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1

Arkansas 50m Wind Power Class  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50m Wind Power Class Metadata also available as Metadata: IdentificationInformation DataQualityInformation SpatialDataOrganizationInformation SpatialReferenceInformation...

2

Arkansas 50m Wind Power Class  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50m Wind Power Class 50m Wind Power Class Metadata also available as Metadata: Identification_Information Data_Quality_Information Spatial_Data_Organization_Information Spatial_Reference_Information Entity_and_Attribute_Information Distribution_Information Metadata_Reference_Information Identification_Information: Citation: Citation_Information: Originator: AWS TrueWind/NREL Publication_Date: April, 2007 Title: Arkansas 50m Wind Power Class Geospatial_Data_Presentation_Form: vector digital data Other_Citation_Details: The wind power resource estimates were produced by AWS TrueWind using their MesoMap system and historical weather data under contract to Wind Powering America/NREL. This map has been validated with available surface data by NREL and wind energy meteorological consultants.

3

Survey of Wind Integration Study Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25% during 2006 and reached almost 74,000 MW worldwide by the end of the year. This rapid growth is forecasted to continue for several years and result in large regional concentrations of wind generation capacity. An increasing amount of this wind energy is expected to come from offshore wind plants, especially in Europe. Because wind generation is an intermittent resource, and can not be dispatched, wind energy will affect the operation of th...

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

4

Hawaii 50 m Wind Power Class  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

using their MesoMap system and historical weather data under contract to Wind Powering AmericaNREL. This map has been validated with available surface data by NREL and...

5

NREL: Wind Research - SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results The SWIFT wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing the SWIFT small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The competitive grant was awarded to Cascade Engineering. The SWIFT is a 1-kilowatt (kW), five-bladed with outer ring, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. The turbine's rotor diameter is 2 meters, and its hub height is 13.72 meters. The SWIFT uses a single-phase permanent-magnet generator rated at 1 kW grid connected through an inverter at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data provided in this table will be provided in the final reports. Data presented are preliminary and subject

6

Wide Area Wind Field Monitoring Status & Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume-scanning elastic has been investigated as a means to derive 3D dynamic wind fields for characterization and monitoring of wind energy sites. An eye-safe volume-scanning lidar system was adapted for volume imaging of aerosol concentrations out to a range of 300m. Reformatting of the lidar data as dynamic volume images was successfully demonstrated. A practical method for deriving 3D wind fields from dynamic volume imagery was identified and demonstrated. However, the natural phenomenology was found to provide insufficient aerosol features for reliable wind sensing. The results of this study may be applicable to wind field measurement using injected aerosol tracers.

Alan Marchant; Jed Simmons

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wind Program: Program Plans, Implementation, and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Program Wind Program HOME ABOUT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT DEPLOYMENT FINANCIAL OPPORTUNITIES INFORMATION RESOURCES NEWS EVENTS EERE » Wind Program » About Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Budget Contacts Plans, Implementation, and Results Here you'll find an overview of the Wind Program and links to its program planning, implementation, and results documents. This list summarizes the program's wind power research, development, and demonstration activities. Read more about: Overview Learn more about this EERE Office. Plans Discover the plans, budgets, and analyses that set the direction of office priorities and activities. Implementation Find out how the office controls, implements, and adjusts its plans and manages its activities. Results Learn about the technological, commercial, and other outputs and outcomes

8

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For Residential Wind Systems USDA Farm Bill Grant TheA-20. Taxable USDA Farm Grant (BTC & SP, Wind Classes 2-A-21. Tax-Exempt USDA Farm Grant (BTC & SP, Wind Classes 2-

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Reasoning on temporal class diagrams: Undecidability results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a temporal class diagram language useful to model temporal varying data. The atemporal portion of the language contains the core constructors available in both EER diagrams and UML class diagrams. The temporal part of the language ... Keywords: computer science, database theory, description logics, knowledge representation, temporal data models, temporal logics

Alessandro Artale

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fast Verification of Wind Turbine Power Summary of Project Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a wind turbine's design phase, the power curve can be predicted using analytical techniques such as Blade using a single cup anemometer at the wind turbine's hub height and it is assumed that this measurementFast Verification of Wind Turbine Power Curves: Summary of Project Results by: Cameron Brown ­ s

11

Wind Class Sampling of Satellite SAR Imagery for Offshore Wind Resource Mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution wind fields retrieved from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery are combined for mapping of wind resources offshore where site measurements are costly and sparse. A new sampling strategy for the SAR scenes is ...

Merete Badger; Jake Badger; Morten Nielsen; Charlotte Bay Hasager; Alfredo Pea

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

NREL: Energy Analysis - Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Wind LCA Harmonization (Fact Sheet) Cover of the LWind LCA Harmonization Fact Sheet Download the Fact Sheet Wind Power Results - Life Cycle Assessment Harmonization To better understand the state of knowledge of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale wind power systems, NREL developed and applied a systematic approach to review life cycle assessment literature, identify sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a meta-analytical process called "harmonization." Over the last 30 years, several hundred life cycle assessments have been conducted for wind power technologies with wide-ranging results. Harmonization for onshore and offshore wind power systems was performed by adjusting published greenhouse gas estimates to achieve:

13

Statistical Wind Power Forecasting Models: Results for U.S. Wind Farms; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are evolving. Accurate wind power forecasts are beneficial for wind plant operators, utility operators, and utility customers. An accurate forecast makes it possible for grid operators to schedule the economically efficient generation to meet the demand of electrical customers. In the evolving markets, some form of auction is held for various forward markets, such as hour ahead or day ahead. This paper develops several statistical forecasting models that can be useful in hour-ahead markets that have a similar tariff. Although longer-term forecasting relies on numerical weather models, the statistical models used here focus on the short-term forecasts that can be useful in the hour-ahead markets. We investigate the extent to which time-series analysis can improve on simplistic persistence forecasts. This project applied a class of models known as autoregressive moving average (ARMA) models to both wind speed and wind power output.

Milligan, M.; Schwartz, M.; Wan, Y.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Wind Resources By Class Per Country At 50m | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

42 42 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142279642 Varnish cache server Wind Resources By Class Per Country At 50m Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from a composite of high resolution wind resource datasets modeled for specific countries with low resolution data originating from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (United States) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States) as processed for use in the IMAGE model. The high resolution datasets were produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States), Risø DTU National Laboratory (Denmark), the National Institute for Space Research (Brazil), and the Canadian Wind Energy Association. The data represents wind power class intervals 3 through 7 at 50 m height above ground. Wind class is derived from the capacity factor obtained from the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 Table B-10. The range was created from years 2005 and 2010.

15

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind for Schools Pilot Project Results  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Pilot Project Results Pilot Project Results In 2006, the Wind Powering America team based at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched a pilot project in Colorado to develop the Wind for Schools project model. The pilot project identified the key elements of a successful Wind for Schools project. This page summarizes these elements. Although the Wind for Schools project ended on September 30, 2013, these lessons learned can be helpful for others planning school turbine installations. Identify a Champion A project cannot succeed without a local project champion, an individual, or group to keep the key players in the community informed, cooperating, and moving toward project goals. During the Colorado pilot project, the Wind Powering America team learned that the project development stages of

16

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wind energy system is 0 percent of cost for year oneWind Energy Association Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory break-even turnkey costLCOE for Wind Classes 2-4 Levelized Cost of Energy ($/kWh)

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Comparative Assessment of Direct Drive High Temperature Superconducting Generators in Multi-Megawatt Class Wind Turbines  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes. Based on the cost and performance data supplied by AMSC, HTSDD technology has good potential to compete successfully as an alternative technology to PMDD and geared technology turbines in the multi megawatt classes. In addition, data suggests the economics of HTSDD turbines improve with increasing size, although several uncertainties remain for all machines in the 6 to 10 MW class.

Maples, B.; Hand, M.; Musial, W.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Conductor Wind Loading--Results of EPRI Field Validation Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive evaluation of current wind load methods indicates that several factors can adversely affect the performance of wind load models. There are wide variations and biased values associated with some of the wind parameters, and inaccurate drag coefficient and air density values can influence the wind load models. Several modified approaches were tested to properly incorporate wind gusts and spatial effects in wind load calculations. The improvement in the wind load predictions made by some of t...

1995-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for small wind systems in the United States, often defined as systems less than or equal to 100 kW that produce power on the customer side of the meter, is small but growing steadily. The installed capacity of domestic small wind systems in 2002 was reportedly 15-18 MW, though the market is estimated to be growing by as much as 40 percent annually (AWEA, 2002). This growth is driven in part by recent technology advancements and cost improvements and, perhaps more importantly, by favorable policy incentives targeted at small wind systems that are offered in several states. Currently, over half of all states have incentive policies for which residential small wind installations are eligible. These incentives range from low-interest loan programs and various forms of tax advantages to cash rebates that cover as much as 60 percent of the total system cost for turbines 10 kW or smaller installed in residential applications. Most of these incentives were developed to support a ran ge of emerging renewable technologies (most notably photovoltaic systems), and were therefore not specifically designed with small wind systems in mind. As such, the question remains as to which incentive types provide the greatest benefit to small wind systems, and how states might appropriately set the level and type of incentives in the future. Furthermore, given differences in incentive types and levels across states, as well as variations in retail electricity rates and other relevant factors, it is not immediately obvious which states offer the most promising markets for small wind turbine manufacturers and installers, as well as potential residential system owners. This paper presents results from a Berkeley Lab analysis of the impact of existing and proposed state and federal incentives on the economics of grid-connected, residential small wind systems. Berkeley Lab has designed the Small Wind Analysis Tool (SWAT) to compare system economics under current incentive structures a cross all 50 states. SWAT reports three metrics to characterize residential wind economics in each state and wind resource class: (1) Break-Even Turnkey Cost (BTC): The BTC is defined as the aggregate installed system cost that would balance total customer payments and revenue over the life of the system, allowing the customer to ''break-even'' while earning a specified rate of return on the small wind ''investment.'' (2) Simple Payback (SP): The SP is the number of years it takes a customer to recoup a cash payment for a wind system and all associated costs, assuming zero discount on future revenue and payments (i.e., ignoring the time value of money). (3) Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE): The LCOE is the levelized cost of generating a kWh of electricity over the lifetime of the system, and is calculated assuming a cash purchase for the small wind system and a 5.5 percent real discount rate. This paper presents SWAT results for a 10 kW wind turbine and turbine power production is based on a Bergey Excel system. These results are not directly applicable to turbines with different power curves and rated outputs, especially given the fact that many state incentives are set as a fixed dollar amount, and the dollar per Watt amount will vary based on the total rated turbine capacity.

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Low Wind Speed Technologies Annual Turbine Technology Update (ATTU) Process for Land-Based, Utility-Class Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The Low Wind Speed Technologies (LWST) Project comprises a diverse, balanced portfolio of industry-government partnerships structured to achieve ambitious cost of energy reductions. The LWST Project goal is: ''By 2012, reduce the cost of energy (COE) for large wind systems in Class 4 winds (average wind speed of 5.8 m/s at 10 m height) to 3 cents/kWh (in levelized 2002 dollars) for onshore systems.'' The Annual Turbine Technology Update (ATTU) has been developed to quantify performance-based progress toward these goals, in response to OMB reporting requirements and to meet internal DOE program needs for advisory data.

Schreck, S.; Laxson, A.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

NREL: Wind Research - Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT10 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Ventera's VT10 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The VT10 is a horizontal-axis downwind, three-bladed turbine rated at 10 kilowatts (kW). Its diameter is 6.7 meters, and it is mounted on a lattice tower with a hub height of 21.7 meters. The VT10 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, permanent-magnet generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/22/2010: 0; 3/29/2010: 26; 3/31/2010: 74; 4/1/2010: 75; 4/2/2010: 174;

23

Offshore Wind Farm Layout Optimization (OWFLO) Project: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

literature to date has focused on land-based wind farms, rather than on offshore farms. Typically, energy wind energy. The project combines an energy production model--taking into account wake effects the cost of energy while maximizing the energy production of the wind farm. Particular attention has been

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

24

Wind Resources By Class Per Country At 50m

These estimates...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AssumptionsUsedforWindDeploymentSystemModel.pdf" title"20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030 table B-10" target"" style"text-decoration: none; color: rgb(41, 115, 152);">20% Wind...

25

Wind Plant Capacity Credit Variations: A Comparison of Results Using Multiyear Actual and Simulated Wind-Speed Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although it is widely recognized that variations in annual wind energy capture can be significant, it is not clear how significant this effect is on accurately calculating the capacity credit of a wind plant. An important question is raised concerning whether one year of wind data is representative of long-term patterns. This paper calculates the range of capacity credit measures based on 13 years of actual wind-speed data. The results are compared to those obtained with synthetic data sets that are based on one year of data. Although the use of synthetic data sets is a considerable improvement over single-estimate techniques, this paper finds that the actual inter- annual variation in capacity credit is still understated by the synthetic data technique.

Milligan, Michael

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Effect of Blade Torsion on Modeling Results for the Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT): Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes modeling results from both the FAST and ADAMS aeroelastic simulators characterizing small wind turbine loads and dynamic behavior.

Corbus, D.; Hansen, A. C.; Minnema, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Task 23: Phase IV Results Regarding Floating Wind Turbine Modeling; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 23. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating spar buoy in 320 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants' codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

Jonkman, J.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Nygaard, T.; Maus, K.; Karimirad, M.; Gao, Z.; Moan, T.; Fylling, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Economic Evaluation of Short-Term Wind Power Forecasts in ERCOT: Preliminary Results; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically, a number of wind energy integration studies have investigated the value of using day-ahead wind power forecasts for grid operational decisions. These studies have shown that there could be large cost savings gained by grid operators implementing the forecasts in their system operations. To date, none of these studies have investigated the value of shorter-term (0 to 6-hour-ahead) wind power forecasts. In 2010, the Department of Energy and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration partnered to fund improvements in short-term wind forecasts and to determine the economic value of these improvements to grid operators, hereafter referred to as the Wind Forecasting Improvement Project (WFIP). In this work, we discuss the preliminary results of the economic benefit analysis portion of the WFIP for the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. The improvements seen in the wind forecasts are examined, then the economic results of a production cost model simulation are analyzed.

Orwig, K.; Hodge, B. M.; Brinkman, G.; Ela, E.; Milligan, M.; Banunarayanan, V.; Nasir, S.; Freedman, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

American Wind Energy Association, Denver, May 2005 Uncertainties in Results of Measure-Correlate-Predict Analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

American Wind Energy Association, Denver, May 2005 Uncertainties in Results of Measure Wind Energy Association, Denver, May 2005 Statistical models are then investigated that estimate-Correlate-Predict Analyses Anthony L. Rogers, Ph. D.* John W. Rogers, M.S.** James F. Manwell, Ph. D.* *Renewable Energy

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

31

Large-Scale Wind Integration Studies in the United States: Preliminary Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy, is managing two large-scale wind integration studies. The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS) covers the footprint of WestConnect, a group of transmission owners that covers most of Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona, Nevada, and Wyoming. The Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) covers a large part of the Eastern Interconnection, and leverages a large-scale transmission study known as the Joint Coordinated System Plan (JCSP). Both studies analyze the impact of 20-30% wind energy penetration within the study footprint based on energy. This paper discusses key results that have emerged so far from each study, focusing primarily on simulation results based on hourly production simulations. Results from both studies show that high wind penetrations can be successfully integrated into the power system, but depend on sufficient transmission and significant changes in operations.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Zavadil, B.; Schuerger, M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Stress and Fracture Analysis of a Class of Bonded Joints in Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified model is proposed to investigate the stress fields and the strain energy release rate (SERR) associated with cracks in bonded joints in wind turbine blades. The proposed two-dimensional model consists of nonparallel upper and lower shells with adhesive between the shells at the tapered end. Nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA) is performed in a systematic parametric study of material and geo- metric properties. Two failure modes and their locations are predicted at different combinations of parameters: yielding at the outside end of the adhesive and interface cracking at the inside end of the bondline. Effect of the shell curvature on the stress fields is also considered. Based on the classic beam theory and the beam-on-elastic-foundation (BOEF) assumption, stress and displacement fields of the adhesively-bonded joint were determined by a new theoretical model to support the results from the numerical computation. The failure analysis is continued by studying the effects of manufacturing defects in the adhesive bond. Single and multiple voids are embedded to simulate air bubble trapped in the interface. The numerical and analytical studies are conducted to investigate SERR associated with the voids and results are provided to illustrate the effects of void position and void size.

Chen, Chang

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Recent results from data analysis of dynamic stall on wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are subjected to dynamic loading from a variety of different sources. Wind shear and turbulence cause time-varying inflow that results in unsteady airloads. Tower shadow, upwind turbine wakes, and yaw angles also introduce unsteady inflow to wind turbine rotors. Wind turbine designers must predict these loads accurately in order to adequately design blades, hubs, and the remaining support structure to achieve a 30-year life. Structural analysts have not been able to predict mean or dynamic loads accurately enough to predict the fatigue life of major wind turbine components with confidence. Part of the problem is due to uncertainty in the stochastic wind environments as mentioned earlier. Another important part of the problem is the lack of basic knowledge of rotary wing airfoil stall performance. There is mounting evidence that dynamic stall may be related to dynamic loads that are greater than predictions. This paper describes some results of investigations of unsteady aerodynamic loads measured on a wind turbine blade. The objective of the investigation is to understand the steady and unsteady stall behavior of wind turbine blades. 13 refs.

Butterfield, C.P.; Simms, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Huyer, S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Lab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The independent testing project was established at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion. Among these barriers is a lack of independent testing results for small turbines.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and analysis needs of the offshore wind community.

Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Doppler Aerosol Wind Lidar (DAWN) Airborne, Wind-Profiling, Coherent-Detection Lidar System: Overview and Preliminary Flight Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first airborne wind measurements of a pulsed, 2-micron solid-state, high-energy, wind-profiling lidar system for airborne measurements are presented. The laser pulse energy is the highest to date in an eyesafe airborne wind lidar system. This ...

