechanical Engineering Objective · Introduce students to the concept of alternative energy. · Explain the math and scientific principles behind engineering wind turbines. Standards and how it applies to wind energy · About how surface area and shape effects wind turbine efficiency

  3. Features of a fully renewable US electricity system: Optimized mixes of wind and solar PV and transmission grid extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    in order to follow the de- mand, wind and solar PV power output is largely determined by weather conditions Large-scale integration of renewable power generation Wind power generation Solar PV power generation Power transmission a b s t r a c t A future energy system is likely to rely heavily on wind and solar PV

  4. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of about 80 GW of coal-based generation technologyand reduces coal-based electricity generation by 18%.to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation

  5. On the Use of Energy Storage Technologies for Regulation Services in Electric Power Systems with Significant Penetration of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Bo; Makarov, Yuri V.; DeSteese, John G.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Nyeng, Preben; McManus, Bart; Pease, John

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy produced by intermittent renewable resources is sharply increasing in the United States. At high penetration levels, volatility of wind power production could cause additional problems for the power system balancing functions such as regulation. This paper reports some partial results of a project work, recently conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The project proposes to mitigate additional intermittency with the help of Wide Area Energy Management System (WAEMS) that would provide a two-way simultaneous regulation service for the BPA and California ISO systems by using a large energy storage facility. The paper evaluates several utility-scale energy storage technology options for their usage as regulation resources. The regulation service requires a participating resource to quickly vary its power output following the rapidly and frequently changing regulation signal. Several energy storage options have been analyzed based on thirteen selection criteria. The evaluation process resulted in the selection of flywheels, pumped hydro electric power (or conventional hydro electric power) plant and sodium sulfur or nickel cadmium batteries as candidate technologies for the WAEMS project. A cost benefit analysis should be conducted to narrow the choice to one technology.

  6. Fully coupled dynamic analysis of a floating wind turbine system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withee, Jon E

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of wind power is in a period of rapid growth worldwide and wind energy systems have emerged as a promising technology for utilizing offshore wind resources for the large scale generation of electricity. Drawing ...

  7. AT GUANTANAMO BAY: A HYBRID WIND-DIESEL SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    WIND POWER AT GUANTANAMO BAY: A HYBRID WIND-DIESEL SYSTEM FOR THE US NAVY AT GUANTANAMO NAVAL BASE Laboratory and are actively developing what will be the world's largest wind-diesel hybrid electric plant. The pending installation of four 950-kW wind turbines to supplement the 22.8 MW diesel electricity plant

  8. Revenue Maximization of Electricity Generation for a Wind Turbine Integrated with a Compressed Air Energy Storage System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Energy Storage System Mohsen Saadat, Farzad A. Shirazi, Perry Y. Li Abstract-- A high-level supervisory controller is developed for a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system integrated with a wind turbine the effect of storage system sizing on the maximum revenue. I. INTRODUCTION Large-scale cost effective energy

  9. Wind Energy Systems Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Tennessee House Bill 809, enacted into law in Public Chapter 377, Acts of 2003 and codified under Title 67, Chapter 5, states that wind energy systems operated by public utilities, businesses or...

  10. System-Wide Emissions Implications of Increased Wind Power Penetration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system

  11. Multi-winding homopolar electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Neste, Charles W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-winding homopolar electric machine and method for converting between mechanical energy and electrical energy. The electric machine includes a shaft defining an axis of rotation, first and second magnets, a shielding portion, and a conductor. First and second magnets are coaxial with the shaft and include a charged pole surface and an oppositely charged pole surface, the charged pole surfaces facing one another to form a repulsive field therebetween. The shield portion extends between the magnets to confine at least a portion of the repulsive field to between the first and second magnets. The conductor extends between first and second end contacts and is toroidally coiled about the first and second magnets and the shield portion to develop a voltage across the first and second end contacts in response to rotation of the electric machine about the axis of rotation.

  12. Final report: Task 4a.2 20% wind scenario assessment of electric grid operational features

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toole, Gasper L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind integration modeling in electricity generation capacity expansion models is important in that these models are often used to inform political or managerial decisions. Poor representation of wind technology leads to under-estimation of wind's contribution to future energy scenarios which may hamper growth of the industry. The NREL's Wind Energy Deployment System (WinDS) model provides the most detailed representation of geographically disperse renewable resources and the optimization of transmission expansion to access these resources. Because WinDS was selected as the primary modeling tool for the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 study, it is the ideal tool for supplemental studies of the transmission expansion results. However, as the wind industry grows and knowledge related to the wind resource and integration of wind energy into the electric system develops, the WinDS model must be continually improved through additional data and innovative algorithms to capture the primary effects of variable wind generation. The detailed representation of wind technology in the WinDS model can be used to provide improvements to the simplified representation of wind technology in other capacity expansion models. This task did not employ the WinDS model, but builds from it and its results. Task 4a.2 provides an assessment of the electric grid operational features of the 20% Wind scenario and was conducted using power flow models accepted by the utility industry. Tasks 2 provides information regarding the physical flow of electricity on the electric grid which is a critical aspect of infrastructure expansion scenarios. Expanding transmission infrastructure to access remote wind resource in a physically realizable way is essential to achieving 20% wind energy by 2030.

  13. The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power depends mainly on the wind speeds and the turbine make and model. Definition: Simple Payback The "Simple period of a small wind power project. All the figures are per turbine, so it can be used for a one, two

  14. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind Integration and Conservation Council Wind Integration Costs · Reserving capacity for within-hour balancing is costly the system without the need to reserve flexible capacity for within-hour balancing of wind generation #12;3 5

  15. ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    countries to install solar energy technologies into local schools and hospitals. In its Energy PolicyMEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS #12;MEng ELECTRICAL ENERGY SYSTEMS Electrical energy is vital aspects of modern life. One of the biggest challenges facing society is the need for reliable energy

  16. Wind energy as a significant source of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, R.G.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

  17. Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Electric power from offshore wind via synoptic-scale interconnection Willett Kemptona,1 , Felipe M regional estimate, Kempton et al. (2) calculated that two-thirds of the offshore wind power off the U in the U.S. Atlantic region is already underway. Fig. 1 shows as black squares offshore wind developments

  18. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    value of re- newable electricity; and customer surveys ofCalifornia or Northwestern electricity demand. This may bebetween wind speed and electricity demand," Solar Energy,

  19. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Facilities. ” American Wind Energy Association (AWEA)Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns onthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWind

  20. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  1. Wind Power Systems 1.0 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu

    Wind Power Systems 1.0 Overview 2.0 Simulation model for wind farm operation 3.0 Research topics #12;Contents 1. Overview of wind power systems 2. Simulation model of wind farm operations 3. Research area of wind power systems 3.0 Overview 3.1 Economic dispatch 3.2 Correlation analysis 3.3 Energy

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Vestas Wind Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vestas Wind Systems SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization On July 29, 2013, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SWIFT, Systems...

  3. Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric System < Small Wind Guidebook Jump to: navigation, search Print PDF WIND ENERGY STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT & OUTREACHSmall Wind...

  4. Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section distinguishes between large (capacity 5,000 kW or more) and small (capacity of less than 5,000 kW) wind energy conversion systems (WECS), and regulates the siting of large conversion...

  5. Drag Forces, Neutral Wind and Electric Conductivity Changes in the Ionospheric E Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenovski, Petko

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrals in the Earth environment are in fact free and subjected to drag forces (by ions). In this study we show that drag or friction forces in the ionosphere-thermosphere system initiate changes in the plasma flow, neutral wind, and the conductivity, as well. Ions and electrons embedded in neutral wind field of velocity u acquire drifts perpendicular both to the initial neutral wind velocity and to the ambient magnetic field producing a perpendicular electric current. This perpendicular electric current is defined by a conductivity derived previously and the polarization electric field u x B. Self-consistently, the free neutrals acquires an additional neutral velocity component perpendicular to the initial neutral wind velocity u. The Pedersen and Hall currents wane within a specific time inversely proportional to neutral-ion collision frequency. These findings are relevant to a better understanding of electric current generation, distribution and closure in weakly ionized plasmas where charged particle...

  6. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electric power from potential wind farm locations inergy 1.5 MW wind turbine to calculate the potential powerpotential difference in wholesale market value between better- correlated and poorly correlated wind

  7. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to locating wind farms in the UK," RenewableV. G. Rau, "Optimum siting of wind turbine generators," IEEEoptimal planning for wind energy conver- sion systems over

  8. Electrical Power Grid Delivery Dynamic Analysis: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana K. Grauer; Michael E. Reed

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

  9. Floating offshore wind farms : demand planning & logistical challenges of electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nnadili, Christopher Dozie, 1978-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Floating offshore wind farms are likely to become the next paradigm in electricity generation from wind energy mainly because of the near constant high wind speeds in an offshore environment as opposed to the erratic wind ...

  10. Low-Maintenance Wind Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasson, Joseph E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with widespread adoption of wind energy. The project hasProject: Low-Maintenance Wind Power System Summary of theImproved Vertical Axis Wind Turbine and Aerodynamic Control

  11. Stator for a rotating electrical machine having multiple control windings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shah, Manoj R. (Latham, NY); Lewandowski, Chad R. (Amsterdam, NY)

    2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating electric machine is provided which includes multiple independent control windings for compensating for rotor imbalances and for levitating/centering the rotor. The multiple independent control windings are placed at different axial locations along the rotor to oppose forces created by imbalances at different axial locations along the rotor. The multiple control windings can also be used to levitate/center the rotor with a relatively small magnetic field per unit area since the rotor and/or the main power winding provides the bias field.

  12. Intelligent wind power prediction systems final report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intelligent wind power prediction systems ­ final report ­ Henrik Aalborg Nielsen (han (FU 4101) Ens. journal number: 79029-0001 Project title: Intelligent wind power prediction systems #12;#12;Intelligent wind power prediction systems 1/36 Contents 1 Introduction 6 2 The Wind Power Prediction Tool 7 3

  13. Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    not exacerbate the global warming problem. However, renewable energy is inherently intermittent and variableManaging Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper, and to meet increasing electricity demand without harming the environment. Two of the most promising solutions

  14. Managing Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and solar energy--is free, abundant, and most importantly, does not exacerbate the global warming problemManaging Wind-based Electricity Generation and Storage by Yangfang Zhou Submitted to the Tepper.S. strive to reduce reliance on the import of fossil fuels, and to meet increasing electricity demand

  15. Dual power, constant speed electric motor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual capacity permanent split capacitor electric motor system is provided with a stator having main and auxiliary windings. The main stator winding includes two winding sections which are connected in parallel with each other and across a pair of line terminals while the auxiliary winding is connected in series with a capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals for operation at a first output power level. Switching means are provided to reconnect the main stator winding sections in series with each other and in series with a second capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals while the stator auxiliary winding is connected directly between the line terminals for operation at a second output power level. Automatic rotation reversal occurs when the motor switches from the first to the second output power level. 6 figs.

  16. Dual power, constant speed electric motor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirschbaum, Herbert S. (Asheville, NC)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual capacity permanent split capacitor electric motor system is provided with a stator having main and auxiliary windings. The main stator winding includes two winding sections which are connected in parallel with each other and across a pair of line terminals while the auxiliary winding is connected in series with a capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals for operation at a first output power level. Switching means are provided to reconnect the main stator winding sections in series with each other and in series with a second capacitor to form a circuit branch which is connected between the line terminals while the stator auxiliary winding is connected directly between the line terminals for operation at a second output power level. Automatic rotation reversal occurs when the motor switches from the first to the second output power level.

  17. NREL: Systems Engineering - 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Systems Engineering Printable Version 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop The third NREL Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop took place on the 14th and 15th...

  18. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References TrueWindValuing the Time-Varying Electricity Production of Solarthe Value of Wind-Generated Electricity References Gipe, P.

  19. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Schwartz. 1993. Wind Energy Potential in the United States .for estimates of wind power potential. ” Journal of Appliedof electric power from potential wind farm locations in

  20. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of electric power from potential wind farm locations infactor across different potential wind sites are about sevenreflects the potential effects of temporal wind patterns on

  1. :,/0$5 Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets :,/0$5 :LQG 3RZHU ,QWHJUDWLRQ LQ /LEHUDOLVHG (OHFWULFLW\\ 0DUNHWV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,/0$5 Wind Power Integration in Liberalised Electricity Markets 1 :,/0$5 :LQG 3RZHU ,QWHJUDWLRQ a cost-effective integration of wind power in large liberalised electricity systems. The main recommendations concern reducing imbalances caused by wind power by bidding closer to delivery hour

  2. Electrical system architecture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Peoria, IL); Johnson, Kris W. (Washington, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL); Hoff, Brian D. (East Peoria, IL)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical system for a vehicle includes a first power source generating a first voltage level, the first power source being in electrical communication with a first bus. A second power source generates a second voltage level greater than the first voltage level, the second power source being in electrical communication with a second bus. A starter generator may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus, and at least one additional power source may be configured to provide power to at least one of the first bus and the second bus. The electrical system also includes at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the first bus and at least one power consumer in electrical communication with the second bus.

  3. Hawaii electric system reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto; Loose, Verne William

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses Hawaii electric system reliability issues; greater emphasis is placed on short-term reliability but resource adequacy is reviewed in reference to electric consumers' views of reliability %E2%80%9Cworth%E2%80%9D and the reserve capacity required to deliver that value. The report begins with a description of the Hawaii electric system to the extent permitted by publicly available data. Electrical engineering literature in the area of electric reliability is researched and briefly reviewed. North American Electric Reliability Corporation standards and measures for generation and transmission are reviewed and identified as to their appropriateness for various portions of the electric grid and for application in Hawaii. Analysis of frequency data supplied by the State of Hawaii Public Utilities Commission is presented together with comparison and contrast of performance of each of the systems for two years, 2010 and 2011. Literature tracing the development of reliability economics is reviewed and referenced. A method is explained for integrating system cost with outage cost to determine the optimal resource adequacy given customers' views of the value contributed by reliable electric supply. The report concludes with findings and recommendations for reliability in the State of Hawaii.

  4. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period October 1, 2006, to December 31, 2006 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  5. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period January 1, 2007 to March 31, 2007 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  6. Superconductivity for Electric Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Superconductivity for Electric Systems Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report For the Period April 1, 2007, to June 30, 2007 #12;2 Superconductivity Program Quarterly Progress Report Superconductivity Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory For: Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery

  7. Camden County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2007, Camden County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may...

  8. Watauga County- Wind Energy System Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2006, Watauga County adopted a wind ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems in the county and to describe the conditions by which a permit for installing such a system may be...

  9. Currituck County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In January 2008, Currituck County adopted an ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems. The ordinance directs any individual or organization wishing to install a wind-energy system to...

  10. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C. (Dunlap, IL)

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  11. Wind energy systems information user study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

  12. The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems Yassine Amirat, Mohamed Benbouzid, Bachir Bensaker and René Wamkeue Abstract--Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) have become. I. INTRODUCTION Wind energy conversion is the fastest-growing source of new electric generation

  13. General Electric Company Oahu Wind Integration Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to disruptions in supply. Further, the volatility in oil prices translates into volatility in electricity prices. As oil prices increase, Hawaii consumers face increases in energy prices as well as the price of most was approximately 13% of the State Gross Product. Most of the imported oil is used for transportation fuel

  14. Central Wind Power Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, K.; Rogers, J.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America.

  15. NREL: Wind Research - Systems Engineering Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illustration of a wind farm with a town in the background and a crane lifting the turbine blades onto the last turbine. A complete wind energy system includes the plant's...

  16. Electric vehicle system for charging and supplying electrical power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Su, Gui Jia

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A power system that provides power between an energy storage device, an external charging-source/load, an onboard electrical power generator, and a vehicle drive shaft. The power system has at least one energy storage device electrically connected across a dc bus, at least one filter capacitor leg having at least one filter capacitor electrically connected across the dc bus, at least one power inverter/converter electrically connected across the dc bus, and at least one multiphase motor/generator having stator windings electrically connected at one end to form a neutral point and electrically connected on the other end to one of the power inverter/converters. A charging-sourcing selection socket is electrically connected to the neutral points and the external charging-source/load. At least one electronics controller is electrically connected to the charging-sourcing selection socket and at least one power inverter/converter. The switch legs in each of the inverter/converters selected by the charging-source/load socket collectively function as a single switch leg. The motor/generators function as an inductor.

  17. Value of electrical heat boilers and heat pumps for wind power integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Value of electrical heat boilers and heat pumps for wind power integration Peter Meibom Juha of using electrical heat boilers and heat pumps as wind power integration measures relieving the link\\ZRUGV wind power, integration, heat pumps, electric heat boilers ,QWURGXFWLRQ 3UREOHP RYHUYLHZ The Danish

  18. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-GeneratedElectricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this paper, we use wind speed data from three different sources to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwestern United States. By ''value'', we refer to either the contribution of wind power to meeting the electric system's peak loads, or the financial value of wind power in electricity markets. Sites for wind power projects are often screened or compared based on the annual average power production that would be expected from wind turbines at each site (Baban and Parry 2001; Brower et al. 2004; Jangamshetti and Rau 2001; Nielsen et al. 2002; Roy 2002; Schwartz 1999). However, at many locations, variations in wind speeds during the day and year are correlated with variations in the electric power system's load and wholesale market prices (Burton et al. 2001; Carlin 1983; Kennedy and Rogers 2003; Man Bae and Devine 1978; Sezgen et al. 1998); this correlation may raise or lower the value of wind power generated at each location. A number of previous reports address this issue somewhat indirectly by studying the contribution of individual wind power sites to the reliability or economic operation of the electric grid, using hourly wind speed data (Fleten et al.; Kahn 1991; Kirby et al. 2003; Milligan 2002; van Wijk et al. 1992). However, we have not identified any previous study that examines the effect of variations in wind timing across a broad geographical area on wholesale market value or capacity contribution of those different wind power sites. We have done so, to determine whether it is important to consider wind-timing when planning wind power development, and to try to identify locations where timing would have a more positive or negative effect. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in California and the Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming) with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. We also assess whether modeled wind data from TrueWind Solutions, LLC, can help answer such questions, by comparing results found using the TrueWind data to those found using anemometers or wind farm power production data. This paper summarizes results that are presented in more detail in a recent report from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Fripp and Wiser 2006). The full report is available at http://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/re-pubs.html.

