Sample records for wind economic development

  1. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  2. Variables Affecting Economic Development of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's JEDI Wind model performed an analysis of wind-power-related economic development drivers. Economic development benefits for wind and coal were estimated using NREL's JEDI Wind and JEDI Coal models.

  3. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model and provides four case studies of potential offshore wind deployment scenarios in different regions of the...

  4. WINDExchange: Wind Economic Development Resources and Tools

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable Version BookmarkDevelopment

  5. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Small Wind: JEDI Model in the Works (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation covers the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's role in economic impact analysis for wind power Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) models, JEDI results, small wind JEDI specifics, and a request for information to complete the model.

  6. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model for Offshore Wind, is a computer tool for studying the economic impacts of fixed-bottom offshore wind projects in the United States. This presentation provides the results of an analysis of four offshore wind development scenarios in the Southeast Atlantic, Great Lakes, Mid-Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico regions.

  7. Economic Development Impact of 1,000 MW of Wind Energy in Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Hendrickson, S.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas has approximately 9,727 MW of wind energy capacity installed, making it a global leader in installed wind energy. As a result of the significant investment the wind industry has brought to Texas, it is important to better understand the economic development impacts of wind energy in Texas. This report analyzes the jobs and economic impacts of 1,000 MW of wind power generation in the state. The impacts highlighted in this report can be used in policy and planning decisions and can be scaled to get a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other wind scenarios. This report can also inform stakeholders in other states about the potential economic impacts associated with the development of 1,000 MW of new wind power generation and the relationships of different elements in the state economy.

  8. Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

  9. SciTech Connect: Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies Office Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY OFFSHORE WIND JOBS; OFFSHORE WIND...

  10. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: Offshore Wind User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed by NREL and MRG & Associates, is a spreadsheet based input-output tool. JEDI is meant to be a user friendly and transparent tool to estimate potential economic impacts supported by the development and operation of offshore wind projects. This guide describes how to use the model as well as technical information such as methodology, limitations, and data sources.

  11. Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach Webinar: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts of Offshore Wind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Starting more than a year ago, NREL initiated work to expand the Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model to include fixed-bottom offshore wind technology. Following the completion of the...

  12. Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet summarizes the findings of a report authored by Sandra Reategui and Suzanne Tegen of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A confluence of events ignited soaring growth in the number of Colorado?s wind power installations in recent years, from 291 megawatts (MW) of nameplate capacity in 2006 to 1,067 MW (nameplate capacity) in 2007. Analyzing the economic impact of Colorado?s first 1,000 MW of wind energy development not only provides a summary of benefits now enjoyed by the state?s population, but it also provides a sense of the economic development opportunities associated with other new wind project scenarios, including the U.S. Department of Energy?s 20% Wind Energy by 2030 scenario. The analysis can be used by interested parties in other states as an example of the potential economic impacts if they were to adopt 1,000 MW of wind power development.

  13. Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

  14. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    early201202061111769109 Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A. (2012). 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review. NRELTP-5000-52920. National Renewable...

  15. Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Community wind projects have long been touted (both anecdotally and in the literature) to increase the economic development impacts of wind projects, but most analyses of community wind have been based on expected results from hypothetical projects. This report provides a review of previous economic development analyses of community wind projects and compares these projected results with empirical impacts from projects currently in operation. A review of existing literature reveals two primary conclusions. First, construction-period impacts are often thought to be comparable for both community-and absentee-owned facilities. Second, operations-period economic impacts are observed to be greater for community-owned projects. The majority of studies indicate that the range of increased operations-period impact is on the order of 1.5 to 3.4 times. New retrospective analysis of operating community wind projects finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are estimated to be on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. In addition, when comparing retrospective results of community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed community wind projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa indicates that construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. Ultimately, wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and community wind projects are shown to have increased impact both during the construction and operations-period of a wind power plant. The extent of increased impact is primarily a function of local ownership and return on investment. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. Furthermore, the increased economic development impact of community wind shown here should not be undervalued. As the wind industry grows and approaches penetrations in the U.S. electricity market of 20%, social opposition to new wind power projects may increase. Community wind could provide a valuable strategy for building community support of wind power - especially in communities that are new to wind power. This analysis finds that total employment impacts from completed community wind projects are on the order of four to six 1-year jobs per-MW during construction and 0.3 to 0.6 long-term jobs per-MW during operations. Furthermore, when comparing community wind to hypothetical average absentee projects, construction-period employment impacts are 1.1 to 1.3 times higher and operations-period impacts are 1.1 to 2.8 times higher for community wind. Comparing the average of the completed projects studied here with retrospective analysis of the first 1,000 MW of wind in Colorado and Iowa shows construction-period impacts are as much as 3.1 times higher for community wind, and operations-period impacts are as much as 1.8 times higher. As the wind industry has grown, community wind has largely been a peripheral development model. However, this analysis shows that wind projects are a source of jobs and economic development, and that community wind projects have greater economic development impacts than absentee-owned projects. As such, policies that prioritize higher levels of local ownership are likely to result in increased economic development impacts. While the magnitude of increased benefit is primarily a function of local ownership and project profitability, the increased economic development impact of all community wind projects should not be undervalued. The ability of community wind projects to disperse economic impacts within the states and communities where they are built and to engage local community members

  16. Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J., Brown; B., Hoen; E., Lantz; J., Pender; R., Wiser

    2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to address the research question using post-project construction, county-level data, and econometric evaluation methods. Wind energy is expanding rapidly in the United States: Over the last 4 years, wind power has contributed approximately 35 percent of all new electric power capacity. Wind power plants are often developed in rural areas where local economic development impacts from the installation are projected, including land lease and property tax payments and employment growth during plant construction and operation. Wind energy represented 2.3 percent of the U.S. electricity supply in 2010, but studies show that penetrations of at least 20 percent are feasible. Several studies have used input-output models to predict direct, indirect, and induced economic development impacts. These analyses have often been completed prior to project construction. Available studies have not yet investigated the economic development impacts of wind development at the county level using post-construction econometric evaluation methods. Analysis of county-level impacts is limited. However, previous county-level analyses have estimated operation-period employment at 0.2 to 0.6 jobs per megawatt (MW) of power installed and earnings at $9,000/MW to $50,000/MW. We find statistically significant evidence of positive impacts of wind development on county-level per capita income from the OLS and spatial lag models when they are applied to the full set of wind and non-wind counties. The total impact on annual per capita income of wind turbine development (measured in MW per capita) in the spatial lag model was $21,604 per MW. This estimate is within the range of values estimated in the literature using input-output models. OLS results for the wind-only counties and matched samples are similar in magnitude, but are not statistically significant at the 10-percent level. We find a statistically significant impact of wind development on employment in the OLS analysis for wind counties only, but not in the other models. Our estimates of employment impacts are not precise enough to assess the validity of employment impacts from input-output models applied in advance of wind energy project construction. The analysis provides empirical evidence of positive income effects at the county level from cumulative wind turbine development, consistent with the range of impacts estimated using input-output models. Employment impacts are less clear.

  17. Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

  18. Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power: A Comparative Analysis of Impacts within the Western Governors' Association States; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Milligan, M.; Goldberg, M.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses NREL's newest Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI II) model to assess economic impacts from alternative power technologies, with a focus on wind energy, for a variety of states.

  19. Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    use requirements of modern wind power plants in the United2002. Economic impacts of wind power in Kittitas County:Office, 2004. Renewable energy: Wind power’s contribution to

  20. Economic Development Impacts of Colorado's First 1000 Megawatts of Wind Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reategui, S.; Tegen, S.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the economic impacts of the installation of 1000 MW of wind power in the state of Colorado.

  1. Wind Energy Economic Development and Impacts | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's picture SubmittedWielandJumpWimberley,Wind

  2. Economic Impacts of Wind Turbine Development in U.S. Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J., Brown

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    15 percent)). Cumulative wind turbine capacity installed inper capita income of wind turbine development (measured inour sample, cumulative wind turbine capacity on a per person

  3. Ex post analysis of economic impacts from wind power development in U.S. counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011) Figure 1. Location of Wind Power Development in theUnited States Figure 2: U.S. Wind Resource Map (Source:Resource Potential for Wind Capacity (Power Class 3-7, MW)

  4. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis additional cost of fuelWind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Levelized Generation CostCoal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis Notes: All Cost are in

  5. WINDExchange Webinar: Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind: Market...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will moderate, and the following speakers will discuss recent developments in the economics of offshore wind: Bruce Hamilton, Navigant: Offshore Wind Market Report. This...

  6. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    systems cost. Suzanne Tegen, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL): Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impact: Four Regional Scenarios. This presentation...

  8. Economic Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomic Development

  9. Job and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model: A User-Friendly Tool to Calculate Economic Impacts from Wind Projects; Preprint

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDIJob and

  10. JEDI II: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts from Coal, Naural Gas and Wind Power (Poster)

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDI II:

  11. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keats, Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of EconomicJournal of Development Economics 87(1): 57-75. [21] Ozier,Journal of Development Economics 94, 151-163. [9] Delavande,

  12. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazzi, Samuel Ali

    are weak,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 2004, 86,Essays in Development Economics A dissertation submitted indegree Doctor of Philosophy in Economics by Samuel Ali Bazzi

  13. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Joan Hamory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Handbook of Development Economics, Volume I (pp. 713-762).Journal of Development Economics, 81, 80-96. Behrman, JereJournal of Development Economics, 79, 349-373. Dercon,

  14. Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the Jobs and Economic Development Benefits model section on the Wind Powering America website.

  15. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

  16. DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More DOE Announces Webinars on Economic Impacts of Offshore Wind, Clean Energy Financing Programs, and More...

  17. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for Tribal Energy Efficiency Projects, and More DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model, Resources for...

  18. WINDExchange: Wind Economic Development

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable Version Bookmark

  19. Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind turbine prices in the United States have declined, on average, by nearly one-third since...

  20. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  1. Wind Power Project Repowering: History, Economics, and Demand...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Power Project Repowering: History, Economics, and Demand Wind Exchange Webinar Eric Lantz January 21, 2015 NRELPR-6A20-63591 2 Presentation Overview 1. Background - Concepts...

  2. Economic Growth and Development Economics 777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Economic Growth and Development Economics 777 July 18, 2008 Fall Semester 2008 Professor J. H. Mc of economic growth and development. We will analyze several different growth models and look at some recent empirical research. Text The text for this course is: Economic Growth (2nd Edition) by Robert J. Barro

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications AmolEstimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications Amolpolicies, and programs, wind energy can be a core component of India’

  4. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    planning, policies, and programs, wind energy can be a coreof Wind Integration in the Tamil Nadu Grid. Energy PolicyEnergy Technologies Division Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy

  5. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Generation2006. “ Integrating Wind Generation into Utility Systems”.Stand-Alone Wind Generation . 60

  6. What economics courses are there? Economics and International Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Economics Essentials What economics courses are there? BA Economics Economics and International Development Economics and International Relations Economics and Politics Philosophy, Politics and Economics (PPE) (p103) BSc Economics Economics and Management Studies Finance and Business (p46) Mathematics

  7. The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    The Effect of Wind Speed and Electric Rates On Wind Turbine Economics Economics of wind power depends mainly on the wind speeds and the turbine make and model. Definition: Simple Payback The "Simple period of a small wind power project. All the figures are per turbine, so it can be used for a one, two

  8. Meeting Summary, Economic Development Panel, Business Meeting No.31

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Bryan

    2003-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 The objectives of the meeting were as follows: (1) Learn more about and discuss economic impacts of wind power development in the U.S, highlighting the NWCC report, ''Assessing the Economic Impacts of Wind Power Development''; (2) Learn more about and discuss wind integration costs and the impacts of recent studies on wind energy development; and (3) Review activities and products planned for FY 2004.

  9. Wind Energy Finance (WEF): An Online Calculator for Economic Analysis of Wind Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure provides an overview of Wind Energy Finance (WEF), a free online cost of energy calculator developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory that provides quick, detailed economic evaluation of potential utility-scale wind energy projects. The brochure lists the features of the tool, the inputs and outputs that a user can expect, visuals of the screens and a Cash Flow Results table, and contact information.

  10. Jobs and Economic Development Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Develop models to estimate jobs and economic impacts from geothermal project development and operation.

  11. Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Minnesota's Transportation Economic Development (TED) Pilot Program Center for Transportation Studies Transportation Research Conference May 24-25, 2011 #12;Transportation Role in Economic Development · Carefully targeted transportation infrastructure improvements will: ­ Stimulate new economic development

  12. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  13. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Great Lakes Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Great Lakes region.

  14. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Mid-Atlantic Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.; Flores, F.; Zammit, D.; Kraemer, M.; Miles, J.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Mid-Atlantic region.

  15. An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Tooele County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind Powering

  16. An Analysis of the Economic Impact on Utah County, Utah from the Development of Wind Power Plants

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind Powering

  17. Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in San Juan County, Utah

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind PoweringAn

  18. Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts from the Development of Wind Power Plants in Summit County, Utah

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind

  19. Analysis of the Economic Impact on Box Elder County, Utah, from the Development of Wind Power Plants

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind An

  20. Quantifying the Economic Development Impacts of Wind Power in Six Rural Montana Counties Using NRELs JEDI Model

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWindJEDIJob%

  1. Economic and Financial Feasibility of Wind Energy -Case Study of Philippines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic and Financial Feasibility of Wind Energy - Case Study of Philippines Jyoti Prasad Painuly), can help project make viable in this case. 1 Introduction Wind energy has been one of the most., indicating viability of wind energy for entrepreneurs in developing countries as well. There are varying

  2. Distributed Wind - Economical, Clean Energy for Industrial Facilities 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trapanese, A.; James, F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind energy works for industrial clients. Corporations and other organizations are choosing to add Distributed Wind energy to their corporate goals for a numerous reasons: economic, environmental, marketing, values, and attracting new...

  3. Distributed Wind - Economical, Clean Energy for Industrial Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trapanese, A.; James, F.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed wind energy works for industrial clients. Corporations and other organizations are choosing to add Distributed Wind energy to their corporate goals for a numerous reasons: economic, environmental, marketing, values, and attracting new...

  4. Generating Economic Development from a Wind Power Plant in Spanish Fork Canyon, Utah: A Case Study and Analysis of State-Level Economic Impacts

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin:Deployment Activities Printable80 mPilot ProjectWind

  5. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Integration Costs ..adequacy costs. Wind generation costs are also significantlyvalue. 3. We add wind integration cost to the levelized cost

  6. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic21 Figure 6. Comparison of ACWH and CCGT-Wind

  7. Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

  8. Wind Development on the Rosebud

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers the Wind Development on the Rosebud, given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

  9. Essays in Empirical Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozier, Owen Whitfield

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    story,” Journal of Development Economics, 91(1), 128–139.Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 58(4), 450–474.to Learn,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 91(3), 437–

  10. Accelerating Offshore Wind Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today the Energy Department announced investments in seven offshore wind demonstration projects. Check out our map to see where these projects will be located.

  11. Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brad G. Stevens, P.E.; Troy K. Simonsen; Kerryanne M. Leroux

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In fiscal year 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) received funding from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake a broad array of tasks to either directly or indirectly address the barriers that faced much of the Great Plains states and their efforts to produce and transmit wind energy at the time. This program, entitled Great Plains Wind Energy Transmission Development Project, was focused on the central goal of stimulating wind energy development through expansion of new transmission capacity or development of new wind energy capacity through alternative market development. The original task structure was as follows: Task 1 - Regional Renewable Credit Tracking System (later rescoped to Small Wind Turbine Training Center); Task 2 - Multistate Transmission Collaborative; Task 3 - Wind Energy Forecasting System; and Task 4 - Analysis of the Long-Term Role of Hydrogen in the Region. As carried out, Task 1 involved the creation of the Small Wind Turbine Training Center (SWTTC). The SWTTC, located Grand Forks, North Dakota, consists of a single wind turbine, the Endurance S-250, on a 105-foot tilt-up guyed tower. The S-250 is connected to the electrical grid on the 'load side' of the electric meter, and the power produced by the wind turbine is consumed locally on the property. Establishment of the SWTTC will allow EERC personnel to provide educational opportunities to a wide range of participants, including grade school through college-level students and the general public. In addition, the facility will allow the EERC to provide technical training workshops related to the installation, operation, and maintenance of small wind turbines. In addition, under Task 1, the EERC hosted two small wind turbine workshops on May 18, 2010, and March 8, 2011, at the EERC in Grand Forks, North Dakota. Task 2 involved the EERC cosponsoring and aiding in the planning of three transmission workshops in the midwest and western regions. Under Task 3, the EERC, in collaboration with Meridian Environmental Services, developed and demonstrated the efficacy of a wind energy forecasting system for use in scheduling energy output from wind farms for a regional electrical generation and transmission utility. With the increased interest at the time of project award in the production of hydrogen as a critical future energy source, many viewed hydrogen produced from wind-generated electricity as an attractive option. In addition, many of the hydrogen production-related concepts involve utilization of energy resources without the need for additional electrical transmission. For this reason, under Task 4, the EERC provided a summary of end uses for hydrogen in the region and focused on one end product in particular (fertilizer), including several process options and related economic analyses.

  12. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    advanced coal-wind hybrid combined cycle power plant naturalwhen the wind generation drops, the power plant needs toa CSP plant, a wind plant produces power during all hours of

  13. A review of the economics of offshore wind farms Rebecca J. Barthelmie1 and Sara Pryor2,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    A review of the economics of offshore wind farms Rebecca J. Barthelmie1 and Sara Pryor2,1 1 prototype offshore wind farms, developed and installed during the 1990's, to the commercial wind farms offshore wind farms compete with moderate onshore locations. We summarise the transition to increasing

  14. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Figures Figure ES-1. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Basicviii Figure 1. Advanced-Coal Wind Hybrid: Basic29 Figure 9. Sensitivity to Coal

  15. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency, DOE. LBNL 275-E Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid:Renewable Energy Laboratory), and Ryan Wiser ( LBNL). i Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid:

  16. Refund for Economic Development (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Refund for Economic Development under the Tax Code for state tax refunds for economic development. Some Texas property owners may be eligible to receive refunds of state sales and use taxes and...

  17. Economic Development Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing...

  18. Coupled dynamics and economic analysis of floating wind turbine systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayman, E. N. (Elizabeth N.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Against the backdrop of rising oil prices and increasing uncertainty in the future of energy and the health of the environment, wind energy is distinguished as a leading technology that is both technologically and economically ...

  19. Counting Jobs and Economic Impacts from Distributed Wind in the United States (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conference poster describes the distributed wind Jobs and Economic Development Imapcts (JEDI) model. The goal of this work is to provide a model that estimates jobs and other economic effects associated with the domestic distributed wind industry. The distributed wind JEDI model is a free input-output model that estimates employment and other impacts resulting from an investment in distributed wind installations. Default inputs are from installers and industry experts and are based on existing projects. User input can be minimal (use defaults) or very detailed for more precise results. JEDI can help evaluate potential scenarios, current or future; inform stakeholders and decision-makers; assist businesses in evaluating economic development impacts and estimating jobs; assist government organizations with planning and evaluating and developing communities.

  20. Economic Development Project Districts (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Redevelopment commissions may petition legislative bodies to designate economic development project districts in cities with populations between 80,500 and 500,000. Such districts may be...

  1. Economic Development Incentive Program (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development Incentive Program (EDIP) is a tax incentive program designed to foster job creation and stimulate business growth throughout the Commonwealth. Participating companies may...

  2. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Southeast Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts identified by the study for the Southeast (defined here as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia).

  3. Avian issues in wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beyea, J. [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lot of concern among wind supporters, I know, about Audubon`s position on wind power. There is concern that this is the wrong time to be critical, and the wrong time to be putting any doubts in investors` minds, and the wrong time to provide an excuse for utilities to stop buying windpower. The long-term future of biodiversity, including bird diversity, depends on development of renewable energy, and that will mean some wind development in the right places and with the right types of systems. For both the long-time survival of the wind industry and for protection of bird populations, Audubon cannot be quiet on this issue. To avoid mistakes that can kill the industry in the long run, expenditures for wind/avian research have to be increased way beyond their present scope. We are going to need about $5 million dollars per year, if we are to (1) understand the biology and physics of bird-wind plant interactions, (2) if we are to understand relevant bird flightpaths, and (3) if we are to design a strategy to protect bird populations.