Michael J. Kavaya; Jeffrey Y. Beyon; Grady J. Koch; Mulugeta Petros; Paul J. Petzar; Upendra N. Singh; Bo C. Trieu; Jirong Yu

37

NREL: Wind Research - Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results Viryd Technologies' CS8 Turbine Testing and Results Viryd Technologies CS8 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Viryd Technologies' CS8 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The CS8 is an upwind, horizontal-axis, three-bladed, stall controlled turbine rated at 8 kilowatts (kW). It has an 8.5-meter rotor diameter and is mounted on a guyed tilt-up lattice tower with a hub height of 24.9 meters. The CS8 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, induction generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data included in this table are provided in the final reports.

38

Research results for the Tornado Wind-Energy system: analysis and conclusions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tornado Wind Energy System (TWES) concept utilizes a wind driven vortex confined by a hollow tower to create a low pressure core intended to serve as a turbine exhaust reservoir. The turbine inlet flow is provided by a separate ram air supply. Numerous experimental and analytical research efforts have investigated the potential of the TWES as a wind energy conversion system (WECS). The present paper summarizes and analyzes much of theresearch to date on the TWES. A simplified cost analysis incorporating these research results is also included. Based on these analyses, the TWES does not show significant promise of improving on either the performance or the cost of energy attainable by conventional WECS. The prospects for achieving either a system power coefficient above 0.20 or a cost of energy less than $0.50/kWh (1979 dollars) appear to be poor.

Jacobs, E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems, Results of IEA Collaboration  

SciTech Connect

There are a multitude of studies completed and ongoing related to the cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R and D Task 25 on 'Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power' produced a state-of-the-art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind-power grid integration studies were analyzed, especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.; Ela, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh from RisoeDTU Bangladesh from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Bangladesh. Version 2 is an updated version of the earlier release and includes an adjustment to Weibull A and k to bring the Atlas values into better agreement with observations. See supplemental information.The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The result is i. a wind resource map, a summary of the simulated wind climate, and ii. a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya from RisoeDTU Kenya from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Kenya. The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The results are a summary of the simulated wind climate, and ii. a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to estimate the wind resource potential in the country including the the spatial variability. This map covers regions where long term measurements are not available. In a sense this is the point of the

42

Low Wind Speed Turbine Project Phase II: The Application of Medium-Voltage Electrical Apparatus to the Class of Variable Speed Multi-Megawatt Low Wind Speed Turbines; 15 June 2004--30 April 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kilowatt ratings of modern wind turbines have progressed rapidly from 50 kW to 1,800 kW over the past 25 years, with 3.0- to 7.5-MW turbines expected in the next 5 years. The premise of this study is simple: The rapid growth of wind turbine power ratings and the corresponding growth in turbine electrical generation systems and associated controls are quickly making low-voltage (LV) electrical design approaches cost-ineffective. This report provides design detail and compares the cost of energy (COE) between commercial LV-class wind power machines and emerging medium-voltage (MV)-class multi-megawatt wind technology. The key finding is that a 2.5% reduction in the COE can be achieved by moving from LV to MV systems. This is a conservative estimate, with a 3% to 3.5% reduction believed to be attainable once purchase orders to support a 250-turbine/year production level are placed. This evaluation considers capital costs as well as installation, maintenance, and training requirements for wind turbine maintenance personnel. Subsystems investigated include the generator, pendant cables, variable-speed converter, and padmount transformer with switchgear. Both current-source and voltage-source converter/inverter MV topologies are compared against their low-voltage, voltage-source counterparts at the 3.0-, 5.0-, and 7.5-MW levels.

Erdman, W.; Behnke, M.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Wind resource characterization results to support the Sandia Wind Farm Feasibility Study : August 2008 through March 2009.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories Wind Technology Department is investigating the feasibility of using local wind resources to meet the requirements of Executive Order 13423 and DOE Order 430.2B. These Orders, along with the DOE TEAM initiative, identify the use of on-site renewable energy projects to meet specified renewable energy goals over the next 3 to 5 years. A temporary 30-meter meteorological tower was used to perform interim monitoring while the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process for the larger Wind Feasibility Project ensued. This report presents the analysis of the data collected from the 30-meter meteorological tower.

Deola, Regina Anne

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Small Wind Turbine Testing Results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) began testing small wind turbines (SWTs) through the Independent Testing project. Using competitive solicitation, five SWTs were selected for testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). NREL's NWTC is accredited by the American Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) to conduct duration, power performance, safety and function, power quality, and noise tests to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards. Results of the tests conducted on each of the SWTs are or will be available to the public on the NREL website. The results could be used by their manufacturers in the certification of the turbines or state agencies to decide which turbines are eligible for state incentives.

Bowen, A.; Huskey, A.; Link, H.; Sinclair, K.; Forsyth, T.; Jager, D.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Wind Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry http://energy.gov/eere/articles/two-facilities-one-goal-advancing-america-s-wind-industry wind-industry" class="title-link">Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry

46

A World-Class University-Industry Consortium for Wind Energy Research, Education, and Workforce Development: Final Technical Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the two-year project period, the consortium members have developed control algorithms for enhancing the reliability of wind turbine components. The consortium members have developed advanced operation and planning tools for accommodating the high penetration of variable wind energy. The consortium members have developed extensive education and research programs for educating the stakeholders on critical issues related to the wind energy research and development. In summary, The Consortium procured one utility-grade wind unit and two small wind units. Specifically, the Consortium procured a 1.5MW GE wind unit by working with the world leading wind energy developer, Invenergy, which is headquartered in Chicago, in September 2010. The Consortium also installed advanced instrumentation on the turbine and performed relevant turbine reliability studies. The site for the wind unit is Invenergy???????¢????????????????s Grand Ridge wind farmin Illinois. The Consortium, by working with Viryd Technologies, installed an 8kW Viryd wind unit (the Lab Unit) at an engineering lab at IIT in September 2010 and an 8kW Viryd wind unit (the Field Unit) at the Stuart Field on IIT???????¢????????????????s main campus in July 2011, and performed relevant turbine reliability studies. The operation of the Field Unit is also monitored by the Phasor Measurement Unit (PMU) in the nearby Stuart Building. The Consortium commemorated the installations at the July 20, 2011 ribbon-cutting ceremony. The Consortium???????¢????????????????s researches on turbine reliability included (1) Predictive Analytics to Improve Wind Turbine Reliability; (2) Improve Wind Turbine Power Output and Reduce Dynamic Stress Loading Through Advanced Wind Sensing Technology; (3) Use High Magnetic Density Turbine Generator as Non-rare Earth Power Dense Alternative; (4) Survivable Operation of Three Phase AC Drives in Wind Generator Systems; (5) Localization of Wind Turbine Noise Sources Using a Compact Microphone Array; (6) Wind Turbine Acoustics - Numerical Studies; and (7) Performance of Wind Turbines in Rainy Conditions. The Consortium???????¢????????????????s researches on wind integration included (1) Analysis of 2030 Large-Scale Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern Interconnection; (2) Large-scale Analysis of 2018 Wind Energy Integration in the Eastern U.S. Interconnection; (3) Integration of Non-dispatchable Resources in Electricity Markets; (4) Integration of Wind Unit with Microgrid. The Consortium???????¢????????????????s education and outreach activities on wind energy included (1) Wind Energy Training Facility Development; (2) Wind Energy Course Development; (3) Wind Energy Outreach.

Shahidehpour, Mohammad

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

A UHF Wind Profiler for the Boundary Layer: Brief Description and Initial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a boundary layer radar recently developed at NOAA's Aeronomy Laboratory. This radar extends wind profiler technology by using a small, relatively inexpensive radar to provide continuous, high-resolution wind measurements ...

W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; B. B. Balsley

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Evaluation of Advanced Wind Power Forecasting Models Results of the Anemos Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity of 33.09 MW distributed on 49 Gamesa G47-660 wind turbines and one Lagerwey LW750 turbine. The RIX (digital terrain maps with elevation and roughness, wind farm layout, wind turbine power and thrust curves of the Baltic Sea. The wind farm consists of 2 Nordtank NTK500/41 turbines with a total rated capacity of 1.0 MW

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

49

Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems; Results of IEA Collaboration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

Ela, E.; Parsons, B.; Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

DOE passive-solar Class A performance-evaluation program: preliminary results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objective of the DOE Passive Solar Class A Performance Evaluation Program is to collect, analyze, and archive detailed test data for the rigorous validation of analysis/design tools used for passive solar research and design. Elements of the plan for Class A validation are described. A proposed validation methodology, including both analytical and empirical tests, a quantitative definition of validation, minimum data requirements, and a standard reporting format, is outlined. The preliminary testing of this methodology using hourly data from two Class A test facilities is presented. Finally, the collection, analysis, and documentation of preliminary data sets is discussed.

Hunn, B.D.; Turk, W.V.; Wray, W.O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

10MW Class Direct Drive HTS Wind Turbine: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00312  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the work completed under the CRADA between NREL and American Superconductor (AMSC). The CRADA combined NREL and AMSC resources to benchmark high temperature superconducting direct drive (HTSDD) generator technology by integrating the technologies into a conceptual wind turbine design, and comparing the design to geared drive and permanent magnet direct drive (PMDD) wind turbine configurations. Analysis was accomplished by upgrading the NREL Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model to represent geared and PMDD turbines at machine ratings up to 10 MW and then comparing cost and mass figures of AMSC's HTSDD wind turbine designs to theoretical geared and PMDD turbine designs at 3.1, 6, and 10 MW sizes.

Musial, W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Integrating High Penetrations of Solar in the Western United States: Results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2 (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This poster presents a summary of the results of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study Phase 2.

Bird, L.; Lew, D.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4), Phase I - Results of Coupled Simulations of an Offshore Wind Turbine with Jacket Support Structure: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the IEA Wind Task 30, Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation Project - Phase 1.

Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Zuga, A.; Kohlmeier, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Larsen, T. J.; Yde, A.; Saetertro, K.; Okstad, K. M.; Nichols, J.; Nygaard, T. A.; Gao, Z.; Manolas, D.; Kim, K.; Yu, Q.; Shi, W.; Park, H.; Vasquez-Rojas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Comparison of Mean Wind Speeds and Turbulence at a Coastal Site and Offshore Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of mean wind speed and longitudinal turbulence at a height of 8 m over the Atlantic ocean, 5 km off Long Island, New York, were compared with simultaneous observations at the beach. Results were grouped into wind direction classes ...

S. SethuRaman; G. S. Raynor

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Regional Field Verification Project--Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

A poster describing two years of operating data for four Bergey, 10-kW wind turbines on different host sites in the Pacific Northwest.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind system. The incentive amount proposed as part of the 2004 Energy Policywind system. The incentive amount proposed as part of the 2004 Energy Policy

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state retail electricity rates, state sales and property taxWind Systems state electricity rates, which increase thethe average state retail electricity rate, meaning that

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and statewide average residential electricity rates below $Average statewide residential electricity rates were takenFor Residential Wind Systems state electricity rates, which

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Evaluation of the Results of Several Full-Scale Conductor Wind Loading Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1991, EPRI's Transmission Line Mechanical Research Center (TLMRC) conducted an experiment that instrumented a transmission tower and two spans of conductors. The instrumentation collected the wind data in a form that could be processed using some of the data reduction methods adopted in previous wind loading experiments conducted by Ontario Hydro, Bonneville Power Administration, and Hydro Quebec.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rotationally sampled wind characteristics and correlations with MOD-OA wind turbine response  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of a comprehensive wind and wind turbine measurement program: the Clayton, New Mexico, vertical plane array/MOD-OA project. In this experiment, the turbulent wind was measured for a large array of fixed anemometers located two blade diameters upwind of a 200-kW horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). Simultaneously, key wind turbine response parameters were also measured. The first of two major objectives of this experiment was to determine the turbulent wind, rotationally sampled to emulate the motion of the wind turbine blade, for the range of different wind speeds and stability classes actually experienced by the wind turbine. The second major objective was to correlate this rotationally sampled wind with the wind turbine blade stress and power, in order to assess the usefulness of the wind measurements for wind turbine loads testing a prediction. Time series of rotationally sampled winds and wind turbine blade bending moments and power were converted to frequency spectra using Fourier transform techniques. These spectra were used as the basis for both qualitative and quantitative comparisons among the various cases. A quantitative comparison between the rotationally sampled wind input and blade bending response was made, using the Fourier spectra to estimate the blade transfer function. These transfer functions were then used to calculate an approximate damping coefficient for the MOD-OA fiberglass blade.

George, R.L.; Connell, J.R.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Regional Field Verification -- Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes four small wind turbines installed in the Pacific Northwest under DOE/NREL's Regional Field Verification Program between 2003 and 2004 and summarizes operational data from each site.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a total annual cost (National Renewable Energy Laboratory,credit levelized cost of energy National Renewable EnergyRenewable Energy Resources Program Grants. g The valuation of the wind energy system is 0 percent of cost

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Simplified Active Array L-Band Radar for Atmospheric Wind Profiling: Initial Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple approach is presented to implement an active aperture radar with a constrained beam-forming network that is adequate enough to generate multiple beams for atmospheric wind profiling. In this approach, elements of the antenna array are fed ...

P. Srinivasulu; P. Yasodha; A. Jayaraman; S. N. Reddy; S. Satyanarayana

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase II Results Regarding Monopile Foundation Modeling  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview and describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, which operates under Subtask 2 of the International Energy Agency Wind Annex XXIII.

Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Passon, P.; Larsen, T.; Camp, T.; Nichols, J.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Large-Scale Wind Integration Studies in the United States: Preliminary Results; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is managing two large regional wind integration studies on behalf of the United States Department of Energy. These two studies are believed to be the largest ever undertaken in the United States.

Milligan, M.; Lew, D.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Zavadil, B.; Schuerger, M.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Regional Field Verification - Operational Results from Four Small Wind Turbines in the Pacific Northwest  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (DOE/NREL) Regional Field Verification (RFV) project is to support industry needs for gaining initial field operation experience with small wind turbines and to verify the performance, reliability, maintainability, and cost of small wind turbines in diverse applications. In addition, RFV aims to help expand opportunities for wind energy in new regions of the United States by tailoring projects to meet unique regional requirements, and document and communicate the experience from these projects for the benefit of others in the wind power development community and rural utilities. Under RFV, Bergey Excel S (10kW) wind turbines were installed at sites in the Pacific Northwest as part of Northwest Sustainable Energy for Economic Development's (NWSEED) Our Wind Cooperative. Each installation was instrumented with data acquisition systems to collect a minimum of two years of operating data. The four turbines highlighted in this paper were installed between 2003 and 2004. At least two years of operational data have been collected from each of these sites by Northwest SEED. This paper describes DOE/NREL's RFV project and summarizes operational data from these sites.

Sinclair, K.; Raker, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

NREL: Wind Research - Site Wind Resource Characteristics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Wind Resource Characteristics Site Wind Resource Characteristics A graphic showing the location of National Wind Technology Center and its wind power class 2. Click on the image to view a larger version. Enlarge image This graphic shows the wind power class at the National Wind Technology Center. You can download a printable copy. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is on the Great Plains just miles from the Rocky Mountains. The site is flat and covered with short grasses. The terrain and lack of obstructions make the site highly suitable for testing wind turbines. Take a tour of the NWTC and its facilities to better understand its location and layout. Another prime feature of the NWTC is the strong directionality of the wind - most of the strong winds come within a few degrees of 285°. West of

69

Wind energy manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Objectives: The course introduces principles of wind power production, design of wind turbines, location and design of wind farms, control of turbines and wind farms, predictive modeling, diagnostics, operations and maintenance, condition monitoring, health monitoring and of turbine components and systems, wind farm performance optimization, and integration of wind power with a grid. The modeling and analysis aspect of the topics discussed in the class will be illustrated with examples and case studies. Textbook: References:

A. Vieira; Da Rosa; Fundamentals Renewable; Energy Processes; San Diego; Jacob Kirpes; Small Wind

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethiopia from RisoeDTU Ethiopia from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Ethiopia. The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The results are a summary of the simulated wind climate, and ii.a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to estimate the wind resource potential in the country including the spatial variability. This map covers regions where long term measurements are not available. In a sense this is the point of the mapping exercise, but it also means that verification of results has not been as complete would be ideal. There is some concern that the results may underestimate the resource. However, new measurement data is coming and revisions to the map may be made if necessary as verification is carried out.

71

Wind News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters http://energy.gov/eere/articles/new-report-shows-trend-toward-larger-offshore-wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects" class="title-link">New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters

72

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Project Development Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Project Development Updates A 2.3 megawatt Siemens wind turbine nacelle on route to the Record Hill Wind project in Roxbury, Maine. January 14, 2013 As a result of the...

73

Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNCs technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clarks Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clarks Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

Vaught, Douglas J.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from the KAMMWASP studies for Kenya.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for...

76

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Nepal.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of windclasses to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using...

77

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the KAMMWASP studies for Ethiopia.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for...

78

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

See supplemental information.

The KAMMWAsP methodology uses a set of wind classes to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for...

79

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the relationship between wind power class and cost is showncosts associated with wind power. The cost implications ofprice electricity, wind power directly reduces exposure to

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

28 Figure 17. BTC Results for Net Metering Electricity Loss69 Table A-14. Net Metering with 10%, 20%, and 30% ExcessSP) 70 Table A-15. Net Metering with 10%, 20%, and

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Evaluating state markets for residential wind systems: Results from an economic and policy analysis tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

28 Figure 17. BTC Results for Net Metering Electricity Loss69 Table A-14. Net Metering with 10%, 20%, and 30% Excess70 Table A-15. Net Metering with 10%, 20%, and 30% Excess

Edwards, Jennifer L.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Forsyth, Trudy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis and test results for a two-bladed, passive cycle pitch, horizontal-axis wind turbine in free and controlled yaw  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the analysis and tests performed at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on a horizontal-axis, two-laded wind turbine with teeter hub. The introduction is a brief account of results obtained during the 5-year period ending December 1985. The wind tunnel model and the test turbine (7.6 m [25 ft.] in diameter) at Washington University`s Tyson Research Center had a 67{degree} delta-three angle of the teeter axis. The introduction explains why this configuration was selected and named the passive cycle pitch (PCP) wind turbine. Through the analysis was not limited to the PCP rotor, all tests, including those done from 1986 to 1994, wee conducted with the same teetered wind rotor. The blades are rather stiff and have only a small elastic coning angle and no precone.