  19. WIND TURBINE DRIVETRAIN TEST FACILITY DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcintosh, J.

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Turbine Drivetrain Test Facility (WTDTF) is a state-of-the-art industrial facility used for testing wind turbine drivetrains and generators. Large power output wind turbines are primarily installed for off-shore wind power generation. The facility includes two test bays: one to accommodate turbine nacelles up to 7.5 MW and one for nacelles up to 15 MW. For each test bay, an independent data acquisition system (DAS) records signals from various sensors required for turbine testing. These signals include resistance temperature devices, current and voltage sensors, bridge/strain gauge transducers, charge amplifiers, and accelerometers. Each WTDTF DAS also interfaces with the drivetrain load applicator control system, electrical grid monitoring system and vibration analysis system.

  20. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  1. System-wide emissions implications of increased wind power penetration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentino, L.; Valenzuela, V.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Conzelmann, G. (Decision and Information Sciences); (Univ. of Illinois, Champaign/Urbana); (Georgia Institute of Technology)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the environmental effects of incorporating wind energy into the electric power system. We present a detailed emissions analysis based on comprehensive modeling of power system operations with unit commitment and economic dispatch for different wind penetration levels. First, by minimizing cost, the unit commitment model decides which thermal power plants will be utilized based on a wind power forecast, and then, the economic dispatch model dictates the level of production for each unit as a function of the realized wind power generation. Finally, knowing the power production from each power plant, the emissions are calculated. The emissions model incorporates the effects of both cycling and start-ups of thermal power plants in analyzing emissions from an electric power system with increasing levels of wind power. Our results for the power system in the state of Illinois show significant emissions effects from increased cycling and particularly start-ups of thermal power plants. However, we conclude that as the wind power penetration increases, pollutant emissions decrease overall due to the replacement of fossil fuels.

  2. Wind turbine generators having wind assisted cooling systems and cooling methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bagepalli, Bharat (Niskayuna, NY); Barnes, Gary R. (Delanson, NY); Gadre, Aniruddha D. (Rexford, NY); Jansen, Patrick L. (Scotia, NY); Bouchard, Jr., Charles G. (Schenectady, NY); Jarczynski, Emil D. (Scotia, NY); Garg, Jivtesh (Cambridge, MA)

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind generator includes: a nacelle; a hub carried by the nacelle and including at least a pair of wind turbine blades; and an electricity producing generator including a stator and a rotor carried by the nacelle. The rotor is connected to the hub and rotatable in response to wind acting on the blades to rotate the rotor relative to the stator to generate electricity. A cooling system is carried by the nacelle and includes at least one ambient air inlet port opening through a surface of the nacelle downstream of the hub and blades, and a duct for flowing air from the inlet port in a generally upstream direction toward the hub and in cooling relation to the stator.

  3. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Wiser, Ryan H; Fripp, Matthias

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production is variable, but also has diurnal and seasonal patterns. These patterns differ between sites, potentially making electric power from some wind sites more valuable for meeting customer loads or selling in wholesale power markets. This paper investigates whether the timing of wind significantly affects the value of electricity from sites in California and the Northwestern United States. We use both measured and modeled wind data and estimate the time-varying value of wind power with both financial and load-based metrics. We find that the potential difference in wholesale market value between better-correlated and poorly correlated wind sites is modest, on the order of 5-10 percent. A load-based metric, power production during the top 10 percent of peak load hours, varies more strongly between sites, suggesting that the capacity value of different wind projects could vary by as much as 50 percent based on the timing of wind alone.

  4. Carteret County- Wind Energy System Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Carteret County passed an ordinance to specify the permitting process and establish siting requirements for wind energy systems. There are different rules and a different permitting process...

  5. Reliability analysis of electric power systems including time dependent sources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Younjong

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chairman of Advisory Committee: Chanan Singh A method for reliability analysis of electric power systems with time dependent sources, such as photovoltaic and wind generation, is introduced. The fluctuating characteristic of unconventional generation... and active solar. wind, geothermal, and hydropower. Of all the renewable energy technologies that have been the focus of encouraging government and private R k D efforts, photovoltaic generation and wind turbine generation appear to be the leading...

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Electrical Power Grid Delivery: Using Prime Mover Engines to Balance Dynamic Wind Turbine Output

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diana K. Grauer

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an investigation into integrated wind + combustion engine high penetration electrical generation systems. Renewable generation systems are now a reality of electrical transmission. Unfortunately, many of these renewable energy supplies are stochastic and highly dynamic. Conversely, the existing national grid has been designed for steady state operation. The research team has developed an algorithm to investigate the feasibility and relative capability of a reciprocating internal combustion engine to directly integrate with wind generation in a tightly coupled Hybrid Energy System. Utilizing the Idaho National Laboratory developed Phoenix Model Integration Platform, the research team has coupled demand data with wind turbine generation data and the Aspen Custom Modeler reciprocating engine electrical generator model to investigate the capability of reciprocating engine electrical generation to balance stochastic renewable energy.

  7. The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm of capacity factor on the investment phase of a wind farm and on spatial planning in an electricity market, it is now recognized that accurate short-term forecasts of wind farms´ power output over the next few hours

  8. Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Simulation of electricity supply of an Atlantic island by offshore wind turbines and wave energy an electricity storage for a 5000 inhabitants island supplied by both marine renewables (offshore wind and waves community. Key words: Wave energy, offshore wind turbines, marine energy 1 Introduction Marine renewables

  9. Real Time Dynamic Wind Calculation for a Pressure Driven Wind System Criss Martin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parberry, Ian

    for controllable real time dynamic wind cal- culation for a pressure driven wind system. Our method allows re to specify the positions and pressure val- ues of a high and a low pressure system to drive the wind. SetupReal Time Dynamic Wind Calculation for a Pressure Driven Wind System Criss Martin Dept. of Computer

  10. Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Ryan N.

    Wind-Energy based Path Planning For Electric Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Markov Decision wind-energy is one possible way to ex- tend flight duration for Unmanned Arial Vehicles. Wind-energy sources of wind energy available to exploit for this problem [5]: 1) Vertical air motion, such as thermal

  11. Dynamic behaviour of a DFIG wind turbine subjected to power system faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic behaviour of a DFIG wind turbine subjected to power system faults Gabriele Michalke+, Anca, Institute for Electrical Power Systems, Landgraf-Georg-Straße 4, 64283 Darmstadt, Germany * Risø National of the dynamic interaction between variable speed DFIG wind turbines and the power system subjected

  12. Coupled Dynamic Modeling of Floating Wind Turbine Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayman, E. N.; Sclavounos, P. D.; Butterfield, S.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents a collaborative research program that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have undertaken to develop innovative and cost-effective floating and mooring systems for offshore wind turbines in water depths of 10-200 m. Methods for the coupled structural, hydrodynamic, and aerodynamic analysis of floating wind turbine systems are presented in the frequency domain. This analysis was conducted by coupling the aerodynamics and structural dynamics code FAST [4] developed at NREL with the wave load and response simulation code WAMIT (Wave Analysis at MIT) [15] developed at MIT. Analysis tools were developed to consider coupled interactions between the wind turbine and the floating system. These include the gyroscopic loads of the wind turbine rotor on the tower and floater, the aerodynamic damping introduced by the wind turbine rotor, the hydrodynamic damping introduced by wave-body interactions, and the hydrodynamic forces caused by wave excitation. Analyses were conducted for two floater concepts coupled with the NREL 5-MW Offshore Baseline wind turbine in water depths of 10-200 m: the MIT/NREL Shallow Drafted Barge (SDB) and the MIT/NREL Tension Leg Platform (TLP). These concepts were chosen to represent two different methods of achieving stability to identify differences in performance and cost of the different stability methods. The static and dynamic analyses of these structures evaluate the systems' responses to wave excitation at a range of frequencies, the systems' natural frequencies, and the standard deviations of the systems' motions in each degree of freedom in various wind and wave environments. This article in various wind and wave environments. This article explores the effects of coupling the wind turbine with the floating platform, the effects of water depth, and the effects of wind speed on the systems' performance. An economic feasibility analysis of the two concepts was also performed. Key cost components included the material and construction costs of the buoy; material and installation costs of the tethers, mooring lines, and anchor technologies; costs of transporting and installing the system at the chosen site; and the cost of mounting the wind turbine to the platform. The two systems were evaluated based on their static and dynamic performance and the total system installed cost. Both systems demonstrated acceptable motions, and have estimated costs of $1.4-$1.8 million, not including the cost of the wind turbine, the power electronics, or the electrical transmission.

  13. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  14. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  15. Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Weihao

    Impact of Wind Shear and Tower Shadow Effects on Power System with Large Scale Wind Power to wind speed variations, the wind shear and the tower shadow effects. The fluctuating power may be ableSILENT/PowerFactory. In this paper, the impacts of wind shear and tower shadow effects on the small signal stability of power systems

  16. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  17. Central Wind Forecasting Programs in North America by Regional Transmission Organizations and Electric Utilities: Revised Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report and accompanying table addresses the implementation of central wind power forecasting by electric utilities and regional transmission organizations in North America. The first part of the table focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that have central wind power forecasting in place; the second part focuses on electric utilities and regional transmission organizations that plan to adopt central wind power forecasting in 2010. This is an update of the December 2009 report, NREL/SR-550-46763.

  18. Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards Assessment of Offshore Wind System Design, Safety, and Operation Standards The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)...

  19. Abstract--In doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind energy conversion systems (WECS), the DFIG is interfaced to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Abstract--In doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind energy conversion systems (WECS of wind energy is growing rapidly and it is expected to provide ten percent of the global electricity a popular candidate in the wind energy conversion systems (WECS) due to its advantages [2-5]. When compared

  20. Reference Manual for the System Advisor Model's Wind Power Performance Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, J.; Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Ferguson, T.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's System Advisor Model (SAM) wind power performance model. The model calculates the hourly electrical output of a single wind turbine or of a wind farm. The wind power performance model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs. In SAM, the performance model can be coupled to one of the financial models to calculate economic metrics for residential, commercial, or utility-scale wind projects. This manual describes the algorithms used by the wind power performance model, which is available in the SAM user interface and as part of the SAM Simulation Core (SSC) library, and is intended to supplement the user documentation that comes with the software.

  1. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Break-Even Turnkey Cost of Residential Wind Systems in theaggregate installed cost of a small wind system that couldand wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions

  2. Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

  3. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply; Executive Summary (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a 21-page summary of the 200+ page analysis that explores one clearly defined scenario for providing 20% of our nation's electricity demand with wind energy by 2030 and contrasts it to a scenario of no new U.S. wind power capacity.

  4. Farmers Electric Cooperative (Kalona)- Renewable Energy Purchase Rate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Farmers Electric Cooperative offers a production incentive to members that install qualifying wind and solar electricity generating systems. Qualifying grid-tied solar and wind energy systems are...

  5. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  6. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure -...

  7. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin (Kenosha, WI); Habetler, Thomas G. (Snellville, GA)

    2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  8. Wind energy systems: program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Wind Energy Program (FWEP) was initiated to provide focus, direction and funds for the development of wind power. Each year a summary is prepared to provide the American public with an overview of government sponsored activities in the FWEP. This program summary describes each of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current wind energy projects initiated or renewed during FY 1979 (October 1, 1978 through September 30, 1979) and reflects their status as of April 30, 1980. The summary highlights on-going research, development and demonstration efforts and serves as a record of progress towards the program objectives. It also provides: the program's general management structure; review of last year's achievements; forecast of expected future trends; documentation of the projects conducted during FY 1979; and list of key wind energy publications.

  9. Building a market for small wind: The break-even turnkey cost of residential wind systems in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although small wind turbine technology and economics have improved in recent years, the small wind market in the United States continues to be driven in large part by state incentives, such as cash rebates, favorable loan programs, and tax credits. This paper examines the state-by-state economic attractiveness of small residential wind systems. Economic attractiveness is evaluated primarily using the break-even turnkey cost (BTC) of a residential wind system as the figure of merit. The BTC is defined here as the aggregate installed cost of a small wind system that could be supported such that the system owner would break even (and receive a specified return on investment) over the life of the turbine, taking into account current available incentives, the wind resource, and the retail electricity rate offset by on-site generation. Based on the analysis presented in this paper, we conclude that: (1) the economics of residential, grid-connected small wind systems is highly variable by state and wind resource class, (2) significant cost reductions will be necessary to stimulate widespread market acceptance absent significant changes in the level of policy support, and (3) a number of policies could help stimulate the market, but state cash incentives currently have the most significant impact, and will be a critical element of continued growth in this market.

  10. POWER SYSTEMS STABILITY WITH LARGE-SCALE WIND POWER PENETRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    of offshore wind farms, wind power fluctuations may introduce several challenges to reliable power system behaviour due to natural wind fluctuations. The rapid power fluctuations from the large scale wind farms Generation Control (AGC) system which includes large- scale wind farms for long-term stability simulation

  11. Pitt County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pitt County Board of Commissioners adopted amendments to the county zoning ordinance in March 2010 which classify wind energy systems as an accessory use and establish siting and permitting...

  12. Advanced Integrated Electric Traction System

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Electric Traction System Greg S. Smith Email: gregory.3.smith@gm.com Phone: (310) 257-3812 Organization: General Motors Team members: Ames Laboratory Arnold Magnetics...

  13. The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The impact of electricity market schemes on predictability being a decision factor in the wind farm used criterion of capacity factor on the investment phase of a wind farm and on spatial planning, it is now recognized that accurate short-term forecasts of wind farms´ power output over the next few hours

  14. Innovative Applications of O.R. Scheduling electric power production at a wind farm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    Innovative Applications of O.R. Scheduling electric power production at a wind farm Zijun Zhang computations Wind farm Particle swarm optimization Small world network a b s t r a c t We present a model for scheduling power generation at a wind farm, and introduce a particle swarm optimization algorithm

  15. Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind power

  16. Method for computing efficient electrical indicators for offshore wind turbine monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by offshore deployment of wind farms. The offshore turbines have much lower accessibility(1) so maintenanceMethod for computing efficient electrical indicators for offshore wind turbine monitoring Georgia.cablea, pierre.granjon, christophe.berenguer} @gipsa-lab.grenoble-inp.fr Abstract Offshore wind turbines

  17. Using Electric Vehicles to Mitigate Imbalance Requirements Associated with an Increased Penetration of Wind Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The integration of variable renewable generation sources continues to be a significant area of focus for power system planning. Renewable portfolio standards and initiatives to reduce the dependency on foreign energy sources drive much of the deployment. Unfortunately, renewable energy generation sources like wind and solar tend to be highly variable in nature. To counter the energy imbalance caused by this variability, wind generation often requires additional balancing resources to compensate for the variability in the electricity production. With the expected electrification of transportation, electric vehicles may offer a new load resource for meeting all, or part, of the imbalance created by the renewable generation. This paper investigates a regulation-services-based battery charging method on a population of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles to meet the power imbalance requirements associated with the introduction of 11 GW of additional wind generation into the Northwest Power Pool. It quantifies the number of vehicles required to meet the imbalance requirements under various charging assumptions.

  18. Impact of Utility-Scale Distributed Wind on Transmission-Level System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new renewable integration study that aims to assess the potential for adding distributed wind to the current power system with minimal or no upgrades to the distribution or transmission electricity systems. It investigates the impacts of integrating large amounts of utility-scale distributed wind power on bulk system operations by performing a case study on the power system of the Independent System Operator-New England (ISO-NE).

  19. Distribution of Wind Power Forecasting Errors from Operational Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodge, B. M.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation offers new data and statistical analysis of wind power forecasting errors in operational systems.

  20. Wind energy as a significant source of electricity for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nix, R.G.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses wind energy and its potential to significantly impact the generation of electricity within the US. The principles and the equipment used to convert wind energy to electricity are described, as is the status of current technology. Markets and production projections are given. There is discussion of the advances required to reduce the selling cost of electricity generated from the wind from today`s price of about $0.05 per kilowatt-hour to full cost-competitiveness with gas- and coal-based electricity.

  1. Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

  2. Facilitating Wind Development: The Importance of Electric Industry Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates which wholesale elecricity market-structure characteristics best accommodate wind energy development.

  3. Impact of Electric Industry Structure on High Wind Penetration Potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Gramlich, R.; Goggin, M.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper attempts to evaluate which balancing area (BA) characteristics best accommodate wind energy.

  4. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Nieto, Albert

    1 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS Instructor: Albert LozanoF) - Value of capacitors: -Printed on body of capacitor (physically large capacitors) -Code (useless) -If

  5. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105 ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Nieto, Albert

    ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105 ­ ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS LABORATORY EXPERIENCES will become familiar with solar cells as photovoltaic energy converters. Secondly, students will practice

  6. Lightning protection system for a wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costin, Daniel P. (Chelsea, VT); Petter, Jeffrey K. (Williston, VT)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a wind turbine (104, 500, 704) having a plurality of blades (132, 404, 516, 744) and a blade rotor hub (120, 712), a lightning protection system (100, 504, 700) for conducting lightning strikes to any one of the blades and the region surrounding the blade hub along a path around the blade hub and critical components of the wind turbine, such as the generator (112, 716), gearbox (708) and main turbine bearings (176, 724).