  4. Final Report for Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Innis; Randy Udall; Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop: Innovative Economic Approaches for Rural America'': This project, ''Harvesting a New Wind Crop'', helped stimulate wind development by rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities in Colorado. To date most of the wind power development in the United States has been driven by large investor-owned utilities serving major metropolitan areas. To meet the 5% by 2020 goal of the Wind Powering America program the 2,000 municipal and 900 rural electric cooperatives in the country must get involved in wind power development. Public power typically serves rural and suburban areas and can play a role in revitalizing communities by tapping into the economic development potential of wind power. One barrier to the involvement of public power in wind development has been the perception that wind power is more expensive than other generation sources. This project focused on two ways to reduce the costs of wind power to make it more attractive to public power entities. The first way was to develop a revenue stream from the sale of green tags. By selling green tags to entities that voluntarily support wind power, rural coops and munis can effectively reduce their cost of wind power. Western Resource Advocates (WRA) and the Community Office for Resource Efficiency (CORE) worked with Lamar Light and Power and Arkansas River Power Authority to develop a strategy to use green tags to help finance their wind project. These utilities are now selling their green tags to Community Energy, Inc., an independent for-profit marketer who in turn sells the tags to consumers around Colorado. The Lamar tags allow the University of Colorado-Boulder, the City of Boulder, NREL and other businesses to support wind power development and make the claim that they are ''wind-powered''. This urban-rural partnership is an important development for the state of Colorado's rural communities get the economic benefits of wind power and urban businesses are able to claim the environmental benefits. The second method to reduce the cost of wind power we investigated involved access to cheap capital. Municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives have access to low-interest loan programs and frequently finance projects through the sale of revenue bonds, but we were interested in the possibility for small businesses and community banks to provide equity and debt for wind projects. We worked with Boulder Community Hospital to explore their interest in partnering with other businesses and individuals to help catalyze the first community-owned wind project in Colorado. We also met with and gained interest from the independent community banks for the idea of wind power. These small banks may be restricted by lending limits, but are an integral part of rural communities and are very interested in the economic development opportunities wind power presents for small towns. This project was successful in getting six rural electric cooperatives and municipal utilities to purchase more than 25 MW of wind power in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska. These utilities also announced plans to explore an additional 100 MW or more of wind power development over the next few years. Finally, munis and coops in New Mexico began exploring wind power by offering small green power programs to their customers. WRA believes the lessons learned from this project will assist other municipal utilities and rural electric cooperatives as they develop wind projects.

  5. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keats, Anthony

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    can’t save alone: commitment in rotating savings and creditDo Simple Savings Accounts Help the Poor to Save? EvidenceSave More Tomorrow: Using Behavioral Economics to Increase Employee Saving”.

  6. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

  7. Wind Energy Career Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwen Andersen

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Saint Francis University has developed curriculum in engineering and in business that is meeting the needs of students and employers (Task 1) as well as integrating wind energy throughout the curriculum. Through a variety of approaches, the University engaged in public outreach and education that reached over 2,000 people annually (Task 2). We have demonstrated, through the success of these programs, that students are eager to prepare for emerging jobs in alternative energy, that employers are willing to assist in developing employees who understand the broader business and policy context of the industry, and that people want to learn about wind energy.

  8. Women Empowerment and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duflo, Esther

    Women empowerment and economic development are closely related: in one direction, development alone can play a major role in driving down inequality between men and women; in the other direction, empowering women may benefit ...

  9. Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ilities-through-uk-acquisition>. Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A. (2012). 2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review. NREL TP-5000-52920. Golden, CO:...

  10. Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2008) find estimates of capital cost of wind projectsHowever, our estimates of costs (e.g. , capital costs) ofin capital costs. 26 Heat Rate Heat rate estimates for the

  11. Essays in Labor Economics and Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yakovlev, Evgeny

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Russian Style." Journal of Public Economics 76(3):337-368Examples)”, RAND Journal of Economics, Summer. Bertrand,Quarterly Journal of Economics 119(1):249-275. Bhattacharya,

  12. Economic Impacts from Indiana's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Hauser, R.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnitude of Indiana's available wind resource indicates that the development of wind power infrastructure has the potential to support millions of dollars of economic activity in the state. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are tools used to estimate some of the economic impacts of energy projects at the state level. JEDI calculates results in the form of jobs, earnings, and economic output in three categories: project development and onsite labor, local revenue and supply chain, and induced impacts. According to this analysis, the first 1,000 MW of wind power development in Indiana (projects built between 2008 and 2011): supported employment totaling more than 4,400 full-time-equivalent jobs in Indiana during the construction periods; supports approximately 260 ongoing Indiana jobs; supported nearly $570 million in economic activity for Indiana during the construction periods; supported and continues to support nearly $40 million in annual Indiana economic activity during the operating periods; generates more than $8 million in annual property taxes; generates nearly $4 million annually in income for Indiana landowners who lease their land for wind energy projects.

  13. Texas Tech University is poised to take a leadership role in the development of wind power systems through research, economic development, job creation and education.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    turbines and water desalination mechanisms in a West Texas community. Texas Tech will begin with a 5APR NEWSLETTER Texas Tech University is poised to take a leadership role in the development, such as Texas State Technical College, will benefit from curriculum development in implementation

  14. Economic Development - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomic

  15. The economic value of wind energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlak, Alex

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's wholesale electricity market passes intermittency costs to the ratepayer in the form of increased overall system cost, a hidden subsidy. Market managers need a competition that correctly allocates cost and provides consumers with the lowest price. One solution is for buyers to contract wind farms to provide energy on demand. (author)

  16. Workforce Development and Wind for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newcomb, C.; Baring-Gould, I.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is faced with the need to quickly develop a skilled workforce and to address public acceptance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these challenges. This poster, produced for the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference, provides an overview of the project, including objectives, methods, and results.

  17. Three essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leight, Jessica E. (Jessica Ellen)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to analyze two questions central to the economic welfare of rural households in developing countries: the trade-offs between equity and efficiency induced by hybrid forms of property rights, and the ...

  18. Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development Loan Fund helps to fill the financing gap between private debt financing and private equity. Up to $1 million is available for each project and can be used for the...

  19. Economic Development Bond Program (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Through its Economic Development Bond Program, the Iowa Finance Authority (IFA) issues tax-exempt bonds on behalf of private entities or organizations for eligible purposes. The responsibility for...

  20. Essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keniston, Daniel Eben

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter 1 looks at the empirical estimation of the welfare impacts of bargaining. Bargaining for retail goods is common in developing countries, but rare in the developed world. The welfare implications of this difference ...

  1. Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters | Department ofofto PurchaseAprilWindFuture Trends |

  2. Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development Executive Summit on Wind Research and Development Each year, DOE EERE invests...

  3. Advancing Development and Greenhouse Gas Reductions in Vietnam's Wind Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilello, D.; Katz, J.; Esterly, S.; Ogonowski, M.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy development is a key component of Vietnam's Green Growth Strategy, which establishes a target to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from domestic energy activities by 20-30 percent by 2030 relative to a business-as-usual scenario. Vietnam has significant wind energy resources, which, if developed, could help the country reach this target while providing ancillary economic, social, and environmental benefits. Given Vietnam's ambitious clean energy goals and the relatively nascent state of wind energy development in the country, this paper seeks to fulfill two primary objectives: to distill timely and useful information to provincial-level planners, analysts, and project developers as they evaluate opportunities to develop local wind resources; and, to provide insights to policymakers on how coordinated efforts may help advance large-scale wind development, deliver near-term GHG emission reductions, and promote national objectives in the context of a low emission development framework.

  4. Making the Economic Case for Small-Scale Distributed Wind -- A Screening for Distributed Generation Wind Opportunities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Brown, E.; Dominick, J.; Jurotich, T.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was an offshoot of a previous assessment, which examined the potential for large-scale, greater than 50 MW, wind development on occupied federal agency lands. The study did not find significant commercial wind development opportunities, primarily because of poor wind resource on available and appropriately sized land areas or land use or aesthetic concerns. The few sites that could accommodate a large wind farm failed to have transmission lines in optimum locations required to generate power at competitive wholesale prices. The study did identify a promising but less common distributed generation (DG) development option. This follow-up study documents the NREL/Global Energy Concepts team efforts to identify economic DG wind projects at a select group of occupied federal sites. It employs a screening strategy based on project economics that go beyond quantity of windy land to include state and utility incentives as well as the value of avoided power purchases. It attempts to account for the extra costs and difficulties associated with small projects through the use of project scenarios that are more compatible with federal facilities and existing land uses. These benefits and barriers of DG are discussed, and the screening methodology and results are included. The report concludes with generalizations about the screening method and recommendations for improvement and other potential applications for this methodology.

  5. APPALACHIAN COLLEGES COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    customized community economic development engagement strategies. · Provide on-site Partnership evaluation to undertake new economic development programs. Communication, Sustainability, and Evaluation--Years 1, 2 and 3APPALACHIAN COLLEGES COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP The UNC-Chapel Hill Office

  6. Wind Power Project Repowering: History, Economics, and Demand (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes a related NREL technical report and seeks to capture the current status of wind power project repowering in the U.S. and globally, analyze the economic and financial decision drivers that surround repowering, and to quantify the level and timing of demand for new turbine equipment to supply the repowering market.

  7. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis was done to determine if small-scale wind energy could be economically feasible on a cotton farm with 1,200 irrigated acres, a house, and a barn. Lubbock and Midland were locations chosen for this model farm and the twenty-year analysis. A...

  8. NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6Site Wind ResourceSmall

  9. Revolving Economic Development and Initiative (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Revolving Economic Development and Initiative (REDI) provides low interest loans to start-up firms, businesses that are expanding or relocating and local economic development corporations. The...

  10. Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Coalfield Economic Development Authority (VACEDA) was created in 1988 to encourage economic development in the western section of the state. The Authority administers incentive and...

  11. Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Offshore Wind Development Authority is a public body, established for the purposes of facilitating, coordinating, and supporting the development, either by the Authority or by other...

  12. Appalachian Colleges Community Economic Development Partnership The Small Private Colleges Economic Development Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    Partnerships o Evaluation: Measuring Effectiveness #12;The Small Private Colleges Economic Development ToolkitAppalachian Colleges Community Economic Development Partnership The Small Private Colleges Economic and sustainable economic development outreach programs. It contains carefully selected articles and case studies

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF MODIFIED WIND TURBINE: A PAST REVIEW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Res; N R Deshmukh; S J Deshmukh; N R Deshmukh; S J Deshmukh

    Wind energy represents a viable alternative, as it is a virtually endless resource. Through the next several decades, renewable energy technologies, thanks to their continually improving performance and cost, and growing recognition of their Environmental, economic and social values, will grow increasingly competitive with Traditional energy technologies, so that by the middle of the 21 st century, renewable Energy, in its various forms, should be supplying half of the world’s energy needs. In this paper various types of wind turbine are reviewed to understand and the development and modification of horizontal axis wind turbine and how more power can be generated compared to bare turbine of the same rotor blade diameter.

  14. Wind Farm Power System Model Development: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In some areas, wind power has reached a level where it begins to impact grid operation and the stability of local utilities. In this paper, the model development for a large wind farm will be presented. Wind farm dynamic behavior and contribution to stability during transmission system faults will be examined.

  15. ASIAN DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS Winter 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, John

    and the Financial System Week 8 (02/27) Chapter 11 Globalization and the New Economy Week 9 (03/03) Chapter 13 economies to which the US economy is increasingly connected. The course will give students a flavor of political economy to examine Asia's economic development Prerequisites: ECON 271, ECON 272 or permission

  16. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

  17. MOWII Webinar: Wind Development Cultural Resource Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the planning stages, wind energy development can be affected by the regulatory process relative to cultural resource management issues. Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act ...

  18. Northern Cheyenne Tribe Wind Energy Development Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belvin Pete; Distributed Generation Systems Inc; WEST, Inc; Michael S. Burney; Chris Bergen; Electrical Consultants, Inc; Terracon

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific development objectives focused on the completion of all actions required to qualify a specfic project for financing and construction of a 30MW wind facility.

  19. Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedden, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

  20. Wind energy curriculum development at GWU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, Stephen M [GWU

    2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A wind energy curriculum has been developed at the George Washington University, School of Engineering and Applied Science. Surveys of student interest and potential employers expectations were conducted. Wind industry desires a combination of mechanical engineering training with electrical engineering training. The curriculum topics and syllabus were tested in several graduate/undergraduate elective courses. The developed curriculum was then submitted for consideration.

  1. Wind Energy Development & Wildlife Striving for Co-existence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Wind Energy Development & Wildlife ­ Striving for Co-existence Caroline Jezierski Nebraska Wind #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 30m http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/30m_US_Wind.jpg #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 50m http://www.nrel.gov/gis/images/US-50m-wind-power-map.jpg #12;Wind Energy Potential @ 80m

  2. Economic Development Tax Credit Program (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development Tax Credit (ETC) program was enacted in 2009 and eliminated five existing tax credit programs (Agricultural Development Zones, Airport Development Zones, Community...

  3. Three Essays on Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakagawa, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Journal of Public Economics 89(4): 705-727. Gertler, P andJournal of Labour Economics , Vol. 17, No. 2, April, 2010Smoothing”, Journal of Economics Perspectives , 9(3), 103-

  4. Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

  5. DOE Announces Webinars on an Offshore Wind Economic Impacts Model,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube| Department of Energy -StateOffshore Wind Economic ImpactsStudent

  6. Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-Scale Wind Integration in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes an analysis, conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in May 2010, of the economic characteristics of a particular utility-scale wind configuration project that has been referred to as the 'Big Wind' project.

  7. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the need to reassess wind potential estimates in India andDivision Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India:July 2011 Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India:

  8. Four Corners Wind Resource Center Webinar: Recent Developments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recent Developments in Western Energy Markets, the EIM, and the Integration of Wind Energy Four Corners Wind Resource Center Webinar: Recent Developments in Western Energy...

  9. Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Maine's Expedited Permitting of Grid-Scale Wind Energy Development statue provides an expedited permitting pathway for proposed wind developments in certain designated locations, known as expedited...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: support wind-energy development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    support wind-energy development Sandia Develops Tool to Evaluate Wind-TurbineRadar Impacts On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News &...

  11. An overview: Challenges in wind technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R W; Hock, S M

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing innovative wind turbine components and advanced turbine configurations is a primary focus for wind technology researchers. In their rush to bring these new components and systems to the marketplace, designers and developers should consider the lessons learned in the wind farms over the past 10 years. Experience has shown that a disciplined design approach is required that realistically accounts for the turbulence-induced loads, unsteady stall loading, and fatigue effects. This paper reviews past experiences and compares current modelling capabilities with experimental measurements in order to identify some of the knowledge gaps that challenge designers of advanced components and systems. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Essays in experimental and development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Healy, Andrew J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a collection of three essays on economic development and experimental economics. In Chapter 1, I present experimental evidence about how Thais treat information from domestic and foreign sources. Thai students ...

  13. Essays in development and environmental economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanna, Rema

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a collection of three empirical essays on economic development and environmental economics. Chapter 1 measures the response of U.S. based multinational firms to the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA), which ...

  14. Essays on conflict, cooperation and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralston, Laura R. (Laura Rosalind)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three chapters on topics relating to conflict, social cooperation and development economics. Several studies have identified the impact of adverse economic shocks on civil conflict using ...

  15. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

  16. Wind Program Announces $2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Program today announced 2 million in funding to advance technologies that address wind development's potential impacts on wildlife. This funding will help address...

  17. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    this study, wind energy potential for turbines at 80m, 100m,wind energy potential due to better technology in the form of higher efficiency, hub heights, and sizes of wind turbines.wind energy potential is higher than currently believed. Those aspects are 1) the rapidly improving wind turbine

  18. Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    Economics of Online Structural Health Monitoring of Wind Turbines: Cost Benefit Analysis Jeremy Van monitoring (OSHM) and condition-based maintenance (CBM) of wind turbine blades has the potential to reduce O cost of energy (LCOE) [1]. The costs required to keep wind turbines working in extreme temperatures

  19. Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

  20. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Bruce Duncan [Navigant Consulting, Inc.

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the report is to provide an assessment of the domestic supply chain and manufacturing infrastructure supporting the U.S. offshore wind market. The report provides baseline information and develops a strategy for future development of the supply chain required to support projected offshore wind deployment levels. A brief description of each of the key chapters includes: » Chapter 1: Offshore Wind Plant Costs and Anticipated Technology Advancements. Determines the cost breakdown of offshore wind plants and identifies technical trends and anticipated advancements in offshore wind manufacturing and construction. » Chapter 2: Potential Supply Chain Requirements and Opportunities. Provides an organized, analytical approach to identifying and bounding the uncertainties associated with a future U.S. offshore wind market. It projects potential component-level supply chain needs under three demand scenarios and identifies key supply chain challenges and opportunities facing the future U.S. market as well as current suppliers of the nation’s land-based wind market. » Chapter 3: Strategy for Future Development. Evaluates the gap or competitive advantage of adding manufacturing capacity in the U.S. vs. overseas, and evaluates examples of policies that have been successful . » Chapter 4: Pathways for Market Entry. Identifies technical and business pathways for market entry by potential suppliers of large-scale offshore turbine components and technical services. The report is intended for use by the following industry stakeholder groups: (a) Industry participants who seek baseline cost and supplier information for key component segments and the overall U.S. offshore wind market (Chapters 1 and 2). The component-level requirements and opportunities presented in Section 2.3 will be particularly useful in identifying market sizes, competition, and risks for the various component segments. (b) Federal, state, and local policymakers and economic development agencies, to assist in identifying policies with low effort and high impact (Chapter 3). Section 3.3 provides specific policy examples that have been demonstrated to be effective in removing barriers to development. (c) Current and potential domestic suppliers in the offshore wind market, in evaluating areas of opportunity and understanding requirements for participation (Chapter 4). Section 4.4 provides a step-by-step description of the qualification process that suppliers looking to sell components into a future U.S. offshore wind market will need to follow.

  1. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of Wind Energy Resource Assessment in China. Chinaindependent 3 party wind resource assessment of at least awind_june07.pdf for Wind Resource Assessment and mapping for

  2. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1 Coincidence of Wind Generation with Seasonal Load Shapes3.2 Coincidence of Wind Generation with Diurnal Load Shapessites for an actual wind generation facility or predict its

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of variability of wind generation and costs related toLaxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model.MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India are

  4. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. Sinden, A. Zervos, (2011): Wind Energy. In IPCC SpecialM. Hand, and A. Laxson (2006). Wind Turbine Design Cost and2009). Analysis of Impacts of Wind Integration in the Tamil

  5. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment of Potential for Wind Farms in India, RenewableNetworks for Offshore Wind Farms, Bremen, Germany, 14-15Assessment of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable

  6. Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development Set-Aside (EDSA) program provides financial assistance to those businesses and industries requiring such assistance in order to create new job opportunities. Assistance is...

  7. Virginia Economic Development Incentive Grant (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Economic Development Incentive Grant is a discretionary cash grant, designed to assist and encourage companies to invest and create new employment opportunities by locating significant...

  8. CAIED Tribal Economic Development Outlook Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Center for American Indian Economic Development (CAIED) is hosting a conference on the impact that business and the economy will have on the next year for Tribes.

  9. Workforce and Economic Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Workforce and Economic Development Slides presented in the "What's Working in Residential Energy Efficiency Upgrade Programs Conference - Promising Approaches and Lessons...

  10. Facilitating Wind Development: The Importance of Electric Industry Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper evaluates which wholesale elecricity market-structure characteristics best accommodate wind energy development.

  11. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MW installed worldwide. 6 Wind energy costs in India areWe estimate the cost of wind energy and compare it with

  12. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unleashing the Potential of Renewable Energy in India.of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (of Potential for Wind Farms in India, Renewable Energy (

  13. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Rotor Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development Offshore Wind RD&D:...

  14. Coupled Operation of a Wind Farm and Pumped Storage Facility: Techno-Economic Modelling and Stochastic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Coupled Operation of a Wind Farm and Pumped Storage Facility: Techno-Economic Modelling Operation of a Wind Farm and Pumped Storage Facility: Techno-Economic Modelling and Stochastic Optimization a stochastic programming approach to the techno-economic analysis of a wind farm coupled with a pumped storage

  15. Economic Evaluation of Short-Term Wind Power Forecasts in ERCOT: Preliminary Results; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwig, K.; Hodge, B. M.; Brinkman, G.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Banunarayanan, V.; Nasir, S.; Freedman, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, a number of wind energy integration studies have investigated the value of using day-ahead wind power forecasts for grid operational decisions. These studies have shown that there could be large cost savings gained by grid operators implementing the forecasts in their system operations. To date, none of these studies have investigated the value of shorter-term (0 to 6-hour-ahead) wind power forecasts. In 2010, the Department of Energy and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration partnered to fund improvements in short-term wind forecasts and to determine the economic value of these improvements to grid operators, hereafter referred to as the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP). In this work, we discuss the preliminary results of the economic benefit analysis portion of the WFIP for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. The improvements seen in the wind forecasts are examined, then the economic results of a production cost model simulation are analyzed.