Holenemser, K.H. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

OpenEI - wind speed  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL GIS Data: Global NREL GIS Data: Global Offshore Wind http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/869 GIS data for offshore wind speed (meters/second).  Specified to Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ).Wind resource based on NOAA blended sea winds and monthly wind speed at 30km resolution, using a 0.11 wind sheer to extrapolate 10m - 90m.  Annual average  >= 10 months of data, no nulls. License

class="field field-type-text field-field-license-type">
class="field-label">Type of License:  Other (please specify below)

84

OpenEI Community - Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind for Schools Wind for Schools Portal http://en.openei.org/community/group/wind-schools-portal

class="form-item"> Description: Project to inspire students in the United States by educating and installing wind turbines. Wind Wind for Schools Portal Mon, 23 Sep 2013 20:01:10 +0000 Rmckeel 751 at http://en.openei.org/community Renewable Energy RFPs http://en.openei.org/community/group/renewable-energy-rfps
class="form-item"> Description: Find renewable energy financial opportunities. We post solicitations for renewable energy generation, renewable energy certificates, and green power as a courtesy to our web site visitors. Unless otherwise noted, these requests

85

A Technique for Estimating Recurrence Intervals of Tropical Cyclone-Related High Winds in the Tropics: Results for Guam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors develop a technique that applies models of the radial profile of the wind in tropical cyclones to historical best-track databases of tropical cyclones, in order to estimate the wind (at 1-h intervals) experienced at any selected ...

John A. Rupp; Mark A. Lander

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 50m above ground and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal from RisoeDTU Nepal from RisoeDTU Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): These data are results from the KAMM/WASP studies for Nepal. The KAMM/WAsP methodology uses a set of windclasses to represent wind conditions for the mapped region. A mesoscale simulation for each wind class, using KAMM (Karlsruhe Mesoscale Model), is performed and statistics performed on the model output. The results are a summary of the simulated wind climate, and a wind atlas, a summary of the wind climate standardized to flat, uniform roughness terrain. (Purpose): The product is intended to be used to estimate the wind resource potential in the country including the the spatial variability. This map covers regions where long term measurements are not available. In a sense this is the point of the mapping exercise, but it also means that verification of results has not been as complete would be ideal. There is some concern that the results may underestimate the resource. However, new measurement data is coming and revisions to the map may be made if necessary as verification is carried out.

87

Low Wind Speed Turbine Developments in Convoloid Gearing: Final Technical Report, June 2005 - October 2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study conducted by Genesis Partners LP as part of the United States Department of Energy Wind Energy Research Program to develop wind technology that will enable wind systems to compete in regions having low wind speeds. The purpose of the program is to reduce the cost of electricity from large wind systems in areas having Class 4 winds to 3 cents per kWh for onshore systems or 5 cents per kWh for offshore systems. This work builds upon previous activities under the WindPACT project, the Next Generation Turbine project, and Phase I of the Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) project. This project is concerned with the development of more cost-effective gearing for speed increasers for wind turbines.

Genesis Partners LP

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Directional Wind-Wave Coupling in Fully Coupled Atmosphere-Wave-Ocean Models: Results from CBLAST-Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The Coupled Boundary Layer Air-Sea Transfer (...

Shuyi S. Chen; Wei Zhao; Mark A. Donelan; Hendrik L. Tolman

89

Directional WindWave Coupling in Fully Coupled AtmosphereWaveOcean Models: Results from CBLAST-Hurricane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme high winds, intense rainfall, large ocean waves, and copious sea spray in hurricanes push the surface-exchange parameters for temperature, water vapor, and momentum into untested regimes. The Coupled Boundary Layer AirSea Transfer (...

Shuyi S. Chen; Wei Zhao; Mark A. Donelan; Hendrik L. Tolman

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Observing Long-Period Fluctuations of Surface Winds in the Tropical Pacific: Initial Results from Island Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility of studying low-frequency surface weather phenomena with long time series of meteorological data from tropical Pacific islands is demonstrated. The wind stress changes associated with El Nio events in the period 195078 are examined ...

D. S. Luther; D. E. Harrison

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration within IEA Wind Annex XXIII: Phase III Results Regarding Tripod Support Structure Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation codes. This paper describes the findings of code-to-code verification activities of the IEA Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration.

Nichols, J.; Camp, T.; Jonkman, J.; Butterfield, S.; Larsen, T.; Hansen, A.; Azcona, J.; Martinez, A.; Munduate, X.; Vorpahl, F.; Kleinhansl, S.; Kohlmeier, M.; Kossel, T.; Boker, C.; Kaufer, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

North Wind 4-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Phase II (testing and fabrication) of a program funded by the US Department of Energy to design, fabricate, and test a cost-effective wind system in the 3 to 6 kW class. During Phase II, using the design developed during Phase I, a prototype 4 kW machine was fabricated and tested in Waitsfield, Vermont. Several problems were encountered and subsequently analyzed. Design modifications, including the use of a larger alternator, are described. Test performed by North Wind and by Rockwell International (which monitored the program) demonstrated the predicted performance characteristics and the validity of the North Wind design.

Lynch, J.; Coleman, C.; Mayer, D.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

TMCC WIND RESOURCE ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

North Dakota has an outstanding resource--providing more available wind for development than any other state. According to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) studies, North Dakota alone has enough energy from good wind areas, those of wind power Class 4 and higher, to supply 36% of the 1990 electricity consumption of the entire lower 48 states. At present, no more than a handful of wind turbines in the 60- to 100-kilowatt (kW) range are operating in the state. The first two utility-scale turbines were installed in North Dakota as part of a green pricing program, one in early 2002 and the second in July 2002. Both turbines are 900-kW wind turbines. Two more wind turbines are scheduled for installation by another utility later in 2002. Several reasons are evident for the lack of wind development. One primary reason is that North Dakota has more lignite coal than any other state. A number of relatively new minemouth power plants are operating in the state, resulting in an abundance of low-cost electricity. In 1998, North Dakota generated approximately 8.2 million megawatt-hours (MWh) of electricity, largely from coal-fired plants. Sales to North Dakota consumers totaled only 4.5 million MWh. In addition, the average retail cost of electricity in North Dakota was 5.7 cents per kWh in 1998. As a result of this surplus and the relatively low retail cost of service, North Dakota is a net exporter of electricity, selling approximately 50% to 60% of the electricity produced in North Dakota to markets outside the state. Keeping in mind that new electrical generation will be considered an export commodity to be sold outside the state, the transmission grid that serves to export electricity from North Dakota is at or close to its ability to serve new capacity. The markets for these resources are outside the state, and transmission access to the markets is a necessary condition for any large project. At the present time, technical assessments of the transmission network indicate that the ability to add and carry wind capacity outside of the state is limited. Identifying markets, securing long-term contracts, and obtaining a transmission path to export the power are all major steps that must be taken to develop new projects in North Dakota.

Turtle Mountain Community College

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

Wind Resource Map: Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Resource Map: Mexico Wind Resource Map: Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Wind Resource Map: Mexico Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.altestore.com/howto/Reference-Materials/Wind-Resource-Map-Mexico/a Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/wind-resource-map-mexico,http://clean Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This is on-shore wind resource map for rural power applications in Mexico. The map can be used to aid in appropriate siting of wind power installations. Please note that the wind speed classes are taken at 30 m (100 feet [ft]), instead of the usual 10 m (33 ft). Each wind power class should span two power densities. For example, Wind Power Class = 3

95

OpenEI - offshore wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

/0 en Offshore Wind Resource /0 en Offshore Wind Resource http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/921 Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by Country, Class, and Depth (quantities in GW)

class="fieldgroup group-license">License
96

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power Wind Powering America Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Wind Power Research Results in DOE Databases IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2, Energy Citations Database NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential, Energy Citations Database Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants, DOE Information Bridge 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind, ScienceCinema, multimedia Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the

97

Projected Impact of Federal Policies on U.S. Wind Market Potential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at 10 meters above ground) to Class 7 (>7.0 ms). WinDS, which also includes offshore wind resources, distinguishes between shallow offshore wind and deep offshore wind turbines....

98

United States areal wind resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States, in support of the US Department of Energy`s National Energy Strategy. These estimates were based on the wind resource data published in a national resource atlas. Estimates of the wind resource in this atlas are expressed in wind power classes ranging from class 1 to class 7, with each class representing a range of mean wind power density or equivalent mean speed at specified heights above the ground (Table 1) . Areas designatedclass 4 or greater are suitable for most wind turbine applications. Power class 3 areas are suitable for wind energy development using tall (50-m hub height) turbines. Class 2 areas are marginal and class 1 areas unsuitable for wind energy development. A map of the areal (percentage of land area) distribution of the wind resource digitized in grid cells (1/4{degrees} latitude by 1/3{degrees} longitude) shows that exposed areas with moderate to high wind resource (class 3 and greater) are dispersed throughout much of the contiguous United States.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

United States areal wind resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States, in support of the US Department of Energy's National Energy Strategy. These estimates were based on the wind resource data published in a national resource atlas. Estimates of the wind resource in this atlas are expressed in wind power classes ranging from class 1 to class 7, with each class representing a range of mean wind power density or equivalent mean speed at specified heights above the ground (Table 1) . Areas designatedclass 4 or greater are suitable for most wind turbine applications. Power class 3 areas are suitable for wind energy development using tall (50-m hub height) turbines. Class 2 areas are marginal and class 1 areas unsuitable for wind energy development. A map of the areal (percentage of land area) distribution of the wind resource digitized in grid cells (1/4[degrees] latitude by 1/3[degrees] longitude) shows that exposed areas with moderate to high wind resource (class 3 and greater) are dispersed throughout much of the contiguous United States.

Schwartz, M.N.; Elliott, D.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effects of Downscattering on the Continuum and Line Spectra in Powerful Wind Environment. Monte Carlo Simulations, Analytical Results and Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Paper by Titarchuk & Shrader the general formulation and results for photon reprocessing (downscattering) that included recoil and Comptonization effects due to divergence of the flow were presented. Here we show the Monte Carlo (MC) simulated continuum and line spectra. We also provide an analytical description of the simulated continuum spectra using the diffusion approximation. We have simulated the propagation of monochromatic and continuum photons in a bulk outflow from a compact object. Electron scattering of the photons within the expanding flow leads to a decrease of their energy which is of first order in V/c (where V is the outflow velocity). The downscattering effect of first order in V/c in the diverging flow is explained by semi-analytical calculations and confirmed by MC simulations. We conclude that redshifted lines and downscattering bumps are intrinsic properties of the powerful outflows for which Thomson optical depth is greater than one. We fitted our model line profiles to the observations using four free parameters, \\beta=V/c, optical depth of the wind \\tau, the wind temperature kT_e and the original line photon energy E_0. We show how the primary spectrum emitted close to the black hole is modified by reprocessing in the warm wind. In the framework of the our wind model the fluorescent iron line K_alpha is formed in the partly ionized wind as a result of illumination by central source continuum photons. The demonstrated application of our outflow model to the XMM observations of MCG 6-30-15, and to the ASCA observations of GRO J1655-40, points out a potential powerful spectral diagnostic for probes of the outflow-central object connection in Galactic and extragalactic BH sources.

Philippe Laurent; Lev Titarchuk

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wind Generation on Winnebago Tribal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Winnebago Wind Energy Study evaluated facility-scale, community-scale and commercial-scale wind development on Winnebago Tribal lands in northeastern Nebraska. The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska has been pursuing wind development in various forms for nearly ten years. Wind monitoring utilizing loaned met towers from NREL took place during two different periods. From April 2001 to April 2002, a 20-meter met tower monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas Casino on the far eastern edge of the Winnebago reservation in Iowa. In late 2006, a 50-meter tower was installed, and subsequently monitored wind data at the WinnaVegas site from late 2006 through late 2008. Significant challenges with the NREL wind monitoring equipment limited the availability of valid data, but based on the available data, average wind speeds between 13.6 14.3 miles were indicated, reflecting a 2+/3- wind class. Based on the anticipated cost of energy produced by a WinnaVegas wind turbine, and the utility policies and rates in place at this time, a WinnaVegas wind project did not appear to make economic sense. However, if substantial grant funding were available for energy equipment at the casino site, and if either Woodbury REC backup rates were lower, or NIPCO was willing to pay more for wind power, a WinnaVegas wind project could be feasible. With funding remaining in the DOE-funded project budget,a number of other possible wind project locations on the Winnebago reservation were considered. in early 2009, a NPPD-owned met tower was installed at a site identified in the study pursuant to a verbal agreement with NPPD which provided for power from any ultimately developed project on the Western Winnebago site to be sold to NPPD. Results from the first seven months of wind monitoring at the Western Winnebago site were as expected at just over 7 meters per second at 50-meter tower height, reflecting Class 4 wind speeds, adequate for commercial development. If wind data collected in the remaining months of the twelve-month collection period is consistent with that collected in the first seven months, the Western Winnebago site may present an interesting opportunity for Winnebago. Given the distance to nearby substations, and high cost of interconnection at higher voltage transmission lines, Winnebago would likely need to be part of a larger project in order to reduce power costs to more attractive levels. Another alternative would be to pursue grant funding for a portion of development or equipment costs, which would also help reduce the cost of power produced. The NREL tower from the WinnaVegas site was taken down in late 2008, re-instrumented and installation attempted on the Thunderway site south of the Winnebago community. Based on projected wind speeds, current equipment costs, and the projects proximity to substations for possible interconnection, a Thunderway community-scale wind project could also be feasible.

Multiple

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. The Engineering ... section. I. Extreme Winds: ... II. Wind Effects on Buildings. Database ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

103

: Class Combinator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Methods inherited from class java.util.AbstractList. iterator, listIterator, listIterator. Methods inherited from class java.lang.Object. ...

104

Wind powering America: Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind resources in the state of Vermont show great potential for wind energy development according to the wind resource assessment conducted by the state, its utilities, and NREL. This fact sheet provides a brief description of the resource assessment and a link to the resulting wind resource map produced by NREL. The fact sheet also provides a description of the state's net metering program, its financial incentives, and green power programs as well as a list of contacts for more information.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

105

Offshore Wind Resource Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Wind Resource Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by Country, Class, and Depth (quantities in GW)
2012-07-12T22:51:45Z 2012-07-13T20:49:20Z I am submitting data from...

106

NREL: Wind Research - Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and Results Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and Results A video of Gaia-Wind's 11-kW wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Gaia-Wind's 11-kilowatt (kW) small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Gaia-Wind's turbine is a three-phase induction generator that operates at 480 volts. The turbine's downwind rotor has a 13-meter diameter, and its tower is 18 meters tall. The two-bladed, oversized rotor is designed for low to moderate wind speeds. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is below with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 6/11/2008: 210; 6/13/2008: 528; 6/16/2008: 716; 6/18/2008: 731; 6/19/2008:

107

Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind Numerical Simulation of the Irish Wind Climate and Comparison with Wind Atlas Data Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): The wind climate of Ireland has been calculated using the Karlsruhe Atmospheric Mesoscale Model KAMM using the statistical-dynamical method. The large-scale climatology is represented by 65 classes of geostropic wind. From the frequency of the classes and the simulations the climatology of the surface wind is determined. The simulated winds are processed similar to observed data to obtain LIB-files for the Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program WAsP. Comparisons are made with mast observations which have been analyzed by WAsP. Sites with high wind power potential are well predicted. Stations with low power are over predicted. (Purpose): Article describing an example of a KAMM

108

A simple method to downscale daily wind statistics to hourly wind data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind is the principal driver in the wind erosion models. The hourly wind speed data were generally required for precisely wind erosion modeling. In this study, a simple method to generate hourly wind speed data from daily wind statistics (daily average and maximum wind speeds together or daily average wind speed only) was established. A typical windy location with 3285 days (9 years) measured hourly wind speed data were used to validate the downscaling method. The results showed that the overall agreement between observed and simulated cumulative wind speed probability distributions appears excellent, especially for the wind speeds greater than 5 m s-1 range (erosive wind speed). The results further revealed that the values of daily average erosive wind power density (AWPD) calculated from generated wind speeds fit the counterparts computed from measured wind speeds well with high models' efficiency (Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient). So that the hourly wind speed data can be predicted from daily average and maximu...

Guo, Zhongling

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Wind Fins: Novel Lower-Cost Wind Power System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project evaluated the technical feasibility of converting energy from the wind with a novel wind fin approach. This patent-pending technology has three major components: (1) a mast, (2) a vertical, hinged wind structure or fin, and (3) a power takeoff system. The wing structure responds to the wind with an oscillating motion, generating power. The overall project goal was to determine the basic technical feasibility of the wind fin technology. Specific objectives were the following: (1) to determine the wind energy-conversion performance of the wind fin and the degree to which its performance could be enhanced through basic design improvements; (2) to determine how best to design the wind fin system to survive extreme winds; (3) to determine the cost-effectiveness of the best wind fin designs compared to state-of-the-art wind turbines; and (4) to develop conclusions about the overall technical feasibility of the wind fin system. Project work involved extensive computer modeling, wind-tunnel testing with small models, and testing of bench-scale models in a wind tunnel and outdoors in the wind. This project determined that the wind fin approach is technically feasible and likely to be commercially viable. Project results suggest that this new technology has the potential to harvest wind energy at approximately half the system cost of wind turbines in the 10kW range. Overall, the project demonstrated that the wind fin technology has the potential to increase the economic viability of small wind-power generation. In addition, it has the potential to eliminate lethality to birds and bats, overcome public objections to the aesthetics of wind-power machines, and significantly expand wind-powers contribution to the national energy supply.

David C. Morris; Dr. Will D. Swearingen

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

EERE: Wind  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy funds R&D to develop wind energy. Learn about the DOE Wind Program, how to use wind energy and get financial incentives, and access...