  7. Environmentally Sound Design and Recycling of Future Wind Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmentally Sound Design and Recycling of Future Wind Power Systems Presentation at the IEA R state-of-the-art wind power system Mapping current trends of wind power technologies and concepts Expert wind power systems Expert panel brainstorm on environmental aspects of decommissioning current

  8. Highly Efficient Electric Motor Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over wider operating range with same size motor Uses up to 40% less electricity NREL Energy Forum;Annual Serviceable Addressable Market (SAM) for >1hp non-hermetic motors NREL Energy Forum November 2009Highly Efficient Electric Motor Systems NREL Energy Forum November 2009 www.novatorque.com Emily

  9. Optimal Contract for Wind Power in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlakha, Sachin

    Introduction The insatiable appetite for energy as well as concerns for global warming have led to greater the impact of uncertain production in electricity markets. Current electricity markets consist of primarilyOptimal Contract for Wind Power in Day-Ahead Electricity Markets Desmond W. H. Cai1 Sachin Adlakha2

  10. El Paso Electric Company- Small and Medium System Renewable Energy Certificate Purchase Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective January 1, 2010, El Paso Electric is purchasing renewable energy certificates (RECs) from its New Mexico customers who install small photovoltaic (PV) systems and wind systems up to 10...

  11. Wind Power Systems 1. Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu

    or non-renewable 3 #12;Electricity basics1 Step-up transmission substation(155-765kV) · Step-down transmission substation (69 kV) · Distribution substations (19.9-24kV) Generation Transmission Distribution 4 1, Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana

  12. Two Colorado-Based Electric Cooperatives Selected as 2014 Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    wind power, and together, Tri-State and San Isabel are expanding the use of low-cost wind energy, and supporting job creation and economic development within their service...

  13. Wind Farm Diversification and Its Impact on Power System Reliability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degeilh, Yannick

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of potential wind farming sites for which the wind patterns are statistically known. The objective is to demonstrate the benefits of diversification for the reliability of wind-sustained systems through the search for steadier overall power outputs. Three... power output. Reported studies are generally concerned about the selection of a given potential wind farming site based on its wind patterns [1], but not about the beneficial interactions that various power outputs from various wind parks may yield...

  14. Toward a 20% Wind Electricity Supply in the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flowers, L.; Dougherty, P.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated the Wind Powering America (WPA) program in 1999, installed wind power capacity in the United States has increased from 2,500 MW to more than 11,000 MW. In 1999, only four states had more than 100 MW of installed wind capacity; now 16 states have more than 100 MW installed. In addition to WPA's efforts to increase deployment, the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) is building a network of support across the country. In July 2005, AWEA launched the Wind Energy Works! Coalition, which is comprised of more than 70 organizations. In February 2006, the wind deployment vision was enhanced by President George W. Bush's Advanced Energy Initiative, which refers to a wind energy contribution of up to 20% of the electricity consumption of the United States. A 20% electricity contribution over the next 20 to 25 years represents 300 to 350 gigawatts (GW) of electricity. This paper provides a background of wind energy deployment in the United States and a history of the U.S. DOE's WPA program, as well as the program's approach to increasing deployment through removal of institutional and informational barriers to a 20% wind electricity future.

  15. Facilitating wind development: the importance of electric industry structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan; Milligan, Michael

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOs and RTOs, with their day-ahead and real-time markets, large geographies to aggregate diverse wind resources, large loads to aggregate with wind, large generation pools that tap conventional-generator flexibility, and regional transmission planning efforts, offer the best environments for wind generation to develop. (author)

  16. Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.

  17. Improved Electrical Load Match In California By Combining Solar Thermal Power Plants with Wind Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vick, B. D.; Clark, R. N.; Mehos, M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    California with its hydro, geothermal, wind, and solar energy is the second largest producer of renewable electricity in the United States (Washington state is the largest producer of renewable energy electricity due to high level of hydro power). Replacing fossil fuel electrical generation with renewable energy electrical generation will decrease the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere which will slow down the rapid increase in global warming (a goal of the California state government). However, in order for a much larger percentage of the total electrical generation in California to be from renewable energies like wind and solar, a better match between renewable energy generation and utility electrical load is required. Using wind farm production data and predicted production from a solar thermal power plant (with and without six hours of storage), a comparison was made between the renewable energy generation and the current utility load in California. On a monthly basis, wind farm generated electricity at the three major wind farm areas in California (Altamont Pass, east of San Francisco Bay area; Tehachapi Pass in the high desert between Tehachapi and Mojave; and San Gorgonio Pass in the low desert near Palm Springs) matches the utility load well during the highest electrical load months (May through September). Prediction of solar thermal power plant output also indicates a good match with utility load during these same high load months. Unfortunately, the hourly wind farm output during the day is not a very good match to the utility electrical load (i.e. in spring and summer the lowest wind speed generally occurs during mid-day when utility load is highest). If parabolic trough solar thermal power plants are installed in the Mojave Desert (similar to the 354 MW of plants that have been operating in Mojave Desert since 1990) then the solar electrical generation will help balance out the wind farm generation since highest solar generated electricity will be during mid-day. Adding six hours of solar thermal storage improved the utility load match significantly in the evening and reliability was also improved. Storage improves reliability because electrical production can remain at a high level even when there are lulls in the wind or clouds decrease the solar energy striking the parabolic trough mirrors. The solar energy from Mojave Desert and wind energy in the major wind farm areas are not a good match to utility load during the winter in California, but if the number of wind farms were increased east of San Diego, then the utility renewable energy match would be improved (this is because the wind energy is highest during the winter in this area). Currently in California, wind electrical generation only contributes 1.8% of total electricity and solar electrical generation only contributes 0.2%. Combining wind farms and solar thermal power plants with storage would allow a large percentage of the electrical load in California to be met by wind and solar energy due to a better match with utility load than by either renewable resource separately.

  18. If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well...

  19. Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be...

  20. Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Residential Solar and Wind Electricity Sales (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May 2011 Maryland enacted legislation providing a sales and use tax exemption for sales of electricity from qualifying solar energy and residential wind energy equipment to residential customers...

  1. EECBG Success Story: Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:26am Addthis Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency...

  2. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (1998). Wind Generation in the Future Competitivegeneration system, as well as computational resources that would make it prohibitive for estimating the capacity value of wind

  3. Power Control and Optimization of Photovoltaic and Wind Energy Conversion Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffari, Azad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    77 5.2 Wind Energy Conversion System . . . . .Optimization and Control in Wind Energy Conversion SystemsAC matrix con- verter for wind energy conversion system,” in

  4. Modeling induction machine winding faults for diagnosis In Electrical Machines Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Chapter 2 Modeling induction machine winding faults for diagnosis In Electrical Machines Diagnosis of a winding fault situation, then the time available to the experimenter may vary from a few minutes to a few will see that the controls are perfectly free from imbalances induced by a stator insulation fault, whether

  5. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical and control system losses, blade contamination, weather (icing, lightning, etc. ), wake effects, turbulence, and turbine outages [

  6. A Vision for Systems Engineering Applied to Wind Energy (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felker, F.; Dykes, K.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation was given at the Third Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop on January 14, 2015. Topics covered include the importance of systems engineering, a vision for systems engineering as applied to wind energy, and application of systems engineering approaches to wind energy research and development.

  7. Cooperative field test program for wind systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Advanced Electric Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Electric Systems grid-slide1 grid-slide2 grid-slide3 grid-slide4 Advanced Electric Systems Integrating Renewable Energy into the Electric Grid Why is Grid...

  9. 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop 2015 Wind Energy Systems Engineering Workshop January 14, 2015 8:00AM MST to January 15, 2015 3:00PM MST University of Colorado...

  10. Low-Maintenance Wind Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasson, Joseph E

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved Vertical Axis Wind Turbine and Aerodynamic ControlDarrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbines and Aerodynamic Control

  11. Designing of Hybrid Power Generation System using Wind energy- Photovoltaic Solar energy- Solar energy with Nanoantenna

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All the natural wastage energies are used for production of Electricity. Thus, the Electrical Power or Electricity is available with a minimum cost and pollution free to anywhere in the world at all times. This process reveals a unique step in electricity generation and availability from natural resources without hampering the ecological balance. This paper describes a new and evolving Electrical Power Generation System by integrating simultaneously photovoltaic Solar Energy, solar Energy with Nano-antenna, Wind Energy and non conventional energy sources. We can have an uninterrupted power supply irrespective of the natural condition without any sort of environmental pollution. Moreover this process yields the least production cost for electricity generation. Utilization of lightning energy for generation of electricity reveals a new step. The set-up consists of combination of photo-voltaic solar-cell array & Nano-anteena array, a mast mounted wind generator, lead-acid storage batteries, an inverter unit to convert DC power to AC power, electrical lighting loads and electrical heating loads, several fuse and junction boxes and associated wiring, and test instruments for measuring voltages, currents, power factors, and harmonic contamination data throughout the system. This hybrid solar-wind power generating system will extensively use in the Industries and also in external use like home appliance.

  12. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    10 kW wind turbine on a 30m tower was installed and five different scenarios were calculated for both locations. Wind speeds for both locations were collected and analyzed to find the closest fitting distribution to incorporate the appropriate risk...

  13. Wind turbine/generator set having a stator cooling system located between stator frame and active coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bevington, Christopher M.; Bywaters, Garrett L.; Coleman, Clint C.; Costin, Daniel P.; Danforth, William L.; Lynch, Jonathan A.; Rolland, Robert H.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind turbine comprising an electrical generator that includes a rotor assembly. A wind rotor that includes a wind rotor hub is directly coupled to the rotor assembly via a simplified connection. The wind rotor and generator rotor assembly are rotatably mounted on a central spindle via a bearing assembly. The wind rotor hub includes an opening having a diameter larger than the outside diameter of the central spindle adjacent the bearing assembly so as to allow access to the bearing assembly from a cavity inside the wind rotor hub. The spindle is attached to a turret supported by a tower. Each of the spindle, turret and tower has an interior cavity that permits personnel to traverse therethrough to the cavity of the wind rotor hub. The wind turbine further includes a frictional braking system for slowing, stopping or keeping stopped the rotation of the wind rotor and rotor assembly.

  14. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  15. Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

  16. Incorporating operational flexibility into electric generation planning : impacts and methods for system design and policy analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmintier, Bryan S. (Bryan Stephen)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation demonstrates how flexibility in hourly electricity operations can impact long-term planning and analysis for future power systems, particularly those with substantial variable renewables (e.g., wind) or ...

  17. Screening method for wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, R.D.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A screening method is presented for evaluating wind energy conversion systems (WECS) logically and consistently. It is a set of procedures supported by a data base for large conventional WECS. The procedures are flexible enough to accommodate concepts lacking cost and engineering detail, as is the case with many innovative wind energy conversion systems (IWECS). The method uses both value indicators and simplified cost estimating procedures. Value indicators are selected ratios of engineering parameters involving energy, mass, area, and power. Cost mass ratios and cost estimating relationships were determined from the conventional WECS data base to estimate or verify installation cost estimates for IWECS. These value indicators and cost estimating procedures are shown for conventional WECS. An application of the method to a tracked-vehicle airfoil concept is presented.

  18. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  19. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  20. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena, Hugo Eduardo

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  1. Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

  2. Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic wind turbine models in power system simulation tool DIgSILENT Anca D. Hansen, Florin Iov Iov, Poul Sørensen, Nicolaos Cutululis, Clemens Jauch, Frede Blaabjerg Title: Dynamic wind turbine system simulation tool PowerFactory DIgSILENT for different wind turbine concepts. It is the second

  3. Detection of arcs in automotive electrical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishrikey, Matthew David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the present time, there is no established method for the detection of DC electric arcing. This is a concern for forthcoming advanced automotive electrical systems which consist of higher DC electric power bus voltages, ...

  4. Town of Kill Devil Hills- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In October 2007, the town of Kill Devil Hills adopted an ordinance to regulate the use of wind-energy systems. The ordinance directs any individual or organization wishing to install a wind-energy...

  5. Wind Farm Diversification and Its Impact on Power System Reliability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Degeilh, Yannick

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind exploitation gains prominence in the power industry, the extensive use of this intermittent source of power may heavily rely on our ability to select the best combination of wind farming sites that yields maximal reliability of power systems...

  6. Using Electric Vehicles to Meet Balancing Requirements Associated with Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Many states are deploying renewable generation sources at a significant rate to meet renewable portfolio standards. As part of this drive to meet renewable generation levels, significant additions of wind generation are planned. Due to the highly variable nature of wind generation, significant energy imbalances on the power system can be created and need to be handled. This report examines the impact on the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP) region for a 2019 expected wind scenario. One method for mitigating these imbalances is to utilize plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) or battery electric vehicles (BEVs) as assets to the grid. PHEVs and BEVs have the potential to meet this demand through both charging and discharging strategies. This report explores the usage of two different charging schemes: V2GHalf and V2GFull. In V2GHalf, PHEV/BEV charging is varied to absorb the additional imbalance from the wind generation, but never feeds power back into the grid. This scenario is highly desirable to automotive manufacturers, who harbor great concerns about battery warranty if vehicle-to-grid discharging is allowed. The second strategy, V2GFull, varies not only the charging of the vehicle battery, but also can vary the discharging of the battery back into the power grid. This scenario is currently less desirable to automotive manufacturers, but provides an additional resource benefit to PHEV/BEVs in meeting the additional imbalance imposed by wind. Key findings in the report relate to the PHEV/BEV population required to meet the additional imbalance when comparing V2GHalf to V2GFull populations, and when comparing home-only-charging and work-and-home-charging scenarios. Utilizing V2GFull strategies over V2GHalf resulted in a nearly 33% reduction in the number of vehicles required. This reduction indicates fewer vehicles are needed to meet the unhandled energy, but they would utilize discharging of the vehicle battery into the grid. This practice currently results in the voiding of automotive manufacturer's battery warranty, and is not feasible for many customers. The second key finding is the change in the required population when PHEV/BEV charging is available at both home and work. Allowing 10% of the vehicle population access to work charging resulted in nearly 80% of the grid benefit. Home-only charging requires, at best, 94% of the current NWPP light duty vehicle fleet to be a PHEV or BEV. With the introduction of full work charging availability, only 8% of the NWPP light duty vehicle fleet is required. Work charging has primarily been associated with mitigating range anxiety in new electric vehicle owners, but these studies indicate they have significant potential for improving grid reliability. The V2GHalf and V2GFull charging strategies of the report utilize grid frequency as an indication of the imbalance requirements. The introduction of public charging stations, as well as the potential for PHEV/BEVs to be used as a resource for renewable generation integration, creates conditions for additional products into the ancillary services market. In the United Kingdom, such a capability would be bid as a frequency product in the ancillary services market. Such a market could create the need for larger, third-party aggregators or services to manage the use of electric vehicles as a grid resource. Ultimately, customer adoption, usage patterns and habits, and feedback from the power and automotive industries will drive the need.

  7. Wind Energy Conversion Systems Fault Diagnosis Using Wavelet Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Wind Energy Conversion Systems Fault Diagnosis Using Wavelet Analysis Elie Al-Ahmar1,2 , Mohamed El, induction generator, Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT), failure diagnosis. I. Introduction Wind energy the condition of induction machines. Fig. 1. Worldwide growth of wind energy installed capacity [1]. 1 E. Al

  8. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  9. Power Control and Optimization of Photovoltaic and Wind Energy Conversion Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffari, Azad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because High Altitude Wind Generators (HAWGs) could movecables, realizing a wind generator that is largely lighterSystems High altitude wind generators will have a relatively

  10. Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

  11. California Wind Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LP Biomass Facilityin ChartsQuality ActCalifornia Wind Systems

  12. EIS-0418: PrairieWinds Project, South Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve the interconnection request from PrairieWinds for their South Dakota PrairieWinds Project, a 151.5-megawatt (MW) nameplate capacity wind powered generation facility, including 101 General Electric 1.5-MW wind turbine generators, electrical collector lines, collector substation, transmission line, communications system, and wind turbine service access roads.

  13. The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and wind power in three Canadian jurisdictions, namely British Columbia, Ontario and Alberta. An Optimal baseload mixtures. The large premium paid for displacing hydro or nuclear power with wind power does littleThe Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse

  14. Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Electrical Machines Paper ID 1434 DFIG-Based Wind Turbine Fault Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -Based Wind Turbine Fault Diagnosis Using a Specific Discrete Wavelet Transform E. Al-Ahmar1,2 , M for electrical and mechanical fault diagnosis in a DFIG-based wind turbine. The investigated technique unambiguously diagnose faults under transient conditions. Index Terms--Wind turbine, Doubly-Fed Induction

  15. Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems Gilbert M. Masters Stanford University A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC., PUBLICATION #12;#12;Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems #12;#12;Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems Gilbert M. Masters Stanford University A JOHN WILEY & SONS, INC

  16. Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in the paper corresponding to this presentation aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This presentation is an overview of a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool

  17. Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, R.G. Jr.; Boberg, E.S.; Lawrie, R.E.; Castaing, F.J.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration. 34 figs.

  18. Powertrain system for a hybrid electric vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reed, Jr., Richard G. (Royal Oak, MI); Boberg, Evan S. (Hazel Park, MI); Lawrie, Robert E. (Whitmore Lake, MI); Castaing, Francois J. (Bloomfield Township, MI)

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid electric powertrain system is provided including an electric motor/generator drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of a transmission. The electric is utilized for synchronizing the rotation of the drive shaft with the driven shaft during gear shift operations. In addition, a mild hybrid concept is provided which utilizes a smaller electric motor than typical hybrid powertrain systems. Because the electric motor is drivingly engaged with the drive shaft of the transmission, the electric motor/generator is driven at high speed even when the vehicle speed is low so that the electric motor/generator provides more efficient regeneration.

  19. Simplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based on Monte-Carlo simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in the literature. In the special case of greenhouses gases (GHG) from wind power electricity, the LCA resultsSimplified life cycle approach: GHG variability assessment for onshore wind electricity based performed by the IPCC [1]. Such result might lead policy makers to consider LCA as an inconclusive method [2

  20. Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Wind Energy Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  1. Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight...