  16. Economic Development | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:research community -- hostedEconomic Economic

  17. Assessment of the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative: Addressing Environmental and Siting Issues Associated with Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; States, Jennifer C.

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Wind Coordinating Collaborative (NWCC) is a consensus-based stakeholder group comprised of representatives from the utility, wind industry, environmental, consumer, regulatory, power marketer, agricultural, tribal, economic development, and state and federal government sectors. The purpose of the NWCC is to support the development of an environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable commercial market for wind power (NWCC 2010). The NWCC has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) since its inception in 1994. In order to evaluate the impact of the work of the NWCC and how this work aligns with DOE’s strategic priorities, DOE tasked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to conduct a series of informal interviews with a small sample of those involved with NWCC.

  18. Wind Energy Workforce Development: Engineering, Science, & Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, George A.; Stewart, Susan W.; Bridgen, Marc

    2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadly, this project involved the development and delivery of a new curriculum in wind energy engineering at the Pennsylvania State University; this includes enhancement of the Renewable Energy program at the Pennsylvania College of Technology. The new curricula at Penn State includes addition of wind energy-focused material in more than five existing courses in aerospace engineering, mechanical engineering, engineering science and mechanics and energy engineering, as well as three new online graduate courses. The online graduate courses represent a stand-alone Graduate Certificate in Wind Energy, and provide the core of a Wind Energy Option in an online intercollege professional Masters degree in Renewable Energy and Sustainability Systems. The Pennsylvania College of Technology erected a 10 kilowatt Xzeres wind turbine that is dedicated to educating the renewable energy workforce. The entire construction process was incorporated into the Renewable Energy A.A.S. degree program, the Building Science and Sustainable Design B.S. program, and other construction-related coursework throughout the School of Construction and Design Technologies. Follow-on outcomes include additional non-credit opportunities as well as secondary school career readiness events, community outreach activities, and public awareness postings.

  19. Economic Development Incentive Programs: Some Best Practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    Economic Development Incentive Programs: Some Best Practices Judith I. Stallmann and Thomas G to be concerned about their ability to generate good returns to public investments. First, firms receiving. Johnson is Frank Miller Professor of Agricultural and Applied Economics, and Professor of Public Affairs

  20. Wind Energy Workforce Development: A Roadmap to a Wind Energy Educational Infrastructure (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Powering America national technical director Ian Baring-Gould made this presentation about workforce development in the wind energy industry to an audience at the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference in Anaheim. The presentation outlines job projections from the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report and steps to take at all levels of educational institutions to meet those projections.

  1. The economic development of Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khader, B.; El-Wifati, B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book focuses on the development of the Libyan economy over the last decade. The book surveys both the structural developments in the Libyan economy and the experience of the individual sectors. It considers the potential for industrial development and the prospects for agriculture both in terms of natural resources and political commitments. The book also examines developments in the service sector especially banking.

  2. Three Essays on Economic Development in Africa 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musumba, Mark

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To achieve economic development, regional authorities have to address issues that relate to climate change, efficient information flow in the market place, and health care. This dissertation presents three essays on current issues of concern...

  3. Three essays on development economics in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Nancy

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is a collection of three independent essays in empirical development economics using data from China. In the first two chapters, I examine the determinants of choices within the household. In the first ...

  4. Puerto Rico- Economic Development Incentives for Renewables

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2008 Economic Incentives for the Development of Puerto Rico Act (EIA) provides a wide array of tax incentives and credits that enable local and foreign companies dedicated to certain business...

  5. Megacities : sustainability, transport, and economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias, Justin Charles, 1980-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The connections between sustainability, transport, and economic development are and will remain essential in the governance of cities. Sustainability concepts include valuing and preserving the earth's resources so that ...

  6. Sandia Energy - Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Offshore Wind Offshore Wind RD&D: Large Offshore Rotor...

  7. Corruption, Institutions and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aidt, Toke S

    and in developing the underlying theory (Dasgupta, 2001, chapter 9; Hamilton and Clemens, 1999). Loosely speaking, sustainable development is related to an economy?s ability to maintain living standards through time. More precisely, Arrow et al. (2004) suggest... capita ?a direct measure of sustainable development ?and corruption. While corruption may have little average e¤ect on the growth rate of GDP per capita, it is a likely source of unsustainable development. Key words: Corruption, Growth, Sustainable...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts Sandia National Laboratories Develops Tool for Evaluating Wind Turbine-Radar Impacts September 12, 2014 - 11:30am Addthis...

  9. Economic assessment of small-scale electricity generation from wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Kristen Dawn

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    10 kW wind turbine on a 30m tower was installed and five different scenarios were calculated for both locations. Wind speeds for both locations were collected and analyzed to find the closest fitting distribution to incorporate the appropriate risk...

  10. Tribal Leader Forum on Tribal Energy and Economic Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Leader Forum on Tribal Energy and Economic Development: Tribal Utility Formation Tribal Leader Forum on Tribal Energy and Economic Development: Tribal Utility Formation July 27,...

  11. Three Essays on Development Economics and Behavioral Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Changcheng

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112 (2), 407-441. Crawford,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 116(4), 1233-1260. Gul,Quarterly Journal of Economics, 112 (2), 407-441. Carlin, B.

  12. Trade Pattern and Economic Development when Endogenous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trade Pattern and Economic Development when Endogenous and Exogenous Comparative Advantages Coexist Papers Center for International Development at Harvard University #12;CID Working Paper no. 3 Trade is divided between commercialized sector which trades with foreign country and self-sufficient sector which

  13. Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Contributed Paper Effects of Wind Energy Development on Nesting Ecology of Greater Prairie 32611, U.S.A. Abstract: Wind energy is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy needs by 2030, but new sites for impacts of a wind energy development on the reproductive ecology of prairie-chickens in a 5-year study. We

  14. Development of Wind Turbines Prototyping Software Under Matlab/Simulink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    204 1 Development of Wind Turbines Prototyping Software Under Matlab/Simulink® Through present the development of a wind turbine prototyping software under Matlab/Simulink® through and the end of 1999, around 75% of all new grid-connected wind turbines worldwide were installed in Europe [3

  15. FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FEED-IN TARIFFS AND OFFSHORE WIND POWER DEVELOPMENT Prepared by Jon Lilley, Blaise Sheridan, Dawn.......................................................................................................................... 25 FERC Clarification as Applied to Offshore Wind........................................................................................................................ 28 #12; 3 Feed-in Tariffs and Offshore Wind Power Development Prepared Pursuant to DOE Grant Em

  16. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    times the current installed capacity) will be about 40,000largest portion of RE installed capacity in the world, withleads all states in installed wind capacity – would yield a

  17. Economic modeling of intermittency in wind power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Alan Yung Chen

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity sector is a major source of carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to global climate change. Over the past decade wind energy has steadily emerged as a potential source for large-scale, low carbon energy. ...

  18. Initial Economic Analysis of Utility-scale Wind Integration in...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    for the scope of this work when considering alternatives. In 2009, recognizing the potential of the Big Wind project to contribute to the RPS goals, a series of studies...

  19. How Many Jobs are there in the Domestic Small Wind Industry? (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster introduces the preliminary small wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model.

  20. Wind for Schools: Developing Education Programs to Train the Next Generation of the Wind Energy Workforce

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Barnett, L.; Miles, J.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the Wind for Schools project elements, including a description of host and collegiate school curricula developed for wind energy and the status of the current projects. The paper also provides focused information on how schools, regions, or countries can become involved or implement similar projects to expand the social acceptance and understanding of wind energy.

  1. Wind Energy Facilities and Residential Properties: The Effect of Proximity and View on Sales Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    about Wind Turbines and Wind Farms. Wind Engineering. 13(4):Towards the Development of Wind Farms in Australia. JournalEconomic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. Beacon

  2. Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 Wind Energy Development and its Impacts on Wildlife Carrie Lowe, M.S. Candidate UniversityOutline · Introduction · Wind energy in the U.S. I t ildlif· Impacts on wildlife · Guidelines · Future directions · References IntroductionIntroduction What is wind energy? · The process by which turbines convert the kinetic

  3. Facilitating wind development: the importance of electric industry structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Brendan; Milligan, Michael

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOs and RTOs, with their day-ahead and real-time markets, large geographies to aggregate diverse wind resources, large loads to aggregate with wind, large generation pools that tap conventional-generator flexibility, and regional transmission planning efforts, offer the best environments for wind generation to develop. (author)

  4. Essays in Public Economics and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerard, Francois

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    but only economic incentives (kWh) Simulations: totargets through economic incentives is often consideredtargets through economic incentives (e.g. , prices) is often

  5. E000308 economic development and the environment Economic development in low-income economies is initially highly resource-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coxhead, Ian

    E000308 economic development and the environment Economic development in low-income economies sources of emissions that contribute to global climate change. Economic development depends on sustained drawdowns, may affect economic development in a dynamic interaction. This feedback is hard to quantify

  6. Preliminary design and economic investigations of diffuser-augmented wind turbines (DAWT). Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, K.M.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preferred design and configuration approach for the DAWT innovative wind energy conversion system is suggested. A preliminary economic assessment is made for limited production rates of units between 5 and 150 kW rated output. Nine point designs are used to arrive at the conclusions regarding best construction material for the diffuser and busbar cost of electricity (COE). It is estimated that for farm and REA cooperative end users, the COE can range between 2 and 3.5 cents/kWh for sites with annual average wind speeds of 16 and 12 mph (25.7 and 19.3 km/h) respectively, and 150 kW rated units. No tax credits are included in these COE figures. For commercial end users of these 150 kW units, the COE ranges between 4.0 and 6.5 cents/kWh for 16 and 12 mph sites. These estimates in 1971 dollars are lower than DOE goals set in 1978 for the rating size and end applications. Recommendations are made for future activities to maintain steady, systematic progress toward mature development of the DAWT.

  7. Preliminary design and economic investigations of Diffuser-Augmented Wind Turbines (DAWT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foreman, K.M.

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preferred design and configuration approach is suggested for the DAWT innovative wind energy conversion system. A preliminary economic asessment is made for limited production rates of units between 5 and 150 kw rated output. Nine point designs are used to arrive at the conclusions regarding best construction material for the diffuser and busbar cost of electricity (COE). It is estimated that for farm and REA cooperative end users, the COE can range between 2 and 3.5 cents/kWh for sites with annual average wind speeds of 16 and 12 mph (25.7 and 19.3 km/h) respectively, and 150 kW rated units. No tax credits are included in these COE figures. For commercial end users of these 150 kW units the COE ranges between 4.0 and 6.5 cents/kWh for 16 and 12 mph sites. These estimates in 1979 dollars are lower than DOE goals set in 1978 for the rating size and end applications. Recommendations are made for future activities to maintain steady, systematic progress toward mature development of the DAWT.

  8. The University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Robert A.

    and Environmental Sciences An Evaluation of Direct and Indirect Economic Losses Incurred by Georgia FruitThe University of Georgia Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development College of Agricultural ............................................................................................................................................................ 3 Economic Consequences

  9. 2014 Offshore Wind Market and Economic Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergyDepartment of Energy Information2012 AwardsWindDepartment2014

  10. New Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with funding from DOE's Wind and Water Power Program. Increasing concerns over the sustainability of sage-grouse populations in the face of increasing development have led...

  11. Research and Development Needs for Wind Systems Utilizing Controllable...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    areas: Grid Integration Manufacturing Research and Development Wind Turbine Power Electronics Advanced Grid Modeling and Simulation. This RFI is not intended to inform a...

  12. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    chickens. windpowerprairiechickens.pdf More Documents & Publications Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development EIS-0485: Draft...

  13. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an area that currently supports important populations of greater sage-grouse and has high wind energy development potential. This early model prototype demonstrated the utility of...

  14. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: Final Subcontract Report, 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    3TIER, Seattle, Washington

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of the necessary and needed wind and solar datasets used in the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS).

  15. The Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    and wind power in three Canadian jurisdictions, namely British Columbia, Ontario and Alberta. An Optimal baseload mixtures. The large premium paid for displacing hydro or nuclear power with wind power does littleThe Techno-economic Impacts of Using Wind Power and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles for Greenhouse

  16. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  17. Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

  18. Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Pennsylvania. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Pennsylvania to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,837 million gallons.

  19. Wind Energy Workforce Development: A Roadmap to a Sustainable Wind Industry (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.; Kelly, M.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States moves toward a vision of greatly expanded wind energy use as outlined in the U.S. Department of Energy's 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, the need for skilled workers at all levels in the industry is repeatedly identified as a critical issue. This presentation is an overview of the educational infrastructure and expected industry needs to support the continued development of a vibrant U.S. wind industry through a discussion of the activities identified that must be put in place to train workers. The paper will also provide a framework to address issues raised from each of the education and industry sectors, identifying a roadmap for developing an educational infrastructure to support wind technology. The presentation will also provide an understanding of the available resources, materials, and programs available across the industry. This presentation provides an overview of the educational infrastructure and expected industry needs to support the continued development of a vibrant U.S. wind industry as part of a collaborative effort to develop a wind workforce roadmap. This presentation will provide 1) A review of needed programs to train workers for the wind industry; 2) An overview of the importance education will play if the nation is to expand wind energy (both in development and deployment terms) and a review of ongoing activities with a focus on federal efforts; 3) A review of the materials and resources available across the industry and a framework to address issues raised from each of the education and industry sectors.

  20. Essays in Labor and Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mutsalklisana, Charles Saharuk

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980s,” Journal of Labor Economics, 15, 1- 42 Blinder, Alan,Differentials,” The Review of Economics and Statistics, 70,Canadian Journal of Economics, 35, 646- 688 Lewbel, A. ,

  1. Three Applied Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapoor, Shruti

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We Learned from the Economics of the Family? ’, Americanof Labor’, Journal of Labor Economics 3(1), S33–58. Becker,Quarterly Journal of Economics 90(2), 285–307. Ben-Porath,

  2. Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

  3. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  4. Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Davis; Tim Eder; David Ulrich; David Naftzger; Donald J. Wuebbles; Mark C. Petri

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Great Lakes Water Scarcity and Regional Economic Development panel at Northwestern University on 10/10/2012

  5. Position Description Project Manager, Office of Community and Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Position Description Project Manager, Office of Community and Economic Development Full will support all aspects of the success of CSU's Office of Community and Economic Development projects from to the Director and Assistant Director of the Community and Economic Development Office of Colorado State

  6. DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.] [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

  7. An overview of DOE`s wind turbine development programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laxson, A; Dodge, D; Flowers, L [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R; Goldman, P [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically advanced, higher efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high priority activity of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting and sponsoring a range of programs aimed at assisting the wind industry with system design, development, and testing. The overall goal is to develop systems that can compete with conventional electric generation for $.05/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with fossil-fuel-based generators for $.04/kWh at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be achieved through several programs. The Value Engineered Turbine Program will promote the rapid development of US capability to manufacture wind turbines with known and well documented records of performance, cost, and reliability, to take advantage of near-term market opportunities. The Advanced Wind Turbine Program will assist US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid 1990s) and to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. The collaborative Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/DOE Utility Wind Turbine Performance Verification Program will deploy and evaluate commercial-prototype wind turbines in typical utility operating environments, to provide a bridge between development programs currently underway and commercial purchases of utility-grade wind turbines. A number of collaborative efforts also will help develop a range of small systems optimized to work in a diesel hybrid environment to provide electricity for smaller non-grid-connected applications.

  8. Wind Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries |Attacksof EnergyWhenWindWind Research and

  9. FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT, REGULATORY FRAMEWORK, AND INTEGRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT, REGULATORY FRAMEWORK, AND INTEGRATION 2010 Amardeep Dhanju All Rights Reserved #12;FOUR ESSAYS ON OFFSHORE WIND POWER POTENTIAL, DEVELOPMENT

  10. Wind power development -Status and perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    countries together covering ap- prox. 80% of the growth in installed wind turbine capacity world wide years the global in- stalled capacity has increased almost threefold, from approx. 2.3 GW in 1991 has increased - in 1995 and 1996 global capacity has increased by approx. 1.3 GW annually or more than

  11. Overcoming Barriers to Wind Development in Appalachian Coal Country

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Bailey; Evan Hansen

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project synthesizes existing data and communication from experts to assess barriers to wind development in Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, and Kentucky, and makes recommendations where feasible to reduce or eliminate those barriers.

  12. Wind for Schools: A National Data and Curricula Development Activity for Schools (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America?s Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community 'host' schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

  13. Weather Incorporated for Needs Development (W.I.N.D.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Gunderson; Melinda Martin; Jay Johnson

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The OSHA Power Generation Standard states that power generation employees shall be trained in specific applications of the standard that apply to individual job requirements. The intent of the project objective, then, is to create a tailored course that identifies standard requirements that apply to wind energy technicians.The purpose of this project is to develop an OSHA Power Generation Standard (1910.269) training course for both college based wind energy technician students and for continued workforce training of already employed wind technicians.

  14. Wind energy information guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

  15. Pattern of Trade and Economic Development in the Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pattern of Trade and Economic Development in the Model of Monopolistic Competition Jeffrey D. Sachs for International Development at Harvard University #12;CID Working Paper no. 14 Pattern of Trade and Economic into the model of monopolistic competition to investigate the interplay between trade policies and development

  16. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Economics of Developing Hot...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search...

  17. TS Wind Power Developers | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector:Shrenik IndustriesState ofSwitchpowerTCITMETS Wind

  18. Wind Prospect Developments Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifang Swisselectronic Co LtdLtd Place:Arcadia JumpWind

  19. Wind Project Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWind Power Energia Jump to:Windprovides

  20. Wind Workforce Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWind Power Energia JumpMaps.jpg

  1. Dynamic valuation model For wind development in regard to land value, proximity to transmission lines, and capacity factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikandrou, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a wind farm involves many variables that can make or break the success of a potential wind farm project. Some variables such as wind data (capacity factor, wind rose, wind speed, etc.) are readily available in ...

  2. Technology and Economics Affecting Unconventional Reservoir Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Campero, Cecilia P.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    translate into additional oil and gas production and reserves. This behavior was observed through the analysis of a series of decline production curves using a VBA program in Excel that compute oil and gas production volumes and their corresponding economic...

  3. Session: Bat ecology related to wind development and lessons learned about impacts on bats from wind development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Greg; Kunz, Thomas

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two paper presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. It was the first of the sessions to shift the focus to the issue of wind energy development's impacts specifically to bats. The presentations discussed lessons that have been learned regarding direct and indirect impacts on bats and strategies planned to address such issues. Presenters addressed what the existing science demonstrates about land-based wind turbine impacts on bats, including: mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts, species and numbers killed, per turbine rates/per MW generated, and impacts on threatened and endangered species. They discussed whether there is sufficient data for wind turbines and bat impacts for projects in the eastern US, especially on ridge tops. Finally, the subject of offshore impacts on bats was briefly addressed, including what lessons have been learned in Europe and how these can be applied in the U S. Paper one, by Greg Johnson, was titled ''A Review of Bat Impacts at Wind Farms in the US''. Paper two, by Thomas Kunz, was titled ''Wind Power: Bats and Wind Turbines''.

  4. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, andWind Power Development in the United States: Current94720 Abstract: The U.S. wind power industry is in an era of

  5. Feasibility analysis of coordinated offshore wind project development in the U.S.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Mimi Q

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind energy is one of the cleanest and most available resources in the world, and advancements in wind technology are making it more cost effective. Though wind power is rapidly developing in many regions, its variable ...