111

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary since energy production depends non-linearly on wind speed (U ), and wind speed observa- tions for the assessment of future long-term wind supply A. M. R. Bakker1 , B. J. J. M. Van den Hurk1 and J. P. Coelingh2 1

Haak, Hein

112

Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study -- Preliminary Findings: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, the development of wind datasets, the transmission analysis, and the results of wind integration analysis for four scenarios.

Corbus, D.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, B.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Benefits of the IEA Wind Co-operation Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy is changing the generation mix 1. Wind energy development brings national benefits 2. IEA Wind activities support national programs by sharing information and joint research resultsWind energy is part of the global economy 1. Worldwide, new wind energy installations in 2010 represented an investment of 47.3 billion (65 billion USD) 2. More than 500,000 people are currently employed in the wind industry Source: GWEC1995

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

CgWind: A high-order accurate simulation tool for wind turbines and wind farms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CgWind is a high-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) tool designed to meet the modeling needs of wind turbine and wind park engineers. This tool combines several advanced computational technologies in order to model accurately the complex and dynamic nature of wind energy applications. The composite grid approach provides high-quality structured grids for the efficient implementation of high-order accurate discretizations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Composite grids also provide a natural mechanism for modeling bodies in relative motion and complex geometry. Advanced algorithms such as matrix-free multigrid, compact discretizations and approximate factorization will allow CgWind to perform highly resolved calculations efficiently on a wide class of computing resources. Also in development are nonlinear LES subgrid-scale models required to simulate the many interacting scales present in large wind turbine applications. This paper outlines our approach, the current status of CgWind and future development plans.

Chand, K K; Henshaw, W D; Lundquist, K A; Singer, M A

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

Avista 2003 Wind RFP Final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 2003 WIND RFP 7 2003 WIND RFP REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Wind Power Up To 50 MW Avista Corporation August 2003 Introduction Avista's 2003 Integrated Resource Plan ("IRP") includes wind within its acquisition strategy beginning in the 2008-10 timeframe. Based on this result, the IRP includes an action item for Avista to investigate wind integration issues. In support of an integration issues study, Avista is interested in purchasing up to 50 MW of nameplate wind capability over a term of between two and five years to gain operational experience with this innovative resource. Because the Company has identified a wind resource preference beginning in 2008, options for project

116

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Wind in Education | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Education in Education Jump to: navigation, search Photo from Remy Luerssen Pangle, NREL 18543 U.S. Department of Energy's Wind for Schools Project Launched in 2005, Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project supported Wind Application Centers at higher education institutions in 11 states. Students assisted in the assessment, design, and installation of small wind systems at host k-12 schools, acting as wind energy consultants. Students also participated in class work and other engineering projects in the wind energy field, preparing them to enter the wind workforce once they graduate. Teacher training and hands-on curricula were implemented at each host school to bring the wind turbine into the classroom through interactive and inter-school wind-related research tasks.[1] Project

118

Statistical Wind Power Forecasting for U.S. Wind Farms: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are evolving. Accurate wind power forecasts are beneficial for wind plant operators, utility operators, and utility customers. An accurate forecast allows grid operators to schedule economically efficient generation to meet the demand of electrical customers. The evolving markets hold some form of auction for various forward markets, such as hour ahead or day ahead. This paper describes several statistical forecasting models that can be useful in hour-ahead markets. Although longer-term forecasting relies on numerical weather models, the statistical models used here focus on the short-term forecasts that can be useful in the hour-ahead markets. The purpose of the paper is not to develop forecasting models that can compete with commercially available models. Instead, we investigate the extent to which time-series analysis can improve simplistic persistence forecasts. This project applied a class of models known as autoregressive moving average (A RMA) models to both wind speed and wind power output. The results from wind farms in Minnesota, Iowa, and along the Washington-Oregon border indicate that statistical modeling can provide a significant improvement in wind forecasts compared to persistence forecasts.

Milligan, M.; Schwartz, M. N.; Wan, Y.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Distributed Wind Energy in Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Project Objective: This project is a research and development program aimed at furthering distributed wind technology. In particular, this project addresses some of the barriers to distributed wind energy utilization in Idaho. Background: At its core, the technological challenge inherent in Wind Energy is the transformation of a highly variable form of energy to one which is compatible with the commercial power grid or another useful application. A major economic barrier to the success of distributed wind technology is the relatively high capital investment (and related long payback periods) associated with wind turbines. This project will carry out fundamental research and technology development to address both the technological and economic barriers. â?¢ Active drive train control holds the potential to improve the overall efficiency of a turbine system by allowing variable speed turbine operation while ensuring a tight control of generator shaft speed, thus greatly simplifying power conditioning. â?¢ Recent blade aerodynamic advancements have been focused on large, utility-scale wind turbine generators (WTGs) as opposed to smaller WTGs designed for distributed generation. Because of Reynolds Number considerations, blade designs do not scale well. Blades which are aerodynamically optimized for distributed-scale WTGs can potentially reduce the cost of electricity by increasing shaft-torque in a given wind speed. â?¢ Grid-connected electric generators typically operate at a fixed speed. If a generator were able to economically operate at multiple speeds, it could potentially convert more of the windâ??s energy to electricity, thus reducing the cost of electricity. This research directly supports the stated goal of the Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program for Distributed Wind Energy Technology: By 2007, reduce the cost of electricity from distributed wind systems to 10 to 15 cents/kWh in Class 3 wind resources, the same level that is currently achievable in Class 5 winds.

Gardner, John; Ferguson, James; Ahmed-Zaid, Said; Johnson, Kathryn; Haynes, Todd; Bennett, Keith

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a wind resource analysis and mapping study for the Philippine archipelago. The study's objective was to identify potential wind resource areas and quantify the value of those resources within those areas. The wind resource maps and other wind resource characteristic information will be used to identify prospective areas for wind-energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; George, R.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; McCarthy, E.

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A discussion of the results of the rainflow counting of a wide range of dynamics associated with the simultaneous operation of adjacent wind turbines  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to provide a fatigue load comparison between two identical wind turbines employing different rotor designs. One turbine was fitted with a rotor consisting of a set of NREL (SERI) thin-airfoil blades while the other rotor included the original-equipment AeroStar blades. The data discussed are based on sample load populations derived from the rainflow cycle counting of 405, 10-minute records specifically collected over a wide range of inflow turbulence conditions. The results have shown that the statistical structure of the alternating load cycles on both turbines can be described as a mixture of three stochastic processes. We noted a high degree of load distribution similarity between the two turbines, with the differences attributable to either rotor weight or swept area.

Kelley, N.; Desrochers, G.; Tangler, J.; Smith, B.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUPWG Meeting FUPWG Meeting NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Robi Robichaud November 18, 2009 Topics Introduction Review of the Current Wind Market Drivers for Wind Development Siting g Issues Wind Resource Assessment Wind Characteristics Wind Power Potential Basic Wind Turbine Theory Basic Wind Turbine Theory Types of Wind Turbines Facts About Wind Siting Facts About Wind Siting Wind Performance 1. United States: MW 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 Current Status of the Wind Industry Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity

123

Wind effects on shoaling wave shape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fig. 1) is a result of wind energy input to the wave fieldcases, indicating that wind energy is not input into freelynonlinearity) allows wind energy to be preferentially put

Feddersen, F; Veron, F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Session: Offshore wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Session: Offshore wind  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

PowerJet Wind Turbine Project  

SciTech Connect

PROJECT OBJECTIVE The PowerJet wind turbine overcomes problems characteristic of the small wind turbines that are on the market today by providing reliable output at a wide range of wind speeds, durability, silent operation at all wind speeds, and bird-safe operation. Prime Energyâ??s objective for this project was to design and integrate a generator with an electrical controller and mechanical controls to maximize the generation of electricity by its wind turbine. The scope of this project was to design, construct and test a mechanical back plate to control rotational speed in high winds, and an electronic controller to maximize power output and to assist the base plate in controlling rotational speed in high winds. The test model will continue to operate beyond the time frame of the project, with the ultimate goal of manufacturing and marketing the PowerJet worldwide. Increased Understanding of Electronic & Mechanical Controls Integrated With Electricity Generator The PowerJet back plate begins to open as wind speed exceeds 13.5 mps. The pressure inside the turbine and the turbine rotational speed are held constant. Once the back plate has fully opened at approximately 29 mps, the controller begins pulsing back to the generator to limit the rotational speed of the turbine. At a wind speed in excess of 29 mps, the controller shorts the generator and brings the turbine to a complete stop. As the wind speed subsides, the controller releases the turbine and it resumes producing electricity. Data collection and instrumentation problems prevented identification of the exact speeds at which these events occur. However, the turbine, controller and generator survived winds in excess of 36 mps, confirming that the two over-speed controls accomplished their purpose. Technical Effectiveness & Economic Feasibility Maximum Electrical Output The output of electricity is maximized by the integration of an electronic controller and mechanical over-speed controls designed and tested during the course of this project. The output exceeds that of the PowerJetâ??s 3-bladed counterparts (see Appendix). Durability All components of the PowerJet turbine assemblyâ??including the electronic and mechanical controls designed, manufactured and field tested during the course of this projectâ??proved to be durable through severe weather conditions, with constant operation and no interruption in energy production. Low Cost Materials for the turbine, generator, tower, charge controllers and ancillary parts are available at reasonable prices. Fabrication of these parts is also readily available worldwide. The cost of assembling and installing the turbine is reduced because it has fewer parts and requires less labor to manufacture and assemble, making it competitively priced compared with turbines of similar output manufactured in the U.S. and Europe. The electronic controller is the unique part to be included in the turbine package. The controllers can be manufactured in reasonably-sized production runs to keep the cost below $250 each. The data logger and 24 sensors are for research only and will be unnecessary for the commercial product. Benefit To Public The PowerJet wind-electric system is designed for distributed wind generation in 3 and 4 class winds. This wind turbine meets DOEâ??s requirements for a quiet, durable, bird-safe turbine that eventually can be deployed as a grid-connected generator in urban and suburban settings. Results As described more fully below and illustrated in the Appendices, the goals and objectives outlined in 2060 SOPO were fully met. Electronic and mechanical controls were successfully designed, manufactured and integrated with the generator. The turbine, tower, controllers and generators operated without incident throughout the test period, surviving severe winter and summer weather conditions such as extreme temperatures, ice and sustained high winds. The electronic controls were contained in weather-proof electrical boxes and the elec

Bartlett, Raymond J

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

OpenEI Community - Wind for Schools Portal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 en Wind for Schools Portal http:en.openei.orgcommunitygroupwind-schools-portal

class"form-item">
128

Economic Development Impacts of Community Wind Projects: A Review and Empirical Evaluation; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Community wind' refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. The extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers, businesses, Native American tribes, universities, cooperatives, or any other local entity seeking to invest in wind energy. The opposite of community wind is an 'absentee' project, in which ownership is completely removed from the state and community surrounding the facility. Thus, there is little or no ongoing direct financial benefit to state and local populations aside from salaries for local repair technicians, local property tax payments, and land lease payments. In recent years, the community wind sector has been inhibited by manufacturers' preference for larger turbine orders. This often puts smaller community wind developers and projects at a competitive disadvantage. However, state policies specifically supporting community wind may become a more influential market factor as turbines are now more readily available given manufacturer ramp-ups and the slow-down in the industry that has accompanied the recent economic and financial crises. This report examines existing literature to provide an overview of economic impacts resulting from community wind projects, compares results, and explains variability.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EIA: Wind  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Technical information and data on the wind energy industry from the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA).

130

Lidar Measurements of Wind in the Planetary Boundary Layer: The Method, Accuracy and Results from Joint Measurements with Radiosonde and Kytoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Central Illinois Rainfall Chemistry Experiment (CIRCE), the University of Wisconsin lidar measured wind and turbulence profiles through the planetary boundary layer for a 32-h period in conjunction with surface observations, radiosonde ...

William P. Hooper; Edwin W. Eloranta

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Wind Atlas for Egypt A national database for wind resource assessment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Atlas for Egypt A national database for wind resource assessment and wind power planning Niels G. Mortensen Wind Energy Department Risø National Laboratory MENAREC 3, Cairo, Egypt 12 June 2006 #12;Acknowledgements The "Wind Atlas for Egypt" is the result of a comprehensive team effort! · New

132

Fuel Property, Emission Test, and Operability Results from a Fleet of Class 6 Vehicles Operating on Gas-to-Liquid Fuel and Catalyzed Diesel Particle Filters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fleet of six 2001 International Class 6 trucks operating in southern California was selected for an operability and emissions study using gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuel and catalyzed diesel particle filters (CDPF). Three vehicles were fueled with CARB specification diesel fuel and no emission control devices (current technology), and three vehicles were fueled with GTL fuel and retrofit with Johnson Matthey's CCRT diesel particulate filter. No engine modifications were made.

Alleman, T. L.; Eudy, L.; Miyasato, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Allison, S.; Corcoran, T.; Chatterjee, S.; Jacobs, T.; Cherrillo, R. A.; Clark, R.; Virrels, I.; Nine, R.; Wayne, S.; Lansing, R.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Standards for Municipal Small Wind Regulations and Small Wind Model Wind Ordinance Eligibility...

134

OpenEI - wind power capacity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4250 en Wind Resources By Class Per Country At 50m http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode492

These estimates are derived from a...

135

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

136

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

European Union Wind Energy Forecasting Model Development and Testing: U.S. Department of Energy -- EPRI Wind Turbine Verification Pr ogram  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind forecasting can increase the strategic and market values of wind power from large wind facilities. This report summarizes the results of the European Union (EU) wind energy forecasting project and performance testing of the EU wind forecasting model. The testing compared forecast and observed wind speed and generation data from U.S. wind facilities.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

140

Wind Turbines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Workforce Development and Wind for Schools (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is faced with the need to quickly develop a skilled workforce and to address public acceptance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these challenges. This poster, produced for the American Wind Energy Association's annual WINDPOWER conference, provides an overview of the project, including objectives, methods, and results.

Newcomb, C.; Baring-Gould, I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Characterization of wind technology progress  

SciTech Connect

US DOE`s Wind Energy Program, NREL, and Sandia periodically re-evaluate the state of wind technology. Since 1995 marked the conclusion of a number of DOE-supported advanced turbine design efforts, and results from the next major round of research are expected near the latter part of the century, this paper discusses future trends for domestic wind farm applications (bulk power), incorporating recent turbine research efforts under different market assumptions from previous DOE estimates. Updated cost/performance projections are presented along with underlying assumptions and discussions of potential alternative wind turbine design paths. Issues on market valuation of wind technology in a restructured electricity market are also discussed.

Cadogan, J B [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Parsons, B [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Cohen, J M; Johnson, B L [Princeton Economic Research, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Wind Powering America: Wind Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind power-related events. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Wind Events http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/calendar.asp Pennsylvania Wind for Schools Educator Workshop https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1352684 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4068 Wed, 4 Dec 2013 00:00:00 MST 2014 Joint Action Workshop http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 Mon, 21 Oct 2013 00:00:00 MST AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 Mon, 21

144

LIDAR wind speed measurements of evolving wind fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylors frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylors hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios. Nomenclature a decay parameter for exponential coherence al decrement parameter for transverse coherence (l ? {u, v, w}) bl offset parameter for transverse coherence (l ? {u, v, w}) D longitudinal distance between two points or measurement preview distance F focal distance f frequency (Hz) ? LIDAR measurement angle off of longitudinal direction k wind velocity wavenumber (m?1) ? wavelength (m) R range along LIDAR beam r scan radius for spinning LIDAR scenario ri,j distance between two points in the yz plane U mean wind speed (m/s) ?i,j average mean wind speed between two points in the yz plane ? azimuth angle in the rotor plane ?2 xy(f) Coherence between signals x and y

Eric Simley; Lucy Y. Pao; Neil Kelley; Bonnie Jonkman; Rod Frehlich

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results from Major Wind Integration Studies Completed 2003-a mini- mum) show that wind integration costs are generallyA number of additional wind integration analyses are planned

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

George, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. Description/Summary: The Building and Fire Research Laboratory has an ...

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

148

Long-Term Wind Power Variability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory started collecting wind power data from large commercial wind power plants (WPPs) in southwest Minnesota with dedicated dataloggers and communication links in the spring of 2000. Over the years, additional WPPs in other areas were added to and removed from the data collection effort. The longest data stream of actual wind plant output is more than 10 years. The resulting data have been used to analyze wind power fluctuations, frequency distribution of changes, the effects of spatial diversity, and wind power ancillary services. This report uses the multi-year wind power data to examine long-term wind power variability.

Wan, Y. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

(The Spanish version of Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

151

Wind Energy Forecasting Technology Update: 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide installed wind generation capacity increased by 25 and reached almost 60,000 MW worldwide during 2005. As wind capacity continues to grow and large regional concentrations of wind generation emerge, utilities and regional transmission organizations will increasingly need accurate same-day and next-day forecasts of wind energy generation to dispatch system generation and transmission resource and anticipate rapid changes of wind generation. The project objective is to summarize the results o...

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Wind Powering America: New England Wind Forum  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About the New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share The New England Wind Forum was conceived in 2005 as a platform to provide a single, comprehensive and objective source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. The New England Wind Forum provides information to wind energy stakeholders through Web site features, periodic newsletters, and outreach activities. The New England Wind Forum covers the most frequently discussed wind energy topics.

153

Wind shear climatology for large wind turbine generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Climatological wind shear analyses relevant to the design and operation of multimegawatt wind turbines are provided. Insight is provided for relating the wind experienced by a rotating blade in a shear flow to the analysis results. A simple analysis of the wind experienced by a rotating blade for three types of wind shear profiles under steady-state conditions is presented in graphical form. Comparisons of the magnitude and frequency of the variations in 1) the wind sensed by a single blade element, 2) the sum, and 3) the difference of the winds sensed by opposite blade elements show strong sensitivity to profile shape. These three items represent forcing functions that can be related to 1) flatwise bending moment, 2) torque on the shaft, and 3) teeter angle. A computer model was constructed to simulate rotational sampling of 10-s sampled winds from a tall tower for three different types of large wind turbines. Time series produced by the model indicated that the forcing functions on a rotating blade vary according to the shear profile encountered during each revolution as opposed to a profile derived from average wind conditions, e.g., hourly average winds. An analysis scheme was developed to establish a climatology of wind shear profiles derived from 10-s sampled winds and hourly average winds measured over a one-year period at several levels on a tall tower. Because of the sensitivity of the forcing function variability to profile shape, the analyses performed and presented are in the form of joint frequency distributions of velocity differences of the the top-to-hub versus the hub-to-bottom portion of disks of rotation for the three turbine configurations.