  2. Electrical system for a motor vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tamor, Michael Alan (Toledo, OH)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment of the present invention, an electrical system for a motor vehicle comprises a capacitor, an engine cranking motor coupled to receive motive power from the capacitor, a storage battery and an electrical generator having an electrical power output, the output coupled to provide electrical energy to the capacitor and to the storage battery. The electrical system also includes a resistor which limits current flow from the battery to the engine cranking motor. The electrical system further includes a diode which allows current flow through the diode from the generator to the battery but which blocks current flow through the diode from the battery to the cranking motor.

  3. Electrical system for a motor vehicle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tamor, M.A.

    1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In one embodiment of the present invention, an electrical system for a motor vehicle comprises a capacitor, an engine cranking motor coupled to receive motive power from the capacitor, a storage battery and an electrical generator having an electrical power output, the output coupled to provide electrical energy to the capacitor and to the storage battery. The electrical system also includes a resistor which limits current flow from the battery to the engine cranking motor. The electrical system further includes a diode which allows current flow through the diode from the generator to the battery but which blocks current flow through the diode from the battery to the cranking motor. 2 figs.

  4. Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B.Sc., University of Wisconsin ­ Madison, 2003 Supervisory and small power systems. However, the variability due to the stochastic nature of the wind resource

  5. Record of Decision for the Electrical Interconnection of the Windy Point Wind Energy Project.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has decided to offer contract terms for interconnection of 250 megawatts (MW) of power to be generated by the proposed Windy Point Wind Energy Project (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS). Windy Point Partners, LLC (WPP) propose to construct and operate the proposed Wind Project and has requested interconnection to the FCRTS. The Wind Project will be interconnected at BPA's Rock Creek Substation, which is under construction in Klickitat County, Washington. The Rock Creek Substation will provide transmission access for the Wind Project to BPA's Wautoma-John Day No.1 500-kilovolt (kV) transmission line. BPA's decision to offer terms to interconnect the Wind Project is consistent with BPA's Business Plan Final Environmental Impact Statement (BP EIS) (DOE/EIS-0183, June 1995), and the Business Plan Record of Decision (BP ROD, August 15, 1995). This decision thus is tiered to the BP ROD.

  6. Wind Energy for Rural Electric Cooperatives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwideWTEDBird,Wilsonville, Oregon: EnergyWindCooperatives Jump to:

  7. Illinois Rural Electric Cooperative Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP Wind Farm JumpIllinois Institute for Rural

  8. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    approach to locating wind farms in the UK," Renewablepower production at existing wind farms. Each of these is anpower from potential wind farm locations in California and

  9. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano-Nieto, Albert

    1 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM EET 105: ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS Instructor: Albert Lozano: Majority Accidents CAN happen at lower voltages Most common hazard in electronics work Energy stored by capacitors, especially those used in by power supply subcircuits: High Energy Good practice: Short out leads

  10. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value ofWind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and theNorthwest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power production varies on a diurnal and seasonal basis. In this report, we use wind speed data modeled by TrueWind Solutions, LLC (now AWS Truewind) to assess the effects of wind timing on the value of electric power from potential wind farm locations in California and the Northwest. (Data from this dataset are referred to as ''TrueWind data'' throughout this report.) The intra-annual wind speed variations reported in the TrueWind datasets have not previously been used in published work, however, so we also compare them to a collection of anemometer wind speed measurements and to a limited set of actual wind farm production data. The research reported in this paper seeks to answer three specific questions: (1) How large of an effect can the temporal variation of wind power have on the value of wind in different wind resource areas? (2) Which locations are affected most positively or negatively by the seasonal and diurnal timing of wind speeds? (3) How compatible are wind resources in the Northwest and California with wholesale power prices and loads in either region? The latter question is motivated by the fact that wind power projects in the Northwest could sell their output into California (and vice versa), and that California has an aggressive renewable energy policy that may ultimately yield such imports. Based on our research, we reach three key conclusions. (1) Temporal patterns have a moderate impact on the wholesale market value of wind power and a larger impact on the capacity factor during peak hours. The best-timed wind power sites have a wholesale market value that is up to 4 percent higher than the average market price, while the worst-timed sites have a market value that is up to 11 percent below the average market price. The best-timed wind sites could produce as much as 30-40 percent more power during peak hours than they do on average during the year, while the worst timed sites may produce 30-60 percent less power during peak hours. (2) Northwestern markets appear to be well served by Northwestern wind and poorly served by California wind; results are less clear for California markets. Both the modeled TrueWind data and the anemometer data indicate that many Northwestern wind sites are reasonably well-matched to the Northwest's historically winter-peaking wholesale electricity prices and loads, while most California sites are poorly matched to these prices and loads. However, the TrueWind data indicate that most California and Northwestern wind sites are poorly matched to California's summer-afternoon-peaking prices and loads, while the anemometer data suggest that many of these same sites are well matched to California's wholesale prices and loads. (3) TrueWind and anemometer data agree about wind speeds in most times and places, but disagree about California's summer afternoon wind speeds: The TrueWind data indicate that wind speeds at sites in California's coastal mountains and some Northwestern locations dip deeply during summer days and stay low through much of the afternoon. In contrast, the anemometer data indicate that winds at these sites begin to rise during the afternoon and are relatively strong when power is needed most. At other times and locations, the two datasets show good agreement. This disagreement may be due in part to time-varying wind shear between the anemometer heights (20-25m) and the TrueWind reference height (50m or 70m), but may also be due to modeling errors or data collection inconsistencies.

  11. Developing Business Case for Electrical System Replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Carles

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    and distribution equipment. This paper is a great resource for technical information concerning failure rates of electrical system protective relaying. ?Upgrading and Enhancing the Generator Protection System by Making Use of Digital Systems?, published.... This paper focus on upgrading generation plant electrical systems and is a good reference for performing generator relay protection upgrades. Chapter 2 ? Literature Review Page 7 of 47 Developing Business Case For Electrical System Replacement Projects...

  12. Colliding Winds in Low-Mass Binary Star Systems: wind interactions and implications for habitable planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnstone, C P; Pilat-Lohinger, E; Bisikalo, D; Güdel, M; Eggl, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. In binary star systems, the winds from the two components impact each other, leading to strong shocks and regions of enhanced density and temperature. Potentially habitable circumbinary planets must continually be exposed to these interactions regions. Aims. We study, for the first time, the interactions between winds from low-mass stars in a binary system, to show the wind conditions seen by potentially habitable circumbinary planets. Methods. We use the advanced 3D numerical hydrodynamic code Nurgush to model the wind interactions of two identical winds from two solar mass stars with circular orbits and a binary separation of 0.5 AU. As input into this model, we use a 1D hydrodynamic simulation of the solar wind, run using the Versatile Advection Code. We derive the locations of stable and habitable orbits in this system to explore what wind conditions potentially habitable planets will be exposed to during their orbits. Results. Our wind interaction simulations result in the formation of two stron...

  13. ARMA systems in wind engineering Yousun Li and A. Kareem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    ARMA systems in wind engineering Yousun Li and A. Kareem Structural Aerodynamics and Ocean System The time domain solution of the equations of motion of structures subjected to a stochastic wind field histories of the aerodynamic force. Recently, autoregressive and moving average (ARMA) recursive models have

  14. Ris-R-1257(EN) Isolated Systems with Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy in isolated communities. So far most studies of isolated systems with wind power have been case and economical feasibility of isolated power supply systems with wind energy. General guidelines and checklists project costs 24 5.5.2 Cost of Energy, COE 25 5.5.3 Value of Energy, VOE 25 Primary power supply 25

  15. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  16. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

  17. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

  18. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donde, Vaibhav; Lopez, Vanessa; Lesieutre, Bernard; Pinar, Ali; Yang, Chao; Meza, Juan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    collapse in electrical power systems,” IEEE Transactions onpower sys- tems,” International Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems,

  19. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donde, Vaibhav

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    collapse in electrical power systems,” IEEE Transactions onpower sys- tems,” International Journal of Electrical Power and Energy Systems,

  20. Electrical system using phase-shifted carrier signals and related operating methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welchko, Brian A; Campbell, Jeremy B

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An automotive drive system and methods for making the same are provided. The system includes a three-phase motor and an inverter module. The three-phase motor includes a first set of windings each having a first magnetic polarity; and a second set of windings each having a second magnetic polarity that is opposite the first magnetic polarity. The first set of windings being electrically isolated from the second set of windings. The inverter module includes a first set of phase legs and a second set of phase legs. Each one of the first set of phase legs is coupled to a corresponding phase of the first set of windings, and each one of the second set of phase legs is coupled to a corresponding phase of the second set of windings.

  1. Madison County- Wind Energy Systems Ordinance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Madison County adopted a new land use ordinance in May 2010, which includes provisions for permitting wind turbines within the county.

  2. Capacity Value of PV and Wind Generation in the NV Energy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Diao, Ruisheng; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculation of photovoltaic (PV) and wind power capacity values is important for estimating additional load that can be served by new PV or wind installations in the electrical power system. It also is the basis for assigning capacity credit payments in systems with markets. Because of variability in solar and wind resources, PV and wind generation contribute to power system resource adequacy differently from conventional generation. Many different approaches to calculating PV and wind generation capacity values have been used by utilities and transmission operators. Using the NV Energy system as a study case, this report applies peak-period capacity factor (PPCF) and effective load carrying capability (ELCC) methods to calculate capacity values for renewable energy sources. We show the connection between the PPCF and ELCC methods in the process of deriving a simplified approach that approximates the ELCC method. This simplified approach does not require generation fleet data and provides the theoretical basis for a quick check on capacity value results of PV and wind generation. The diminishing return of capacity benefit as renewable generation increases is conveniently explained using the simplified capacity value approach.

  3. July 29th -30th 2010 1Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 MW Offshore Onshore Wind · Wind farms: · Grid codes ensure capability to regulate #12;July 29th - 30th 2010 9Integration of WindJuly 29th - 30th 2010 1Integration of Wind Power in the Danish Energy System Integration of Wind

  4. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrical and control system losses, blade contamination, weather, wake effects, turbulence, and turbine outages (

  5. GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems (Smart Grid Project) (Spain) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected...

  6. Permanent split capacitor single phase electric motor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirschbaum, H.S.

    1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent split capacitor single phase electric motor achieves balanced operation at more than one operating point by adjusting the voltage supplied to the main and auxiliary windings and adjusting the capacitance in the auxiliary winding circuit. An intermediate voltage tap on an autotransformer supplies voltage to the main winding for low speed operation while a capacitive voltage divider is used to adjust the voltage supplied to the auxiliary winding for low speed operation. 4 figs.

  7. Superconductivity for electric power systems: Program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Largely due to government and private industry partnerships, electric power applications based upon high-temperature superconductivity are now being designed and tested only seven years after the discovery of the high-temperature superconductors. These applications offer many benefits to the national electric system including: increased energy efficiency, reduced equipment size, reduced emissions, increased stability/reliability, deferred expansion, and flexible electricity dispatch/load management. All of these benefits have a common outcome: lower electricity costs and improved environmental quality. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors research and development through its Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. This program will help develop the technology needed for U.S. industries to commercialize high-temperature superconductive electric power applications. DOE envisions that by 2010 the U.S. electric power systems equipment industry will regain a major share of the global market by offering superconducting products that outperform the competition.

  8. Power Control and Optimization of Photovoltaic and Wind Energy Conversion Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffari, Azad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    both AC drives and wind energy Turbine, shaft, and Gear BoxWind Energy Conversion Systems using Extremum Seeking Wind turbines (wind energy generation can be realized by capturing wind power at altitudes over the ground that cannot be reached by wind turbines.

  9. Addressing System Integration Issues Required for the Developmente of Distributed Wind-Hydrogen Energy Systems: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D; Salehfar, H.; Harrison, K.W.; Dale, N.; Biaku, C.; Peters, A.J.; Hernandez-Pacheco: E.

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind generated electricity is a variable resource. Hydrogen can be generated as an energy storage media, but is costly. Advancements in power electronics and system integration are needed to make a viable system. Therefore, the long-term goal of the efforts at the University of North Dakota is to merge wind energy, hydrogen production, and fuel cells to bring emission-free and reliable power to commercial viability. The primary goals include 1) expand system models as a tool to investigate integration and control issues, 2) examine long-term effects of wind-electrolysis performance from a systematic perspective, and 3) collaborate with NREL and industrial partners to design, integrate, and quantify system improvements by implementing a single power electronics package to interface wild AC to PEM stack DC requirements. This report summarizes the accomplishments made during this project.

  10. Ris-R-1256(EN) Isolated Systems with Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of methods and guidelines rather than "universal solutions" for the use of wind energy in isolated the technical and economical feasibility of isolated power supply systems with wind energy. As a part of the project the following tasks were carried out: Review of literature, field measurements in Egypt

  11. Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    generation to analyse the effects of uncertainty. We find that the costs of balancing wind power were relatively low in the Ger- man system in 2003. They could be reduced even further when a better forecast becomes available, either by implementing a later... . This was to be expected, as start-up and shut-down decisions are the key variables used to balance wind power’s volatility. On the other hand, we find that the increase in generation costs is marginal. This is also plausible as average wind generation is held constant...

  12. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Analysis, Phase 1. CWEC-2003-06. Davis, California: California Windanalysis of the effect of wind timing and variability on the system integration costs

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles on Wind Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Short, W.; Denholm, P.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines a measure that may potentially reduce oil use and also more than proportionately reduce carbon emissions from vehicles. The authors present a very preliminary analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) that can be charged from or discharged to the grid. These vehicles have the potential to reduce gasoline consumption and carbon emissions from vehicles, as well as improve the viability of renewable energy technologies with variable resource availability. This paper is an assessment of the synergisms between plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and wind energy. The authors examine two bounding cases that illuminate this potential synergism.

  14. Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

  15. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capac- ityas the capacity factor of the wind power plant during the 10Wind Plant Integration: Costs, Status, and Issues," IEEE Power &

  16. EC417: Electric Energy Systems: Adapting to Renewable Resources Description: This course will present a detailed perspective of electric power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    power calculations for balanced and unbalanced loads 5. Real and Reactive Power and Power Factor and "blackouts" (especially those related to the introduction of renewables (Photovoltaics, wind, etc.) 10. Power will present a detailed perspective of electric power systems from generation, transmission, and storage

  17. SMART Wind Mechanical Systems Subgroup Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Commerce National Institute of Standards and Technology, the SMART Wind Consortium will connect more than 80 collaborators to form consensus on near-term and mid...

  18. Special Assessment for Wind Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purposes of property tax assessment, utility-owned wind projects are considered to have a value equal to their salvage value, with certain limitations. This incentive effectively lowers the...

  19. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and S. Bretz, "Wind Generation in the Future Competitiveenergy sources, wind power generation I. I NTRODUCTION Windwind alone. Index Terms—energy resources, power generation

  20. Fiber-Optic Defect and Damage Locator System for Wind Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Vahid Sotoudeh; Dr. Richard J. Black; Dr. Behzad Moslehi; Mr. Aleks Plavsic

    2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    IFOS in collaboration with Auburn University demonstrated the feasibility of a Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) integrated sensor system capable of providing real time in-situ defect detection, localization and quantification of damage. In addition, the system is capable of validating wind turbine blade structural models, using recent advances in non-contact, non-destructive dynamic testing of composite structures. This new generation method makes it possible to analyze wind turbine blades not only non-destructively, but also without physically contacting or implanting intrusive electrical elements and transducers into the structure. Phase I successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the technology with the construction of a 1.5 kHz sensor interrogator and preliminary instrumentation and testing of both composite material coupons and a wind turbine blade.

  1. Electrical Energy Storage for Renewable Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helms, C. R.; Cho, K. J.; Ferraris, John; Balkus, Ken; Chabal, Yves; Gnade, Bruce; Rotea, Mario; Vasselli, John

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This program focused on development of the fundamental understanding necessary to significantly improve advanced battery and ultra-capacitor materials and systems to achieve significantly higher power and energy density on the one hand, and significantly lower cost on the other. This program spanned all the way from atomic-level theory, to new nanomaterials syntheses and characterization, to system modeling and bench-scale technology demonstration. Significant accomplishments are detailed in each section. Those particularly noteworthy include: • Transition metal silicate cathodes with 2x higher storage capacity than commercial cobalt oxide cathodes were demonstrated. • MnO? nanowires, which are a promising replacement for RuO?, were synthesized • PAN-based carbon nanofibers were prepared and characterized with an energy density 30-times higher than current ultracapacitors on the market and comparable to lead-acid batteries • An optimization-based control strategy for real-time power management of battery storage in wind farms was developed and demonstrated. • PVDF films were developed with breakdown strengths of > 600MVm?¹, a maximum energy density of approximately 15 Jcm?³, and an average dielectric constant of 9.8 (±1.2). Capacitors made from these films can support a 10-year lifetime operating at an electric field of 200 MV m?¹. This program not only delivered significant advancements in fundamental understanding and new materials and technology, it also showcased the power of the cross-functional, multi-disciplinary teams at UT Dallas and UT Tyler for such work. These teams are continuing this work with other sources of funding from both industry and government.

  2. SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ..................11 Table 2: Levelized System Costs ($2006/MWh) .................................................12CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION SCENARIO ANALYSES OF CALIFORNIA'S ELECTRICITY SYSTEM: PRELIMINARY RESULTS FOR THE 2007 INTEGRATED ENERGY POLICY REPORT ADDENDUM STAFFDRAFTREPORT JULY 2007 CEC-200

  3. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Kotzebue, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Kotzebue, Alaska. Data provided for this project include wind turbine output, average wind speed, average net capacity factor, and optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  4. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; Toksook Bay, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in Toksook Bay, Alaska. Data provided for this project include community load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, thermal load data, average net capacity factor, optimal net capacity factor based on Alaska Energy Authority wind data, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  5. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 1: National assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [6714 Norway Road, Dallas, TX (United States); Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

  6. Wind power on BPA system sets another new record

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RELEASE Tuesday, March 20, 2012 CONTACT: Mike Hansen, BPA 503-230-4328 or 503-230-5131 Wind power on BPA system sets another new record The renewable resource passes 4,000...