  6. Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geography, Economic Policy and Regional Development in China Sylvie Démurger, Jeffrey D. Sachs and Regional Development in China Sylvie Démurger Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) Centre d Woo Economics Department University of California, Davis wtwoo@ucdavis.edu Shuming Bao China Data

  7. Canada Research Chair, Tier II in Economics of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeff

    Canada Research Chair, Tier II in Economics of Sustainable Development The University of Winnipeg has designated a Tier II Canada Research Chair in the Economics of Sustainable Development within and enhanced research support. The Canada Research Chair program was established by the Government of Canada

  8. TED: Technology and Economic Development International Conference on Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    TED: Technology and Economic Development 3rd International Conference on Innovation, Technology and Knowledge Economics Ankara, 24th -26th June An Empirical Study into the Determinants of Innovativeness for Industrial Management (TUSSIDE), 41401 Gebze, Kocaeli, Turkey 3 Gebze Institute of Technology, Department

  9. Potential for Development of Solar and Wind Resource in Bhutan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilman, P.; Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) produced maps and data of the wind and solar resources in Bhutan. The solar resource data show that Bhutan has an adequate resource for flat-plate collectors, with annual average values of global horizontal solar radiation ranging from 4.0 to 5.5 kWh/m2-day (4.0 to 5.5 peak sun hours per day). The information provided in this report may be of use to energy planners in Bhutan involved in developing energy policy or planning wind and solar projects, and to energy analysts around the world interested in gaining an understanding of Bhutan's wind and solar energy potential.

  10. Analysis of the Technical and Economic Potential for Mid-Scale Distributed Wind: December 2007 - October 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwartin, R.; Wolfrum, A.; Granfield, K.; Kagel, A.; Appleton, A.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines the status, restrainers, drivers, and estimated development potential of mid-scale (10 kW - 5000 kW) distributed wind energy projects.

  11. Techno-economic Modeling of the Integration of 20% Wind and Large-scale Energy Storage in ERCOT by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross Baldick; Michael Webber; Carey King; Jared Garrison; Stuart Cohen; Duehee Lee

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This study�¢����s objective is to examine interrelated technical and economic avenues for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) grid to incorporate up to and over 20% wind generation by 2030. Our specific interests are to look at the factors that will affect the implementation of both high level of wind power penetration (> 20% generation) and installation of large scale storage.

  12. Technology and Economics Affecting Unconventional Reservoir Development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Campero, Cecilia P.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    5.1.1 Low-Permeability Oil (Chalk Reservoirs) ???...? 47 5.1.1.1 Austin Chalk Formation????????? 48 5.1.1.1.1 Production History?????????. 49 5.1.2 Oil Shale???????????????..??. 53 5.1.2.1 Bakken Shale Formation... are more sensitive to certain type of resources such as oil shales and gas hydrates????????????????????.. 3 1.2 Oil shale resources in the Green River formation are giant accumulations waiting for economical exploitation???????????...???... 4 1...

  13. Assessment of Ports for Offshore Wind Development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkinton, Chris [DNV GL] [DNV GL; Blatiak, Alicia; Ameen, Hafsa

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As offshore wind energy develops in the United States, port facilities will become strategic hubs in the offshore wind farm supply chain because all plant and transport logistics must transit through these facilities. Therefore, these facilities must provide suitable infrastructure to meet the specific requirements of the offshore wind industry. As a result, it is crucial that federal and state policy-makers and port authorities take effective action to position ports in the offshore wind value chain to take best advantage of their economic potential. The U.S. Department of Energy tasked the independent consultancy GL Garrad Hassan (GL GH) with carrying out a review of the current capability of U.S. ports to support offshore wind project development and an assessment of the challenges and opportunities related to upgrading this capability to support the growth of as many as 54 gigawatts of offshore wind installed in U.S. waters by 2030. The GL GH report and the open-access web-based Ports Assessment Tool resulting from this study will aid decision-makers in making informed decisions regarding the choice of ports for specific offshore projects, and the types of investments that would be required to make individual port facilities suitable to serve offshore wind manufacturing, installation and/or operations. The offshore wind industry in the United States is still in its infancy and this study finds that additional port facilities capable of supporting offshore wind projects are needed to meet the anticipated project build-out by 2030; however, no significant barriers exist to prevent the development of such facilities. Furthermore, significant port capabilities are in place today with purpose-build port infrastructure currently being built. While there are currently no offshore wind farms operating in the United States, much of the infrastructure critical to the success of such projects does exist, albeit in the service of other industries. This conclusion is based on GL GH’s review of U.S. ports infrastructure and its readiness to support the development of proposed offshore wind projects in U.S. waters. Specific examples of facility costs and benefits are provided for five coastal regions (North Atlantic, South Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, Great Lakes, and Pacific) around the country. GL GH began this study by identifying the logistical requirements of offshore wind ports to service offshore wind. This review was based on lessons learned through industry practice in Northern Europe. A web-based port readiness assessment tool was developed to allow a capability gap analysis to be conducted on existing port facilities based on the identified requirements. Cost models were added to the assessment tool, which allowed GL GH to estimate the total upgrade cost to a port over the period 2014-2030 based on a set of regional project build-out scenarios. Port fee information was gathered from each port allowing an estimate of the potential revenue to the port under this same set of scenarios. The comparison of these revenue and improvement cost figures provides an initial indication of the level of offshore wind port readiness. To facilitate a more in-depth infrastructure analysis, six ports from different geographic regions, with varied levels of interest and preparedness towards offshore wind, were evaluated by modeling a range of installation strategies and port use types to identify gaps in capability and potential opportunities for economic development. Commonalities, trends, and specific examples from these case studies are presented and provide a summary of the current state of offshore wind port readiness in the U.S. and also illustrate the direction some ports have chosen to take to prepare for offshore wind projects. For example, the land area required for wind turbine and foundation manufacturing is substantial, particularly due to the large size of offshore wind components. Also, the necessary bearing capacities of the quayside and storage area are typically greater for offshore wind components than for more conventiona

  14. Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Community Development Block Grant/Economic Development Infrastructure Financing (CDBG/EDIF) provides public infrastructure financing to help communities grow jobs, enable new business startups and...

  15. NREL: Wind Research - Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilver Toyota Prius being drivenand Development A

  16. Community Wind Development Handbook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.png ElColumbia, NorthCommunity Management CompanyDevelopment

  17. LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT AS A MAGNET FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LIGHT RAIL TRANSIT AS A MAGNET FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: EVIDENCE FROM TWIN CITIES Jason Cao Engineering (PE): December 13, 2006 Full Funding GrantAgreement (FFGA):April 27, 2011 #12;Data Collection

  18. Economic development in Northern New Mexico focus of new podcast...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in NNM focus of new podcast from Los Alamos Lab Economic development in Northern New Mexico focus of new podcast from Los Alamos National Laboratory Podcast part of Lab's new...

  19. Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit Program encourages companies to remain, expand, or locate in Illinois. The program provides tax credits to qualifying companies equal to...

  20. Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development for a Growing Economy Tax Credit is awarded to businesses with projects that result in net new jobs. The tax credit must be a major factor in the company’s decision to move...

  1. Community Economic Development Business Program (Prince Edward Island, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Economic Development Business (CEDB) program has been created as part of the Prince Edward Island Rural Action Plan to support local investment in innovative Prince Edward Island...

  2. Contributions of Cell Phones to Economic Development in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    Contributions of Cell Phones to Economic Development in Africa: An Information Study of Corn · Background · Motivation · research questions/hypotheses · Framework · Methodology · Contributions to impact corn growers cell phone usage · RH 2: Agricultural information carried on cell phone is more

  3. Economic analysis of wind-powered farmhouse and farm building heating systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stafford, R.W.; Greeb, F.J.; Smith, M.F.; Des Chenes, C.; Weaver, N.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study evaluated the break-even values of wind energy for selected farmhouses and farm buildings focusing on the effects of thermal storage on the use of WECS production and value. Farmhouse structural models include three types derived from a national survey - an older, a more modern, and a passive solar structure. The eight farm building applications that were analyzed include: poultry-layers, poultry-brooding/layers, poultry-broilers, poultry-turkeys, swine-farrowing, swine-growing/finishing, dairy, and lambing. These farm buildings represent the spectrum of animal types, heating energy use, and major contributions to national agricultural economic values. All energy analyses were based on hour-by-hour computations which allowed for growth of animals, sensible and latent heat production, and ventilation requirements. Hourly or three-hourly weather data obtained from the National Climatic Center was used for the nine chosen analysis sites, located throughout the United States and corresponding to regional agricultural production centers.

  4. New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    has developed a tool to estimate jobs and other economic impacts associated with offshore wind development in the United States. The modeling tool, which illustrates the potential...

  5. Three essays on environment and development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welch, Jarrod Ross

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall of the Environmental Kuznets Curve,” World Development,on the Environmental Kuznets Curve suggests the relationshipof an Environmental Kuznets Curve (Cropper and Griffiths,

  6. 1 Introduction The development of wind energy use has led to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    1 Introduction The development of wind energy use has led to a noticeable contribution in of electricity by wind energy acts as a negative load leading to an increase in fluctuations of net load patterns conventional reserves have to be kept ready to replace the wind energy share in case of decreasing wind speeds

  7. Offshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore windfarms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    -situ and remote sensing data from offshore wind farms in Denmark, are used to examine both horizontal and vertical the area of the wind farm appear to be small and negligible. 1. INTRODUCTION As large offshore wind farmsOffshore Coastal Wind Speed Gradients: issues for the design and development of large offshore

  8. Win-Win for Wind and Wildlife: A Vision to Facilitate Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foresman, Kerry R.

    , North Dakota, United States of America Abstract Wind energy offers the potential to reduce carbon for the U.S. by 2030. We estimate there are ,7,700 GW of potential wind energy available across the U as development based solely on maximizing wind potential. Wind subsidies targeted at favoring low

  9. Is Your Community Ready for Economic Development?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldana, Luis

    2003-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    System ? College Station,Texas Dear Community Leader: I hope the information I have collected will help you and your community groups prepare yourselves for success! Luis H. Salda?a County Extension Agent? Urban Development Willacy...

  10. Essays on social networks in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chandrasekhar, Arun Gautham

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the role that social networks play in developing economies. The first two chapters analyze econometric issues that arise when researchers work with sampled network data. The final two chapters study ...

  11. Financial modeling of new product development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramaniam, Anitha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Product design and development is a complex process that involves extensive engineering considerations as well as management decisions based on the overall vision for the product. Traditionally, most decision making in ...

  12. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  13. NREL Develops New Controls that Proactively Adapt to the Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until now, wind turbine controls that reduce the impacts of wind gusts and turbulence were always reactive-responding to the wind rather than anticipating it. But with today's laser-based sensors that measure wind speed ahead of the turbine, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their industry partners are developing more intelligent controls. The world's first field tests of these controls are currently underway at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL, with plans for future commercialization.

  14. NREL Develops New Controls that Proactively Adapt to the Wind (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until now, wind turbine controls that reduce the impacts of wind gusts and turbulence were always reactive -- responding to the wind rather than anticipating it. But with today's laser-based sensors that measure wind speed ahead of the turbine, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and their industry partners are developing more intelligent controls. The world's first field tests of these controls are currently underway at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL, with plans for future commercialization.

  15. Comparative Analysis of a Novel Approach to Economical Wind Energy Verterbi School of Engineering Research & Innovation Fund Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    ). This system was analyzed using software Figure 2 Figure 1 #12;2 developed at UC Berkeley, SAP2000 of the research project: Conventional wind energy generation is obtained from "wind farms" that are in high of the infrastructure and land required to construct the towers has limited the use of this system. A new cable based

  16. Argonne National Laboratory Develops Extreme-Scale Wind Farm...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    studies of complex flow and wind turbine interactions in large land-based and offshore wind farms that will improve wind plant design and reduce the levelized cost of energy....

  17. State and local economic development tools : how does the range of state-level economic development tools available to a locality influence the way local resources are deployed?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piercy, Brett I. (Brett Ianthe)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Patterns in Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) expenditures for economic development in selected states were analyzed to explore whether differences in economic development tools, policies and programs available at ...

  18. CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics B.R. Bock1 , R.G. Rhudy2 , and H technologies and practices under development for CO2 storage and sink enhancement, including options. For the geologic and ocean storage options, CO2 capture costs from another project were added to the costs of CO2

  19. Hull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation in the Town of Hull, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hull Wind II: A Case Study of the Development of a Second Large Wind Turbine Installation", the largest wind turbine (660 kW) yet installed in the state. That project proved to be so popular that HMLP undertook to develop a second, larger wind turbine project (1.8 MW). This paper provides a description

  20. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prices, environmental improvement, reduced water consumption, rural economic development, and employment opportunities in the renewable energy

  1. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and operating wind energy facilities in locations with sensitive bat species. As wind energy continues to grow as a renewable source of energy for communities throughout...

  2. Wind Program Announces $2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWasteWho Will BeWhyWindEnergyImpact

  3. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  4. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    community, grouse, hazard function, mortality, preda- tion, wind turbine *Correspondence author. EEffects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development

  5. From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in%

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    From%laggard%to%leader:%% Explaining%offshore%wind%developments%in% the%UK% Florian!laggard!to!leader:!Explaining! offshore!wind!developments!in!the!UK! Florian Kern1* , Adrian Smith1 , Chris Shaw1 , Rob Raven2 and Bram for publication in Energy Policy, 19 Feb 2014 Abstract Offshore wind technology has recently undergone rapid

  6. LEEDCo awarded $4 million to launch offshore wind development on Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    LEEDCo awarded $4 million to launch offshore wind development on Lake Erie By Teresa Dixon Murray in the United States, the Lake Erie Energy Development Corp. of Cleveland will launch an offshore wind, Democrat of Ohio, who has pushed for such alternative energy projects for years, said offshore wind could

  7. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  8. Definition of a 5-MW Reference Wind Turbine for Offshore System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Scott, G.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a three-bladed, upwind, variable-speed, variable blade-pitch-to-feather-controlled multimegawatt wind turbine model developed by NREL to support concept studies aimed at assessing offshore wind technology.

  9. Low Wind Speed Turbine Developments in Convoloid Gearing: Final Technical Report, June 2005 - October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genesis Partners LP

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study conducted by Genesis Partners LP as part of the United States Department of Energy Wind Energy Research Program to develop wind technology that will enable wind systems to compete in regions having low wind speeds. The purpose of the program is to reduce the cost of electricity from large wind systems in areas having Class 4 winds to 3 cents per kWh for onshore systems or 5 cents per kWh for offshore systems. This work builds upon previous activities under the WindPACT project, the Next Generation Turbine project, and Phase I of the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) project. This project is concerned with the development of more cost-effective gearing for speed increasers for wind turbines.

  10. A quantitative method to analyze the quality of EIA information in wind energy development and avian/bat assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Tony, E-mail: tc282@nau.edu [Environmental Science and Policy Program, School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, 602 S Humphreys P.O. Box 5694, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011 (United States); Nielsen, Erik, E-mail: erik.nielsen@nau.edu [Environmental Science and Policy Program, School of Earth Science and Environmental Sustainability, Northern Arizona University, 602 S Humphreys P.O. Box 5694, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011 (United States); Auberle, William, E-mail: william.auberle@nau.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering Program, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northern Arizona University, 2112 S Huffer Ln P.O. Box 15600, Flagstaff, AZ, 860011 (United States); Solop, Frederic I., E-mail: fred.solop@nau.edu [Political Science Program, Department of Politics and International Affairs, Northern Arizona University, P.O. Box 15036, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been a tool for decision makers since the enactment of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Since that time, few analyses have been performed to verify the quality of information and content within EIAs. High quality information within assessments is vital in order for decision makers, stake holders, and the public to understand the potential impact of proposed actions on the ecosystem and wildlife species. Low quality information has been a major cause for litigation and economic loss. Since 1999, wind energy development has seen an exponential growth with unknown levels of impact on wildlife species, in particular bird and bat species. The purpose of this article is to: (1) develop, validate, and apply a quantitative index to review avian/bat assessment quality for wind energy EIAs; and (2) assess the trends and status of avian/bat assessment quality in a sample of wind energy EIAs. This research presents the development and testing of the Avian and Bat Assessment Quality Index (ABAQI), a new approach to quantify information quality of ecological assessments within wind energy development EIAs in relation to avian and bat species based on review areas and factors derived from 23 state wind/wildlife siting guidance documents. The ABAQI was tested through a review of 49 publicly available EIA documents and validated by identifying high variation in avian and bat assessments quality for wind energy developments. Of all the reviewed EIAs, 66% failed to provide high levels of preconstruction avian and bat survey information, compared to recommended factors from state guidelines. This suggests the need for greater consistency from recommended guidelines by state, and mandatory compliance by EIA preparers to avoid possible habitat and species loss, wind energy development shut down, and future lawsuits. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed, validated, and applied a quantitative index to review avian/bat assessment quality for wind energy EIAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the trends and status of avian/bat assessment quality in a sample of wind energy EIAs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Applied index to 49 EIA documents and identified high variation in assessment quality for wind energy developments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For the reviewed EIAs, 66% provided inadequate preconstruction avian and bat survey information.

  11. Development and Commissioning of a Small/Mid-Size Wind Turbine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Development and Commissioning of a SmallMid-Size Wind Turbine Test Facility: Preprint Re-direct Destination: This paper describes the development and commissioning tests of the...

  12. Manufacturing Development of the NCSX Modular Coil Windings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chrzanowsk, J. H.; Fogarty, P. J.; Heitzenroeder, P. J.; Meighan, T.; Nelson, B.; Raftopoulos, S.; Williamson, D.

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The modular coils on the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) present a number of significant engineering challenges due to their complex shapes, requirements for high dimensional accuracy and the high current density required in the modular coils due to space constraints. In order to address these challenges, an R&D program was established to develop the conductor, insulation scheme, manufacturing techniques, and procedures. A prototype winding named Twisted Racetrack Coil (TRC) was of particular importance in dealing with these challenges. The TRC included a complex shaped winding form, conductor, insulation scheme, leads and termination, cooling system and coil clamps typical of the modular coil design. Even though the TRC is smaller in size than a modular coil, its similar complex geometry provided invaluable information in developing the final design, metrology techniques and development of manufacturing procedures. In addition a discussion of the development of the copper rope conductor including "Keystoning" concerns; the epoxy impregnation system (VPI) plus the tooling and equipment required to manufacture the modular coils will be presented.

  13. Landowners and Wind Energy Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:Landowners and Wind Energy Development Jump to: navigation, search Photo from

  14. Fulong Wind Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife EnergyFreightFulong Wind Technology Development Co

  15. Economic analysis of wind-powered refrigeration cooling/water-heating systems in food processing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garling, W.S.; Harper, M.R.; Merchant-Geuder, L.; Welch, M.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential applications of wind energy include not only large central turbines that can be utilized by utilities, but also dispersed systems for farms and other applications. The US Departments of Energy (DOE) and Agriculture (USDA) currently are establishing the feasibility of wind energy use in applications where the energy can be used as available, or stored in a simple form. These applications include production of hot water for rural sanitation, heating and cooling of rural structures and products, drying agricultural products, and irrigation. This study, funded by USDA, analyzed the economic feasibility of wind power in refrigeration cooling and water heating systems in food processing plants. Types of plants included were meat and poultry, dairy, fruit and vegetable, and aquaculture.

  16. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is vital to controlling cost of doing business, reducing consumer spending on energy, and making our an addition $5 billion per year on energy costs an increase of nearly one and onehalf percent in our stateSTATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Energy Policy Division

  17. Tourism's Impact on Economic Growth and Development in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Tourism's Impact on Economic Growth and Development in Spain Jessica Dennis #12;Spanish Civil War as a % of Spain's GDP #12;50,000,000 5,050,000,000 10,050,000,000 15,050,000,000 20,050,000,000 25,050,000,000 30 International Tourism Receipts, Foreign Direct Investment Reciepts & Remittances as % of Spain's GDP Int

  18. Regional Economic Development: An Analysis of Practices, Resources and Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    regions within the three-state area. Also, this survey analysis was used to create a general template Survey Methodology and Publication 23 Survey Analysis 30 Final Focus Points 42 Appendix Appendix A--Survey Response Tools i Appendix B--Survey of Regional Economic Development Organizations iii Appendix C

  19. Economic Modeling of Intermittency in Wind Power Generation Alan Yung Chen Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the total cost from energy from wind more expensive. Because the model explicitly accounts for the impacts intermittent sources to the system in addition to the cost of generating wind energy This model the past decade wind energy has steadily emerged as a potential source for large-scale, low carbon energy

  20. The Impact of Wind Power Projects on Residential Property Values in the United States: A Multi-Site Hedonic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Towards the Development of Wind Farms in Australia. JournalEconomic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. BeaconProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &

  1. GIS-based Multi-Criteria Analysis of Wind Farm Development Henning Sten Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    GIS-based Multi-Criteria Analysis of Wind Farm Development Henning Sten Hansen National on the environment of traditional power- generating methods, especially coal and oil-fired power stations wind power. A project ­ Wind Energy in the Baltic Sea Region - financed by EU / INTERREG III B was initiated in order

  2. Developing a Practical Wind Tunnel Test Engineering Course for Undergraduate Aerospace Engineering Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recla, Benjamin Jeremiah

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development and assessment of an undergraduate wind tunnel test engineering course utilizing the 7ft by 10ft Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). Only 5 other universities in the United States have a wind tunnel...