Elliott, D.L.; Wendell, L.L.; Heflick, S.K.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

offshore wind | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wind wind Dataset Summary Description Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by Country, Class, and Depth (quantities in GW) Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released July 12th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated July 12th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords offshore resource offshore wind renewable energy potential Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon offshore_resource_100_vs2.xlsx (xlsx, 41.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote

155

Wind turbulence characterization for wind energy development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of its support of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Wind Energy Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has initiated an effort to work jointly with the wind energy community to characterize wind turbulence in a variety of complex terrains at existing or potential sites of wind turbine installation. Five turbulence characterization systems were assembled and installed at four sites in the Tehachapi Pass in California, and one in the Green Mountains near Manchester, Vermont. Data processing and analyses techniques were developed to allow observational analyses of the turbulent structure; this analysis complements the more traditional statistical and spectral analyses. Preliminary results of the observational analyses, in the rotating framework or a wind turbine blade, show that the turbulence at a site can have two major components: (1) engulfing eddies larger than the rotor, and (2) fluctuating shear due to eddies smaller than the rotor disk. Comparison of the time series depicting these quantities at two sites showed that the turbulence intensity (the commonly used descriptor of turbulence) did not adequately characterize the turbulence at these sites. 9 refs., 10 figs.,

Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Morris, V.R.; Tomich, S.D.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Definition: Wind turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbine turbine Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Wind turbine A machine that converts wind energy to mechanical energy; typically connected to a generator to produce electricity.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A wind turbine is a device that converts kinetic energy from the wind, also called wind energy, into mechanical energy in a process known as wind power. If the mechanical energy is used to produce electricity, the device may be called a wind turbine or wind power plant. If the mechanical energy is used to drive machinery, such as for grinding grain or pumping water, the device is called a windmill or wind pump. Similarly, it may be referred to as a wind charger when used for charging batteries. The result of over a millennium of windmill development and modern engineering,

157

Wind Energy Resource Assessment of the Caribbean and Central America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind energy resource assessment of the Caribbean and Central America has identified many areas with good to outstanding wind resource potential for wind turbine applications. Annual average wind resource maps and summary tables have been developed for 35 island/country areas throughout the Caribbean and Central America region. The wind resource maps highlight the locations of major resource areas and provide estimates of the wind energy resource potential for typical well-exposed sites in these areas. The average energy in the wind flowing in the layer near the ground is expressed as a wind power class: the greater the average wind energy, the higher the wind power class. The summary tables that are included with each of the 35 island/country wind energy maps provide information on the frequency distribution of the wind speeds (expressed as estimates of the Weibull shape factor, k) and seasonal variations in the wind resource for the major wind resource areas identified on the maps. A new wind power class legend has been developed for relating the wind power classes to values of mean wind power density, mean wind speed, and Weibull k. Guidelines are presented on how to adjust these values to various heights above ground for different roughness and terrain characteristics. Information evaluated in preparing the assessment included existing meteorological data from airports and other weather stations, and from ships and buoys in offshore and coastal areas. In addition, new data from recent measurement sites established for wind energy siting studies were obtained for a few areas of the Caribbean. Other types of information evaluated in the assessment were climatological data and maps on winds aloft, surface pressure, air flow, and topography. The various data were screened and evaluated for their usefulness in preparing the wind resource assessment. Much of the surface data from airports and other land-based weather stations were determined to be from sheltered sites and were thus not very useful in assessing the wind resource at locations that are well exposed to the winds. Ship data were determined to be the most useful for estimating the large-scale wind flow and assessing the spatial distribution of the wind resource throughout the region. Techniques were developed for analyzing and correcting ship wind data and extrapolating these data to coastal and inland areas by considering terrain influences on the large-scale wind flow. In areas where extrapolation of ship wind data was not entirely feasible, such as interior areas of Central America, other techniques were developed for estimating the wind flow and distribution of the wind resource. Through the application of the various innovative techniques developed for assessing the wind resource throughout the Caribbean and Central America region, many areas with potentially good to outstanding wind resource were identified that had not been previously recognized. In areas where existing site data were available from exposed locations, the measured wind resource was compared with the estimated wind resource that was derived using the assessment techniques. In most cases, there was good agreement between the measured wind resource and the estimated wind resource. This assessment project supported activities being pursued by the U.S. Committee for Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade (CORECT), the U.S. government's interagency program to assist in overseas marketing and promote renewable energy exports. An overall goal of the program is to improve U.S. competitiveness in the world renewable energy market. The Caribbean and Central America assessment, which is the first of several possible follow-on international wind energy resource assessments, provides valuable information needed by the U.S. wind energy industry to identify suitable wind resource areas and concentrate their efforts on these areas.

DL Elliott; CI Aspliden; GL Gower; CG Holladay, MN Schwartz

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

NREL: Wind Research - Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and Results Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and Results A video of Mariah Power's Windspire wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Mariah Power's Windspire Giromill small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) through January 14, 2009 when NREL terminated its testing. Read a chronology of events and letter from Mariah Power to NREL. The Windspire is a 1.2-kilowatt (kW) vertical-axis small wind turbine. The turbine tower is 9.1 meters tall, and its rotor area is 1.2 by 6.1 meters. The turbine has a permanent-magnet generator with a single-phase output at 120 volts AC. Testing Summary Testing was terminated January 14, 2009. Published test reports include

159

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

result, these prices do not represent wind energy generationprices presumably reflect only the value of energy, whereas wind

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Wind speed modeling and prediction in wind farms using fuzzy logic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the upcoming wind speed is forecasted using the stochastic characteristics of wind speed of previous years. The wind speed is estimated in the fuzzy inference system and simulated with the fuzzy logic. The simulation results illustrate ... Keywords: fuzzy, prediction, wind farm

Shahram Javadi; Zeinab Hojjatinia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Wind resource evaluation at the Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind resource evaluation at the Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (FLOWE) Quinn;Caltech Field Laboratory for Optimized Wind Energy (reduced visual signature) #12;Field Study Results 6 continuous hours existing wind farms Planform Kinetic Energy Flux = U (W m-2) mean power above cut

162

The Answer Is Blowing in the Wind: Analysis of Powering Internet Data Centers with Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Answer Is Blowing in the Wind: Analysis of Powering Internet Data Centers with Wind Energy Yan. As a result, many IDC operators have started using renewable energy, e.g., wind power, to power their data centers. Unfortunately, the utilization of wind energy has stayed at a low ratio due to the intermittent

163

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe Mountains,...

164

Energy Storage System in Wind Power System on Islands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The wind energy has several merits but there exit some barriers in the development of wind power plant, and this is as a result (more)

Jiang, Yuning

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Relation between SaffirSimpson Hurricane Scale Wind ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... verifying the results based on the power law as ... of the open-sea roughness in winds greater than ... continue to increase at mean wind speeds beyond ...

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

166

Community Wind Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Toolkit Wind Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search "Community wind" refers to a class of wind energy ownership structures. Projects are considered "community" projects when they are at least partially owned by individuals or businesses in the state and local area surrounding the wind power project. The community element of these projects can be defined narrowly so that ownership is concentrated in the county or region where the project is built, or it may be defined broadly so that project investors are from the state where the project is sited. Furthermore, the extent of local ownership may range from a small minority share to full ownership by persons in the immediate area surrounding the wind project site. Potential project owners include local farmers,

167

Balancing of Wind Power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In the future, renewable energy share, especially wind power share, in electricity generation is expected to increase. Due to nature of the wind, wind (more)

lker, Muhammed Akif

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Technology  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power Technology Wind Power Technology Modern wind turbines have become sophisticated power plants while the concept of converting wind energy to electrical energy remains quite simple. Follow these links to learn more about the science behind wind turbine technology. Wind Power Animation An image of a scene from the wind power animation. The animation shows how moving air rotates a wind turbine's blades and describes how the internal components work to produce electricity. It shows small and large wind turbines and the differences between how they are used, as stand alone or connected to the utility grid. How Wind Turbines Work Learn how wind turbines make electricity; what are the types, sizes, and applications of wind turbines; and see an illustration of the components inside a wind turbine.

169

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Assessment Wind Resource Assessment A map of the United States is color-coded to indicate the high winds at 80 meters. This map shows the wind resource at 80 meters for both land-based and offshore wind resources in the United States. Correct estimation of the energy available in the wind can make or break the economics of wind plant development. Wind mapping and validation techniques developed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) along with collaborations with U.S. companies have produced high-resolution maps of the United States that provide wind plant developers with accurate estimates of the wind resource potential. State Wind Maps International Wind Resource Maps Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Due to the existence of special use airspace (SUA) (i.e., military airspace

170

Hi-Q Rotor - Low Wind Speed Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objective was to optimize the performance of the Hi-Q Rotor. Early research funded by the California Energy Commission indicated the design might be advantageous over state-of-the-art turbines for collecting wind energy in low wind conditions. The Hi-Q Rotor is a new kind of rotor targeted for harvesting wind in Class 2, 3, and 4 sites, and has application in areas that are closer to cities, or 'load centers.' An advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor is that the rotor has non-conventional blade tips, producing less turbulence, and is quieter than standard wind turbine blades which is critical to the low-wind populated urban sites. Unlike state-of-the-art propeller type blades, the Hi-Q Rotor has six blades connected by end caps. In this phase of the research funded by DOE's Inventions and Innovation Program, the goal was to improve the current design by building a series of theoretical and numeric models, and composite prototypes to determine a best of class device. Development of the rotor was performed by aeronautical engineering and design firm, DARcorporation. From this investigation, an optimized design was determined and an 8-foot diameter, full-scale rotor was built and mounted using a Bergey LX-1 generator and furling system which were adapted to support the rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor was then tested side-by-side against the state-of-the-art Bergey XL-1 at the Alternative Energy Institute's Wind Test Center at West Texas State University for six weeks, and real time measurements of power generated were collected and compared. Early wind tunnel testing showed that the cut-in-speed of the Hi-Q rotor is much lower than a conventional tested HAWT enabling the Hi-Q Wind Turbine to begin collecting energy before a conventional HAWT has started spinning. Also, torque at low wind speeds for the Hi-Q Wind Turbine is higher than the tested conventional HAWT and enabled the wind turbine to generate power at lower wind speeds. Based on the data collected, the results of our first full-scale prototype wind turbine proved that higher energy can be captured at lower wind speeds with the new Hi-Q Rotor. The Hi-Q Rotor is almost 15% more productive than the Bergey from 6 m/s to 8 m/s, making it ideal in Class 3, 4, and 5 wind sites and has application in the critical and heretofore untapped areas that are closer to cities, 'load centers,' and may even be used directly in urban areas. The additional advantage of the Hi-Q Rotor's non-conventional blade tips, which eliminates most air turbulence, is noise reduction which makes it doubly ideal for populated urban areas. Hi-Q Products recommends one final stage of development to take the Hi-Q Rotor through Technology Readiness Levels 8-9. During this stage of development, the rotor will be redesigned to further increase efficiency, match the rotor to a more suitable generator, and lower the cost of manufacturing by redesigning the structure to allow for production in larger quantities at lower cost. Before taking the rotor to market and commercialization, it is necessary to further optimize the performance by finding a better generator and autofurling system, ones more suitable for lower wind speeds and rpms should be used in all future testing. The potential impact of this fully developed technology will be the expansion and proliferation of energy renewal into the heretofore untapped Class 2, 3, 4, and 5 Wind Sites, or the large underutilized sites where the wind speed is broken by physical features such as mountains, buildings, and trees. Market estimates by 2011, if low wind speed technology can be developed are well above: 13 million homes, 675,000 commercial buildings, 250,000 public facilities. Estimated commercial exploitation of the Hi-Q Rotor show potential increase in U.S. energy gained through the clean, renewable wind energy found in low and very low wind speed sites. This new energy source would greatly impact greenhouse emissions as well as the public sector's growing energy demands.

Todd E. Mills; Judy Tatum

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

171

Evaluating a Hybrid PrognosticDiagnostic Model That Improves Wind Forecast Resolution in Complex Coastal Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results from a hybrid approach that combines the forecasts of a mesoscale model with a diagnostic wind model to produce high-resolution wind forecasts in complex coastal orography are evaluated. The simple diagnostic wind model [Winds on ...

Francis L. Ludwig; Douglas K. Miller; Shawn G. Gallaher

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Wind-Stress Coefficients at Light Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase of the wind-stress coefficient with wind velocity was found to start with winds as light as 3 m s?1, below which, following the formula for aerodynamically smooth flows, the wind-stress coefficient decreases as the wind velocity ...

Jin Wu

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Wind Energy Assessment and Visualization Laboratory Extra-Tall Tower Wind Resource Assessment: Icing Rules and Trends in the Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study describes the results of the measurement campaign for the Wind Energy Assessment and Visualization Laboratory (WEAV) wind feasibility study in Athens, OH. A (more)

Harris, James C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

How do Wind and Solar Power Affect Grid Operations: The Western Wind and Solar Integration Study; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the scope of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study, the development of wind and solar datasets, and the results to date on three scenarios.

Lew, D.; Milligan, M.; Jordan, G.; Freeman, L.; Miller, N.; Clark, K.; Piwko, R.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NREL: Wind Research - Controls Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controls Analysis Controls Analysis Photo of a man working inside the hub of a large 3-blades turbine. Working in the hub of Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) Man in wind turbine hub viewed from inside a wind turbine's blade. At the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), we design, implement, and test advanced wind turbine controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are simulated using specialized modeling software. The resulting advanced controls algorithms are field tested on the NWTC's Controls Advanced Research Turbines (CARTs). NWTC researchers are also studying blade pitch and generator torque, and employing advanced sensors to optimize power capture and reduce wind

176

Wind load reduction for heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests supported through the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) by the Office of Solar Thermal Technology of the US Department of Energy as part of the SERI research effort on innovative concentrators. As gravity loads on drive mechanisms are reduced through stretched-membrane technology, the wind-load contribution of the required drive capacity increases in percentage. Reduction of wind loads can provide economy in support structure and heliostat drive. Wind-tunnel tests have been directed at finding methods to reduce wind loads on heliostats. The tests investigated primarily the mean forces, moments, and the possibility of measuring fluctuating forces in anticipation of reducing those forces. A significant increase in ability to predict heliostat wind loads and their reduction within a heliostat field was achieved.

Peterka, J.A.; Hosoya, N.; Bienkiewicz, B.; Cermak, J.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Solar Wind and its Evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By using our previous results of magnetohydrodynamical simulations for the solar wind from open flux tubes, I discuss how the solar wind in the past is different from the current solar wind. The simulations are performed in fixed one-dimensional super-radially open magnetic flux tubes by inputing various types of fluctuations from the photosphere, which automatically determines solar wind properties in a forward manner. The three important parameters which determine physical properties of the solar wind are surface fluctuation, magnetic field strengths, and the configuration of magnetic flux tubes. Adjusting these parameters to the sun at earlier times in a qualitative sense, I infer that the quasi-steady-state component of the solar wind in the past was denser and slightly slower if the effect of the magneto-centrifugal force is not significant. I also discuss effects of magneto-centrifugal force and roles of coronal mass ejections.

Suzuki, Takeru K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Wind for Schools: Developing Educational Programs to Train the Next Generation of Wind Energy Experts (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the world moves toward a vision of expanded wind energy, the industry is faced with the challenges of obtaining a skilled workforce and addressing local wind development concerns. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Program works to address these issues. The program installs small wind turbines at community "host" schools while developing wind application centers at higher education institutions. Teacher training with interactive and interschool curricula is implemented at each host school, while students at the universities assist in implementing the host school systems while participating in other wind course work. This poster provides an overview of the program's objectives, goals, approach, and results.

Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Miles, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Wind and Solar Curtailment: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High penetrations of wind and solar generation on power systems are resulting in increasing curtailment. Wind and solar integration studies predict increased curtailment as penetration levels grow. This paper examines experiences with curtailment on bulk power systems internationally. It discusses how much curtailment is occurring, how it is occurring, why it is occurring, and what is being done to reduce curtailment. This summary is produced as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Task 25 on Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power.

Lew, D.; Bird, L.; Milligan, M.; Speer, B.; Wang, X.; Carlini, E. M.; Estanqueiro, A.; Flynn, D.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Menemenlis, N.; Orths, A.; Pineda, I.; Smith, J. C.; Soder, L.; Sorensen, P.; Altiparmakis, A.; Yoh, Y.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

2010 Cost of Wind Energy Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides a detailed description of NREL's levelized cost of wind energy equation, assumptions and results in 2010, including historical cost trends and future projections for land-based and offshore utility-scale wind.

Tegen, S.; Hand, M.; Maples, B.; Lantz, E.; Schwabe, P.; Smith, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Economics  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Cost Components Determining Factors Influencing Wind Economics in New England How does wind compare to the cost of other electricity options? Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Wind Power Economics Long-Term Cost Trends Since the first major installations of commercial-scale wind turbines in the 1980s, the cost of energy from wind power projects has decreased substantially due to larger turbine generators, towers, and rotor lengths; scale economies associated with larger projects; improvements in manufacturing efficiency, and technological advances in turbine generator and blade design. These technological advances have allowed for higher generating capacities per turbine and more efficient capture of wind, especially at lower wind speeds.

182

New England Wind Forum: Large Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Small Wind Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Large Wind When establishing wind farms, wind energy developers generally approach landowners where they want to build. Interest in wind farms is frequently spurred by external pressures such as tax and other financial incentives and legislative mandates. Since each situation is influenced by local policies and permitting, we can only provide general guidance to help you learn about the process of installing wind turbines. Publications Wind Project Development Process Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities: A Handbook. (August 2002). National Wind Coordinating Collaborative. Landowner Frequently Asked Questions and Answers. (August 2003). "State Wind Working Group Handbook." pp. 130-133.