  7. WIND EFFECTS ON CHEMICAL SPILL IN ST ANDREW BAY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    WIND EFFECTS ON CHEMICAL SPILL IN ST ANDREW BAY SYSTEM PETER C. CHU, PATRICE PAULY Naval Can easily reach 20 m/s and more during hurricane events #12;Water Quality Management and Analysis

  8. Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aljeeran, Fares

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This research study developed basic dynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the response behavior of a near-shore wind turbine structure with monopile, suction caisson, or gravity-based foundation systems. The marine soil conditions...

  9. Local Option- Solar, Wind and Biomass Energy Systems Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 487 of the New York State Real Property Tax Law provides a 15-year real property tax exemption for solar, wind energy, and farm-waste energy systems constructed in New York State. As...

  10. Simulated performance of an airborne lidar wind shear detection system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffith, Kenneth Scott

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRBORNE LIDAR WIND SHEAR DETECTION SYSTEM A Thesis by KENNETH SCOTT GRIFFITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1987 Major Subject: Physics SIMULATED PERFORMANCE OF AN AIRBORNE LIDAR WIND SHEAR DETECTION SYSTEM A Thesis by KENNETH SCOTT GRIFFITH Approved as to style and content by: e . atta ar (Chair an of Committee) T omas . air, III (Member) ic...

  11. Maui Electrical System Model Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 2. Simulation Data and Assumptions 1 2.1 Economic Data and Assumptions 1 2.1.1 Thermal Plants 1 2 of the power plant FUEL_TYPE OIL-Distillate Oil (No.2); RENEW - zero cost fuel used for modeling Wind & Geoth.1.2 Independent Power Producers 2 2.1.3 Load Demand 2 2.2 Dynamics 4 2.2.1 Load Flow 4 2.2.1.1 Database Conversion

  12. Land-use implications of wind-energy-conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noun, R.J.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An estimated 20 utilities in the United States are now investigating potential wind machine sites in their areas. Identifying sites for wind machine clusters (wind farms) involves more than just finding a location with a suitable wind resource. Consideration must also be given to the proximity of sites to existing transmission lines, environmental impacts, aesthetics, and legal concerns as well as the availability of and alternative uses for the land. These issues have made it increasingly difficult for utilities to bring conventional power plants on-line quickly. Utilities are now required, however, to give careful consideration to specific legal, social, and environmental questions raised by the siting of wind energy conversion systems (WECS).

  13. Land-Based Wind Plant Balance-of-System Cost Drivers and Sensitivities (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mone, C.; Maples, B.; Hand, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With Balance of System (BOS) costs contributing up to 30% of the installed capital cost, it is fundamental to understand the BOS costs for wind projects as well as potential cost trends for larger turbines. NREL developed a BOS model using project cost estimates developed by industry partners. Aspects of BOS covered include engineering and permitting, foundations for various wind turbines, transportation, civil work, and electrical arrays. The data introduce new scaling relationships for each BOS component to estimate cost as a function of turbine parameters and size, project parameters and size, and geographic characteristics. Based on the new BOS model, an analysis to understand the non?turbine wind plant costs associated with turbine sizes ranging from 1-6 MW and wind plant sizes ranging from 100-1000 MW has been conducted. This analysis establishes a more robust baseline cost estimate, identifies the largest cost components of wind project BOS, and explores the sensitivity of the capital investment cost and the levelized cost of energy to permutations in each BOS cost element. This presentation shows results from the model that illustrate the potential impact of turbine size and project size on the cost of energy from US wind plants.

  14. 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply (Executive Summary) 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply...

  15. The effect of wind speed fluctuations on the performance of a wind-powered membrane system for brackish water desalination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Gavin L.; Schäfer, Andrea; Richards, Bryce S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind-powered reverse osmosis membrane (wind-membrane) system without energy storage was tested using synthetic brackish water (2750 and 5500 mg/L NaCl) over a range of simulated wind speeds under both steady-state and ...

  16. High density electrical card connector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haggard, J. Eric (Elgin, IL); Trotter, Garrett R. (Aurora, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical circuit board card connection system is disclosed which comprises a wedge-operated locking mechanism disposed along an edge portion of the printed circuit board. An extrusion along the edge of the circuit board mates with an extrusion fixed to the card cage having a plurality of electrical connectors. The connection system allows the connectors to be held away from the circuit board during insertion/extraction and provides a constant mating force once the circuit board is positioned and the wedge inserted. The disclosed connection system is a simple solution to the need for a greater number of electrical signal connections.

  17. Maui Electrical System Simulation Model Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maui Electrical System Simulation Model Validation Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Under Award No. DE-FC-06NT42847 Task 9 Deliverable ­ Baseline Model Validation By GE Global Research Niskayuna, New York And University of Hawaii Hawaii Natural

  18. Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

  19. EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of providing a financial assistance grant under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 to the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology to facilitate the development and demonstration of a multi-faceted, synergistic approach to managing fluctuations in wind power within the Electric Reliability Council of Texas transmission grid.

  20. Introducing WISDEM:An Integrated System Modeling for Wind Turbines and Plant (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Graf, P.; Scott, G.; Ning, A.; King, R.; Guo, Y.; Parsons, T.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Veers, P.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better National Wind Technology Center wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its research capabilities toward integrating wind energy engineering and cost models across wind plants. This Wind-Plant Integrated System Design & Engineering Model (WISDEM) platform captures the important interactions between various subsystems to achieve a better understanding of how to improve system-level performance and achieve system-level cost reductions. This work illustrates a few case studies with WISDEM that focus on the design and analysis of wind turbines and plants at different system levels.

  1. Bus bar electrical feedthrough for electrorefiner system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A bus bar electrical feedthrough for an electrorefiner system may include a retaining plate, electrical isolator, and/or contact block. The retaining plate may include a central opening. The electrical isolator may include a top portion, a base portion, and a slot extending through the top and base portions. The top portion of the electrical isolator may be configured to extend through the central opening of the retaining plate. The contact block may include an upper section, a lower section, and a ridge separating the upper and lower sections. The upper section of the contact block may be configured to extend through the slot of the electrical isolator and the central opening of the retaining plate. Accordingly, relatively high electrical currents may be transferred into a glovebox or hot-cell facility at a relatively low cost and higher amperage capacity without sacrificing atmosphere integrity.

  2. Electromagnetic interference filter for automotive electrical systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herron, Nicholas Hayden; Carlson, Douglas S; Tang, David; Korich, Mark D

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A filter for an automotive electrical system includes a substrate having first and second conductive members. First and second input terminals are mounted to the substrate. The first input terminal is electrically connected to the first conductive member, and the second input terminal is electrically connected to the second conductive member. A plurality of capacitors are mounted to the substrate. Each of the capacitors is electrically connected to at least one of the first and second conductive members. First and second power connectors are mounted to the substrate. The first power connector is electrically connected to the first conductive member, and the second power connector is electrically connected to the second conductive member. A common mode choke is coupled to the substrate and arranged such that the common mode choke extends around at least a portion of the substrate and the first and second conductive members.

  3. RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Statistics for Large Arrays of Wind Turbines (wind energy program is based on such a design Therefore Justus, for example, has found that a is cubic, wind turbine

  4. Performance of a stand-alone wind-electric ice maker for remote villages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, H.C. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Brandemuehl, M.J. [University of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Joint Center for Energy Management; Bergey, M.L.S. [Bergey Windpower Co., Norman, OK (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two ice makers in the 1.1 metric tons per 24 hours (1.2 tons per day) size range were tested to determine their performance when directly coupled to a variable-frequency wind turbine generator. Initial tests were conducted using a dynamometer to simulate to wind to evaluate whether previously determined potential problems were significant and to define basic performance parameters. Field testing in Norman, Oklahoma, was completed to determine the performance of one of the ice makers under real wind conditions. As expected, the ice makers produced more ice at a higher speed than rated, and less ice at a lower speed. Due to the large start-up torque requirement of reciprocating compressors, the ice making system experienced a large start-up current and corresponding voltage drop which required a larger wind turbine that expected to provide the necessary current and voltage. Performance curves for ice production and power consumption are presented. A spreadsheet model was constructed to predict ice production at a user-defined site given the wind conditions for that location. Future work should include long-term performance tests and research on reducing the large start-up currents the system experiences when first coming on line.

  5. Abstract--This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS) which involve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Abstract-- This paper addresses the problem of controlling wind energy conversion systems (WECS-inverter. The goal of control is to maximize wind energy extraction and this needs letting the wind turbine rotor wind energy extraction) only for one wind speed value depending on the considered value of turbine

  6. Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Impact of DFIG wind turbines on transient stability of power systems ­ a review Authors Na Abstract of wind farms are using variable speed wind turbines equipped with doubly-fed induction generators (DFIG) due to their advantages over other wind turbine generators. Therefore, the analysis of wind power

  7. A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    penetration of wind-based generation. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, achieving 20% of wind power hinder the widespread penetration of wind-based power generation [2]. These are i) the impact of wind1 A Framework for Reliability and Performance Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

  8. Small Wind Guidebook/What are the Basic Parts of a Small Wind Electric

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG SolarSkykomish,NewEnergySmallSystem | Open Energy

  9. NCAR WRF-based data assimilation and forecasting systems for wind energy applications power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Guebuem

    NCAR WRF-based data assimilation and forecasting systems for wind energy applications power Yuewei of these modeling technologies w.r.t. wind energy applications. Then I'll discuss wind farm

  10. Power Control and Optimization of Photovoltaic and Wind Energy Conversion Systems /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghaffari, Azad

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be realized by capturing wind power at altitudes over the2011. [2] ——, “High altitude wind power systems: A survey onOckels, “Optimal cross-wind towing and power generation with

  11. Examination of Capacity and Ramping Impacts of Wind Energy on Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When wind plants serve load within the balancing area, no additional capacity required to integrate wind power into the system. We present some thought experiments to illustrate some implications for wind integration studies.

  12. EIS-0006: Wind Turbine Generator System, Block Island, Rhode Island

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy prepared this EIS to evaluate the environmental impacts of installing and operating a large experimental wind turbine, designated the MOD-OA, which is proposed to be installed on a knoll in Rhode Island's New Meadow Hill Swamp, integrated with the adjacent Block Island Power Company power plant and operated to supply electricity to the existing utility network.

  13. Comprehensive Diagnosis of Complex Electrical Power Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daigle, Matthew

    Comprehensive Diagnosis of Complex Electrical Power Distribution Systems Indranil Roychoudhury Abstract: Electrical power distribution systems are composed of heterogeneous components, which include and discrete faults in electrical power distribution systems that include dc and ac components. We use a hybrid

  14. Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

  15. RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems and Research Needs, EPRI EL-377-SR, February 1977.Electric Utility Systems, EPRI, EM-336, November, 1976. 24.of Large Generating Units EPRI WS-77-50, February 1978.

  16. Wind Technology Modeling Within the System Advisor Model (SAM) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Dobos, A.; Ferguson, T.; Freeman, J.; Gilman, P.; Whitmore, J.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster provides detail for implementation and the underlying methodology for modeling wind power generation performance in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). SAM's wind power model allows users to assess projects involving one or more large or small wind turbines with any of the detailed options for residential, commercial, or utility financing. The model requires information about the wind resource, wind turbine specifications, wind farm layout (if applicable), and costs, and provides analysis to compare the absolute or relative impact of these inputs. SAM is a system performance and economic model designed to facilitate analysis and decision-making for project developers, financers, policymakers, and energy researchers. The user pairs a generation technology with a financing option (residential, commercial, or utility) to calculate the cost of energy over the multi-year project period. Specifically, SAM calculates the value of projects which buy and sell power at retail rates for residential and commercial systems, and also for larger-scale projects which operate through a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a utility. The financial model captures complex financing and rate structures, taxes, and incentives.

  17. SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.P. McCann

    1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Electrical Power System receives and distributes utility power to all North Portal site users. The major North Portal users are the Protected Area including the subsurface facility and Balance of Plant areas. The system is remotely monitored and controlled from the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System. The system monitors power quality and provides the capability to transfer between Off-Site Utility and standby power (including dedicated safeguards and security power). Standby power is only distributed to selected loads for personnel safety and essential operations. Security power is only distributed to essential security operations. The standby safeguards and security power is independent from all other site power. The system also provides surface lighting, grounding grid, and lightning protection for the North Portal. The system distributes power during construction, operation, caretaker, and closure phases of the repository. The system consists of substation equipment (disconnect switches, breakers, transformers and grounding equipment) and power distribution cabling from substation to the north portal switch gear building. Additionally, the system includes subsurface facility substation (located on surface), switch-gear, standby diesel generators, underground duct banks, power cables and conduits, switch-gear building and associated distribution equipment for power distribution. Each area substation distributes power to the electrical loads and includes the site grounding, site lighting and lightning protection equipment. The site electrical power system distributes power of sufficient quantity and quality to meet users demands. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the North Portal surface systems requiring electrical power. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System which will supply power to the underground facilities from the North Portal. Power required for the South Portal and development side activities of the subsurface facility will be provided at the South Portal by the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the Off-Site Utility System for the receipt of power. The System interfaces with the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control. The System interfaces with MGR Site Layout System for the physical location of equipment and power distribution.

  18. A Unified Framework for Reliability Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    1 A Unified Framework for Reliability Assessment of Wind Energy Conversion Systems Sebastian S a framework for assessing wind energy conversion systems (WECS) reliability in the face of external based on wind energy are: the impact of wind speed variability on system reliability [1]; WECS' reaction

  19. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Farm Production: We used hourly power production data from the Altamont, Tehachapi and San GorgonioSan Gorgonio resource areas, we also show the effects calculated using the total output from all wind farms

  20. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  1. Energy 101: Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    See how wind turbines generate clean electricity from the power of the wind. Highlighted are the various parts and mechanisms of a modern wind turbine.

  2. Reference Model for Control and Automation Systems in Electrical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Model for Control and Automation Systems in Electrical Power (October 2005) Reference Model for Control and Automation Systems in Electrical Power (October 2005) Modern...

  3. Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System Country Denmark...

  4. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems of America, Inc. Electric Drive Component Manufacturing: Magna E-Car Systems...

  5. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade Project Will Take Advantage of...

  6. Advanced Systems of Efficient Use of Electrical Energy SURE ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advanced Systems of Efficient Use of Electrical Energy SURE (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Advanced Systems of Efficient Use of Electrical Energy...

  7. Modeling and control of an open accumulator Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system for wind turbines q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Modeling and control of an open accumulator Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system for wind compressed air energy storage. Maximizes energy production, levels load, downsizes electrical parts, meets Energy Storage (CAES) Load leveling Hydraulics Pneumatics Bandwidth limitation a b s t r a c t This paper

  8. A novel hybrid (wind-photovoltaic) system sizing procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hocaoglu, Fatih O. [Afyon Kocatepe University, Dept. of Electronics and Communication Eng., 03200 Afyonkarahisar (Turkey); Gerek, Oemer N.; Kurban, Mehmet [Anadolu University, Dept. of Electrical and Electronics Eng., 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind-photovoltaic hybrid system (WPHS) utilization is becoming popular due to increasing energy costs and decreasing prices of turbines and photovoltaic (PV) panels. However, prior to construction of a renewable generation station, it is necessary to determine the optimum number of PV panels and wind turbines for minimal cost during continuity of generated energy to meet the desired consumption. In fact, the traditional sizing procedures find optimum number of the PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost. However, the optimum battery capacity is either not taken into account, or it is found by a full search between all probable solution spaces which requires extensive computation. In this study, a novel description of the production/consumption phenomenon is proposed, and a new sizing procedure is developed. Using this procedure, optimum battery capacity, together with optimum number of PV modules and wind turbines subject to minimum cost can be obtained with good accuracy. (author)

  9. Proceedings of the fourth biennial conference and workshop on wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kottler, R.J. Jr. (ed.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts are included for papers presented concerning research and development requirements and utility interface and institutional issues for small-scale systems; design requirements and research and development requirements for large-scale systems; economic and operational requirements of large-scale wind systems; wind characteristics and wind energy siting; international activities; wind energy applications in agriculture; federal commercialization and decentralization plans; and wind energy innovative systems.

  10. Conceptual Model of Offshore Wind Environmental Risk Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Hamilton, Erin L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we describe the development of the Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), a risk-informed analytical process for estimating the environmental risks associated with the construction and operation of offshore wind energy generation projects. The development of ERES for offshore wind is closely allied to a concurrent process undertaken to examine environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy generation, although specific risk-relevant attributes will differ between the MHK and offshore wind domains. During FY10, a conceptual design of ERES for offshore wind will be developed. The offshore wind ERES mockup described in this report will provide a preview of the functionality of a fully developed risk evaluation system that will use risk assessment techniques to determine priority stressors on aquatic organisms and environments from specific technology aspects, identify key uncertainties underlying high-risk issues, compile a wide-range of data types in an innovative and flexible data organizing scheme, and inform planning and decision processes with a transparent and technically robust decision-support tool. A fully functional version of ERES for offshore wind will be developed in a subsequent phase of the project.

  11. High slot utilization systems for electric machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two new High Slot Utilization (HSU) Systems for electric machines enable the use of form wound coils that have the highest fill factor and the best use of magnetic materials. The epoxy/resin/curing treatment ensures the mechanical strength of the assembly of teeth, core, and coils. In addition, the first HSU system allows the coil layers to be moved inside the slots for the assembly purpose. The second system uses the slided-in teeth instead of the plugged-in teeth. The power density of the electric machine that uses either system can reach its highest limit.