  3. Short-term Forecasting of Offshore Wind Farm Production Developments of the Anemos Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Short-term Forecasting of Offshore Wind Farm Production ­ Developments of the Anemos Project J to the large dimensions of offshore wind farms, their electricity production must be known well in advance networks) models were calibrated on power data from two offshore wind farms: Tunoe and Middelgrunden

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN-SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN- SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Abington, Cambridge, CB21 6AL, UK bic@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT It is crucial to maintain wind turbine blades. This work investigates using pulse-echo ultrasound to detect internal damages in wind turbine blades without

  5. Two Colorado-Based Electric Cooperatives Selected as 2014 Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    wind power, and together, Tri-State and San Isabel are expanding the use of low-cost wind energy, and supporting job creation and economic development within their service...

  6. Acoustic Array Development for Wind Turbine Noise Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, S.; Roadman, J.; Moriarty, P.; Palo, S.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the design and use of a multi-arm, logarithmic spiral acoustic array by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for measurement and characterization of wind turbine-generated noise. The array was developed in collaboration with a team from the University of Colorado Boulder. This design process is a continuation of the elliptical array design work done by Simley. A description of the array system design process is presented, including array shape design, mechanical design, design of electronics and the data acquisition system, and development of post-processing software. System testing and calibration methods are detailed. Results from the initial data acquisition campaign are offered and discussed. Issues faced during this initial deployment of the array are presented and potential remedies discussed.

  7. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  8. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

  9. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 1: Issues, Impacts, and Economics of Wind and Hydropower Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  10. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  11. Development and Deployment of an Advanced Wind Forecasting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    findings. Part 2 addresses how operators of wind power plants and power systems can incorporate advanced the output of advanced wind energy forecasts into decision support models for wind power plant and power and applications of power market simulation models around the world. Argonne's software tools are used extensively

  12. Offshore Wind Energy Permitting: A Survey of U.S. Project Developers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Cleve, Frances B.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a goal to generate 20% of the nation’s electricity from wind power by 2030. Achieving this “20% Wind Scenario” in 2030 requires acceleration of the current rate of wind project development. Offshore wind resources contribute substantially to the nation’s wind resource, yet to date no offshore wind turbines have been installed in the U.S. Progress developing offshore wind projects has been slowed by technological challenges, uncertainties about impacts to the marine environment, siting and permitting challenges, and viewshed concerns. To address challenges associated with siting and permitting, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) surveyed offshore wind project developers about siting and project development processes, their experience with the environmental permitting process, and the role of coastal and marine spatial planning (CMSP) in development of the offshore wind industry. Based on the responses to survey questions, we identify several priority recommendations to support offshore wind development. Recommendations also include considerations for developing supporting industries in the U.S. and how to use Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning (CMSP) to appropriately consider ocean energy among existing ocean uses. In this report, we summarize findings, discuss the implications, and suggest actions to improve the permitting and siting process.

  13. Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011) An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    of Offshore Wind Power Whereas, the offshore waters of [State] are ecologically and economically vital public, Whereas, offshore wind power provides utility-scale renewable energy at competitive costs, helps to meet consequences; and Whereas, offshore wind power, being a domestic source of energy enhances U.S. energy

  14. Research, Innovation & Economic Development at North Carolina State University ReseaRch Impetus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langerhans, Brian

    economic opportunities and improve people's lives. "Research is an investment in the future. Basic researchresults Research, Innovation & Economic Development at North Carolina State University XI, NO. 2 FALL 2011 ReseaRch Impetus: economIc RecoveRy #12;TRaNSlaTINg RESEaRCh INTo ECoNomIC gRowTh TaBlE oF Co

  15. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology Comparison...

  16. New DOE Modeling Tool Estimates Economic Benefits of Offshore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    renewable power plants. The updated version allows users to better understand the potential regional economic impacts of offshore wind development. DOE is using the new...

  17. Sage-Grouse and Wind Energy: Biology, Habits, and Potential Effects from Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Tagestad, Jerry D.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposed development of domestic energy resources, including wind energy, is expected to impact the sagebrush steppe ecosystem in the western United States. The greater sage-grouse relies on habitats within this ecosystem for survival, yet very little is known about how wind energy development may affect sage-grouse. The purpose of this report is to inform organizations of the impacts wind energy development could have on greater sage-grouse populations and identify information needed to fill gaps in knowledge.

  18. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Administration (2003). Annual Energy Outlook 2003. DOE/EIA-SP SWAT TVA USDA Annual Energy Outlook American Wind Energyaccording to the 2003 Annual Energy Outlook. Although this

  19. Session: What can we learn from developed wind resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thelander, Carl; Erickson, Wally

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was composed of two parts intended to examine what existing science tells us about wind turbine impacts at existing wind project sites. Part one dealt with the Altamont Wind Resource area, one of the older wind projects in the US, with a paper presented by Carl Thelander titled ''Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part 1''. Questions addressed by the presenter included: how is avian habitat affected at Altamont and do birds avoid turbine sites; are birds being attracted to turbine strings; what factors contribute to direct impacts on birds by wind turbines at Altamont; how do use, behavior, avoidance and other factors affect risk to avian species, and particularly impacts those species listed as threatened, endangered, or of conservation concern, and other state listed species. The second part dealt with direct impacts to birds at new generation wind plants outside of California, examining such is sues as mortality, avoidance, direct habitat impacts from terrestrial wind projects, species and numbers killed per turbine rates/MW generated, impacts to listed threatened and endangered species, to USFWS Birds of Conservation Concern, and to state listed species. This session focused on newer wind project sites with a paper titled ''Bird Fatality and Risk at New Generation Wind Projects'' by Wally Erickson. Each paper was followed by a discussion/question and answer period.

  20. Offshore Wind Turbines - Estimated Noise from Offshore Wind Turbine, Monhegan Island, Maine: Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Energy Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aker, Pamela M.; Jones, Anthony M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep C Wind, a consortium headed by the University of Maine will test the first U.S. offshore wind platforms in 2012. In advance of final siting and permitting of the test turbines off Monhegan Island, residents of the island off Maine require reassurance that the noise levels from the test turbines will not disturb them. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, at the request of the University of Maine, and with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program, modeled the acoustic output of the planned test turbines.

  1. Office of Research and Economic Development S. David Kimball, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Clinical Outcomes Office of Research and Economic Development Strengths in Translational Research Genetics Development Clinical Trials Clinical Practice Clinical Outcomes Office of Research and Economic Development Science Pathways Probes Therapies Basic Research Translational Sciences Clinical Research Medicinal

  2. Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

  3. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR REACT AND WIND COMMON COIL MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ESCALLIER,J.; ANERELLA,M.; COZZOLINO,J.; GANETIS,G.; GHOSH,A.; GUPTA,R.; HARRISON,M.; MARONE,A.; MURATORE,J.; PARKER,B.; SAMPSON,W.; WANDERER,P.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    High field common coil magnets [1,2] using brittle High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or Nb{sub 3}Sn cables provide new challenges with respect to the design and manufacturing of coils. We are developing the scaleable techniques that can be used in the production of common coil or other magnets with similar designs [3,4]. By utilizing a cost-effective rapid turnaround short coil program, it is possible to quickly develop and test the new conductors and learn the design and manufacturing concepts needed for them. The flexible nature of a rapid turnaround program required the development of a standard coil cassette for different size cable, allowing coils to be used as building blocks for testing in different magnet configurations. Careful attention is given to the design of the coil structure: The inner bobbin the wire is wound on, the coil winding process, insulation integrity, epoxy vacuum impregnation, and final assembly into a test magnet. This paper will discuss the manufacturing techniques and design rules learned from the rapid turnaround program, and test results to date.

  4. Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

    2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel “wind fin” approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-power’s contribution to the national energy supply.

  5. Vindicator Lidar Assessment for Wind Turbine Feed-Forward Control Applications: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-352

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative development and testing of feed-forward and other advanced wind turbine controls using a laser wind sensor.

  6. Challenges and successes with economic and business development models at the local level: The Quatsino experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Challenges and successes with economic and business development models at the local level: 534 Title of Project: Challenges and successes with economic and business development models !)*+#&,+( In this case study, I examine the economic development and business development experiences of the Quatsino

  7. Sustainable Development and Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and International1098-A, September Sustainable Development and Public PolicyThe Economics of Sustainable Development. ” Population and

  8. Sustainable Development & Sustainable Transportation: Strategies for Economic Prosperity, Environmental Quality, and Equity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deakin, Elizabeth

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wimsatt, Alma. “Sustainable Development and International1098-A, September Sustainable Development and Public PolicyThe Economics of Sustainable Development. ” Population and

  9. 20% Wind Energy 20% Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    (government, industry, utilities, NGOs) Analyzes wind's potential contributions to energy security, economic · Transmission a challenge #12;Wind Power Class Resource Potential Wind Power Density at 50 m W/m 2 Wind Speed20% Wind Energy by 2030 20% Wind Energy by 2030 #12;Presentation and Objectives Overview Background

  10. Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    xii Figure ES-4. Incremental LCOE Without State16 Figure 5. LCOE Results from SWAT Base-Case60 Table A-5. Base Case Results for LCOE for Wind Classes 2-

  11. Factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,500 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states that have achieved a substantial amount of wind energy investment. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  12. The University of NebraskaLincoln Office of Research and Economic Development Page 1 of 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    biologists, basic and applied engineers, theoretical and physical chemists, organicThe University of Nebraska­Lincoln Office of Research and Economic Development Page 1 and Economic Development Pathway to Interdisciplinary Research Centers Phase III

  13. The University of NebraskaLincoln Office of Research and Economic Development Page 1 of 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    pathologists, physiologists and molecular biologists, basic and applied engineersThe University of Nebraska­Lincoln Office of Research and Economic Development Page 1 and Economic Development Pathway to Interdisciplinary Research Centers Phase II

  14. Wind energy development experience central and south west: EPRI/DOE-turbine verification program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, W.; Treece, J. [Central and South West Services, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Turbine Verification Program (TVP) is a partnership of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and utility participants. The objectives of the TVP program are as follows: (1) Provide a limited market for newly designed wind turbines prior to their achievement of a fully commercial status. (2) Share the cost of the project so that it can be considered a prudent capital investment. (3) Determine the economic viability of wind turbine generation. (4) Promote utility participation in wind power projects and the evaluation of the latest commercial wind turbines. (5) Determine and document the performance of the wind turbines to meet TVP objectives. (6) Communicate the experiences gained in a turbine verification project to other utilities and turbine manufacturers. (7) Create a project whereby the expertise available through EPRI and DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory is readily accessible for utilities in their early use of wind power. EPRI and DOE awarded funds to select utilities based on the proposed projects ability to help commercialize state-of-the-art wind turbine technology. The funding will cover a portion of the costs associated with a 6 MW wind farm. In addition to funding the project, EPRI and the DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided valuable technical expertise.

  15. Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project: June 17, 1997--April 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GE Wind Energy, LLC

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports the technical results of the Next Generation Turbine Development Project conducted by GE Wind Energy LLC. This project is jointly funded by GE and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.The goal of this project is for DOE to assist the U.S. wind industry in exploring new concepts and applications of cutting-edge technology in pursuit of the specific objective of developing a wind turbine that can generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy of $0.025/kWh at sites with an average wind speed of 15 mph (at 10 m height).

  16. Development in Rural Texas: An Assessment of TEEX Economic Development Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calcaneo, Edgar Adrian; Cripe, Ramsey; Davis, Taylor; Gonzalez, Ramon; Grimes, Joshua; Hemby, Olivia; Humphrey, Colby; Keppy, Paul; Surgenor, Ken

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with public officials and other individuals involved with the TEEX reports, and making site visits. A demographic breakdown is also provided for each community, which includes economic, population, race/ethnicity and education information. Following this..., the organization should work towards tying the local economic and political conditions of the community with the report, particularly in cases dealing with site-specific development. Additionally, it is recommended that TEEX provide information detailing...

  17. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  18. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  19. U.S. Offshore Wind Manufacturing and Supply Chain Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Accessed March 1, 2012. Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A. (2012). "2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review." NREL TP-5000-52920. Golden, CO:...

  20. Tribal Wind Assessment by the Eastern Shoshone Tribe of the Wind River Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pete, Belvin; Perry, Jeremy W.; Stump, Raphaella Q.

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tribes, through its consultant and advisor, Distributed Generation Systems (Disgen) -Native American Program and Resources Division, of Lakewood CO, assessed and qualified, from a resource and economic perspective, a wind energy generation facility on tribal lands. The goal of this feasibility project is to provide wind monitoring and to engage in preproject planning activities designed to provide a preliminary evaluation of the technical, economic, social and environmental feasibility of developing a sustainable, integrated wind energy plan for the Eastern Shoshone and the Northern Arapahoe Tribes, who resides on the Wind River Indian Reservation. The specific deliverables of the feasibility study are: 1) Assessments of the wind resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation 2) Assessments of the potential environmental impacts of renewable development 3) Assessments of the transmission capacity and capability of a renewable energy project 4) Established an economic models for tribal considerations 5) Define economic, cultural and societal impacts on the Tribe

  1. Development of Eastern Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets: March 3, 2008 -- March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brower, M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to provide wind resource inputs to the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

  2. Techno-economic Optimization of Integrating Wind Power into Constrained Electric Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    into a generation mixture with a large percentage of coal capacity can increase emissions for moderate wind load leveling technique, ensuring that generation meets demand in every period. The current research generation sources, while remaining within the network's operating constraints. The model minimizes

  3. Economic and technical impacts of wind variability and intermittency on long-term generation expansion planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paristech 2009 Submitted to the Engineering Systems Division in partial fulfillment of the requirements to the Engineering Systems Division on May 6, 2011 in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of the U.S. I aggregate an hourly dataset of load and wind resource in eleven regions in order to capture

  4. The development of a wind tunnel facility for the study of V/STOL noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widnall, S. E.

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-jet wind tunnel operating within an anechoic chamber was developed for the purpose of the study of V/STOL noise mechanisms. An existing low-speed conventional hard-walled wind tunnel was modified to operate as an ...

  5. Wind Turbine R&D and Certification Services: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-04-00147

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL and Underwriters Laboratories Inc. are developing a domestic certification program for the US wind and photovoltaic (PV) industry.

  6. Energy consumption and economic development in West Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chima, C.M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the commercial energy sector of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS). Presently, an economic union exists between the 16 countries of West Africa that are members of ECOWAS. Although the ECOWAS region has plentiful resources of commercial energy, it faces problems in this sector for two reasons. First is the problem resulting from the diminishing traditional energy resources such as wood fuel and charcoal. Second, most ECOWAS members, except Nigeria, are net importers of commercial energy, and hence face a high import burden for oil. Liquid petroleum is the dominant form of commercial energy used in the ECOWAS despite the availability of other resources. This author basically argues that the best policy and strategy solution for dealing with energy problems is through a combination of regional cooperative effort, and a more-intensive country level. The intensity-of-use hypothesis is tested with case studies of Ghana, the Ivory Coast, and Nigeria. The results indicate that newly developing countries can deviate from the expectations of the hypothesis.

  7. Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

  8. Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judson, Ruth A.; Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.

    To deepen understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

  9. Economic development and the structure of the demand for commerial energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judson, Ruth A.

    To deepen the understanding of the relation between economic development and energy demand, this study estimates the Engel curves that relate per-capita energy consumption in major economic sectors to per-capita GDP. Panel ...

  10. Qixia Rulin Wind Power Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: Wind energy Product: WindProrenerElectric Co

  11. Shenyang Huaren Wind Power Technology Development Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCalifornia Sector: WindRiegotecSeaScapeInformation Huaren Wind

  12. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR REACT AND WIND COMMON COIL MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    Temperature Superconductors (HTS) or Nb3Sn cables provide new challenges with respect to the design: The inner bobbin the wire is wound on, the coil winding process, insulation integrity, epoxy vacuum application of reacted HTS and Nb3Sn cables. For practical reasons, the rapid turnaround program forces

  13. Best Practices for Wind Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pebbles, Victoria; Hummer, John; Haven, Celia

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This report offers a menu of 18 different, yet complementary, preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. Each best practice describes the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, academia, and federal, state and local government regulators. The practices were identified through a year-long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors. Optimally, a suite of these best practices would be applied in an appropriate combination to fit the conditions of a particular wind project or a set of wind projects within a given locality or region.

  14. Development and Verification of a Fully Coupled Simulator for Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J. M.; Buhl, M. L. Jr.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the development of an analysis tool capable of analyzing a variety of wind turbine, support platform, and mooring system configurations.The simulation capability was tested by model-to-model comparisons to ensure its correctness.

  15. Development and testing of improved statistical wind power forecasting methods.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendes, J.; Bessa, R.J.; Keko, H.; Sumaili, J.; Miranda, V.; Ferreira, C.; Gama, J.; Botterud, A.; Zhou, Z.; Wang, J. (Decision and Information Sciences); (INESC Porto)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind power forecasting (WPF) provides important inputs to power system operators and electricity market participants. It is therefore not surprising that WPF has attracted increasing interest within the electric power industry. In this report, we document our research on improving statistical WPF algorithms for point, uncertainty, and ramp forecasting. Below, we provide a brief introduction to the research presented in the following chapters. For a detailed overview of the state-of-the-art in wind power forecasting, we refer to [1]. Our related work on the application of WPF in operational decisions is documented in [2]. Point forecasts of wind power are highly dependent on the training criteria used in the statistical algorithms that are used to convert weather forecasts and observational data to a power forecast. In Chapter 2, we explore the application of information theoretic learning (ITL) as opposed to the classical minimum square error (MSE) criterion for point forecasting. In contrast to the MSE criterion, ITL criteria do not assume a Gaussian distribution of the forecasting errors. We investigate to what extent ITL criteria yield better results. In addition, we analyze time-adaptive training algorithms and how they enable WPF algorithms to cope with non-stationary data and, thus, to adapt to new situations without requiring additional offline training of the model. We test the new point forecasting algorithms on two wind farms located in the U.S. Midwest. Although there have been advancements in deterministic WPF, a single-valued forecast cannot provide information on the dispersion of observations around the predicted value. We argue that it is essential to generate, together with (or as an alternative to) point forecasts, a representation of the wind power uncertainty. Wind power uncertainty representation can take the form of probabilistic forecasts (e.g., probability density function, quantiles), risk indices (e.g., prediction risk index) or scenarios (with spatial and/or temporal dependence). Statistical approaches to uncertainty forecasting basically consist of estimating the uncertainty based on observed forecasting errors. Quantile regression (QR) is currently a commonly used approach in uncertainty forecasting. In Chapter 3, we propose new statistical approaches to the uncertainty estimation problem by employing kernel density forecast (KDF) methods. We use two estimators in both offline and time-adaptive modes, namely, the Nadaraya-Watson (NW) and Quantilecopula (QC) estimators. We conduct detailed tests of the new approaches using QR as a benchmark. One of the major issues in wind power generation are sudden and large changes of wind power output over a short period of time, namely ramping events. In Chapter 4, we perform a comparative study of existing definitions and methodologies for ramp forecasting. We also introduce a new probabilistic method for ramp event detection. The method starts with a stochastic algorithm that generates wind power scenarios, which are passed through a high-pass filter for ramp detection and estimation of the likelihood of ramp events to happen. The report is organized as follows: Chapter 2 presents the results of the application of ITL training criteria to deterministic WPF; Chapter 3 reports the study on probabilistic WPF, including new contributions to wind power uncertainty forecasting; Chapter 4 presents a new method to predict and visualize ramp events, comparing it with state-of-the-art methodologies; Chapter 5 briefly summarizes the main findings and contributions of this report.

  16. Engineering Challenges for Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, S.; Musial, W.; Jonkman, J.; Sclavounos, P.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of this paper is to survey the technical challenges that must be overcome to develop deepwater offshore wind energy technologies and to provide a framework from which the first-order economics can be assessed.

  17. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3,937,831 over the age of 16 (Census 2011b). 3 2 Project Scenario This analysis considers potential new wind and natural gas electricity generation capacity in Wyoming as well as...