183

NREL: Wind Research - International Wind Resource Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Maps NREL is helping to develop high-resolution projections of wind resources worldwide. This allows for more accurate siting of wind turbines and has led to the...

184

Wind energy systems information user study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a series of telephone interviews with potential users of information on wind energy conversion. These interviews, part of a larger study covering nine different solar technologies, attempted to identify: the type of information each distinctive group of information users needed, and the best way of getting information to that group. Groups studied include: wind energy conversion system researchers; wind energy conversion system manufacturer representatives; wind energy conversion system distributors; wind turbine engineers; utility representatives; educators; county agents and extension service agents; and wind turbine owners.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wind turbine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine of the type having an airfoil blade (15) mounted on a flexible beam (20) and a pitch governor (55) which selectively, torsionally twists the flexible beam in response to wind turbine speed thereby setting blade pitch, is provided with a limiter (85) which restricts unwanted pitch change at operating speeds due to torsional creep of the flexible beam. The limiter allows twisting of the beam by the governor under excessive wind velocity conditions to orient the blades in stall pitch positions, thereby preventing overspeed operation of the turbine. In the preferred embodiment, the pitch governor comprises a pendulum (65,70) which responds to changing rotor speed by pivotal movement, the limiter comprising a resilient member (90) which engages an end of the pendulum to restrict further movement thereof, and in turn restrict beam creep and unwanted blade pitch misadjustment.

Cheney, Jr., Marvin C. (Glastonbury, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Topic: Wind Engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Topic: Wind Engineering. Forty-Fourth Meeting of the UJNR Panel on Wind and Seismic Effects. NIST researchers collected ...

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Extreme Wind Speeds: Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... "Algorithms for Generating Large Sets of Synthetic Directional Wind Speed Data for Hurricane, Thunderstorm, and Synoptic Winds," NIST Technical ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options Site Map Printable Version Offshore Standards and Testing NREL's Offshore Wind Testing Capabilities 35 years of wind turbine testing experience Custom high speed data...

189

Wind Turbine Safety and Function Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small wind turbines (SWT). In total, four turbines were tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Safety and function testing is one of up to five tests performed on the turbines, including power performance, duration, noise, and power-quality tests. The results of the testing provide the manufacturers with reports that can be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine mounted on an 18-m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark. The system was installed by the NWTC site operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

NREL: Wind Research - Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine Testing and Results Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 Wind Turbine Testing and Results Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. A video of Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Abundant Renewable Energy's ARE 442 turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The ARE 442 is a 10-kilowatt (kW), three-bladed, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. It has a hub height of 30.9 meters and a rotor diameter of 7.2 meters. The turbine has a single-phase permanent-magnet generator that operates at variable voltages up to 410 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is below with the final reports.

191

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems that are designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed the validity of physicist G.I. Taylor's 1938 frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) 5-megawatt turbine model to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution was applied to a frozen wind field that was used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements were also evaluated using a large eddy simulation (LES) of a stable boundary layer that was provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. The LIDAR measurement scenario investigated consists of a hub-mounted LIDAR that scans a circle of points upwind of the turbine in order to estimate the wind speed component in the mean wind direction. Different combinations of the preview distance that is located upwind of the rotor and the radius of the scan circle were analyzed. It was found that the dominant source of measurement error for short preview distances is the detection of transverse and vertical wind speeds from the line-of-sight LIDAR measurement. It was discovered in previous studies that, in the absence of wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances is the spatial averaging caused by the LIDAR's sampling volume. However, by introducing wind evolution, the dominant source of error for large preview distances was found to be the coherence loss caused by evolving turbulence. Different measurement geometries were compared using the bandwidth for which the measurement coherence remained above 0.5 and also the area under the measurement coherence curve. Results showed that, by increasing the intensity of wind evolution, the measurement coherence decreases. Using the coherence bandwidth metric, the optimal preview distance for a fixed-scan radius remained almost constant for low and moderate amounts of wind evolution. For the wind field with the simple wind evolution model introduced, the optimal preview distance for a scan radius of 75% blade span (47.25 meters) was found to be 80 meters. Using the LES wind field, the optimal preview distance was 65 meters. When comparing scan geometries using the area under the coherence curve, results showed that, as the intensity of wind evolution increases, the optimal preview distance decreases.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.; Kelley, N.; Jonkman, B.; Frehlich, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Development Small Wind Turbine Development A photo of Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine in front of a home. PIX14936 Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine. A photo of the Endurance wind turbine. PIX15006 The Endurance wind turbine. A photo of the Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. PIX07301 The Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL supports continued market expansion of small wind turbines by funding manufacturers through competitive solicitations (i.e., subcontracts and/or grants) to refine prototype systems leading to commercialization. Learn more about the turbine development projects below. Skystream NREL installed and tested an early prototype of this turbine at the

193

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Webinars Small Wind Turbine Webinars Here you will find webinars about small wind turbines that NREL hosted. Introducing WindLease(tm): Making Wind Energy Affordable NREL and the American Solar Energy Society (ASES) Wind Division co-hosted this webinar. (Text Version.) Date: August 1, 2013 Run Time: 40 minutes Joe Hess, VP of Business Development at United Wind, described United Wind's WindQuote and WindLease Program and explained the process from the dealer's and consumer's perspective. Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association NREL and the American Solar Energy Society (ASES) Wind Division co-hosted this webinar. (Text Version). Date: March 7, 2013 Run Time: 1 hour Russel Smith, Texas Renewable Energy Industries Association executive director and co-founder, provided an overview of the trade association

194

New England Wind Forum: Small Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies: Thomas Harrison Middle School, Virginia Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies: Thomas Harrison Middle School, Virginia August 26, 2013 Workshop Explores Information's Role in Wind Project Siting: A Wind Powering America Success Story November 19, 2012 More News Subscribe to News Updates Events Renewable Energy Market Update Webinar January 29, 2014 Strategic Energy Planning: Webinar February 26, 2014 Introduction to Wind Systems March 10, 2014 More Events Publications 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications August 12, 2013 More Publications Features Sign up for the New England Wind Forum Newsletter. New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England

195

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding education to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institutions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more graduate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initiative launched the Wind for Schools project to develop a wind energy knowledge base among future leaders of our communities, states, and nation while raising awareness about wind energy's benefits. This fact sheet provides an overview of wind energy curricula as it relates to the Wind for Schools project.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Wind Powering America  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the June 1999 Windpower Conference, the Secretary of Energy launched the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Wind Powering America (WPA) initiative. The goals of the initiative are to meet 5% of the nation's energy needs with wind energy by 2020 (i.e., 80,000 megawatts installed), to double the number of states that have more than 20 megawatts (MW) of wind capacity to 16 by 2005 and triple it to 24 by 2010, and to increase wind's contribution to Federal electricity use to 5% by 2010. To achieve the Federal government's goal, DOE would take the leadership position and work with its Federal partners. Subsequently, the Secretary accelerated the DOE 5% commitment to 2005. Achieving the 80,000 MW goal would result in approximately $60 billion investment and $1.5 billion of economic development in our rural areas (where the wind resources are the greatest). The purpose of this paper is to provide an update on DOE's strategy for achieving its goals and the activities it has undertaken since the initiative was announced.

Flowers, L. (NREL); Dougherty, P. J. (DOE)

2001-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Subhourly wind forecasting techniques for wind turbine operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three models for making automated forecasts of subhourly wind and wind power fluctuations were examined to determine the models' appropriateness, accuracy, and reliability in wind forecasting for wind turbine operation. Such automated forecasts appear to have value not only in wind turbine control and operating strategies, but also in improving individual wind turbine control and operating strategies, but also in improving individual wind turbine operating strategies (such as determining when to attempt startup). A simple persistence model, an autoregressive model, and a generalized equivalent Markhov (GEM) model were developed and tested using spring season data from the WKY television tower located near Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The three models represent a pure measurement approach, a pure statistical method and a statistical-dynamical model, respectively. Forecasting models of wind speed means and measures of deviations about the mean were developed and tested for all three forecasting techniques for the 45-meter level and for the 10-, 30- and 60-minute time intervals. The results of this exploratory study indicate that a persistence-based approach, using onsite measurements, will probably be superior in the 10-minute time frame. The GEM model appears to have the most potential in 30-minute and longer time frames, particularly when forecasting wind speed fluctuations. However, several improvements to the GEM model are suggested. In comparison to the other models, the autoregressive model performed poorly at all time frames; but, it is recommended that this model be upgraded to an autoregressive moving average (ARMA or ARIMA) model. The primary constraint in adapting the forecasting models to the production of wind turbine cluster power output forecasts is the lack of either actual data, or suitable models, for simulating wind turbine cluster performance.

Wegley, H.L.; Kosorok, M.R.; Formica, W.J.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Alaskan Cooperative Wins Wind Award | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Cooperative Wins Wind Award Alaskan Cooperative Wins Wind Award Alaskan Cooperative Wins Wind Award April 2, 2010 - 2:30pm Addthis A rural Alaskan electric cooperative was honored for breaking new ground with Alaska's first wind megawatt class turbine project. The Kodiak Electric Association received the Wind Cooperative of the Year Award for its Pillar Mountain Wind Project. The award, sponsored by the Energy Department and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, recognizes KEA for leadership in advancing wind power. Boosters of Pillar Mountain see the project as the first step toward wind power at other Alaskan utilities, freeing them from the state's dependence on diesel power generation. The association is on Kodiak Island and serves just less than 6,000 electric meters on the island of about 12,000 people. This puts Kodiak well

199

Method and apparatus for wind turbine braking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for braking a wind turbine including at least one rotor blade coupled to a rotor. The method includes selectively controlling an angle of pitch of the at least one rotor blade with respect to a wind direction based on a design parameter of a component of the wind turbine to facilitate reducing a force induced into the wind turbine component as a result of braking.

Barbu, Corneliu (Laguna Hills, CA); Teichmann, Ralph (Nishkayuna, NY); Avagliano, Aaron (Houston, TX); Kammer, Leonardo Cesar (Niskayuna, NY); Pierce, Kirk Gee (Simpsonville, SC); Pesetsky, David Samuel (Greenville, SC); Gauchel, Peter (Muenster, DE)

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

200

Wind driven gas generator  

SciTech Connect

A means is provided to convert wind energy into electrical energy which, through electrolysis, forms gases to be stored under pressure, giving a form of stored energy for use at some future time by the use of a high torque, low speed vertical axis wind machine connected by direct drive to homopolar direct current generators so as to create direct current for the electrolysis of water, resulting in the breakdown of water into its basic components of hydrogen and oxygen, which are then stored under pressure until necessary for use as a source of energy.

Crehore, R.

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed WindSolar Interconnection Workshop Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed WindSolar Interconnection Workshop May 21, 2013 8:00AM...

204

The Wind Energy Outlook Scenarios 1 India Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 ?Status of wind energy in India ????????????????????6 Wind energy in India????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????7 Wind power resource assessment?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????6 Wind power installations by state?????????????????????????????????????????????????????????8

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Wind Research Offshore Wind Research Photo of a European offshore wind farm. Early progress in European Offshore Wind Energy over the last decade provides a glimpse into the vast potential of the global offshore resource. For more than eight years, NREL has worked with the Department of Energy to become an international leader in offshore wind energy research. Capabilities NREL's offshore wind capabilities focus on critical areas that reflect the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the U.S. Department of Energy including: Offshore Design Tools and Methods Offshore Standards and Testing Energy Analysis of Offshore Systems Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Grid Integration of Offshore Wind Key Research NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United States in

206

Wind resource analysis. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

FY78 results of the Wind Resource Analyses task of the ERAB are described. Initial steps were taken to acquire modern atmosphere models of near-surface wind flow and primary data sets used in previous studies of national and regional wind resources. Because numerous assumptions are necessary to interpret available data in terms of wind energy potential, conclusions of previous studies differ considerably. These data analyses may be improved by future SERI research. State-of-the-art atmosphere models are a necessary component of the SERI wind resource analyses capacity. However, these methods also need to be tested and verified in diverse applications. The primary data sets and principal features of the models are discussed.

Hardy, D. M.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute`s (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10% to 30% more energy than conventional blades. 6 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

210

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

211

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

212

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a hilly field, with six visible wind turbines spinning in the wind. Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating...

213

Solar Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Wind Place Krasnodar, Romania Zip 350000 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Russia-based PV product manufacturer. Solar Wind manufactures...

214

EERE: Wind Program Home Page  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

wind projects and offshore wind resource potential. Offshore Wind R&D DOE makes strategic research & deployment investments to launch domestic offshore wind industry....

215

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 2010. Impact of Wind Energy Installations on DomesticUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2012a.D.C. : American Wind Energy Association. American Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and K. Porter. 2011. Wind Power and Electricity Markets.41 6. Wind Power Priceat Various Levels of Wind Power Capacity Penetration Wind

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Horizon Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) does not have regulatory authority specific to wind power development at this time. WDFW is an agency with environmental expertise as provided for through the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 197-11-920. Comments related to environmental impacts are provided to regulatory authorities through the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) Revised Code of Washington (RCW) 43.21C review process.

Cover Photo; Nina Carter; Heath Packard; Lisa Paribello; Craig Dublanko; Dana Peck; Nicole Hughes; Bill Robinson; Robert Kruse; Arlo Corwin; Joe Buchanan; Ted Clausing; Eric Cummins; Travis Nelson; Eric Pentico; Mike Ritter; Jeff Tayer; James Watson; William Weiler; David Mcclure

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on the results of the power performance test that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted on Entegrity Wind System Inc.'s EW50 small wind turbine.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Wind resource assessment and wind energy system cost analysis: Fort Huachuca, Arizona  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this joint DOE and National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) project is to determine whether wind turbines can reduce costs by providing power to US military facilities in high wind areas. In support of this objective, one year of data on the wind resources at several Fort Huachuca sites was collected. The wind resource data were analyzed and used as input to an economic study for a wind energy installation at Fort Huachuca. The results of this wind energy feasibility study are presented in the report.

Olsen, T.L. [Tim Olsen Consulting, Denver, CO (United States); McKenna, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NREL: Wind Research - Information and Outreach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

small wind systems. Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities Projects Offshore Wind Research Large Wind Turbine Research Midsize Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Wind Power as an Electrical Energy Source in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using 3 h wind data (197074) from nine first-order NWS stations in and around Illinois, monthly frequency histograms of wind speeds for each station, and for each half-day (07001800 and 19000600 LST) were constructed. The histogram class ...

Wayne M. Wendland

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wind Power Generation Dynamic Impacts on Electric Utility Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical planning study is an initial assessment of potential dynamic impacts on electric utility systems of wind power generation via large wind turbines. Three classes of dynamic problems-short-term transient stability, system frequency excursions, and minute-to-minute unit ramping limitations - were examined in case studies based on the Hawaiian Electric Co. System.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Correlation of Real and Model Wind Speeds in Different Terrains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind speeds over a 6-month period from 21 surface stations, 3 upper-wind stations, and 2 different models are compared. Similar data are used for three different topographic regions of New Zealand broadly classed as having low, moderate, and high ...

Steve J. Reid; Richard Turner

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

: Class FeatureList  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Methods inherited from class java.util.AbstractList. iterator, listIterator, listIterator. Methods inherited from class java.lang.Object. ...

225

Wind Vision Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Vision Wind Farm Facility Wind Vision Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Vision Developer Wind Vision Location St. Ansgar IA Coordinates 43.348224°, -92.888816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.348224,"lon":-92.888816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

High Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds Wind Farm Winds Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Winds Wind Farm Facility High Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser PPM Energy Inc Location Solano County CA Coordinates 38.124844°, -121.764915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.124844,"lon":-121.764915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Research Small Wind Turbine Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Small Wind Project's objectives are to reduce barriers to wind energy expansion, stabilize the market, and expand the number of small wind turbine systems installed in the United States. "Small wind turbine" refers to a turbine smaller than or equal to 100 kilowatts (kW). "Distributed wind" includes small and midsize turbines (100 kW through 1 megawatt [MW]). Since 1996, NREL's small wind turbine research has provided turbine testing, turbine development, and prototype refinement leading to more commercially available small wind turbines. Work is conducted under the following areas. You can also learn more about state and federal policies

228

Wind Power Plant Monitoring Project Annual Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intermittent nature of the wind resource, together with short-term power fluctuations, are the two principal issues facing a utility with wind power plants in its power grid. To mitigate these issues, utilities, wind power plant developers, and operators need to understand the nature of wind power fluctuations and how they affect the electrical power system, as well as to analyze ancillary service requirements with real wind power plant output data. To provide the necessary data, NREL conducted a study to collect at least 2 years of long-term, high-frequency (1-hertz [Hz]) data from several medium- to large-scale wind power plants with different wind resources, terrain features, and turbine types. Researchers then analyzed the data for power fluctuations, frequency distribution of wind power (by deriving a probability distribution function of wind power plant output variations), spatial and temporal diversity of wind power, and wind power capacity credit issues. Results of these analyses can provide data on the potential effects of wind power plants on power system regulation.

Wan, Y.

2001-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Study of a Wind Farm Power System: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A wind power system differs from a conventional power system. In a conventional power plant, the operator can control the plant's output. The output of a wind farm cannot be controlled because the output fluctuates with the wind. In this paper, we investigate the power-system interaction resulting from power variations at wind farms using steady-state analysis.

Muljadi, E.; Wan, Y.; Butterfield, C. P.; Parsons, B.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

driven by lower natural gas prices), pushed wind energy fromAlthough low natural gas prices are, in part, attributableincreases in natural gas prices going forward. As a result,

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Katabatic Wind in Opposing Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a one-dimensional model of katabatic winds in ambient flow and examines types of possible solutions. Results presented in dimensionless form indicate that 1) cooling along a slope with upslope ambient flow can lead to tranquil ...