  12. Electric Power System Asset Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEAWater Use Goal 4:Administration Electric Power

  13. Entegrity Wind Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy OffshoreDeveloperEnertech Jump to:Entegrity Wind

  14. Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators A. El the problem of controlling wind energy conversion (WEC) systems involving permanent magnet synchronous is to maximize wind energy extraction which cannot be achieved without letting the wind turbine rotor operate

  15. The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    243 1 The State of the Art of Generators for Wind Energy Conversion Systems Y. Amirat, M. E. H. Benbouzid, B. Bensaker, R. Wamkeue and H. Mangel Abstract--Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) have become of the studied generators is provided in Fig. 2. II. WIND ENERGY BACKGROUND A. Wind Power Conversion

  16. WIND TOMOGRAPHY IN BINARY SYSTEMS O.Knill, R.Dgani and M.Vogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knill, Oliver

    WIND TOMOGRAPHY IN BINARY SYSTEMS O.Knill, R.Dgani and M.Vogel ETH-Zurich, CH-8092, Switzerland method is particularly suitable for determining the velocity laws of stellar winds. 1. WIND TOMOGRAPHY AND ABEL'S INTEGRAL Binary systems in which a compact, point-like radiation source shines through the wind

  17. Systems Performance Analyses of Alaska Wind-Diesel Projects; St. Paul, Alaska (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes a systems performance analysis of the wind-diesel project in St. Paul, Alaska. Data provided for this project include load data, average wind turbine output, average diesel plant output, dump (controlling) load, average net capacity factor, average net wind penetration, estimated fuel savings, and wind system availability.

  18. Impact of Generator Flexibility on Electric System Costs and Integration of Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palchak, D.; Denholm, P.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flexibility of traditional generators plays an important role in accommodating the increased variability and uncertainty of wind and solar on the electric power system. Increased flexibility can be achieved with changes to operational practices or upgrades to existing generation. One challenge is in understanding the value of increasing flexibility, and how this value may change given higher levels of variable generation. This study uses a commercial production cost model to measure the impact of generator flexibility on the integration of wind and solar generators. We use a system that is based on two balancing areas in the Western United States with a range of wind and solar penetrations between 15% and 60%, where instantaneous penetration of wind and solar is limited to 80%.

  19. The renewable electric plant information system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report explains the procedures used for creating the Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) database, describes the database fields, and summarizes the data. The REPiS database contains comprehensive information on grid-connected renewable electric generation plants in the United States. Originally designed in 1987 and updated in 1990, the database includes information through 1994. The report also illustrates ways of using the data for analysis is and describes how researchers validated the data.

  20. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  1. Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

  2. RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    station plants or wind generators and compare bulk storageutilization and the wind generator at 30 percent average,in one case, and by wind generators in the other. tion

  3. MIT Electric Vehicle Team Porsche designing a cooling system for the AC24 electric motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meenen, Jordan N

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I worked on the design and analysis of a cooling system for the electric motor of the MIT Electric Vehicle Team's Porsche 914 Battery Electric Vehicle. The vehicle's Azure Dynamics AC24 motor tended to ...

  4. 1 INRODUCTION Electric power system is an important lifeline engi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., B.F.

    1 INRODUCTION Electric power system is an important lifeline engi- neering system that has much to do with the national economy and the people's livelihood. With social progress, electric power system and safety of electric power system become more and more important. Earthquake resistant analysis of electric

  5. Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Proton corebeam system in the expanding solar wind: Hybrid simulations Petr Hellinger1,2 and Pavel 9 November 2011. [1] Results of a twodimensional hybrid expanding box simulation of a proton to a decrease of the ratio between the proton perpendicular and parallel temperatures as well as to an increase

  6. Topic 5: Power System Operation and Planning for Enhanced Wind Generation Penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vittal, Vijay; Heydt, Gerald T; Ayyanar, Raja; McCalley, James D; Ajjarapu, V; Aliprantis, Dionysios

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project dealt with the development of a range of educational resources dealing with wind energy and wind energy integration in the electric grid. These resources were developed for a variety of audiences including; a) high school student, b) undergraduate electrical engineering students, c) graduate electrical engineering students, and d) practicing engineers in industry. All the developed material is available publicly and the courses developed are being taught at the two participating universities, Arizona State University and Iowa State University.

  7. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory, private communi- cation, March 12, 2004. WECC, "WECC 2006 Power Supply Assessment," Western Electricity

  8. Rare-Earth-Free Nanostructure Magnets: Rare-Earth-Free Permanent Magnets for Electric Vehicle Motors and Wind Turbine Generators: Hexagonal Symmetry Based Materials Systems Mn-Bi and M-type Hexaferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    REACT Project: The University of Alabama is developing new iron- and manganese-based composite materials for use in the electric motors of EVs and renewable power generators that will demonstrate magnetic properties superior to today’s best rare-earth-based magnets. Rare earths are difficult and expensive to refine. EVs and renewable power generators typically use rare earths to make their electric motors smaller and more powerful. The University of Alabama has the potential to improve upon the performance of current state-of-the-art rare-earth-based magnets using low-cost and more abundant materials such as manganese and iron. The ultimate goal of this project is to demonstrate improved performance in a full-size prototype magnet at reduced cost.

  9. Electrical generation plant design practice intern experience at Power Systems Engineering, Inc.: an internship report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ting-Zern Joe, 1950-

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    .2 Steady-State Performance of Electrical Conductors 22 2.3- Transient Performance of Electrical Conductors and Supports 27 2.4 Applications of Instrument Transformers 43 2.5 The R-X Diagram 47 CHAPTER 3 GENERATOR PROTECTION 52 3.1 Philosophy... Basis Devices 21 Figure 2.3 Shape Correction Factors for Strap Buses 35 Figure 2.4 Ice and Wind Loading on Electrical Conductors 37 Figure 2.5 System Conditions on the R-X Diagram 50 Figure 3.1 Differential Protection for a Wye-Connected Generator...

  10. 3/5/2014 TinyMicro Wind Turbines Generate Electricity| New Energyand Fuel http://newenergyandfuel.com/http:/newenergyandfuel/com/2014/01/16/tiny-micro-wind-turbines-generate-electricity/ 1/12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    Off Topic Plans Politics Power Units Fuel Cells Hybrid Electric Piezoelectrics Solar Artificial Photosynthesis Solar Panels Space Based Solar Thermal Solar Wind Power Storage Batteries Super Capacitors Thermal.W. Styles Energy Outlook Green Biz Green Car Congress Maria Energia Marketing Green MIT's Technology Review

  11. Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Sliding Mode Power Control of Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems B. Beltran, T. Ahmed power generation in variable speed wind energy conversion systems (VS-WECS). These systems have two variations. Index Terms--Wind energy conversion system, power generation control, sliding mode control

  12. A Feasibility Study of a Wind/Hydrogen System for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    systems (SAPS). Their work specifically concentrated on non-grid connected systems that included local project have been carried out. These projects both show the technical feasibility of wind/hydrogen systems1 A Feasibility Study of a Wind/Hydrogen System for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts American Wind

  13. DESIGN AND MODELING OF DISPATCHABLE HEAT STORAGE IN WIND/DIESEL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    1 DESIGN AND MODELING OF DISPATCHABLE HEAT STORAGE IN WIND/DIESEL SYSTEMS Clint Johnson, Utama system designed to increase the utilization of wind power in cold climate wind/diesel systems where and load occurs in many isolated cold-climate diesel systems around the world where the summer population

  14. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas...

  15. Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Flathead Electric Cooperative Facility Geothermal Heat Pump System Upgrade CHERYL TALLEY, PE Flathead Electric Cooperative Ground Source Heat Pumps Demonstration Projects May 19,...

  16. Integrating Wind and Solar Energy in the U.S. Bulk Power System: Lessons from Regional Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, L.; Lew, D.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two recent studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have examined the impacts of integrating high penetrations of wind and solar energy on the Eastern and Western electric grids. The Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS), initiated in 2007, examined the impact on power system operations of reaching 20% to 30% wind energy penetration in the Eastern Interconnection. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) examined the operational implications of adding up to 35% wind and solar energy penetration to the Western Interconnect. Both studies examined the costs of integrating variable renewable energy generation into the grid and transmission and operational changes that might be necessary to address higher penetrations of wind or solar generation. This paper identifies key insights from these regional studies for integrating high penetrations of renewables in the U.S. electric grid. The studies share a number of key findings, although in some instances the results vary due to differences in grid operations and markets, the geographic location of the renewables, and the need for transmission.

  17. Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Airborne Wind Energy Based on Dual Airfoils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CONTROL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY 1 Airborne Wind Energy Based on Dual Airfoils Mario Zanon, S´ebastien Gros, Joel Andersson and Moritz Diehl Abstract--The Airborne Wind Energy paradigm Airborne Wind Energy enables flight in higher-altitude, stronger wind layers, the extra drag generated

  19. MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    MODULAR MULTI-LEVEL CONVERTER BASED HVDC SYSTEM FOR GRID CONNECTION OF OFFSHORE WIND POWER PLANT U off-shore wind power plants. The MMC consists of a large number of simple voltage sourced converter offshore wind power plants (WPP) because they offer higher energy yield due to a superior wind profile

  20. Uncertainties in the Value of Bill Savings from Behind-the-Meter, Residential Photovoltaic Systems: The Roles of Electricity Market Conditions, Retail Rate Design, and Net Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darghouth, Naim Richard

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    case of wind electricity in Spain. Energy Policy 36, 3345–case of wind electricity in Spain. Energy Policy 36, 3345–wind penetrations will affect investment incentives in the GB electricity sector. Energy Policy

  1. ESE 680: Special Topics in Electrical and Systems Engineering Modern Electrical Energy Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    Fall 2012 ESE 680: Special Topics in Electrical and Systems Engineering Modern Electrical Energy is on the study of modern electrical energy networks with the thesis that they are becoming an increasingly integration between the electrical energy infrastructure and other infrastructure systems. Instructors: Ufuk

  2. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder, E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A., E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Sivapalan, Subarna, E-mail: subarna-sivapalan@petronas.com.my [Department of Management and Humanities, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  3. Oscillation control system for electric motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slicker, J.M.; Sereshteh, A.

    1988-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback system for controlling mechanical oscillations in the torsionally complaint drive train of an electric or other vehicle. Motor speed is converted in a processor to estimate state signals in which a plant model which are used to electronically modify the torque commands applied to the motor. 5 figs.

  4. Oscillation control system for electric motor drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slicker, James M. (Union Lake, MI); Sereshteh, Ahmad (Union Lake, MI)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A feedback system for controlling mechanical oscillations in the torsionally complaint drive train of an electric or other vehicle. Motor speed is converted in a processor to estimate state signals in which a plant model which are used to electronically modify thetorque commands applied to the motor.

  5. Integrated Wind Energy/Desalination System: October 11, 2004 -- July 29, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GE Global Research

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the feasibility of multiple concepts for integrating wind turbines and reverse osmosis desalination systems for water purification.

  6. Method and system for operating an electric motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Hiti, Silva; Perisic, Milun

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for operating an electric motor having a plurality of windings with an inverter having a plurality of switches coupled to a voltage source are provided. A first plurality of switching vectors is applied to the plurality of switches. The first plurality of switching vectors includes a first ratio of first magnitude switching vectors to second magnitude switching vectors. A direct current (DC) current associated with the voltage source is monitored during the applying of the first plurality of switching vectors to the plurality of switches. A second ratio of the first magnitude switching vectors to the second magnitude switching vectors is selected based on the monitoring of the DC current associated with the voltage source. A second plurality of switching vectors is applied to the plurality of switches. The second plurality of switching vectors includes the second ratio of the first magnitude switching vectors to the second magnitude switching vectors.

  7. Solar-Electric Dish Stirling System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, T.R.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical power generated with the heat from the sun, called solar thermal power, is produced with three types of concentrating solar systems - trough or line-focus systems; power towers in which a centrally-located thermal receiver is illuminated with a large field of sun-tracking heliostats; and dish/engine systems. A special case of the third type of system, a dish/Stirling system, is the subject of this paper. A dish/Stirling system comprises a parabolic dish concentrator, a thermal receiver, and a Stirling engine/generator located at the focus of the dish. Several different dish/Stirling systems have been built and operated during the past 15 years. One system claims the world record for net conversion of solar energy to electric power of 29.4%; and two different company`s systems have accumulated thousands of hours of on-sun operation. Due to de-regulation and intense competition in global energy markets as well as the immaturity of the technology, dish/Stirling systems have not yet found their way into the marketplace. This situation is changing as solar technologies become more mature and manufacturers identify high-value niche markets for their products. In this paper, I review the history of dish/Stirling system development with an emphasis on technical and other issues that directly impact the Stirling engine. I also try to provide some insight to the opportunities and barriers confronting the application of dish/Stirling in power generation markets.

  8. Testing of a 50-kW Wind-Diesel Hybrid System at the National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D. A.; Green, H. J.; Allderdice, A.; Rand, K.; Bianchi, J.; Linton, E.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In remote off-grid villages and communities, a reliable power source is important in improving the local quality of life. Villages often use a diesel generator for their power, but fuel can be expensive and maintenance burdensome. Including a wind turbine in a diesel system can reduce fuel consumption and lower maintenance, thereby reducing energy costs. However, integrating the various components of a wind-diesel system, including wind turbine, power conversion system, and battery storage (if applicable), is a challenging task. To further the development of commercial hybrid power systems, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the New World Village Power Corporation (NWVP), tested a NWVP 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system connected to a 15/50 Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) wind turbine. Testing was conducted from October 1995 through March 1996 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). A main objective of the testing was to better understand the application of wind turbines to weak grids typical of small villages. Performance results contained in this report include component characterization, such as power conversion losses for the rotary converter system and battery round trip efficiencies. In addition, system operation over the test period is discussed with special attention given to dynamic issues. Finally, future plans for continued testing and research are discussed.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling On June 11, 2014, in Wind generation continues to dominate the interconnection queues and the need for generic,...

  10. Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Veen, Barry D.

    Power Systems Engineering Research Center Renewable Electricity Futures Trieu Mai Electricity of the extent to which renewable energy supply can meet the electricity demands of the contiguous United States renewable electricity generation levels: from 30% up to 90% (focusing on 80%) of all U.S. electricity

  11. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  12. Optimisation of a Small Non Controlled Wind Energy Conversion System for Stand-Alone Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimisation of a Small Non Controlled Wind Energy Conversion System for Stand-Alone Applications. This article proposes a method to optimize the design of a small fixed-voltage wind energy conversion system are shown and discussed. Key words Wind energy conversion system, stand-alone application, nonlinear

  13. Transient Stability Assessment of Power System with Large Amount of Wind Power Penetration: the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak, Claus Leth

    the transient stability. In Denmark, the onshore and offshore wind farms are connected to distribution system and transmission system respectively. The control and protection methodologies of onshore and offshore wind farms definitely affect the transient stability of power system. In this paper, the onshore and offshore wind farms

  14. ENERGY MODELING OF A LEAD-ACID BATTERY WITHIN HYBRID WIND / PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ENERGY MODELING OF A LEAD-ACID BATTERY WITHIN HYBRID WIND / PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEMS O. GERGAUD, G Abstract: Within the scope of full-scale energy modeling of a hybrid wind / photovoltaic system coupled-power hybrid wind/photovoltaic production system (20 ASE modules for a 2- kW polycrystalline silicon peak

  15. LQ Optimal Control of Wind Turbines in Hybrid Power Systems N.A. Cutululis1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LQ Optimal Control of Wind Turbines in Hybrid Power Systems N.A. Cutululis1 , H. Bindner1 , I power systems represent a viable solution for rural electrification. One of the most important aspects taken into account for the design of a wind ­ diesel power system is the wind power penetration, which

  16. Benefits of Stochastic Scheduling for Power Systems with Significant Installed Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benefits of Stochastic Scheduling for Power Systems with Significant Installed Wind Power Aidan Abstract-- Wind energy on a power system alters the unit commitment and dispatch problem, as it adds generation, Power system eco- nomics, Power generation dispatch, Unit Commitment, Wind Forecasting. I

  17. Operating the Irish Power System with Increased Levels of Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operating the Irish Power System with Increased Levels of Wind Power Aidan Tuohy, Student Member of Ireland. Using results from various studies performed on this system, it is shown that wind power of installed wind power will have implications for the operation of power systems. These will be seen

  18. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solar in the new home construction market; the risk mitigation value of re- newable electricity; and customer

  19. 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 4: Transmission and Integration...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4: Transmission and Integration into the U.S. Electric System Summary Slides 20% Wind Energy by 2030 - Chapter 4: Transmission and Integration into the U.S. Electric System Summary...

  20. Wind Farm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

  1. Global Wind Power Conference September 18-21, 2006, Adelaide, Australia Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power, first

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power, first results of IEA collaboration Hannele Holttinen1.holttinen@vtt.fi Abstract: An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power"will analyse existing case studies from different power systems

  2. 7th International Workshop on Large-Scale Integration of Wind Power and on Transmission Networks for Offshore Wind Farms Models for HLI analysis of power systems with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    for Offshore Wind Farms 1 Models for HLI analysis of power systems with offshore wind farms and distributed power plants, distributed generation and offshore wind farms. Particular attention is paid to the latter]-[4], but there is a lack of models of offshore wind farms, which introduce new issues for their representation, due to some

  3. ELECTRICITY CASE: RISK ANALYSIS OF INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS-DIFFERENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Hai

    of infrastructure systems. The discussion is applied to electric power delivery systems, i.e. transmissionELECTRICITY CASE: RISK ANALYSIS OF INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS-DIFFERENT APPROACHES FOR RISK ANALYSIS OF ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS Holmgren, A. CREATE REPORT Under FEMA Grant EMW-2004-GR-0112 May 31, 2005 Center

  4. Wind Resource Assessment in Europe Using Emergy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Subodh; Santarelli, Massimo; Martin, Viktoria; Lacarriere, Bruno; Le Corre, Olivier

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy assessment and wind farm simulation in Triunfo- Pernambuco, Brazil,wind resources for electrical energy production. Wind resources as- sessment of Brazil

  5. Electric Springs A new Smart Grid Technology Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Cheong

    electronics system. · · It can be embedded in an electric appliance such as electric water heater-scale wind and solar power generation · . 7 #12;Future power systems adopt "distributed" power generation (Wind and Solar Power). · ( ). · Electric Springs do not need communication and, collectively

  6. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  7. Broken Bar Detection in Synchronous Machines Based Wind Energy Conversion System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahimian, Mina Mashhadi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrical machines are subject to different types of failures. Early detection of the incipient faults and fast maintenance may prevent costly consequences. Fault diagnosis of wind turbine is especially important because they are situated...