  18. The Economic Implications of Adding Wind Capacity to a Bulk Power Transmission Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    standards of operating reliability. The co-optimization criterion minimizes the expected cost of meeting, these are precisely the prices that must be determined correctly to measure the economic value of equipment on the network. For an optimum network, some equipment that is essential for meeting contingencies may have

  19. Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. � Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. � Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. � Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the wind�s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

  20. ENDOW: EFFICIENT DEVELOPMENT OF OFFSHORE WINDFARMS Rebecca Barthelmie and Gunner Larsen, *Wind Energy Department, Ris National Laboratory, 4000 Roskilde,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developers and turbine manufacturers to optimise power output from offshore wind farms through minimised wake offshore wind farms (Vindeby and Bockstigen) to undertake the first comprehensive evaluation of offshore with a mesoscale model focusing on boundary-layer development within and over a large offshore wind farm

  1. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation...

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    on on-site labor expenditures. 4 hotels, and retail establishments but also include child care providers and any other entity affected by increased economic activity and spending...

  2. Policies and market factors driving wind power development in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, Lori; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, there has been substantial recent growth in wind energy generating capacity, with growth averaging 24 percent annually during the past five years. About 1,700 MW of wind energy capacity was installed in 2001, while another 410 MW became operational in 2002. This year (2003) shows promise of significant growth with more than 1,100 MW planned. With this growth, an increasing number of states are experiencing investment in wind energy projects. Wind installations currently exist in about half of all U.S. states. This paper explores the key factors at play in the states in which a substantial amount of wind energy capacity has been developed or planned. Some of the factors that are examined include policy drivers, such as renewable portfolio standards (RPS), federal and state financial incentives, and integrated resource planning; as well as market drivers, such as consumer demand for green power, natural gas price volatility, and wholesale market rules.

  3. Wind Program Announces $2 Million to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your DensityEnergy U.S.-China Electric VehicleCenters | Department ofofto PurchaseAprilWindFuture TrendsImpact

  4. Wind Energy Leasing Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

  5. Best Practices for Sustainable WInd Energy Development in the Great Lakes Region and Beyond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Great Lakes Commission; Victoria Pebbles; John Hummer; Celia Haven

    2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This document offers a menu of 18 different, yet complimentary preferred practices and policies. The best practices cover all phases of the wind energy development process - from the policies that allow for wind development, to the sustainable operation of a wind project, to the best practices for decommissioning a spent turbine - including applications for offshore wind. The practices include those that have been previously tested and proven effective, as well as new practices that were identified by experts in the field as needed for future wind developments. Each best practice includes information about the opportunities and challenges (pros and cons), and offers a case example that illustrates how that best practice is being utilized by a particular jurisdiction or wind project. The practices described in this publication were selected by a diverse group of interests from the Great Lakes Wind Collaborative that included environmental groups, industry, and federal, state and local government regulators. They were identified through a year long process that included a literature review, online survey and interviews with individuals from the public, private and non-profit sectors.

  6. Use of synthetic aperture radar for offshore wind resource assessment and wind farm development in the UK 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cameron, Iain Dickson

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UK has an abundant offshore wind resource with offshore wind farming set to grow rapidly over the coming years. Optimisation of energy production is of the utmost importance and accurate estimates of wind speed distributions are critical...

  7. Second Wind Sonic Wind Profiler: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-08-00297

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J. A.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second Wind will deploy their Triton Sonic Wind Profiler at the National Wind Technology Center for the purposes of verification with measurements made by the NWTC 80 meter Meteorological tower.

  8. Making european-style community wind power development work in theUnited States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A.

    2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Once primarily a European phenomenon, community wind power development--defined here as one or more locally owned, utility-scale wind turbines interconnected on either the customer or utility side of the meter--is gaining a foothold in an increasing number of states throughout the United States. This article describes the various policies and incentives that Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Massachusetts are using to support community wind power development, and how state and federal support influences the types of projects and ownership structures that are being developed. Experience in these states demonstrates that, with an array of incentives and creative financing schemes targeted at community-scale projects, there are opportunities to make community wind work in the United States.

  9. Successful Economic Development in a Multi-Ethnic Society: The Malaysian Case Donald R. Snodgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Successful Economic Development in a Multi-Ethnic Society: The Malaysian Case Donald R. Snodgrass income between 1965 and 1990. Malaysia is also unusual in having attempted to reduce ethnic economic inequality by undertaking an ambitious affirmative action program -- the New Economic Policy, or NEP

  10. Economic structure and development in an emergent Asian economy: evidence from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Economic structure and development in an emergent Asian economy: evidence from a social accounting matrix for vietnam$ Finn Tarpa,*,1 , David Roland-Holstb , John Randa a Institute of Economics Vietnam started a wide-ranging process of economic reform in 1986 and is presently opening up its economy

  11. From Growth to Poverty Reduction: A New Conceptual Framework in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    From Growth to Poverty Reduction: A New Conceptual Framework in Development Economics Alice: sindzingre@wanadoo.fr. International Conference "Poverty and Misery in the History of Economic Thought-4Dec2011 Author manuscript, published in ""Poverty and Misery in the History of Economic Thought

  12. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  13. An Analysis of Wind Power Development in the Town of Hull, MA, Appendix 2: LaCapra Financial Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Christopher

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial analysis and summary results presented in this document represent a first cut at an economic assessment of the proposed Hull Offshore Wind Project. Wind turbine price increases have outpaced the materials and labor price pressures faced by nonrenewable power plant developers due to increased demands on a limited pool of turbine manufacturers and offshore installation companies. Moreover, given the size of the proposed offshore facility, it may be difficult to contract with turbine manufacturers and/or foundation companies given the size and scope of competing worldwide demand. The results described in this report assume that such conditions will not significantly impact the prices that will have to be received from the output of the project; rather, the project size may require as a prerequisite that Hull be able to piggyback on other offshore efforts. The financial estimates provided here necessarily feature a range due to uncertainty in a number of project assumptions as well as overall uncertainty in offshore wind costs. Nevertheless, taken together, the analysis provides a ballpark revenue requirement of approximately $157/MWh for the municipal financing option, with higher estimates possible assuming escalation in costs to levels higher than assumed here.

  14. Development of a Web-based Emissions Reduction Calculator for Green Power Purchases from Texas Wind Energy Providers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Gilman, D.; Haberl, J.; Culp, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that have been developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region, including an analysis of actual hourly wind power generated from a wind turbine in Randall County, Texas... development here. The capacity of installed wind turbines totals 1,407 MW as of April 2005 and the planned capacity for new projects 4 rises to 3,700 1 In the 2003 Texas State legislative session...

  15. The U.S. Department of Energy Wind Turbine Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Link, H.; Laxson, A.; Smith, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of technologically-advanced wind turbines continues to be a high priority of the US wind industry. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a range of projects that assist the wind industry to design, develop, and test new wind turbines. The overall goal is to develop turbines that can compete with conventional electric generation with a cost of energy (COE) of 5 cents/kWh at 5.8 m/s (13 mph sites) by the mid-1990s and with a cost of energy of 4 cents/kWh or less at 5.8 m/s sites by the year 2000. These goals will be supported through the DOE Turbine Development Program. The Turbine Development Program uses a two-path approach. The first path assists US industry to develop and integrate innovative technologies into utility-grade wind turbines for the near-term (mid-1990s). The second path assists industry to develop a new generation of turbines for the year 2000. This paper describes present and planned projects under the Turbine Development Program.

  16. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR Conference Report - September 2007 & The Oil And Gas Development Partnership #12;ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT BENEFITS OF THE OIL AND GAS INDUSTRY IN NEWFOUNDLAND AND LABRADOR May 16, 2007 St. John's Conference Report September

  17. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Solar Water Heater Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Solar Partnership (KSP) and the Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) partner to offer low interest loans for the installation of solar water heaters. Loans...

  18. Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

  19. Offshore Wind Technology Development Projects | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssueOffshore Wind

  20. Guodian Hefeng Wind Power Development Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarms A SUKHydrogenGuascor Geratec Ltda JumpHefeng Wind

  1. Jilin Huayi Wind Energy Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarmsPower Co LtdTN LLC JumpJilin Huayi Wind Energy

  2. Zhejiang Wind Power Development Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifang SwisselectronicXian JieliYanbu,YourWind Power

  3. Wind for Schools Portal Developer Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapers Home Kyoung's pictureWind Power Energia

  4. Proceedings of the fourth biennial conference and workshop on wind energy conversion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kottler, R.J. Jr. (ed.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts are included for papers presented concerning research and development requirements and utility interface and institutional issues for small-scale systems; design requirements and research and development requirements for large-scale systems; economic and operational requirements of large-scale wind systems; wind characteristics and wind energy siting; international activities; wind energy applications in agriculture; federal commercialization and decentralization plans; and wind energy innovative systems.

  5. Opportunities for technological and economic development policy in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalquist, Stephanie K. (Stephanie Kay), 1981-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brazil's transformation from an agriculturally-based colonial economy to an industrial republic spans seven decades - from the 1930s to the present - with three rapid growth phases which were each followed by economic and ...

  6. Economics, Environment, and Equity: Policy Integration During Development in Vietnam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Dara

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the competing pressu res for economic growth, enviseveral years) has placed pressu re on the government totrade-offs, as wel l as new pressu res on labor organizi ng.

  7. Altered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance in Quercus stands on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Justin

    . Logistic regression revealed an increasing probability of mortality during wind disturbance with increasingAltered structural development and accelerated succession from intermediate-scale wind disturbance Structure Succession Wind a b s t r a c t Natural disturbances play important roles in shaping the structure

  8. LWST Phase I Project Conceptual Design Study: Evaluation of Design and Construction Approaches for Economical Hybrid Steel/Concrete Wind Turbine Towers; June 28, 2002 -- July 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaNier, M. W.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Energy Research Program has begun a new effort to partner with U.S. industry to develop wind technology that will allow wind systems to compete in regions of low wind speed. The Class 4 and 5 sites targeted by this effort have annual average wind speeds of 5.8 m/s (13 mph), measured at 10 m (33 ft) height. Such sites are abundant in the United States and would increase the land area available for wind energy production twenty-fold. The new program is targeting a levelized cost of energy of 3 cents/kWh at these sites by 2010. A three-element approach has been initiated. These efforts are concept design, component development, and system development. This work builds on previous activities under the WindPACT program and the Next Generation Turbine program. If successful, DOE estimates that his new technology could result in 35 to 45 gigawatts of additional wind capacity being installed by 2020.

  9. Sault Tribe Wind Energy Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toni Osterhout; Global Energy Concepts

    2005-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sault Tribe conducted a feasibility study on tribal lands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to determine the technical and economic feasibility of both small and large-scale wind power development on tribal lands. The study included a wind resource assessment, transmission system analysis, engineering and regulatory analyzes and assessments.

  10. Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.

  11. An approach to the development and analysis of wind turbine control algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, K.C.

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to develop the capability of symbolically generating an analytical model of a wind turbine for studies of control systems. This report focuses on a theoretical formulation of the symbolic equations of motion (EOMs) modeler for horizontal axis wind turbines. In addition to the power train dynamics, a generic 7-axis rotor assembly is used as the base model from which the EOMs of various turbine configurations can be derived. A systematic approach to generate the EOMs is presented using d`Alembert`s principle and Lagrangian dynamics. A Matlab M file was implemented to generate the EOMs of a two-bladed, free yaw wind turbine. The EOMs will be compared in the future to those of a similar wind turbine modeled with the YawDyn code for verification. This project was sponsored by Sandia National Laboratories as part of the Adaptive Structures and Control Task. This is the final report of Sandia Contract AS-0985.

  12. Conference Proceedings, 2011 Low Impact Development Symposium, Submitted, March 2012 Economic and Adaptation Benefits of Low Impact Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conference Proceedings, 2011 Low Impact Development Symposium, Submitted, March 2012 1 Economic.ballestero@unh.edu; web: www.unh.edu/unhsc/. #12;Conference Proceedings, 2011 Low Impact Development Symposium, Submitted

  13. Airborne Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Makani Power is developing an Airborne Wind Turbine (AWT) that eliminates 90% of the mass of a conventional wind turbine and accesses a stronger, more consistent wind at altitudes of near 1,000 feet. At these altitudes, 85% of the country can offer viable wind resources compared to only 15% accessible with current technology. Additionally, the Makani Power wing can be economically deployed in deep offshore waters, opening up a resource which is 4 times greater than the entire U.S. electrical generation capacity. Makani Power has demonstrated the core technology, including autonomous launch, land, and power generation with an 8 meter wingspan, 20 kW prototype. At commercial scale, Makani Power aims to develop a 600 kW, 28 meter wingspan product capable of delivering energy at an unsubsidized cost competitive with coal, the current benchmark for low-cost power.

  14. HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    HURRICANE IMAGING RADIOMETER WIND SPEED AND RAIN RATE RETRIEVAL: [PART-1] DEVELOPMENT U.S.A * selnimri@mail.ucf.edu 2 NOAA/AOML/Hurricane Research Division, Miami, Florida, USA 3 Space model has been developed to support the analysis and design of the new airborne Hurricane Imaging

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Nick Gaguano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCAUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Nick Gaguano Fred Kaiser .........................................................8 System Boundary

  16. Achieving community economic development in New York City : lessons from the Kingsbridge Armory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tishman, Maggie Bancale

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New York City spends over two billion dollars each year in the name of economic development. Much of this money goes to subsidize private developers in order to create jobs. However, these projects often fail to produce ...

  17. International project finance : the case of Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Jassar, Sulaiman Ahmed

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the record of the Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development (KFAED) in light of changing fashions regarding the proper role and management of such funds in the development finance process. The key ...

  18. Input-Output as a Method of Evaluahon of the Economic Impact of Water Resources Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canion, R. L.; Trock, W. L.

    In this report the results of a study of the use of input-output analysis to evaluate the economic impact of water resources development are presented. Blackburn Crossing reservoir on the Upper Neches river was the subject development...

  19. ENERGY FOR SUSTAINABILITY: HIGHLY COMPLIANT FLOATING OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES: FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT THROUGH THEORY, SIMULATION AND DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweetman, Bert

    revolution that enables economic development of wind farms in very challenging deepwater offshore locationsA-1 ENERGY FOR SUSTAINABILITY: HIGHLY COMPLIANT FLOATING OFFSHORE WIND TURBINES: FEASIBILITY surrounding Europe, and plans are in place for offshore developments in the US. Locating these wind turbines

  20. Solar Photovoltaic Economic Development: Building and Growing a Local PV Industry, August 2011 (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. photovoltaic (PV) industry is forecast to grow, and it represents an opportunity for economic development and job creation in communities throughout the United States. This report helps U.S. cities evaluate economic opportunities in the PV industry. It serves as a guide for local economic development offices in evaluating their community?s competitiveness in the solar PV industry, assessing the viability of solar PV development goals, and developing strategies for recruiting and retaining PV companies to their areas.

  1. NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, S.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

  2. Job and Economic Development Impact Models (JEDI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergyFarmsPower Co LtdTN LLC JumpJilin HuayiJilin Wind

  3. Africa-Economic Development Report 2010 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1AMEE JumpAeroWind Inc.Information Afluente Gera oSelect

  4. WP2 IEA Wind Task 26:The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lantz, Eric

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Speed Sites. ” European Wind Energy Association. Marseille,Innovation and the price of wind energy in the US. ” EnergyThe Economics of Wind Energy. ” Renewable and Sustainable

  5. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

  6. Promoting environmental protection during economic development in a growth region in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleason, M.; Mire, J.; Gade, K.; Allison, T.; Weil, L.; Platt, D.; Popkin, B.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The extreme pressures for economic development and the required infrastructure for expanding populations in regions such as Southeast Asia often result in extensive degradation and contamination of the environment. Protection of natural resources during the rapid growth in developing areas depends on local and regional environmental planning that incorporates lessons learned in developed nations concerning natural resource assessments and accurate predictions of environmental, socio-economic, and human health risks of development alternatives. This case study focuses on Batam, Indonesia, a bonded economic region near Singapore and Malaysia that is the site of intensive and rapid government-sponsored development. The authors are assessing the environmental impacts of current development activities and providing guidance in selecting industries or development alternatives that will have the lowest environmental cost. In particular, they are evaluating the long-term and short-term consequences of different development strategies using a cost-benefit approach that incorporates life cycle analysis, cumulative effects models, and industrial ecology models to make recommendations concerning which types of economic activities will result in the lowest environmental cost to the region, while still providing sufficient economic gains. Environmental planning and technical assistance to developing regions must integrate resource planning, ecological-economic models, and appropriate institutional strengthening and training to move towards sustainable development goals. Pollution-prevention and predictive risk assessment should become important components of technology transfer from post-industrial to developing nations.

  7. Development of a graphical user interface and graphics display for the WIND system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Steen, B.L.; Fast, J.D.; Suire, B.S.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced graphical user interface (GUI) and improved graphics for transport calculations have been developed for the Weather Information and Display System (WINDS). Two WINDS transport codes, Area Evac and 2DPUF, have been ported from their original VAX/VMS environment to a UNIX operating system and reconfigured to take advantage of the new graphics capability. A developmental prototype of this software is now available on a UNIX based IBM 340 workstation in the Dose Assessment Center (DAC). Automatic transfer of meteorological data from the WINDS VAX computers to the IBM workstation in the DAC has been implemented. This includes both regional National Weather Service (NWS) data and SRS tower data. The above developments fulfill a FY 1993 DOE milestone.

  8. Development of a graphical user interface and graphics display for the WIND system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Steen, B.L.; Fast, J.D.; Suire, B.S.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An advanced graphical user interface (GUI) and improved graphics for transport calculations have been developed for the Weather Information and Display System (WINDS). Two WINDS transport codes, Area Evac and 2DPUF, have been ported from their original VAX/VMS environment to a UNIX operating system and reconfigured to take advantage of the new graphics capability. A developmental prototype of this software is now available on a UNIX based IBM 340 workstation in the Dose Assessment Center (DAC). Automatic transfer of meteorological data from the WINDS VAX computers to the IBM workstation in the DAC has been implemented. This includes both regional National Weather Service (NWS) data and SRS tower data. The above developments fulfill a FY 1993 DOE milestone.

  9. Wind power and Wind power and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power and the CDM #12; Wind power and the CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power 2005 Jyoti P. Painuly, Niels-Erik Clausen, Jørgen Fenhann, Sami Kamel and Romeo Pacudan #12; WIND POWER AND THE CDM Emerging practices in developing wind power projects for the Clean Development Mechanism Energy

  10. Economic development through biomass system integration: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. Chapters describe alfalfa basics, production risks, production economics, transportation and storage, processing, products, market analysis, business analysis, environmental impact, and policy issues. 69 figs., 63 tabs.

  11. Access Framework: Model Text (November 2011): An Act to Establish a Framework for Development of Offshore Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The model offshore wind power legislation focused on two aspects: compensation for use of ocean space and environmental assessment. In particular, the model legislation recommends the adoption of a rent and royalty scheme that is premised on high rent and low royalties in order to stimulate qualified bids from developers who are motivated to begin production as early as possible and to discourage sham bidding. The model legislation also includes a provision that sets royalties at a lower rate in the early years of project operation, and that provides states with the discretion to waive or defer rent and/or royalties for a period of time to meet the goals and objectives of energy independence, job creation, reduced emissions of conventional pollutants and greenhouse gases and increased state requirements for electricity from renewable sources. The environmental impact assessment (EIA) is structured to provide a systematic and interdisciplinary evaluation of the potential positive and negative life-cycle effects of a proposed offshore wind project on the physical, biological, cultural and socio-economic attributes of the project.

  12. Hawaii Energy Resource Overviews. Volume 5. Social and economic impacts of geothermal development in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canon, P.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overview statement of the socio-economic effects of developing geothermal energy in the State of Hawaii is presented. The following functions are presented: (1) identification of key social and economic issues, (2) inventory of all available pertinent data, (3) analysis and assessment of available data, and (4) identification of what additional information is required for adequate assessment.

  13. The Great Plains Wind Power Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, John

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This multi-year, multi-faceted project was focused on the continued development of a nationally-recognized facility for the testing, characterization, and improvement of grid-connected wind turbines, integrated wind-water desalination systems, and related educational and outreach topics. The project involved numerous faculty and graduate students from various engineering departments, as well as others from the departments of Geosciences (in particular the Atmospheric Science Group) and Economics. It was organized through the National Wind Institute (NWI), which serves as an intellectual hub for interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research, commercialization and education related to wind science, wind energy, wind engineering and wind hazard mitigation at Texas Tech University (TTU). Largely executed by an academic based team, the project resulted in approximately 38 peer-reviewed publications, 99 conference presentations, the development/expansion of several experimental facilities, and two provisional patents.