David R. Fitzjarrald

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model  

SciTech Connect

In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Modeling Sensitivities to the 20% Wind Scenario Report with the WinDS Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In May 2008, DOE published '20% Wind Energy by 2030', a report which describes the costs and benefits of producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology. The total electricity system cost resulting from this scenario was modestly higher than a scenario in which no additional wind was installed after 2006. NREL's Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model was used to support this analysis. With its 358 regions, explicit treatment of transmission expansion, onshore siting considerations, shallow- and deep-water wind resources, 2030 outlook, explicit financing assumptions, endogenous learning, and stochastic treatment of wind resource variability, WinDS is unique in the level of detail it can bring to this analysis. For the 20% Wind Energy by 2030 analysis, the group chose various model structures (such as the ability to wheel power within an interconnect), and the wind industry agreed on a variety of model inputs (such as the cost of transmission or new wind turbines). For this paper, the analysis examined the sensitivity of the results to variations in those input values and model structure choices. These included wind cost and performance improvements over time, seasonal/diurnal wind resource variations, transmission access and costs, siting costs, conventional fuel cost trajectories, and conventional capital costs.

Blair, N.; Hand, M.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Wind Power Today  

SciTech Connect

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Wind Power Today  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program.

Not Available

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characteristics Study of Transmission Line Mechanical Research Center (TLMRC) Wind Tower Data: Notes on Field-Wind Loading Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field determination of wind loads is one of the critical areas of wind research. In the past, researchers have used different procedures to collect, reduce, and analyze wind data, making it difficult to compare results. This study focused on data acquisition and reduction techniques for field-wind experiments and their derived results. The outcome will be useful for developing a standard procedure for future field-wind loading experiments.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Wind Spires as an Alternative Energy Source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discloses the design and development of an innovative wind tower system having an axisymmetric wind deflecting structure with a plurality of symmetrically mounted rooftop size wind turbines near the axisymmetric structure. The purpose of the wind deflecting structure is to increase the ambient wind speed that in turn results in an overall increase in the power capacity of the wind turbines. Two working prototypes were constructed and installed in the summer of 2009 and 2012 respectively. The system installed in the Summer of 2009 has a cylindrical wind deflecting structure, while the tower installed in 2012 has a spiral-shape wind deflecting structure. Each tower has 4 turbines, each rated at 1.65 KW Name-Plate-Rating. Before fabricating the full-size prototypes, computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses and scaled-down table-top models were used to predict the performance of the full-scale models. The performance results obtained from the full-size prototypes validated the results obtained from the computational models and those of the scaled-down models. The second prototype (spiral configuration) showed at a wind speed of 11 miles per hour (4.9 m/s) the power output of the system could reach 1,288 watt, when a typical turbine installation, with no wind deflecting structure, could produce only 200 watt by the same turbines at the same wind speed. At a wind speed of 18 miles per hour (8 m/sec), the spiral prototype produces 6,143 watt, while the power generated by the same turbines would be 1,412 watt in the absence of a wind deflecting structure under the same wind speed. Four US patents were allowed, and are in print, as the results of this project (US 7,540,706, US 7,679,209, US 7,845,904, and US 8,002,516).

Majid Rashidi, Ph.D., P.E.

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Wind Turbine Generator System Safety and Function Test Report for the Ventera VT10 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a safety and function test that NREL conducted on the Ventera VT10 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Test application of a semi-objective approach to wind forecasting for wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

The test application of the semi-objective (S-O) wind forecasting technique at three locations is described. The forecasting sites are described as well as site-specific forecasting procedures. Verification of the S-O wind forecasts is presented, and the observed verification results are interpreted. Comparisons are made between S-O wind forecasting accuracy and that of two previous forecasting efforts that used subjective wind forecasts and model output statistics. (LEW)

Wegley, H.L.; Formica, W.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NREL: Wind Research - Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Photo of a large wind turbine blade sticking out of the structural testing laboratory; it is perpendicular to a building at the National Wind Technology Center. A...

243

Wind | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment and Characterization Defining, measuring, and forecasting land-based and offshore wind resources Environmental Impacts and Siting of Wind Projects Avoiding,...

244

Wind/Hydro Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Announcements (Updated July 8, 2010) The Final WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Report, dated June 2, 2009, has been submitted to...

245

Wind Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating electricity, charging batteries, pumping water, and grinding grain.

246

Wind for Schools (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

Baring-Gould, I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wind for Schools (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

Baring-Gould, I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Wind energy bibliography  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography is designed to help the reader search for information on wind energy. The bibliography is intended to help several audiences, including engineers and scientists who may be unfamiliar with a particular aspect of wind energy, university researchers who are interested in this field, manufacturers who want to learn more about specific wind topics, and librarians who provide information to their clients. Topics covered range from the history of wind energy use to advanced wind turbine design. References for wind energy economics, the wind energy resource, and environmental and institutional issues related to wind energy are also included.

None

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 10. Alaska region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each subregion of Alaska. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a state scale is given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each subregion are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the Alaska wind energy resource. An outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each subregion is included. Assessments for individual subregions are presented as separate chapters. The subregion wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the Alaska wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the subregion chapters.

Wise, J.L.; Wentink, T. Jr.; Becker, R. Jr.; Comiskey, A.L.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 9. The Southwest Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in Nevada and California. Background on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted is presented. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline to the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state are given. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed.

Simon, R.L.; Norman, G.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 4. The Northeast region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled in this chapter into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. An introduction and outline are provided for in the descriptions of the wind resource given for each state. Assessments for individual states are presented. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters.

Pickering, K.E.; Vilardo, J.M.; Schakenbach, J.T.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

policy support for other renewable energy sources, wind mayrenewable energy and climate policy initiatives. With wind

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Diablo Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diablo Winds Wind Farm Diablo Winds Wind Farm Facility Diablo Winds Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location Altamont Pass CA Coordinates 37.7347°, -121.652° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.7347,"lon":-121.652,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Wind Resource Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Offshore Wind Resource Characterization Map of the United States, showing the wind potential of offshore areas across the country. Enlarge image US offshore wind speed estimates at 90-m height NREL scientists and engineers are leading efforts in resource mapping, remote sensor measurement and development, and forecasting that are essential for the development of offshore wind. Resource Mapping For more than 15 years, NREL's meteorologists, engineers, and Geographic Information System experts have led the production of wind resource characterization maps and reports used by policy makers, private industry, and other government organizations to inform and accelerate the development of wind energy in the United States. Offshore wind resource data and mapping has strategic uses. As with terrestrial developments, traditional

255

NREL: Wind Research - Midsize Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midsize Wind Turbine Research Midsize Wind Turbine Research To facilitate the development and commercialization of midsize wind turbines (turbines with a capacity rating of more than 100 kW up to 1 MW), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL launched the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project. In its latest study, NREL determined that there is a substantial market for midsize wind turbines. One of the most significant barriers to the midsize turbine market is the lack of turbines available for deployment; there are few midsize turbines on the market today. The objectives of the Midsize Wind Turbine Development Project are to reduce the barriers to wind energy expansion by filling an existing domestic technology gap; facilitate partnerships; accelerate maturation of existing U.S. wind energy businesses; and incorporate process improvement

256

Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Micro Wind Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

257

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Wind Power Today: Federal Wind Program Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Aleutian Pribilof Islands Wind Energy Feasibility Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under this project, the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association (APIA) conducted wind feasibility studies for Adak, False Pass, Nikolski, Sand Point and St. George. The DOE funds were also be used to continue APIA's role as project coordinator, to expand the communication network quality between all participants and with other wind interest groups in the state and to provide continued education and training opportunities for regional participants. This DOE project began 09/01/2005. We completed the economic and technical feasibility studies for Adak. These were funded by the Alaska Energy Authority. Both wind and hydro appear to be viable renewable energy options for Adak. In False Pass the wind resource is generally good but the site has high turbulence. This would require special care with turbine selection and operations. False Pass may be more suitable for a tidal project. APIA is funded to complete a False Pass tidal feasibility study in 2012. Nikolski has superb potential for wind power development with Class 7 wind power density, moderate wind shear, bi-directional winds and low turbulence. APIA secured nearly $1M from the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Utilities Service Assistance to Rural Communities with Extremely High Energy Costs to install a 65kW wind turbine. The measured average power density and wind speed at Sand Point measured at 20m (66ft), are 424 W/m2 and 6.7 m/s (14.9 mph) respectively. Two 500kW Vestas turbines were installed and when fully integrated in 2012 are expected to provide a cost effective and clean source of electricity, reduce overall diesel fuel consumption estimated at 130,000 gallons/year and decrease air emissions associated with the consumption of diesel fuel. St. George Island has a Class 7 wind resource, which is superior for wind power development. The current strategy, led by Alaska Energy Authority, is to upgrade the St. George electrical distribution system and power plant. Avian studies in Nikolski and Sand Point have allowed for proper wind turbine siting without killing birds, especially endangered species and bald eagles. APIA continues coordinating and looking for funding opportunities for regional renewable energy projects. An important goal for APIA has been, and will continue to be, to involve community members with renewable energy projects and energy conservation efforts.

Bruce A. Wright

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

New England Wind Forum: Technical Challenges  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Technical Challenges Technical Challenges Wind power is by its nature variable, and as a result, it differs from the majority of generation supplying the electric grid. Aspects of this variability are often cited as shortcomings. For instance, the fact that wind power will not be as regularly and reliably available at system peak times as most other generators is sometimes used to argue that wind power requires additional backup resources by other generation on a one-to-one basis. And wind's relatively low capacity factor (a ratio of the total energy output relative to the theoretical sustained peak output) is sometimes used to characterize wind generators as inefficient. It's been stated that other generation will have to be operated in such an inefficient manner to react to wind that it will not reduce fossil fuel usage or emissions. Here we address concerns that wind power's variability will eradicate any expected benefit.

262

Wind Resource Atlas of Oaxaca (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CD version of the Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Wind Power Project Repowering: Financial Feasibility, Decision...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

advancements, have resulted in significant increases in net capacity factors for utility-scale wind plants over the past 13 years (Lantz et al. 2012). Changes are...

264

Offshore Wind Resource | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Offshore Wind Resource Offshore Wind Resource Dataset Summary Description Global Wind Potential Supply Curves by Country, Class, and Depth (quantities in GW) Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released July 12th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated July 12th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords offshore resource offshore wind renewable energy potential Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon offshore_resource_100_vs2.xlsx (xlsx, 41.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access

265

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Performance Test Report for the ARE442 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the ARE 442 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the ARE 442 is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

van Dam, J.; Jager, D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training Michigan Wind Maufacturer Teams with College on Training July 6, 2010 - 11:14am Addthis Tom Bos is one of nine employees hired at wind turbine blade manufacturer Energetx Composites from the first class of students to graduate from Grand Rapids Community College's composites technician course. | Photo courtesy Energetx Tom Bos is one of nine employees hired at wind turbine blade manufacturer Energetx Composites from the first class of students to graduate from Grand Rapids Community College's composites technician course. | Photo courtesy Energetx Joshua DeLung Tom Bos has found a new profession. Bos was laid off after 20 years in a small company office environment. He spent 14 months looking for a job, before seeing an ad in the local paper

268

Small Wind Research Turbine: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Small Wind Research Turbine (SWRT) project was initiated to provide reliable test data for model validation of furling wind turbines and to help understand small wind turbine loads. This report will familiarize the user with the scope of the SWRT test and support the use of these data. In addition to describing all the testing details and results, the report presents an analysis of the test data and compares the SWRT test data to simulation results from the FAST aeroelastic simulation model.

Corbus, D.; Meadors, M.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Applications: Operational wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Operational wind turbines Benefits: Optimize wind turbine performance Summary: Researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Intelligent Wind Turbine Program are developing a multi-physics modeling approach for the analysis of wind turbines in the presence of realistic

270

Wind powering America: Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind resources in the state of Iowa show great potential for wind energy development. This fact sheet provides a brief description of the state's wind resources and the financial incentives available for the development of wind energy systems. It also provides a list of contacts for more information.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

271

West Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Winds Wind Farm West Winds Wind Farm Facility West Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison/PacifiCorp Location San Gorgonio CA Coordinates 33.9095°, -116.734° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9095,"lon":-116.734,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

272

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Resources  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resources Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Resources Go to the Vermont wind resource map. Go to the New Hampshire wind resource map. Go to the Maine wind resource map. Go to the Massachusetts wind resource map. Go to the Connecticut wind resource map. Go to the Rhode Island wind resource map. New England Wind Resource Maps Wind resources maps of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont.

273

Wind energy, offers considerable promise: the wind itself is free,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy, offers considerable promise: the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise: the wind itself is free, wind power is clean, and it is virtually inexhaustible. In recent years, research on wind energy has accelerated

Langendoen, Koen

274

Wind Powering America  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

These news items are notable additions These news items are notable additions to the Wind Powering America Web site. The Wind Powering America Web site reports recent national and state wind market changes by cataloging wind activities such as wind resource maps, small wind consumer's guides, local wind workshops, news articles, and publications in the areas of policy, public power, small wind, Native Americans, agricultural sector, economic development, public lands, and schools. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/ Nominate an Electric Cooperative for Wind Power Leadership Award by January 15 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4076 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4076 Mon, 16

275

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Site Assessment: Wind Powering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

environmental impacts have increased the demand for small wind energy systems for homeowners, schools, businesses, and local governments. Over the past decade, the knowledge,...

276

Wind Power Outlook 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The brochure, expected to be updated annually, provides the American Wind Energy Association's (AWAE's) up-to-date assessment of the wind industry. It provides a summary of the state of wind power in the U.S., including the challenges and opportunities facing the industry. It provides summary information on the growth of the industry, policy-related factors such as the federal wind energy production tax credit status, comparisons with natural gas, and public views on wind energy.

anon.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Wind Resource Maps (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides high-resolution wind maps and estimates of the wind resource potential that would be possible from development of the available windy land areas after excluding areas unlikely to be developed. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to Wind Powering America's online wind energy resource maps.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

NREL: Wind Research - Entegrity Wind Systems's EW50 Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entegrity Wind Systems's EW50 Turbine Testing and Results Entegrity Wind Systems's EW50 Turbine Testing and Results Entegrity Wind Systems' EW50 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Entegrity Wind Systems' EW50 turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The EW50 is a 50-kilowatt (kW), three-bladed, horizontal-axis downwind small wind turbine. The turbine's rotor diameter is 15 meters, and its hub height is 30.5 meters. It has a three-phase induction generator that operates at 480 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/11/2009: 17; 3/12/2009: 17; 3/13/2009: 17; 3/14/2009: 17; 3/15/2009: 17;

279

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Applications Center Valuable Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Applications Center Valuable Resource for Wind for Schools Partners March 14, 2013 Audio with Jerry Hudgins, Nebraska Wind Applications Center Director and Joel Jacobs,...

282

Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends Wind Powering America Webinar: Wind Power Economics: Past, Present, and Future Trends November 23, 2011 - 1:43pm Addthis Wind...

283

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing One of the barriers for the small wind market has been the lack...

284

Discussion of Ultimate Wind Load Design Gust Wind Speeds ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ind. Aerodyn., 97(34), 120131. Peterka, JA (2001). Database of peak gust wind speeds, Texas Tech/ CSU. Extreme winds and wind effects on ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

Surface wind speed distributions| Implications for climate and wind power.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Surface constituent and energy fluxes, and wind power depend non-linearly on wind speed and are sensitive to the tails of the wind distribution. Until (more)

Capps, Scott Blair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Wind energy resource atlas. Volume 5: the East Central Region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This atlas of the wind energy resource is composed of introductory and background information, a regional summary of the wind resource, and assessments of the wind resource in each state of the region. Background is presented on how the wind resource is assessed and on how the results of the assessment should be interpreted. A description of the wind resource on a regional scale is then given. The results of the wind energy assessments for each state are assembled into an overview and summary of the various features of the regional wind energy resource. Assessments for individual states are presented as separate chapters. The state wind energy resources are described in greater detail than is the regional wind energy resource, and features of selected stations are discussed. This preface outlines the use and interpretation of the information found in the state chapters. States include Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Brode, R.; Stoner, R.; Elliott, D.L.; Barchet, W.R.; George, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A Technique for Removing the Effect of Migrating Birds in 915-MHz Wind Profiler Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described and evaluated for decreasing artifacts in radar wind profiler data resulting from overflying, migrating birds. The method processes the prerecorded, averaged spectral data of a wind profiler to derive hourly wind profiles ...

M. S. Pekour; R. L. Coulter

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. U.S. Department of Energy (2008). 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energys Contribution to U.S.shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing, Phase 1: Initial Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes initial results from the Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Project at a 75-MW wind project in west Texas.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Role of Eddies in Determining the Structure and Response of the Wind-Driven Southern Hemisphere Overturning: Results from the Modeling Eddies in the Southern Ocean (MESO) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Modeling Eddies in the Southern Ocean (MESO) project uses numerical sensitivity studies to examine the role played by Southern Ocean winds and eddies in determining the density structure of the global ocean and the magnitude and structure of ...

Robert Hallberg; Anand Gnanadesikan

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM 2 Presentation Overview * Introduction to 2009 edition of U.S. wind energy market report * Wind installation trends * Wind industry trends * Price, cost, and...

292

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,GE Energy. 2011a. Oahu Wind Integration Study Final Report.Corp. 2010. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study.