  8. Importance of the Equlibrium Node in Preventing the Voltage Collapse Occurs in the Wind Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    Importance of the Equlibrium Node in Preventing the Voltage Collapse Occurs in the Wind Power collapse will occurs in a wind power system is discussed next. The method of power flow calculation is the specific analysis of a given simplified wind power system. Keywords--voltage collapse; Newton

  9. Structural Composites Industries 4 kilowatt wind system development. Phase I: design and analysis, technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machine to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. The Phase I effort began in November, 1979 and was carried through the Final Design Review in February 1981. During this period extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating the following unique features: Composite Blades; Free-Standing Composite Tower; Torque-Actuated Blade Pitch Control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

  10. A methodology for optimal sizing of autonomous hybrid PV/wind system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    mathematical models for characterizing PV module, wind generator and battery are proposed. The second step is obtained for a system comprising a 125 W photovoltaic modules, one wind generator (600 W) and storage

  11. FAST Code Verification of Scaling Laws for DeepCwind Floating Wind System Tests: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, A.; Robertson, A. N.; Jonkman, J. M.; Goupee, A. J.; Kimball, R. W.; Swift, A. H. P.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates scaling laws that were adopted for the DeepCwind project for testing three different floating wind systems at 1/50 scale in a wave tank under combined wind and wave loading.

  12. Potential of wind-powered renewable energy membrane systems for Ghana 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, G.L.; Schäfer, Andrea; Richard, B.S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Areas of the world that lack fresh water often have an ample supply of wind or solar energy, making renewable energy an attractive option as a power source for desalination systems. Particularly, wind energy is attractive because of its relatively...

  13. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  14. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

  15. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Market Report vii potential wind energy generation withinthat nearly 8% of potential wind energy generation withinAreas, in GWh (and % of potential wind generation) Electric

  16. FreedomCAR :electrical energy storage system abuse test manual for electric and hybrid electric vehicle applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Daniel Harvey; Crafts, Chris C.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual defines a complete body of abuse tests intended to simulate actual use and abuse conditions that may be beyond the normal safe operating limits experienced by electrical energy storage systems used in electric and hybrid electric vehicles. The tests are designed to provide a common framework for abuse testing various electrical energy storage systems used in both electric and hybrid electric vehicle applications. The manual incorporates improvements and refinements to test descriptions presented in the Society of Automotive Engineers Recommended Practice SAE J2464 ''Electric Vehicle Battery Abuse Testing'' including adaptations to abuse tests to address hybrid electric vehicle applications and other energy storage technologies (i.e., capacitors). These (possibly destructive) tests may be used as needed to determine the response of a given electrical energy storage system design under specifically defined abuse conditions. This manual does not provide acceptance criteria as a result of the testing, but rather provides results that are accurate and fair and, consequently, comparable to results from abuse tests on other similar systems. The tests described are intended for abuse testing any electrical energy storage system designed for use in electric or hybrid electric vehicle applications whether it is composed of batteries, capacitors, or a combination of the two.

  17. Lincoln Electric System (Residential)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers several rebates to residential customers who are interested in upgrading to energy efficient household equipment. 

  18. Equivalencing the Collector System of a Large Wind Power Plant: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on our effort to develop an equivalent representation of a wind power plant collector system for power system planning studies.

  19. Wind Energy and Power System Operations: A Review of Wind Integration Studies to Date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCesaro, J.; Porter, K.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the challenges associated with wind integration and summarizes the findings of the wind integration studies conducted over the course of the past five years.

  20. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from operating wind farms in the Altamont, San Gorgonio anddata from wind farms in Altamont, Tehachapi and San Gorgoniofrom wind farms in the Altamont, Tehachapi and San Gorgonio

  1. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1992). “Capacity credit of wind power in the Netherlands. ”modeling as a tool for wind resource assessment andBurton, T. , et al. (2001). Wind Energy Handbook, John

  2. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    towers or operational wind farms are needed to resolveapproach to locating wind farms in the UK. ” Renewablepower from potential wind farm locations in California and

  3. Analyzing the Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7 2.2.3 Wind Farm Production1. Rated Capacity of Wind Farms for which Monthly Productionpower from potential wind farm locations in California and

  4. Electric Power System Anomaly Detection Using Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    Electric Power System Anomaly Detection Using Neural Networks Marco Martinelli1 , Enrico Tronci1. The aim of this work is to propose an approach to monitor and protect Electric Power System by learning of an Electric Power System. In this paper, a neural network based approach for novelty detection is presented

  5. Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 1.0: Networked Monitoring and Control of Small Interconnected Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janet.twomey@wichita.edu

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    EXECUTIVE SUMARRY This report presents accomplishments, results, and future work for one task of five in the Wichita State University Sustainable Energy Solutions Project: To develop a scale model laboratory distribution system for research into questions that arise from networked control and monitoring of low-wind energy systems connected to the AC distribution system. The lab models developed under this task are located in the Electric Power Quality Lab in the Engineering Research Building on the Wichita State University campus. The lab system consists of four parts: 1. A doubly-fed induction generator 2. A wind turbine emulator 3. A solar photovoltaic emulator, with battery energy storage 4. Distribution transformers, lines, and other components, and wireless and wired communications and control These lab elements will be interconnected and will function together to form a complete testbed for distributed resource monitoring and control strategies and smart grid applications testing. Development of the lab system will continue beyond this project.

  6. Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.

    1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads is disclosed. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples. 6 figs.

  7. Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jatko, William B. (10601 Rivermist La., Knoxville, TN 37922); McNeilly, David R. (Rte. 12, Box 538, Maryville, TN 37801)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples.

  8. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Energy Efficiency, Wind and Renewables 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND RENEWABLES May 2008 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 2 Electricity Production from Wind Farms (2002-2007) ? Installed capacity of wind turbines was 3,026 MW (March 2007). ? Announced new project capacity is 3,125 MW by 2010. ? Lowest electricity period... Energy Systems Laboratory p. 1 Jeff Haberl, Bahman Yazdani, Charles Culp Energy Systems Laboratory Texas Engineering Experiment Station Texas A&M University System STATEWIDE AIR EMISSIONS CALCULATIONS FROM ENERGY EFFICIENCY, WIND...

  9. Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service Country Denmark...

  10. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity at Different Sites in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fripp, Matthias; Wiser, Ryan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling Utility-Scale Wind Power Plants Part 2: Capacitycapacity factor of the wind power plant during the top 10

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for large, multi-MW wind farms where dispersed geographicProject The Michigan Farm Wind Pumping Project The MichiganProject The Minnesota Farm Wind Electricity Project The New

  12. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

  13. Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Yannick Degeilh, Justine Descloux, George Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    Simulation Of Energy Storage In A System With Integrated Wind Resources Yannick Degeilh, Justine-scale storage [3],[4] to facilitate the improved harnessing of the wind resources by storing wind energy Descloux, George Gross University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA Abstract ­ Utility-scale storage

  14. Control of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control & Moving Horizon Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control of Airborne Wind Energy Systems Based on Nonlinear Model Predictive Control & Moving arising in the Airborne Wind Energy paradigm, an essential one is the control of the tethered airfoil], [3], the Airborne Wind Energy (AWE) paradigm shift proposes to get rid of the structural elements

  15. Shaping Power System Inter-area Oscillations through Control Loops of Grid Integrated Wind Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayme, Dennice

    Shaping Power System Inter-area Oscillations through Control Loops of Grid Integrated Wind Farms. However, in many situations, it may not be possible to site a wind farm at the location with the most desirable frequency response. Here, we show that one can design a wind farm controller to shape

  16. Impact of High Wind Penetration on the Voltage Profile of Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    of wind generator the voltage of the system may become lower than acceptable voltage level due and wind generator is presented. Simulation results are given in Section III which shows the impact of high--In this paper, simulation results showing the effect of lower and higher penetration of distributed wind

  17. V2G Technology for Designing Active Filter System to Improve Wind Power Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    generation. A system model with wind generator and a dynamic model of PHEVs are introduced here based on the instantaneous power theory (p-q theory) to improve the wind generator performance through compensating have the potential to work as active filter with wind generator to improve power quality, dynamic power

  18. Assessing the Impact of Wind Variability on Power System Small-Signal Reachability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    Assessing the Impact of Wind Variability on Power System Small-Signal Reachability Yu Christine-signal and transient stability [6]. In this regard, it has been acknowledged that, as the presence of wind in the power balancing in near real time [7]. This paper focuses on this last problem--the impact of wind penetration

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN-SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN- SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Abington, Cambridge, CB21 6AL, UK bic@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT It is crucial to maintain wind turbine blades. This work investigates using pulse-echo ultrasound to detect internal damages in wind turbine blades without

  20. Optimal management of batteries in electric systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Corey, Garth P. (Albuquerque, NM); Symons, Philip C. (Morgan Hill, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric system including at least a pair of battery strings and an AC source minimizes the use and maximizes the efficiency of the AC source by using the AC source only to charge all battery strings at the same time. Then one or more battery strings is used to power the load while management, such as application of a finish charge, is provided to one battery string. After another charge cycle, the roles of the battery strings are reversed so that each battery string receives regular management.

  1. Gaussian Processes for Short-Horizon Wind Power Forecasting Joseph Bockhorst, Chris Barber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockhorst, Joseph

    on this task, and attention has shifted to statistical and machine learning approaches. Among the challenges of wind energy into electrical trans- mission systems. The importance of wind forecasts for wind energy throughout a power system must be nearly in balance at all times, 2) because it depends strongly on wind

  2. Short-term Wind Power Forecasting Using Advanced Statistical T.S. Nielsen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , in order to be able to absorb a large fraction of wind power in the electrical systems reliable short from refer- ence MET forecasts to the actual wind farm, wind farm power curve models, dynamical models of art wind power prediction system is outlined in Section 2. Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP

  3. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  4. High Altitude Wind Power Systems: A Survey on Flexible Power Kites Mariam Ahmed*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2ELab) 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Ahmad Hably** GIPSA-lab -ENSE3 BP 46 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Seddik Bacha*** Grenoble Electrical Engineering Laboratory (G2ELab) 38402 Saint-Martin d'Heres, France Abstract-- High altitude wind energy (HAWE) is a new

  5. Century Electric Distribution System Operations Lorenzo Kristov,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    May 2014 1 21st Century Electric Distribution System Operations Lorenzo Kristov,1 California Independent System Operator Paul De Martini, Caltech Resnick Institute Introduction The electric industry has to provide similar functions for their area of responsibility. Many states also opened retail electricity

  6. Chapter three Assessing the Electric System Benefits of Clean Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Clean energy programs and policies can help states achieve their goal of providing a less polluting, more reliable and affordable electric system that addresses multiple challenges, including: ??Lowering energy costs for customers and utilities alike, particularly during periods of peak electricity demand; 1 ??Improving the reliability of the electricity system and averting blackouts at a lower cost; Document map • Chapter one

  7. Garrett Electric Boosting Systems (EBS) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Arnold; Craig Balis; Pierre Barthelet; Etienne Poix; Tariq Samad; Greg Hampson; S. M. Shahed

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbo diesel engine use in passenger cars in Europe has resulted in 30-50% improvement in fuel economy. Diesel engine application is particularly suitable for US because of vehicle size and duty cycle patterns. Adopting this technology for use in the US presents two issues--emissions and driveability. Emissions reduction technology is being well addressed with advanced turbocharging, fuel injection and catalytic aftertreatment systems One way to address driveability is to eliminate turbo lag and increase low speed torque. Electrically assisted turbocharging concepts incorporated in e-Turbo{trademark} designs do both The purpose of this project is to design and develop an electrically assisted turbocharger, e-Turbo{trademark}, for diesel engine use in the US. In this report, early design and development of electrical assist technology is described together with issues and potential benefits. In this early phase a mathematical model was developed and verified. The model was used in a sensitivity study. The results of the sensitivity study together with the design and test of first generation hardware was fed into second generation designs. In order to fully realize the benefits of electrical assist technology it was necessary to expand the scope of work to include technology on the compressor side as well as electronic controls concepts. The results of the expanded scope of work are also reported here. In the first instance, designs and hardware were developed for a small engine to quantify and demonstrate benefits. The turbo size was such that it could be applied in a bi-turbo configuration to an SUV sized V engine. Mathematical simulation was used to quantify the possible benefits in an SUV application. It is shown that low speed torque can be increased to get the high performance expected in US, automatic transmission vehicles. It is also shown that e-Turbo{trademark} can be used to generate modest amounts of electrical power and supplement the alternator under most load-speed conditions. It is shown that a single (large) e-Turbo{trademark} consumes slightly less electrical power for the same steady state torque shaping than a bi-Turbo configuration. However, the transient response of a bi-Turbo configuration is slightly better. It was shown that in order to make full use of additional capabilities of e-Turbo{trademark} wide compressor flow range is required. Variable geometry compressor (VGC) technology developed under a separate project was evaluated for incorporation into e-Turbo{trademark} designs. It was shown that the combination of these two technologies enables very high torque at low engine speeds. Designs and hardware combining VGC and e-Turbo{trademark} are to be developed in a future project. There is concern about high power demands (even though momentary) of e-Turbo{trademark}. Reducing the inertia of the turbocharger can reduce power demand and increase battery life. Low inertia turbocharger technology called IBT developed under a separate project was evaluated for synergy with e-Turbo{trademark} designs. It was concluded that inertial reduction provided by IBT is very beneficial for e-Turbo{trademark}. Designs and hardware combining IBT and e-Turbo{trademark} are to be developed in a future project. e-Turbo{trademark} provides several additional flexibilities including exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for emissions reduction with minimum fuel economy penalty and exhaust temperature control for aftertreatment. In integrated multi-parameter control system is needed to realize the full potential of e-Turbo{trademark} performance. Honeywell expertise in process control systems involving hundreds of sensors and actuators was applied to demonstrate the potential benefits of multi-parameter, model based control systems.

  8. Hybrid Wind and Solar Electric Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome| DepartmentPumpHome OfficeConsume?aYourHybrid

  9. Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome|Information Resources

  10. SMART Wind Electrical Systems Subgroup Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913| DepartmentSLIDESHOW: SolarSMARTSMART

  11. Installing and Maintaining a Small Wind Electric System | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking of BlytheDepartment ofEnergy1Energy Maintaining a Home

  12. Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois:EdinburghEldorado IvanpahGasProject) | Open(Smart Grid

  13. TMA Global Wind Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By FaultSunpodsSweetwaterTMA Global Wind Energy Systems

  14. Wind Turbine System State Awareness - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of tinyWindEnergySystem State

  15. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

  16. Advances in electric power systems : robustness, adaptability, and fairness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xu Andy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity industry has been experiencing fundamental changes over the past decade. Two of the arguably most significant driving forces are the integration of renewable energy resources into the electric power system ...

  17. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 4: Bulk Electric Power Systems: Operations and Transmission Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hein, J.; Schneider, T.; Brinkman, G.; Denholm, P.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  18. Optimization and Control of Electric Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.; Molzahn, Daniel K.

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis and optimization needs for planning and operation of the electric power system are challenging due to the scale and the form of model representations. The connected network spans the continent and the mathematical models are inherently nonlinear. Traditionally, computational limits have necessitated the use of very simplified models for grid analysis, and this has resulted in either less secure operation, or less efficient operation, or both. The research conducted in this project advances techniques for power system optimization problems that will enhance reliable and efficient operation. The results of this work appear in numerous publications and address different application problems include optimal power flow (OPF), unit commitment, demand response, reliability margins, planning, transmission expansion, as well as general tools and algorithms.

  19. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  20. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN); Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  1. Study of the Advantages of Internal Permanent Magnet Drive Motor with Selectable Windings for Hybrid-Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.; Hsu, J.S.; Adams, D.J.

    2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research performed on the viability of changing the effectively active number of turns in the stator windings of an internal permanent magnet (IPM) electric motor to strengthen or weaken the magnetic fields in order to optimize the motor's performance at specific operating speeds and loads. Analytical and simulation studies have been complemented with research on switching mechanisms to accomplish the task. The simulation studies conducted examine the power and energy demands on a vehicle following a series of standard driving cycles and the impact on the efficiency and battery size of an electrically propelled vehicle when it uses an IPM motor with turn-switching capabilities. Both full driving cycle electric propulsion and propulsion limited starting from zero to a set speed have been investigated.

  2. Extended tension leg platform design for offshore wind turbine systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Nicholas W. (Nicholas William)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rise of reliable wind energy application has become a primary alternative to conventional fossil fuel power plants in the United States and around the world. The feasibility of building large scale wind farms has become ...

  3. Analysis of wind power for battery charging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Drouilhet, S.; Holz, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Gevorgian, V. [University of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia). State Engineering

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One type of wind-powered battery charging will be explored in this paper. It consists of a wind turbine driving a permanent magnet alternator and operates at variable speed. The alternator is connected to a battery bank via a rectifier. The characteristic of the system depends on the wind turbine, the alternator, and the system configuration. If the electrical load does not match the wind turbine, the performance of the system will be degraded. By matching the electrical load to the wind turbine, the system can be improved significantly. This paper analyzes the properties of the system components. The effects of parameter variation and the system configuration on the system performance are investigated. Two basic methods of shaping the torque-speed characteristic of the generator are presented. The uncompensated as well as the compensated systems will be discussed. Control strategies to improve the system performance will be explored. Finally, a summary of the paper will be presented in the last section.