  14. A Spectral Analysis of World GDP Dynamics: Kondratieff Waves, Kuznets Swings, Juglar and Kitchin Cycles in Global Economic Development, and the 2008–2009 Economic Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korotayev, Andrey V; Tsirel, Sergey V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Significance of Kuznets Cycles. Economic Development andUniversity Press. Kuznets S. 1930. Secular Movements inSchumpeter and Kuznets: Trend Periods Revisited. Journal of

  15. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    high levels of wind generation. Figure 5. Installed Windis that the increased wind generation offsets both coal andmuch higher levels of wind power generation than currently

  16. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supply curve for wind using cost and performance assumptionspressure on installed wind project costs while the industryon U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance

  17. Development and Analysis of a Swept Blade Aeroelastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.; Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department-of-Energy-funded Competitiveness Improvement Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed new capabilities for aeroelastic modeling of precurved and preswept blades for small wind turbines. This presentation covers the quest for optimized rotors, computer-aided engineering tools, a case study, and summary of the results.

  18. Obtaining data for wind farm development and management: the EO-WINDFARM project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    providers, wind energy market players and end-users such as electricity companies. It is supported by the European Space Agency within the Earth Observation Market Development program. The set of data comprises production should then increase from 6 % to 12 % in 2010. While Europe is not rich in oil, gas and coal

  19. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing the Sustainability of the UBC Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    scale. The group has developed a tool by which sustainability of the UBC campus may be periodically defined "sustainable development as `development that meets the needs of the present without compromisingUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Assessing

  20. Cumulative impact assessments and bird/wind farm interactions: Developing a conceptual framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masden, Elizabeth A., E-mail: e.masden.1@research.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom) and Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Fox, Anthony D., E-mail: tfo@dmu.d [Department of Wildlife Ecology and Biodiversity, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Kalo, Grenavej 14, 8410 Ronde (Denmark); Furness, Robert W., E-mail: r.furness@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Bullman, Rhys, E-mail: rhys.bullman@rpsgroup.co [Scottish Natural Heritage, The Beta Centre, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, Stirling FK9 4NF (United Kingdom); Haydon, Daniel T., E-mail: d.haydon@bio.gla.ac.u [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boyd Orr Centre for Population and Ecosystem Health, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind power industry has grown rapidly in the UK to meet EU targets of sourcing 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020. Although wind power is a renewable energy source, there are environmental concerns over increasing numbers of wind farm proposals and associated cumulative impacts. Individually, a wind farm, or indeed any action, may have minor effects on the environment, but collectively these may be significant, potentially greater than the sum of the individual parts acting alone. EU and UK legislation requires a cumulative impact assessment (CIA) as part of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA). However, in the absence of detailed guidance and definitions, such assessments within EIA are rarely adequate, restricting the acquisition of basic knowledge about the cumulative impacts of wind farms on bird populations. Here we propose a conceptual framework to promote transparency in CIA through the explicit definition of impacts, actions and scales within an assessment. Our framework requires improved legislative guidance on the actions to include in assessments, and advice on the appropriate baselines against which to assess impacts. Cumulative impacts are currently considered on restricted scales (spatial and temporal) relating to individual development EIAs. We propose that benefits would be gained from elevating CIA to a strategic level, as a component of spatially explicit planning.

  1. Repertoires of development in economic divergence on the U.S. - Mexico border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pipkin, Seth Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation represents a new approach to the age-old social science problem of the underlying causes of economic development. It focuses on two initially very similar cross-border pairs of cities (McAllen, TX - ...

  2. The duality of innovation : implications for the role of the university in economic development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martínez Vela, Carlos Andrés, 1973-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The university is increasingly seen as an engine of regional economic development. Since the 1980s the university's role has been framed in terms of its contribution to industrial innovation. The conventional wisdom views ...

  3. Mountain Association for Community Economic Development- Energy Efficient Enterprise Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mountain Association for Community Economic Development (MACED) offers loans to small and mid-sized businesses, non-profits, schools and municipalities to improve energy efficiency through its...

  4. How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Leon, Alex R.

    · How does renewable energy drive community economic development, improve air quality & contribute to healthy families & communities? · How does renewable energy revitalize agricultural communities, provide energy self-sufficiency & protect the environment? · How do renewable energy & sustainable food create

  5. The Informal Sector and Economic Development in Latin America: A Brief Study of the Chilean Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jordan

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A major hindrance to the achievement of steady economic growth is widespread informal employment, also known as the informal sector. The informal sector is a complex phenomenon which is pervasive in developing regions of the world such as sub...

  6. Theoretical Developments and Practical Aspects of Dynamic Systems in Wind Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Brian C

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    for offshore wind technology, however, are significant obstacles that need to be overcome to make offshore wind a viable option. Vertical-axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are potentially ideal candidates for large offshore wind energy applications, and may...

  7. ESD.126 Energy Systems and Economic Development, Spring 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabors, Richard D.

    A team-based policy research subject focused on evaluation of energy technologies and their implementation within developing countries. Focuses on one or more specific nations, carries out a resource assessment, and develops ...

  8. Petroleum Refinery Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are user-friendly tools utilized to estimate the economic impacts at the local level of constructing and operating fuel and power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Petroleum Refinery Model User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in employing and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted. Based on project-specific inputs from the user, the model estimates job creation, earning and output (total economic activity) for a given petroleum refinery. This includes the direct, indirect and induced economic impacts to the local economy associated with the refinery's construction and operation phases. Project cost and job data used in the model are derived from the most current cost estimations available. Local direct and indirect economic impacts are estimated using economic multipliers derived from IMPLAN software. By determining the regional economic impacts and job creation for a proposed refinery, the JEDI Petroleum Refinery model can be used to field questions about the added value refineries may bring to the local community.

  9. Erlianhot Changfeng Xiehe Wind Power Development Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDIT REPORTEnergy OffshoreDeveloperEnertechEolicaEolo Energy S A

  10. Wind Development Found to Increase County-Level Personal Income |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships ToolkitWasteWho Will BeWhy SOFCWilliam F.Much as

  11. Fort Carson Wind Resource Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robichaud, R.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and economic potential of a wind turbine project on a ridge in the southeastern portion of the Fort Carson Army base.

  12. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the drop in wind power plant installations, for example,the decrease in new wind power plant construction. A GrowingRelative Economics of Wind Power Plants Installed in Recent

  13. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. BeaconP. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &

  14. Wind Farms in North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoen, Ben

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. and Mueller, A. (2010) Wind Farm Announcements and RuralProposed Rail Splitter Wind Farm. Prepared for Hinshaw &Economic Analysis of a Wind Farm in Nantucket Sound. Beacon

  15. 2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolinger, Mark

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    natural gas prices, though the economic value of wind energyenergy and climate policy initiatives. With wind turbine pricesprices reported here would be at least $20/MWh higher without the PTC), they do not represent wind energy

  16. ECON 483N: Economic Policy Development Prof. Vikesh Amin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    growth, poverty, inequality, education and health, corruption, international migration and finance growth and development y the end of this unit students should understand the following: d saving Weil

  17. asian economic development: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    water legislation, wider choice of irrigation systems and development of more marginal water supply sites. Historically, growers often made irrigation decisions based on...

  18. Assessing Network Applications for Economic Development Sustainable Access in Rural India (SARI) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    Assessing Network Applications for Economic Development Sustainable Access in Rural India (SARI Department of Electric Engineering MIT Media Laboratory- eDevelopment Group #12;SUSTAINABLE ACCESS IN RURAL) Project Pilot Phase Assessment ­ Madurai District, Tamil Nadu, India Professor Michael Best Director, eDevelopment

  19. Economic development through biomass system integration: Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLong, M.M. [Northern States Power Co., Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alfalfa is a well-known and widely-planted crop that offers environmental and soil conservation advantages when grown as a 4-year segment in a 7-year rotation with corn and soybeans. Alfalfa fixes nitrogen from the air, thereby enhancing soil nitrogen and decreasing the need for manufactured nitrogen fertilizer. With alfalfa yields of 4 dry tons per acre per year and the alfalfa leaf fraction sold as a high-value animal feed the remaining alfalfa stem fraction can be economically viable fuel feedstock for a gasifier combined cycle power plant. This report is a feasibility study for an integrated biomass power system, where an energy crop (alfalfa) is the feedstock for a processing plant and a power power plant (integrated gasification combined cycle) in a way that benefits the facility owners. The sale of an animal feed co-product and electricity both help cover the production cost of alfalfa and the feedstock processing cost, thereby requiring neither the electricity or leaf meal to carry the total cost. The power plant provides an important continous demand for the feedstock and results in continous supply of leaf product to provide a reliable supply needed for the leaf meal product.

  20. How to Estimate the Economic Impacts from Renewable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Technical Assistance Project (TAP) for state and local officials; Gail Mosey and Eric Lantz, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Wind Model.

  1. 14.772 Development Economics: Macroeconomics, Spring 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kremer, Michael

    This course emphasizes dynamic models of growth and development. Topics covered include: migration, modernization, and technological change; static and dynamic models of political economy; the dynamics of income distribution ...

  2. Essays in Labor Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harker Roa, Arturo

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Eco- nomicQuarterly Journal of Economics, August 1996, 111, 779-804. [Journal of Development Economics, 1996, 50, 297-312. [5

  3. Wind energy bibliography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

  4. STATE OF WASHINGTON DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY, TRADE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the emissions from the "net system mix", or electricity available for export, to be 1,014 lbs. CO2/MWh in 2006's electricity imports. We recognize the critical importance of tracking emissions related to the production electric industry emissions profile and to develop an accurate tracking or reporting mechanism

  5. Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

  6. Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Courtney Lane

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    As the Department of Energy stated in its 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report, there will need to be enhanced outreach efforts on a national, state, regional, and local level to communicate wind development opportunities, benefits and challenges to a diverse set of stakeholders. To help address this need, PennFuture was awarded funding to create the Mid-Atlantic Regional Wind Energy Institute to provide general education and outreach on wind energy development across Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Over the course of the two-year grant period, PennFuture used its expertise on wind energy policy and development in Pennsylvania and expanded it to other states in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture accomplished this through reaching out and establishing connections with policy makers, local environmental groups, health and economic development organizations, and educational institutions and wind energy developers throughout the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture conducted two regional wind educational forums that brought together wind industry representatives and public interest organizations from across the region to discuss and address wind development in the Mid-Atlantic region. PennFuture developed the agenda and speakers in collaboration with experts on the ground in each state to help determine the critical issue to wind energy in each location. The sessions focused on topics ranging from the basics of wind development; model ordinance and tax issues; anti-wind arguments and counter points; wildlife issues and coalition building. In addition to in-person events, PennFuture held three webinars on (1) Generating Jobs with Wind Energy; (2) Reviving American Manufacturing with Wind Power; and (3) Wind and Transmission. PennFuture also created a web page for the institute (http://www.midatlanticwind.org) that contains an online database of fact sheets, research reports, sample advocacy letters, top anti-wind claims and information on how to address them, wind and wildlife materials and sample model ordinances. Video and presentations from each in-person meeting and webinar recordings are also available on the site. At the end of the two-year period, PennFuture has accomplished its goal of giving a unified voice and presence to wind energy advocates in the Mid-Atlantic region. We educated a broad range of stakeholders on the benefits of wind energy and gave them the tools to help make a difference in their states. We grew a database of over 500 contacts and hope to continue the discussion and work around the importance of wind energy in the region.

  7. Transmission Line Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Keyser, D.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are freely available, user-friendly tools that estimate the potential economic impacts of constructing and operating power generation projects for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The Transmission Line JEDI model can be used to field questions about the economic impacts of transmission lines in a given state, region, or local community. This Transmission Line JEDI User Reference Guide was developed to provide basic instruction on operating the model and understanding the results. This guide also provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data contained in the model.

  8. Indian agricultural development in the context of economic reforms. Causes of change and issues for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Indian agricultural development in the context of economic reforms. Causes of change and issues the influence of reforms in the 1990s regarding the agricultural development in India. Many studies have sector rather than on the agricultural sector. After India gained independence, the government

  9. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report ZHENGXIANG QIU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report ZHENGXIANG QIU Life Cycle ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA of the inputs, outputs and potential impacts of the building system throughout its life cycle, being regarded

  10. APORDE -African Programme on Rethinking Development Economics 5 -19 May 2011, Johannesburg, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    Africa Supported by the Department of Trade and Industry of South Africa (the dti), the French Development Agency (AFD), and the French Embassy in South Africa, with the French Institute of South Africa Development Economics APORDE) will be held in Johannesburg (South Africa) from the 5th to the 19th of May 2011

  11. UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social, Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Social Sustainability 2, one closely tied to conservation. Sustainable development has been famously defined by the Brundtland The Oxford English Dictionary defines `Sustainable' as, "able to be upheld or defended; able to be maintained

  12. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainability initiatives, working with UBC Food Services and AMS Food Services to develop and conduct marketUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Customer Awareness off and Participation in Sustainability Mandy Cheng, Sara Harrison, Andria Lam, Cristina Machial, Lena Syrovy, Diana

  13. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Weicen Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;Weicen Wang LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT - Wesbrook Building CIVL 498C November 18UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Weicen Wang LIFE CYCLE

  14. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Raza Jaffery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ the UBC LCA Project ­ which aims to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA at rob.sianchuk@gmail.com #12;LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT - CENTER FOR INTERACTIVE RESEARCH ON SUSTAINABILITYUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Raza Jaffery LIFE CYCLE

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT -CENTER FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to support the development of the field of life cycle assessment (LCA). The information and findingsUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report JIAN SUN LIFE CYCLE which has one of the largest life cycle inventory database in North America. Assumptions and According

  16. 2009 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

  17. Wind Energy Guide for County Commissioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costanti, M.

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the key stakeholders associated with economic development are local government officials, who are often required to evaluate and vote on commercial wind energy project permits, as well as to determine and articulate what wind energy benefits accrue to their counties. Often these local officials lack experience with large-scale wind energy and need to make important decisions concerning what may be a complicated and controversial issue. These decisions can be confounded with diverse perspectives from various stakeholders. This project is designed to provide county commissioners, planners, and other local county government officials with a practical overview of information required to successfully implement commercial wind energy projects in their county. The guidebook provides readers with information on the following 13 topics: Brief Wind Energy Overview; Environmental Benefits; Wind Energy Myths and Facts; Economic Development Benefits; Wind Economics; The Development Process; Public Outreach; Siting Issues; Property Tax Incentives; Power System Impacts; Permitting, Zoning, and Siting Processes; Case Studies; and Further Information. For each of the above topics, the guidebook provides an introduction that identifies the topic, why local government should care, a topic snapshot, how the topic will arise, and a list of resources that define and assess the topic.

  18. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). 2008. “20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.targets. Keywords: Wind energy, renewable energy, cost

  19. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    system that relies heavily on wind. 5. References U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). 2008. “20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.

  20. Development of economically viable, highly integrated, highly modular SEGIS architecture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enslin, Johan (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Hamaoui, Ronald (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Gonzalez, Sigifredo; Haddad, Ghaith (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Rustom, Khalid (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Stuby, Rick (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Kuran, Mohammad (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Mark, Evlyn (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Amarin, Ruba (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Alatrash, Hussam (Petra Solar, Inc., South Plainfield, NJ); Bower, Ward Isaac; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Sena-Henderson, Lisa; David, Carolyn; Akhil, Abbas Ali

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initiated in 2008, the SEGIS initiative is a partnership involving the U.S. DOE, Sandia National Laboratories, private sector companies, electric utilities, and universities. Projects supported under the initiative have focused on the complete-system development of solar technologies, with the dual goal of expanding renewable PV applications and addressing new challenges of connecting large-scale solar installations in higher penetrations to the electric grid. Petra Solar, Inc., a New Jersey-based company, received SEGIS funds to develop solutions to two of these key challenges: integrating increasing quantities of solar resources into the grid without compromising (and likely improving) power quality and reliability, and moving the design from a concept of intelligent system controls to successful commercialization. The resulting state-of-the art technology now includes a distributed photovoltaic (PV) architecture comprising AC modules that not only feed directly into the electrical grid at distribution levels but are equipped with new functions that improve voltage stability and thus enhance overall grid stability. This integrated PV system technology, known as SunWave, has applications for 'Power on a Pole,' and comes with a suite of technical capabilities, including advanced inverter and system controls, micro-inverters (capable of operating at both the 120V and 240V levels), communication system, network management system, and semiconductor integration. Collectively, these components are poised to reduce total system cost, increase the system's overall value and help mitigate the challenges of solar intermittency. Designed to be strategically located near point of load, the new SunWave technology is suitable for integration directly into the electrical grid but is also suitable for emerging microgrid applications. SunWave was showcased as part of a SEGIS Demonstration Conference at Pepco Holdings, Inc., on September 29, 2011, and is presently undergoing further field testing as a prelude to improved and expanded commercialization.

  1. Development of NEXRAD Wind Retrievals as Input to Atmospheric Dispersion Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Copeland, Jeffrey H.; Sun, Jenny

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility that routinely collected data from the Doppler radars can appropriately be used in Atmospheric Dispersion Models (ADMs) for emergency response. We have evaluated the computational efficiency and accuracy of two variational mathematical techniques that derive the u- and v-components of the wind from radial velocities obtained from Doppler radars. A review of the scientific literature indicated that the techniques employ significantly different approaches in applying the variational techniques: 2-D Variational (2DVar), developed by NOAA¹s (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's) National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We designed a series of numerical experiments in which both models employed the same horizontal domain and resolution encompassing Oklahoma City for a two-week period during the summer of 2003 so that the computed wind retrievals could be fairly compared. Both models ran faster than real-time on a typical single dual-processor computer, indicating that they could be used to generate wind retrievals in near real-time. 2DVar executed ~2.5 times faster than VDRAS because of its simpler approach.

  2. Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, JaeKyung [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

  3. Approach and development strategy for an agent-based model of economic confidence.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprigg, James A.; Pryor, Richard J.; Jorgensen, Craig Reed

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are extending the existing features of Aspen, a powerful economic modeling tool, and introducing new features to simulate the role of confidence in economic activity. The new model is built from a collection of autonomous agents that represent households, firms, and other relevant entities like financial exchanges and governmental authorities. We simultaneously model several interrelated markets, including those for labor, products, stocks, and bonds. We also model economic tradeoffs, such as decisions of households and firms regarding spending, savings, and investment. In this paper, we review some of the basic principles and model components and describe our approach and development strategy for emulating consumer, investor, and business confidence. The model of confidence is explored within the context of economic disruptions, such as those resulting from disasters or terrorist events.

  4. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiser, Ryan H; Hand, Maureen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global wind power market has been growing at a phenomenal pace, driven by favorable policies towards renewable energy and the improving economics of wind projects. On a going forward basis, utility-scale wind power offers the potential for significant reductions in the carbon footprint of the electricity sector. Specifically, the global wind resource is vast and, though accessing this potential is not costless or lacking in barriers, wind power can be developed at scale in the near to medium term at what promises to be an acceptable cost.

  5. Development and Validation of WECC Variable Speed Wind Turbine Dynamic Models for Grid Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behnke, M.; Ellis, A.; Kazachkov, Y.; McCoy, T.; Muljadi, E.; Price, W.; Sanchez-Gasca, J.

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes reduced-order, simplified wind turbine models for analyzing the stability impact of large arrays of wind turbines with a single point of network interconnection.

  6. Wind Power Development in the United States: Current Progress, Future Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: Wind energy, renewable energy, cost trends,wind energy are projected to be relatively modest. Figure 6 shows the total estimated electric-sector costs

  7. Advanced wind turbine near-term product development. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990 the US Department of Energy initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine (AWT) Program to assist the growth of a viable wind energy industry in the US. This program, which has been managed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has been divided into three phases: (1) conceptual design studies, (2) near-term product development, and (3) next-generation product development. The goals of the second phase were to bring into production wind turbines which would meet the cost goal of $0.05 kWh at a site with a mean (Rayleigh) windspeed of 5.8 m/s (13 mph) and a vertical wind shear exponent of 0.14. These machines were to allow a US-based industry to compete domestically with other sources of energy and to provide internationally competitive products. Information is given in the report on design values of peak loads and of fatigue spectra and the results of the design process are summarized in a table. Measured response is compared with the results from mathematical modeling using the ADAMS code and is discussed. Detailed information is presented on the estimated costs of maintenance and on spare parts requirements. A failure modes and effects analysis was carried out and resulted in approximately 50 design changes including the identification of ten previously unidentified failure modes. The performance results of both prototypes are examined and adjusted for air density and for correlation between the anemometer site and the turbine location. The anticipated energy production at the reference site specified by NREL is used to calculate the final cost of energy using the formulas indicated in the Statement of Work. The value obtained is $0.0514/kWh in January 1994 dollars. 71 figs., 30 tabs.