  4. Thermal Systems Group; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Thermal Systems Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

  5. A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    A PRODUCTION SIMULATION TOOL FOR SYSTEMS WITH INTEGRATED WIND ENERGY RESOURCES BY NICOLAS BENOIT reserves resulting in increased system production costs. Consequently, there is an acute need production simulation tool with the capability to quantify the variable effects of systems with varying wind

  6. Impact of Wind Turbine Penetration on the Dynamic Performance of Interconnected Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Impact of Wind Turbine Penetration on the Dynamic Performance of Interconnected Power Systems M. J School of S ~ao Carlos, Brazil. Email: ramos@sel.eese.usp.br Abstract--The complexity of power systems, such as wind generators. This changing nature of power systems has considerable effect on its dynamic behaviour

  7. Wind velocity measurements using a pulsed LIDAR system: first results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peinke, Joachim

    . A laser beam of 1.54 µm wavelength takes measurements of the wind speed in beamwise direction. To obtain the three-dimensinal wind vector, the beam is inclined by 30 from vertical direction and measurements 12345 t [s] vh[m/s] Figure 2. Segment of measured time series of the horizontal wind speed magnitude vh

  8. Electrical system architecture having high voltage bus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian Douglas (East Peoria, IL); Akasam, Sivaprasad (Peoria, IL)

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical system architecture is disclosed. The architecture has a power source configured to generate a first power, and a first bus configured to receive the first power from the power source. The architecture also has a converter configured to receive the first power from the first bus and convert the first power to a second power, wherein a voltage of the second power is greater than a voltage of the first power, and a second bus configured to receive the second power from the converter. The architecture further has a power storage device configured to receive the second power from the second bus and deliver the second power to the second bus, a propulsion motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus, and an accessory motor configured to receive the second power from the second bus.

  9. HEMP emergency planning and operating procedures for electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddoch, T.W.; Markel, L.C. (Electrotek Concepts, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations of the impact of high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) on electric power systems and electrical equipment have revealed that HEMP creates both misoperation and failures. These events result from both the early time E[sub 1] (steep-front pulse) component and the late time E[sub 3] (geomagnetic perturbations) component of HEMP. In this report a HEMP event is viewed in terms of its marginal impact over classical power system disturbances by considering the unique properties and consequences of HEMP. This report focuses on system-wide electrical component failures and their potential consequences from HEMP. In particular, the effectiveness of planning and operating procedures for electric systems is evaluated while under the influence of HEMP. This assessment relies on published data and characterizes utilities using the North American Electric Reliability Council's regions and guidelines to model electric power system planning and operations. Key issues addressed by the report include how electric power systems are affected by HEMP and what actions electric utilities can initiate to reduce the consequences of HEMP. The report also reviews the salient features of earlier HEMP studies and projects, examines technology trends in the electric power industry which are affected by HEMP, characterizes the vulnerability of power systems to HEMP, and explores the capability of electric systems to recover from a HEMP event.

  10. Abstract--As a common tendency, large-scale wind farms are increasingly connected to the transmission system of modern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    1 Abstract--As a common tendency, large-scale wind farms are increasingly connected on the integration of wind farms. One common requirement to wind farms is the function of system voltage control. This ancillary voltage control provided by wind farms could have some influence on the system small signal

  11. Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Iver

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a subcontractor to General Motors (GM), Ames Laboratory provided the technical expertise and supplied experimental materials needed to assess the technology of high energy bonded permanent magnets that are injection or compression molded for use in the Advanced Electric Traction System motor. This support was a sustained (Phase 1: 6/07 to 3/08) engineering effort that builds on the research achievements of the primary FreedomCAR project at Ames Laboratory on development of high temperature magnet alloy particulate in both flake and spherical powder forms. Ames Lab also provide guidance and direction in selection of magnet materials and supported the fabrication of experimental magnet materials for development of injection molding and magnetization processes by Arnold Magnetics, another project partner. The work with Arnold Magnetics involved a close collaboration on particulate material design and processing to achieve enhanced particulate properties and magnetic performance in the resulting bonded magnets. The overall project direction was provided by GM Program Management and two design reviews were held at GM-ATC in Torrance, CA. Ames Lab utilized current expertise in magnet powder alloy design and processing, along with on-going research advances being achieved under the existing FreedomCAR Program project to help guide and direct work during Phase 1 for the Advanced Electric Traction System Technology Development Program. The technical tasks included review of previous GM and Arnold Magnets work and identification of improvements to the benchmark magnet material, Magnequench MQP-14-12. Other benchmark characteristics of the desired magnet material include 64% volumetric loading with PPS polymer and a recommended maximum use temperature of 200C. A collaborative relationship was maintained with Arnold Magnets on the specification and processing of the bonded magnet material required by GM-ATC.

  12. A.W. Blakers, 'Solar and Wind Electricity in Australia', Australian Journal of Environmental Management, Vol 7, pp 223-236, 2000 SOLAR AND WIND ELECTRICITY IN AUSTRALIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    environmental impact associated with the construction of what amounts to a coastal hydro scheme. Solar energy.blakers@anu.edu.au Abstract This paper examines the renewable generation of electricity in Australia from photovoltaics (PV environmental impacts even when deployed on very large scales. They are the only fully sustainable technologies

  13. ELECTRICAL ANALOGY MODELLING OF PEFC SYSTEM FED BY A COMPRESSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 PB13-078 ELECTRICAL ANALOGY MODELLING OF PEFC SYSTEM FED BY A COMPRESSOR Moussa Chnani1 , Hattab to be integrated in the simulation of an electrical vehicle power train. As many components have to be modelled by the motor speed. The modelling of the fuel cell electrical response is developed, based on semi

  14. PROJECT GOALS Use electricity accounts and Building Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROJECT GOALS · Use electricity accounts and Building Management System (BMS) data to describe and annual rates of consumption. DESCRIPTION Approximately 82 per cent of the NGA electricity consumption can. Fluctuations in heat or humidity are therefore likely to have a significant influence on electricity

  15. System for the co-production of electricity and hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Anderson, Brian Lee (Lodi, CA)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is a system for the co-generation of hydrogen gas and electricity, wherein the proportion of hydrogen to electricity can be adjusted from 0% to 100%. The system integrates fuel cell technology for power generation with fuel-assisted steam-electrolysis. A hydrocarbon fuel, a reformed hydrocarbon fuel, or a partially reformed hydrocarbon fuel can be fed into the system.

  16. Testing Small Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.; Bowen, A.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WindPower 2008 conference sponsored by AWEA held in Houston, Texas on June 1-4, 2008. This poster describes four small wind electric systems that were tested to IEC and AWEA standards at NREL's NWTC.

  17. Reference Model for Control and Automation Systems in Electrical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reference Model for Control and Automation Systems in Electrical Power Version 1.2 October 12, 2005 Prepared by: Sandia National Laboratories' Center for SCADA Security Jason...

  18. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Germany) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power...

  19. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- 2015 Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives for commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are provided on...

  20. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Available for Download October 22, 2010 EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5)...

  1. Analytical Target Cascading Optimization of an Electric Vehicle Powertrain System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    curves and motor power loss maps produced by an electric vehicle (EV) powertrain system. Three, since the motor performance information (torque curves and power loss map) significantly impacts

  2. 2008 DOE Annual Merit Review Hybrid and Electric Systems and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Materials Technologies Plenary Session Overview 2008 DOE Annual Merit Review Hybrid and Electric Systems and Materials Technologies Plenary Session Overview Presentation from the...

  3. Visualization of Electric Power System Information: Workshop Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kroposki, B.; Komomua, C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the workshop entitled: Visualization of Electric Power System Information. The workshop was held on September 11, 2012 on NREL's campus in Golden, Colorado.

  4. Homeowners Guide to Leasing a Solar Electric System (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This updated fact sheet provides an introduction to solar leases for homeowners who are considering installing a solar electric system on their home.

  5. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United Kingdom) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country United Kingdom...

  6. Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Presentation about Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature Geothermal Resources includes background, results and discussion, future plans and conclusion....

  7. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Norway) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A...

  8. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ireland) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country Ireland Coordinates...

  9. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Belgium) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country Belgium Coordinates...

  10. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Czech Republic) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration Country Czech Republic...

  11. Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial)- Sustainable Energy Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Lincoln Electric System (LES) offers a variety of energy efficiency incentives for commercial and industrial customers through the Sustainable Energy Program (SEP). Some incentives are provided on...

  12. What day-ahead reserves are needed in electric grids with high levels of wind power? This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Paulina

    What day-ahead reserves are needed in electric grids with high levels of wind power? This article) 034013 (11pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/8/3/034013 What day-ahead reserves are needed in electric grids analysis uses data from two different electric grids in the US with similar levels of installed wind

  13. Effects of Temporal Wind Patterns on the Value of Wind-Generated Electricity in California and the Northwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power system’s load and wholesale market prices [7-11]; thisgeographical area on the wholesale market value or capacityMontana and Wyoming) with wholesale power prices and loads

  14. Set-point reconfiguration approach for the FTC of wind turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Set-point reconfiguration approach for the FTC of wind turbines B. Boussaid C. Aubrun N system stability. The effectiveness of the proposed solution is illustrated by a wind turbine example issue. Nowadays, wind turbines which generate electrical energy from the wind energy are considered one

  15. The Inside of a Wind Turbine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Wind turbines harness the power of the wind and use it to generate electricity. Simply stated, a wind turbine works the opposite of a fan. Instead of using electricity to make wind, like a fan,...

  16. Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Mariah Power Windspire Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of the first round of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines. Other tests include power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. NWTC testing results provide manufacturers with reports that may be used to meet part of small wind turbine certification requirements. This duration test report focuses on the Mariah Power Windspire wind turbine.

  17. Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howes, H; Perley, R

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

  18. Siting handbook for small wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wegley, H.L.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Orgill, M.M.; Drake, R.L.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook was written to serve as a siting guide for individuals wishing to install small wind energy conversion systems (WECS); that is, machines having a rated capacity of less than 100 kilowatts. It incorporates half a century of siting experience gained by WECS owners and manufacturers, as well as recently developed siting techniques. The user needs no technical background in meteorology or engineering to understand and apply the siting principles discussed; he needs only a knowledge of basic arithmetic and the ability to understand simple graphs and tables. By properly using the siting techniques, an owner can select a site that will yield the most power at the least installation cost, the least maintenance cost, and the least risk of damage or accidental injury.

  19. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 2: Participant Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  20. A survey on wind power ramp forecasting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, C.; Gama, J.; Matias, L.; Botterud, A.; Wang, J. (Decision and Information Sciences); (INESC Porto)

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The increasing use of wind power as a source of electricity poses new challenges with regard to both power production and load balance in the electricity grid. This new source of energy is volatile and highly variable. The only way to integrate such power into the grid is to develop reliable and accurate wind power forecasting systems. Electricity generated from wind power can be highly variable at several different timescales: sub-hourly, hourly, daily, and seasonally. Wind energy, like other electricity sources, must be scheduled. Although wind power forecasting methods are used, the ability to predict wind plant output remains relatively low for short-term operation. Because instantaneous electrical generation and consumption must remain in balance to maintain grid stability, wind power's variability can present substantial challenges when large amounts of wind power are incorporated into a grid system. A critical issue is ramp events, which are sudden and large changes (increases or decreases) in wind power. This report presents an overview of current ramp definitions and state-of-the-art approaches in ramp event forecasting.

  1. CHANGES OF SYSTEM OPERATION COSTS DUE TO LARGE-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Institute of Energy Economics and the Rational Use of EnergyIER Changes of System Operation CostsCHANGES OF SYSTEM OPERATION COSTS DUE TO LARGE-SCALE WIND INTEGRATION Derk Jan SWIDER1 , Rüdiger-Essen, Germany 3 Risoe International Laboratory, Denmark Business and Policy Track: Integrating wind

  2. A Feasibility Study for Wind/Hybrid Power System Applications for New England Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    wind/hybrid systems. A feasibility study, carried out at the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory (RERLA Feasibility Study for Wind/Hybrid Power System Applications for New England Islands Gabriel Blanco, James F. Manwell, and Jon G. McGowan Renewable Energy Research Laboratory, University

  3. Simulation of wind driven ventilative cooling systems for an apartment building in Beijing and Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Simulation of wind driven ventilative cooling systems for an apartment building in Beijing., Glicksman, L.R. and Norford, L.K. 2002. "Simulation of wind driven ventilative cooling systems evaluation of two passive cooling strategies, daytime ventilation and night cooling, for a generic, six

  4. Impacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    development of wind energy tech- nology and the current world-wide status of grid-connected as well as standImpacts of Large-Scale Wind Generators Penetration on the Voltage Stability of Power Systems M. J systems and their dynamic behaviours to identify critical issues that limit the large-scale integration

  5. A Brief Status on Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A Brief Status on Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Wind Energy Conversion Systems--There is a constant need for the reduction of operational and maintenance costs of Wind Energy Conversion Systems since they are situated on extremely high towers, which are normally 20 m or more in height

  6. Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Wind Energy Conversion Systems: A Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis in Wind Energy Conversion Systems: A Review Y. Amirat, M for the reduction of operational and maintenance costs of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS). The most efficient they are situated on extremely high towers, which are normally 20 m or greater in height. There are also plans

  7. Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Coulter, Richard; Ritsche, Michael

    Balloon-borne sounding system (BBSS): Vaisala-processed winds, press., temp, and RH. The balloon-borne sounding system (SONDE) provides in situ measurements (vertical profiles) of both the thermodynamic state of the atmosphere, and the wind speed and direction.

  8. Alternatives to Electric Air Conditioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, B. B.; Koplow, M. D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of an engine-driven chiller is very fundamental. The electric motor: which drives the refrigerant compressor, is replaced with an engine. (Each prime mover has a shaft that rotates and transmits power.) Gas engine-driven chillers can capitalize... on the advances in compressor technology that have made electric air conditioning so attractive. The relative prices of natural gas and electricity will determine the best choice. An electric chiller may have a COP of 5.5. The gas engine chiller, because its...

  9. Farmington Electric Utility System- Net Metering

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Net metering rules developed by the New Mexico Public Regulation Commission (PRC) apply to the state's investor-owned utilities and electric cooperatives. Municipal utilities, which are not...

  10. Coupling Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupling Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage: A Time-Series Application of the Super Electric Energy System #12;Coupling Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage: A Time Wind Generation with Controllable Load and Storage: A Time-Series Application of the SuperOPF." (PSERC

  11. Statewide Air Emissions Calculations from Energy Efficiency, Wind and Renewables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J.; Yazdani, B.; Culp, C.

    AND RENEWABLES May 2008 Energy Systems Laboratory p. 2 Electricity Production from Wind Farms (2002-2007) ? Installed capacity of wind turbines was 3,026 MW (March 2007). ? Announced new project capacity is 3,125 MW by 2010. ? Lowest electricity period... variations in measured power vs base year power production in the OSP. Energy Systems Laboratory p. 4 Next, looked at hourly electricity produced vs NOAA wind data. Issue: too much scatter. Hourly Turbine Power vs. Wind Speed (On-site) 0 10 20 30...

  12. 2010-11 Electrical Engineering BSE/EPES 4-year Flow Chart Concentration in Electrical Power and Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    2010-11 Electrical Engineering BSE/EPES 4-year Flow Chart Concentration in Electrical Power and Energy Systems NOTE 1: The program in Electrical Engineering requires a total of 15 hours of technical

  13. 2011-12 Electrical Engineering BSE/EPES 4-year Flow Chart Concentration in Electrical Power and Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    2011-12 Electrical Engineering BSE/EPES 4-year Flow Chart Concentration in Electrical Power and Energy Systems NOTE 1: The program in Electrical Engineering requires a total of 15 hours of technical

  14. Ashe County - Wind Energy System Ordinance | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tribal Government Utility Program Info State North Carolina Program Type SolarWind Permitting Standards Provider Ashe County Planning Department In 2007 Ashe County...

  15. Research and Development Needs for Wind Systems Utilizing Controllable...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    areas: Grid Integration Manufacturing Research and Development Wind Turbine Power Electronics Advanced Grid Modeling and Simulation. This RFI is not intended to inform a...

  16. Model Ordinance for Siting of Wind-Energy Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With respect to small wind turbines, the model ordinance addresses setbacks, access, lighting, noise, appearance, code compliance, utility notification, abandonment, and the permitting process....

  17. NREL: Community - NREL Researchers Advance Wind Energy Systems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gave a large improvement in computational efficiency, suggesting that there is potential in using advanced statistical methods to analyze wind turbine fatigue and...

  18. Integrating Renewables and CHP into the UK Electricity System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Integrating Renewables and CHP into the UK Electricity System Xueguang Wu, Nick Jenkins, Goran Report 13 #12;1 Integrating Renewables and CHP into the UK Electricity System Tyndall Centre Technical and Regional CHP Projections to 2010 ...............................................18 2.5 Scenarios

  19. Electrical system for pulse-width modulated control of a power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals and related operating methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welchko, Brian A. (Torrance, CA)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are provided for pulse-width modulated control of power inverter using phase-shifted carrier signals. An electrical system comprises an energy source and a motor. The motor has a first set of windings and a second set of windings, which are electrically isolated from each other. An inverter module is coupled between the energy source and the motor and comprises a first set of phase legs coupled to the first set of windings and a second set of phase legs coupled to the second set of windings. A controller is coupled to the inverter module and is configured to achieve a desired power flow between the energy source and the motor by modulating the first set of phase legs using a first carrier signal and modulating the second set of phase legs using a second carrier signal. The second carrier signal is phase-shifted relative to the first carrier signal.

  20. african farming systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems with Applications in Advanced Hybrid Electric Vehicles and Wind Farms with Battery Storage. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??Modern hybrid electric vehicles...