  8. 1E Wind Energy Program: Technical Information and Outreach Support Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, Abigail

    2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A U.S. consensus-based collaborative formed in 1994, the National Wind Coordinating Committee (NWCC) identifies issues that affect the use of wind power, establishes dialogue among key stakeholders, and catalyzes appropriate activities to support the development of environmentally, economically, and politically sustainable commercial markets for wind power. NWCC members include representatives from electric utilities and support organizations, state legislatures, state utility commissions, consumer advocacy offices, wind equipment suppliers and developers, green power marketers, environmental organizations, agriculture and economic development organizations, and state and federal agencies.

  9. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    space constraints. Ohio: The Lake Erie Energy DevelopmentGreat Lakes Ohio Wind, and Great Lakes Wind Energy LLC. In

  10. Wind Energy Research Penn State has the broad multi-disciplinary expertise needed to address the interwoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    Wind Energy Research Penn State has the broad multi-disciplinary expertise needed to address the interwoven technological, economic, environmental, and societal barriers associated with wind energy and needs and have the capabilities required to conceptualize, develop and evaluate wind energy systems

  11. Model Development and Loads Analysis of a Wind Turbine on a Floating Offshore Tension Leg Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matha, D.; Fischer, T.; Kuhn, M.; Jonkman, J.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results of the analysis of a 5-MW wind turbine located on a floating offshore tension leg platform (TLP) that was conducted using the fully coupled time-domain aero-hydro-servo-elastic design code FAST with AeroDyn and HydroDyn. Models in this code are of greater fidelity than most of the models that have been used to analyze floating turbines in the past--which have neglected important hydrodynamic and mooring system effects. The report provides a description of the development process of a TLP model, which is a modified version of a Massachusetts Institute of Technology design derived from a parametric linear frequency-domain optimization process. An extensive loads and stability analysis for ultimate and fatigue loads according to the procedure of the International Electrotechnical Commission offshore wind turbine design standard was performed with the verified TLP model. Response statistics, extreme event tables, fatigue lifetimes, and selected time histories of design-driving extreme events are analyzed and presented. Loads for the wind turbine on the TLP are compared to those of an equivalent land-based turbine in terms of load ratios. Major instabilities for the TLP are identified and described.

  12. Structural Composites Industries 4 kilowatt wind system development. Phase I: design and analysis, technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malkine, N.; Bottrell, G.; Weingart, O.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 4 kW small wind energy conversion system (SWECS) has been designed for residential applications in which relatively low (10 mph) mean annual wind speeds prevail. The objectives were to develop such a machine to produce electrical energy at 6 cents per kWh while operating in parallel with a utility grid or auxiliary generator. The Phase I effort began in November, 1979 and was carried through the Final Design Review in February 1981. During this period extensive trade, optimization and analytical studies were performed in an effort to provide the optimum machine to best meet the objectives. Certain components, systems and manufacturing processes were tested and evaluated and detail design drawings were produced. The resulting design is a 31-foot diameter horizontal axis downwind machine rated 5.7 kW and incorporating the following unique features: Composite Blades; Free-Standing Composite Tower; Torque-Actuated Blade Pitch Control. The design meets or exceeds all contract requirements except that for cost of energy. The target 6 cents per kWh will be achieved in a mean wind speed slightly below 12 mph instead of the specified 10 mph.

  13. Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennell, W.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

  14. Abstract--A novel methodology for economic evaluation of hydrogen storage for a mixed wind-nuclear power plant is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    -nuclear power plant is presented in this article in a context of a "Hydrogen Economy". The simulation power plant production (MW) NP : nuclear power plant production (MW) CP : electrolyzer consumption (MW, IEEE THE FEASIBILITY OF HYDROGEN STORAGE FOR MIXED WIND-NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS #12;price scenario p

  15. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into the Wheat Straw Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pulping is the black liquor residue. Regarding the black liquor, a by-product of wheat straw pulping, Vibratory Shear Enhanced Process (VSEP) shows that lignin and hemicelluloses can be extracted from the blackUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation

  16. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Revealing Carbon in Hampton Place

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Revealing Carbon in Hampton Place Laiyi Chow Barry Jonat Martin Lewynsky University of British Columbia FRST 490/521C April at UBC. We urge you to contact the research persons mentioned in a report or the SEEDS Coordinator about

  17. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recycling rate of 59%, with 43% operational waste diversion. Operational waste1 diversion targets are 70 considered: organics, mixed paper, returnable containers, cardboard, e-waste, construction materials (butUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report UBC Zero Waste Planning

  18. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy & Buildings: Sustainable Strategies for Ponderosa Hub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENERGY & BUILDINGS: SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES FOR PONDEROSA HUB #12;1 TABLE OF CONTENTS I.0 BackgroundUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy & Buildings: Sustainable Strategies for Ponderosa Hub Raphael Roy-Jauvin, Yael Haar, Hadi Kholeif, Natalia Pisarek

  19. YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR PROGRAM The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) is promoting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR PROGRAM The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IEDC) is promoting a reality in Indiana. The IEDC will work with local and regional communities to offer incentives to the Young Entrepreneurs with the best business plans. These incentives can include and are not limited to

  20. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Do It In The Dark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Ohio and designed the online building dashboard software used to monitor energy consumption throughUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Do It In The Dark: Energy Competitions as an Effective Means of Student Engagement around Energy Consumption Quinn Runkle University

  1. Department of Economic Development EMERGENCY RULE MAKING START-UP NY Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Department of Economic Development EMERGENCY RULE MAKING START-UP NY Program I.D. No. EDV-31 into law the SUNY Tax-free Areas to Revitalize and Transform UPstate New York (START-UP NY) program, which affiliated with New York universities and colleges. The START-UP NY program will leverage these tax benefits

  2. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Science 450 Fence Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Agricultural Science 450 University of British Columbia AGSC 450 April 10, 2009 Disclaimer: "UBC SEEDS provides students Science 450 Fence Report Group 2 Alexander Changfoot Stephanie Chung Shawn Johnston Stephanie Tai Brian Wu

  3. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets Beyond Climate Neutral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Moving UBC Food Outlets ..................................................................................................................................... 27 Abstract With the increase in global energy use there has been a subsequent increase in greenhouse of qualitative interviews with key stakeholders. Key findings include the low supply of local food, the need

  4. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Waste Reducing Vending Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Waste Reducing Vending Machine Pens, Pencils, and Highlighters Trent Pehlke Richard Schaap Kurt Knudson with the UBC community. The reader should bear in mind that this is a student project/report

  5. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of water consumption: drinking from the tap. The reasoning behind this is a lack of awareness and promotionUBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sustainable Water Water Consumption This report outlines how Sustainability Marketing practices can be used to reduce

  6. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sugarcane Bagasse Paper versus Wheat Straw Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Sugarcane Bagasse Paper Bagasse Paper versus Wheat Straw Paper prepared by Omar Omari 54434105 Marcus Cheung 82207101 Robert Chen this project to investigate and compare the advantages and disadvantages between sugarcane bagasse paper

  7. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EXPLORING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report EXPLORING THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN Tabassum Firoz, Emily Kwan, Doris Lo, Cynthia Mak, Karyn Schnick, Sally Shum, Jia THE SUSTAINABILITY OF THE BARN AGSC 450 April 3, 2002 Group 12 Tabassum Firoz Emily Kwan Doris Lo Cynthia Mak Karyn

  8. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Examining the Sustainability of Lawns on Campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Examining the Sustainability of Lawns on Campus Emily Gray University of British Columbia GEOG 419 April 3, 2013 Disclaimer of a project/report". #12;Examining the Sustainability of Lawns on Campus Emily Gray 1 Examining

  9. CLEMSON UNIVERSITY'S COMMITMENT TO GREEN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WHITE PAPER ON CLEAN ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    CLEMSON UNIVERSITY'S COMMITMENT TO GREEN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT WHITE PAPER ON CLEAN ENERGY: Clemson discussion about clean and renewable energy -- discussions that General Electric Chairman and Chief Executive of the 21st century for South Carolina and the nation -- energy. Energy is interwoven with the nation

  10. UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle Assessment Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    purposes. A life cycle assessment (LCA) was carried out on two of the event arenas built for the 2010UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Life Cycle AssessmentC: Life Cycle Assessment Report Thunderbird Old Arena Group Members: Dennis Fan, Sean Geyer, Hillary

  11. Public Policy 290-14 and ARE 298 International Economic Development Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    1 8/22/01 Public Policy 290-14 and ARE 298 Fall 2001 International Economic Development Policy Six case study papers, four policy briefs, and final examination. Case studies and policy briefs will be exercises involving quantitative analysis and the write up of a consultant report. One will be a policy

  12. EA-1856: Conveyance of Land and Facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant for Economic Development Purposes, Piketon, Ohio

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of conveyance of land and facilities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, in Piketon, Ohio, for economic development purposes.

  13. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  14. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  15. Ex post analysis of economic impacts from wind power development in U.S. counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Map (Source: National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Figure 3:A. , Shmakin, A. 2011. Renewable energy in the context ofof Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Wiser, R. , Yang,

  16. Ex Post Analysis of Economic Impacts from Wind Power Development in U.S. Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Jason P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    204. Chien, T. , Hu J. 2008. Renewable energy: An efficient6A2-45834. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory.from the promotion of renewable energy technologies: the

  17. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOf EnvironmentalGuide, JulyIssue 15IssueEnergyFour

  18. Offshore Wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts in the United States: Four Regional Scenarios

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOilNEWResponse toOctober 2014 National,2008aims toOfficial Use Offshore

  19. The development of CACTUS : a wind and marine turbine performance simulation code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Murray, Jonathan

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CACTUS (Code for Axial and Cross-flow TUrbine Simulation) is a turbine performance simulation code, based on a free wake vortex method, under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of a Department of Energy program to study marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The current effort builds upon work previously done at SNL in the area of vertical axis wind turbine simulation, and aims to add models to handle generic device geometry and physical models specific to the marine environment. An overview of the current state of the project and validation effort is provided.

  20. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  1. Assessing the Importance of Nonlinearities in the Development of a Substructure Model for the Wind Turbine CAE Tool FAST: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiani, R.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Song, H.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and analysis of wind turbines are performed using aero-servo-elastic tools that account for the nonlinear coupling between aerodynamics, controls, and structural response. The NREL-developed computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool FAST also resolves the hydrodynamics of fixed-bottom structures and floating platforms for offshore wind applications. This paper outlines the implementation of a structural-dynamics module (SubDyn) for offshore wind turbines with space-frame substructures into the current FAST framework, and focuses on the initial assessment of the importance of structural nonlinearities. Nonlinear effects include: large displacements, axial shortening due to bending, cross-sectional transverse shear effects, etc.

  2. Impacts of Federal Tax Laws and Economic Developments on the Texas Cattle Industry.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, J.R.; Dietrich, R.A.; Richardson, J.W.; Nixon, C.J.; Davis, E.E

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment Station Texas A&M University System College Station, Texas Execu ti ve Summary Recent changes in the U.S. federal income tax provisions enacted in the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (TRA) will significantly alter the manner in which costs and revenues... of the TRA and other recent economic developments on future land and cattle prices are examined. Second, the impacts on the economic viability of representative ranch firms in selected major beef producing areas of Texas are analyzed using a firm -level...

  3. Scoping and Framing Social Opposition to U.S. Wind Projects (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Flowers, L.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historical barriers to wind power include cost and reliability. However, rapid growth has increased the footprint of wind power in the United States, and some parts of the country have begun to observe conflicts between local communities and wind energy development. Thus, while questions of economic viability and the ability of grid operators to effectively manage wind energy have become less significant, community acceptance issues have emerged as a barrier to wind and associated transmission projects. Increasing community acceptance is likely to be a growing challenge as the wind industry seeks electricity sector penetration levels approaching 20%.

  4. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

  5. Strategies to Mitigate Declines in the Economic Value of Wind and Solar at High Penetration in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This resource evaluates several options to reduce and eliminate the decline in the value of wind and solar PV technology, as a previous study had quantified the decline as penetration levels increased. Researchers found that largest increase in the value of PV at high penetration levels comes from assuming that low-cost bulk power storage is an investment option. Other attractive options, particularly at more modest penetration levels, include real-time pricing and technology diversity.

  6. Wind Power: How Much, How Soon, and At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiser, Ryan H

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of Global Wind Power." Journal of Geophysical2008. "The Economics of Wind Power with Energy Storage."Economics of Large-Scale Wind Power in a Carbon Constrained

  7. Development of Offshore Wind Recommended Practice for U.S. Waters: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W. D.; Sheppard, R. E.; Dolan, D.; Naughton, B.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how the American Petroleum Institute oil and gas standards were interfaced with International Electrotechnical Commission and other wind turbine and offshore industry standards to provide guidance for reliable engineering design practices for offshore wind energy systems.

  8. Low Wind Speed Turbine Development Project Report: November 4, 2002 - December 31, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikhail, A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes work conducted by Clipper Windpower under the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine project. The objective of this project was to produce a wind turbine that can lower the cost of energy.

  9. Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Reference wind farm selection for regional wind power prediction models Nils Siebert George.siebert@ensmp.fr, georges.kariniotakis@ensmp.fr Abstract Short-term wind power forecasting is recognized today as a major requirement for a secure and economic integration of wind generation in power systems. This paper deals

  10. FACTORS THAT INFLUENCE CIVIC PARTICIPATION IN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PLANNING: TOURISM IN THE VILLAGE OF NORTH UTICA, ILLINOIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spears, Chaya Riannon

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Participatory economic development planning has been proposed as a means to address problems associated with more traditional "top-down" planning methods. Purposeful solicitation of participation in development planning ...

  11. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through the Development of a Comparative-Projection Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J.E.

    Using two established reservoir projects, an economic simulation model for reservoir development was constructed. The two comparative areas used for the model development are both reservoirs in central Texas and were constructed during approximately...

  12. Wind Turbine Manufacturing Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waseem Faidi; Chris Nafis; Shatil Sinha; Chandra Yerramalli; Anthony Waas; Suresh Advani; John Gangloff; Pavel Simacek

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To develop a practical inline inspection that could be used in combination with automated composite material placement equipment to economically manufacture high performance and reliable carbon composite wind turbine blade spar caps. The approach technical feasibility and cost benefit will be assessed to provide a solid basis for further development and implementation in the wind turbine industry. The program is focused on the following technology development: (1) Develop in-line monitoring methods, using optical metrology and ultrasound inspection, and perform a demonstration in the lab. This includes development of the approach and performing appropriate demonstration in the lab; (2) Develop methods to predict composite strength reduction due to defects; and (3) Develop process models to predict defects from leading indicators found in the uncured composites.

  13. Wind Energy Program: Top 10 Program Accomplishments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brochure on the top accomplishments of the Wind Energy Program, including the development of large wind machines, small machines for the residential market, wind tunnel testing, computer codes for modeling wind systems, high definition wind maps, and successful collaborations.

  14. The Biofuels Revolution: Understanding the Social, Cultural and Economic Impacts of Biofuels Development on Rural Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Theresa L. Selfa; Dr. Richard Goe; Dr. Laszlo Kulcsar; Dr. Gerad Middendorf; Dr. Carmen Bain

    2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this research was an in-depth analysis of the impacts of biofuels industry and ethanol plants on six rural communities in the Midwestern states of Kansas and Iowa. The goal was to provide a better understanding of the social, cultural, and economic implications of biofuels development, and to contribute to more informed policy development regarding bioenergy.Specific project objectives were: 1. To understand how the growth of biofuel production has affected and will affect Midwestern farmers and rural communities in terms of economic, demographic, and socio-cultural impacts; 2. To determine how state agencies, groundwater management districts, local governments and policy makers evaluate or manage bioenergy development in relation to competing demands for economic growth, diminishing water resources, and social considerations; 3. To determine the factors that influence the water management practices of agricultural producers in Kansas and Iowa (e.g. geographic setting, water management institutions, competing water-use demands as well as producersâ?? attitudes, beliefs, and values) and how these influences relate to bioenergy feedstock production and biofuel processing; 4. To determine the relative importance of social-cultural, environmental and/or economic factors in the promotion of biofuels development and expansion in rural communities; The research objectives were met through the completion of six detailed case studies of rural communities that are current or planned locations for ethanol biorefineries. Of the six case studies, two will be conducted on rural communities in Iowa and four will be conducted on rural communities in Kansas. A â??multi-methodâ? or â??mixed methodâ? research methodology was employed for each case study.

  15. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wyoming is a significant energy exporter, producing nearly 40% of the nation's coal and 10% of the nation's natural gas. However, opportunities to add new energy exports in the form of power generation are limited by insufficient transmission capacity. This fact sheet summarizes results from a recent analysis conducted by NREL for the Wyoming Infrastructure Authority (WIA) that estimates jobs and economic development activity that could occur in Wyoming should the market support new investments in power generation and transmission in the state.

  16. Session: Non-fatality and habitat impacts on birds from wind energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickland, Dale

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop was consisted of one paper presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The session focused on discussion of non-collision impacts of wind energy projects on birds, primarily impacts to habitat. The presentation included information about the impacts of habitat fragmentation, disturbance, and site avoidance from wind turbines, as well as from roads, transmission facilities, and other related construction at wind project sites. Whether birds habituate to the presence of turbines and the influence of regional factors were also addressed. The paper given by Dale Strickland was titled ''Overview of Non-Collision Related Impacts from Wind Projects''.

  17. Economic development through biomass systems integration: US Energy Department feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downing, M. [ORNL, TN (United States); Bain, R.; Overend, R. [NREL, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The broad objectives of {open_quotes}Economic Development Through Biomass Systems Integration{close_quotes} projects were to promote the development of integrated biomass production and conversion technologies, and to evaluate the potential for early implementation of cost-shared field demonstrations or pre-commercial developments of integrated systems in anticipation of future joint ventures to commercialize these systems. Specifically, these feasibility studies were to determine the technical, environmental, and economic viability of implementing integrated systems that would lead to planting tree and grass crops to serve as dedicated feedstock supply systems, and the scale-up of conversion technologies for producing liquid biofuels, and electric power that would use the dedicated feedstock supply systems. Some of the final reports are slated to published and available through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Because of space constraints we present brief summaries of 9 of the studies. Further demonstration and scale-up after completion of these feasibility studies will enhance our understanding of the economics and policy of energy, agriculture and environment at local, regional and national scales.

  18. Environmental Effects of Offshore Wind Development. Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Duberstein, Corey A.; Matzner, Shari; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Blake, Kara M.; Stavole, Jessica

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of offshore wind (OSW) energy projects are not well understood, and regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between OSW installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. To examine the environmental risks associated with OSW developments in the U.S. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) focused on the following four priority research areas in FY 2012: • Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) - Followed project developments on the two OSW projects that PNNL screened in FY 2011 for environmental consequence: Fishermen’s Energy off the coast of Atlantic City, NJ and LEEDCo. near Cleveland, OH in Lake Erie. • Tethys - Developed a smart knowledge base which houses environmental research, data and information pertaining to OSW energy: • Technical Assessment - Produced a new software to create an automated process of identifying and differentiating between flying organism such as birds and bats by using thermal imagery; and • North Atlantic Right Whales - Developed an environmental risk management system to mitigate the impacts on North Atlantic Right Whales (NARW) during installation and piledriving stages of OSW developments. By identifying and addressing the highest priority environmental risks for OSW devices and associated installations the ERES process assists project proponents, regulators, and stakeholders to engage in the most efficient and effective siting and permitting pathways.

  19. Wind Resource Assessment Report: Mille Lacs Indian Reservation, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez, A. C.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the RE-Powering America's Land initiative to encourage development of renewable energy on potentially contaminated land and mine sites. EPA collaborated with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians to evaluate the wind resource and examine the feasibility of a wind project at a contaminated site located on the Mille Lacs Indian Reservation in Minnesota. The wind monitoring effort involved the installation of a 60-m met tower and the collection of 18 months of wind data at multiple heights above the ground. This report focuses on the wind resource assessment, the estimated energy production of wind turbines, and an assessment of the economic feasibility of a potential wind project sited this site.

  20. Rural Community-Based Energy Development Act (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This act aims to create new rural economic development opportunities through rural community-based energy development. The act supports C-BED wind development projects, which are defined as...