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Arizona Public Service Wind Integration Cost Impact Study.2010. SPP WITF Wind Integration Study. Little Rock,

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind energy integration, transmission, and policy2012, however, federal policy towards wind energy remainsin federal policy towards wind energy after 2012 places such

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyPTC. Moreover, federal policy towards wind energy remainsand policy announcements demonstrate accelerated activity in the offshore wind energy

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty The wind energy integration, transmission, and policyand absent supportive policies for wind energy. That said,

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ December 1, 2005 Prepared for United States ......................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

298

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2003 ­ August 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

299

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island December 1, 2003 ­ February 29, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts.................................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 11 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

300

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island June 1, 2004 ­ August 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT FALMOUTH, MA June1, 2004 to August 31, 2004. Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 8 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 8 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

302

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island September 1, 2003 ­ November 30, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

303

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2004 ­ May 31, 2004 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distribution

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

304

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle December 1, 2004 ­ February 28, 2005 Prepared for United States.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

305

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle March 1, 2005 ­ May 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department.................................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Time Series........................................................................................................... 10 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

306

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Presque Isle June 1, 2005 ­ August 31, 2005 Prepared for United States Department...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

307

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND DATA REPORT Thompson Island March 1, 2003 ­ May 31, 2003 Prepared for Massachusetts Technology...................................................................................................................... 9 Wind Speed Time Series............................................................................................................. 9 Wind Speed Distributions

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

308

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine prices. Installed project costs are found to exhibitpressure on total project costs and wind power prices. Windinstalled wind power project costs, wind turbine transaction

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

downward pressure on project costs and wind power prices.installed wind power project costs, wind turbine transactionand uncertain offshore project costs, and public acceptance

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Consult. 2010. International Wind Energy Development: WorldUBS Global I/O: Global Wind Sector. UBS Investment Research.

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA).2009b. AWEA Small Wind Turbine Global Market Study: Year

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Minnesota (12%). Offshore Wind Power Project and Policythe emergence of an offshore wind power market still facesexists in developing offshore wind energy in several parts

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 advanced-stage offshore wind project proposals totalingcontinued in 2008 (see Offshore Wind Development Activities,Market Report Offshore Wind Development Activities In

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas prices), pushed wind energy to the top of (andperformance, and price of wind energy, policy uncertainty cost, performance, and price of wind energy, some of these

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

RI_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionRhodeIslandWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Rhode...

316

CT_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionConnecticutWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of...

317

MA_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionMassachusettsWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of...

318

VT_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionVermontWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Vermont...

319

NH_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UnitedStatesWindHighResolutionNewHampshireWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of New...

320

IA_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISDataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionIowaWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Iowa at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ME_50m_Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SDataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionMaineWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Maine...

322

ga_50m_wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionGeorgiaWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for the state of Georgia...

323

ny_50m_wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ataTechnologySpecificUnitedStatesWindHighResolutionNewYorkWindHighResolution.zip> Description: Abstract: Annual average wind resource potential for New York at a 50...

324

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

federal and state incentives for wind energy deployment. Thefederal and state incentives for wind energy deployment.federal and state incentives for wind energy deployment in

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

continued state and federal incentives for wind energy,continued state and federal incentives for wind energy,continued state and federal incentives for wind energy,

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008. Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association.American Wind Energy Association ( AWEA). 2009b. AWEA SmallWashington, DC: American Wind Energy Association. Bolinger,

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. International Wind Energy Development: World MarketUniversity. American Wind Energy Association (AWEA). 2010a.Washington, DC: American Wind Energy Association. American

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

2009 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. Status of Centralized Wind Power Forecasting in NorthInterconnection Policies and Wind Power: A Discussion ofs first utility-scale wind power project. Credit: Klaus

Wiser, Ryan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Effects of Integrating Wind Power on Transmission SystemInterconnection Policies and Wind Power: A Discussion ofof their database of wind power projects, and for providing

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Power Testing and Data in General Wind and Turbine Dynamics Wind Stresses Control, the Power Grid, and the Grids Economics Environmental Effects Energy101: Wind Turbines...

331

New England Wind Forum newsletter, Volume 1, Issue 1 - January 2006  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

1 - January 2006 1 - January 2006 New England Wind Forum Is a Clearinghouse for New England Wind Power Information New England is the birthplace of the U.S. wind power industry and home to a number of wind industry firsts, including the first large-scale electricity-producing windmill and the world's first wind "farm." Today, wind power is the fastest-growing energy source in the country and the world. In New England, wind energy is poised to help diversify the region's electricity supply mix, reducing the energy dependence of a region that is traditionally a major energy importer. A new wave of development activity, including traditional wind farms, community-scale development, and efforts to tap the world-class winds off our shores, is under- way throughout the region.

332

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Showcase - Wind Power Science Showcase - Wind Power Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Wind Power Research Results in DOE Databases IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2, Energy Citations Database NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential, Energy Citations Database Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants, DOE Information Bridge 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind, ScienceCinema, multimedia Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the

333

Wind | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Wind Wind America is home to one of the largest and fastest growing wind markets in the world. Watch the video to learn more about the latest trends in the U.S. wind power market and join us this Thursday, August 8 at 3 pm ET for a Google+ Hangout on wind energy in America. The United States is home to one of the largest and fastest growing wind markets in the world. To stay competitive in this sector, the Energy Department invests in wind projects, both on land and offshore, to advance technology innovations, create job opportunities and boost economic growth. Moving forward, the U.S. wind industry remains a critical part of the Energy Department's all-of-the-above energy strategy to cut carbon pollution, diversify our energy economy and bring the next-generation of

334

NREL: Wind Research - WindPACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindPACT WindPACT The Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technology (WindPACT) studies were conducted to assist industry by testing innovative components, such as advanced blades and drivetrains, to lower the cost of energy. Specific goals included: Foster technological advancements to reduce the cost of wind energy Determine probable size ranges of advanced utility-scale turbines over the next decade for U.S. application Evaluate advanced concepts that are necessary to achieve objectives of cost and size for future turbines Identify and solve technological hurdles that may block industry from taking advantage of promising technology Design, fabricate, and test selected advanced components to prove their viability Support wind industry through transfer of technology from

335

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Introduction Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding educa- tion to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institu- tions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more gradu- ate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initia-

336

Practical method for estimating wind characteristics at potential wind-energy-conversion sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Terrain features and variations in the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer produce local variations in wind, and these variations are not depicted well by standard weather reports. A method is developed to compute local winds for use in estimating the wind energy available at any potential site for a wind turbine. The method uses the terrain heights for an area surrounding the site and a series of wind and pressure reports from the nearest four or five national Weather Service stations. An initial estimate of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer is made, then these winds are adjusted to satisfy the continuity equation. In this manner the flow is made to reflect the influences of the terrain and the shape of the boundary-layer top. This report describes in detail the methodology and results, and provides descriptions of the computer programs, instructions for using them, and complete program listings.

Endlich, R. M.; Ludwig, F. L.; Bhumralkar, C. M.; Estoque, M. A.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wind energy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of the electricity that could potentially be generated by wind power and of the land area available for wind energy development have been calculated for the contiguous United States. The estimates are based on published wind resource data and exclude windy lands that are not suitable for development as a result of environmental and land-use considerations. Despite these exclusions, the potential electric power from wind energy is surprisingly large. Good wind areas, which cover 6% of the contiguous US land area, have the potential to supply more than one and a half times the current electricity consumption of the United States. Technology under development today will be capable of producing electricity economically from good wind sites in many regions of the country.

Elliott, D.L.; Schwartz, M.N.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Bayesian Inference for Wind Field Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many problems in spatial statistics it is necessary to infer a global problem solution by combining local models. A principled approach to this problem is to develop a global probabilistic model for the relationships between local variables and to use this as the prior in a Bayesian inference procedure. We show how a Gaussian process with hyper-parameters estimated from Numerical Weather Prediction Models yields meteorologically convincing wind fields. We use neural networks to make local estimates of wind vector probabilities. The resulting inference problem cannot be solved analytically, but Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods allow us to retrieve accurate wind fields. Keywords: Bayesian inference; surface winds; spatial priors; Gaussian Processes 2 Bayesian Inference for Wind Field Retrieval 1 Introduction Satellite borne scatterometers are designed to retrieve surface winds over the oceans. These observations enhance the initial conditions supplied to Numerical Weather Predictio...

Dan Cornford And; Dan Cornford; Ian T. Nabney; Christopher K. I. Williams

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

NREL: Education Programs - KidWind Project and Wind Education...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KidWind Project and Wind Education in the Classroom: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned July 1, 2013 Integrating wind energy curricula into the classroom can seem like a...

340

NREL: Wind Research - Landing a Job in the Wind Industry: Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Landing a Job in the Wind Industry: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned January 28, 2013 Wind Powering America interviewed Marilla Lamb, a 2012 graduate of Northern Arizona...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NREL: Wind Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's wind energy research and development projects focus on reducing the cost of wind technology and expanding access to wind energy sites. Our specialized technical expertise, comprehensive design and analysis tools, and unique testing facilities help industry overcome challenges to bringing new wind technology to the marketplace. Some of these success stories are described in NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories. We also work closely with universities and other national laboratories supporting fundamental research in wind technologies, including aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, and material sciences essential in the development of new blade technologies and advanced controls, power electronics, and testing to further refine drivetrain topology.

342

Wind Power Career Chat  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document will teach students about careers in the wind energy industry. Wind energy, both land-based and offshore, is expected to provide thousands of new jobs in the next several decades. Wind energy companies are growing rapidly to meet America's demand for clean, renewable, and domestic energy. These companies need skilled professionals. Wind power careers will require educated people from a variety of areas. Trained and qualified workers manufacture, construct, operate, and manage wind energy facilities. The nation will also need skilled researchers, scientists, and engineers to plan and develop the next generation of wind energy technologies.

Not Available

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Wind power today  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Wind energy information guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Using ADCP Background Sound Levels to Estimate Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known that ambient sound is generated by wind through the process of wave breaking and bubble injection. The resulting sound levels are highly correlated with wind speed and, even though the physical process is not fully understood, ...

Len Zedel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impact of Energy Imbalance Tariff on Wind Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a study that uses actual wind power data and actual energy prices to analyze the impact of an energy imbalance tariff imposed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on wind power.

Wan, Y.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hydraulic Physical Modeling and Observations of a Severe Gap Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong gap winds in Howe Sound, British Columbia, are simulated using a small-scale physical model. Model results are presented and compared with observations recorded in Howe Sound during a severe gap wind event in December 1992. Hydraulic ...

Timothy D. Finnigan; Jason A. Vine; Peter L. Jackson; Susan E. Allen; Gregory A. Lawrence; Douw G. Steyn

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comments on Reexamination of Tropical Cyclone WindPressure Relationship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In their study on the windpressure relationship (WPR) that exists in tropical cyclones, Knaff and Zehr presented results of the use of the Dvorak Atlantic WPR for estimating central pressure and maximum wind speed of tropical cyclones. These ...

Shyamnath Veerasamy

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

An experimental and numerical study of wind turbine seismic behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Turbine Rotor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.9 Results ofA. C. (2006). WindPACT turbine rotor design study. ReportA. C. (2006). WindPACT turbine rotor design study. Report

Prowell, I.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wind Resource and Feasibility Assessment Report for the Lummi Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the wind resource on the Lummi Indian Reservation (Washington State) and presents the methodology, assumptions, and final results of the wind energy development feasibility assessment, which included an assessment of biological impacts and noise impacts.

DNV Renewables (USA) Inc.; J.C. Brennan & Associates, Inc.; Hamer Environmental L.P.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Comparison of Wind Monitoring Systems. Pad II: Doppley. Sodars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of wind speed, wind direction, and the vertical component of turbulence, from four different commercially available Doppler sodars, are compared with similar measurements from in situ sensors on a 300 m instrumented tower. Results ...

P. L. Finkelstein; J. C. Kaimal; J. E. Gaynor; M. E. Graves; T. J. Lockhart

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Buoy-Calibrated Winds over the Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large variability of the Gulf of Mexico wind field indicates that high-resolution wind data will be required to represent the weather systems affecting ocean circulation. This report presents methods and results of the calculation of a ...

Robert C. Rhodes; J. Dana Thompson; Alan J. Wallcraft

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Spume Drops Produced by the Wind Tearing of Wave Crests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wind tearing of breaking wave crests produces spume drops. The authors report preliminary laboratory data from direct and unambiguous observation of this process under various wind conditions using a video imaging technique. Results include ...

Magdalena Anguelova; Richard P. Barber Jr.; Jin Wu

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

New England Wind Forum: Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Issues Affecting Public Acceptance of Wind Energy Wind farm proponents seek to identify locations with the greatest wind resource and the smallest population. This approach mitigates human interaction and impact whenever possible. Uninhabited areas are scarce in New England, however. Due to the region's population density, many of the region's windy locations - which include coastal areas and high elevations - are in view of nearby communities or valued for their natural beauty or recreational value. As a result, the importance of public acceptance is magnified in determining the viability of wind power installations. Further complicating public acceptance of wind power installations is the local nature of wind project impacts compared to wind power's substantial benefits. All forms of energy have impacts on their surroundings, and our society requires power plants to satisfy its demand for electricity. On a regional and broader scale, wind power's benefits are considerable, and surveys show that the majority of the population supports wind power when compared to the alternatives. In light of these benefits and the broad public support, some communities focus on the question of "compared to what?" and then embrace wind power proposals.

356

Reference wind speed distributions and height profiles for wind turbine design and performance evaluation applications. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a set of reference or standard values of wind profiles, wind speed distributions and their effects on wind turbine performance for engineering design applications. Based on measured Weibull distribution parameters, representative average, low, and high variance data are given for height profiles of mean, 25 percentile, and 75 percentile wind speeds; and for wind speed probability density (velocity frequency) functions and cumulative probability (velocity duration) functions at selected heights. Results of a sensitivity analysis of the dependence of wind turbine performance parameters on cut-in speed, and rated speed for various mean wind and wind variance regimes are also presented. Wind turbine performance is expressed in terms of capacity factor (ratio of mean power output to rated power) and recovery factor (ratio of mean energy output to energy theoretically available in the wind). The representative high, mean, and low variance cases were determined from calculated Weibull distributions at 140 sites across the Continental U.S., and all of the representative functions are evaluated at mean wind speeds of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 m/s at standard 10 m level.

Justus, C.G.; Hargraves, W.R.; Mikhail, A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prepared for the Utility Wind Integration Group. Arlington,Wind Logics, Inc. 2004. Wind Integration StudyFinal Report.EnerNex Corp. 2006. Wind Integration Study for Public

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Wind Power Animation This animation discusses the advantages of wind power, the workings of a wind turbine, and wind resources in the United States. It also...

359

Wind Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Blog Wind Blog RSS September 26, 2013 Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative How can we make it easier for more communities to use wind power?...

360

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

growth in U.S. wind turbine manufacturing capability and the drop in wind power plantgrowth in U.S. wind turbine manufacturing capability and the drop in wind power plant

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Virtual Wind Speed Sensor for Wind Turbines Andrew Kusiak1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Virtual Wind Speed Sensor for Wind Turbines Andrew Kusiak1 ; Haiyang Zheng2 ; and Zijun Zhang3 Abstract: A data-driven approach for development of a virtual wind-speed sensor for wind turbines is presented. The virtual wind-speed sensor is built from historical wind-farm data by data-mining algorithms

Kusiak, Andrew

362

Error Estimates for Ocean Surface Winds: Applying Desroziers Diagnostics to the Cross-Calibrated, Multiplatform Analysis of Wind Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Desroziers diagnostics (DD) are applied to the cross-calibrated, multi-platform (CCMP) ocean surface wind data sets to estimate wind speed errors of the ECMWF background, the microwave satellite observations and the resulting CCMP analysis. ...

Ross N. Hoffman; Joseph V. Ardizzone; S. Mark Leidner; Deborah K. Smith; Robert Atlas

363

Wind Power Integration: Smoothing Short-Term Power Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid growth of wind power generation, utility systems are beginning to feel the intermittent and variable nature of these wind resources in electricity transmission and distribution system operations. Both short-term power fluctuations resulting from gusty winds and longer term variations resulting from diurnal wind speed variations and shifting weather patterns can affect utility power delivery as well as grid operations. This report addresses the characteristics of short-term power fluctuatio...

2005-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wind Power Integration: Energy Storage for Firming and Shaping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rapid growth of wind power generation, utility systems are beginning to experience the intermittent and variable nature of wind resources in electricity transmission and distribution system operations. Both short-term power fluctuations resulting from gusty winds and longer term power output variations resulting from diurnal wind speed variations and shifting weather patterns can affect utility power delivery as well as grid operations. This report addresses the longer-term power variations of w...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

Severe Convective Wind Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nontornadic thunderstorm winds from long-lived, widespread convective windstorms can have a tremendous impact on human lives and property. To examine environments that support damaging wind producing convection, sounding parameters from Rapid ...

Evan L. Kuchera; Matthew D. Parker

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Greensburg Wind Farm  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

renewable energy and energy efficiency. * Kansas offers the third highest potential for wind energy in the U.S. * Thorough research conducted by NREL proved the viability of wind...

367

Wind Rose Bias Correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind rose summaries, which provide a basis for understanding and evaluating the climatological behavior of local wind, have a directional bias if a conventional method is used in their generation. Three techniques used to remove this bias are ...

Scott Applequist

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

NREL: Wind Research - Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards NREL has received many awards for its technical innovations in wind energy. In addition, the research conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL has led...

369

Surface Wind Direction Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Common large shifts of wind direction in the weak-wind nocturnal boundary layer are poorly understood and are not adequately captured by numerical models and statistical parameterizations. The current study examines 15 datasets representing a ...

Larry Mahrt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a crane lifting the blades onto a wind turbine that reads 'U.S. Department of Energy, NREL.' You can learn more about horizontal axis turbines from the EERE Wind Program's...

371

Wind Energy Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avg Wind Speed 7.5 m/s 8.74 m/s GE 2.x turbine family ... 1 to 48 Hour Wind Forecasting ... Danish Transmission Grid w/ Interconnects & Offshore Sites ...

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Wind Energy Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wind energy can be produced anywhere in the world where the wind blows with a strong and consistent force. Windier locations produce more energy, which lowers the cost of producing electricity....

373

Wind Energy Benefits  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy provides many benefits, including economic and environmental. This two-sided fact sheet succinctly outlines the top ten wind energy benefits and is especially well suited for general audiences.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Wind Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guideline provides component-level information regarding the maintenance of major components associated with a wind turbine. It combines recommendations offered by major equipment manufacturers with lessons learned from owner/operators of wind turbine facilities.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

375

Stations in Special Wind Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stations in Special Wind Regions. ... station_matrix_912850.xlsx (Excel file). [ SED Home | Extreme Winds Home | Previous | Next ] ...

2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acquisition CPV Wind Duke Energy Acquisition Tierra Energy,Allco Wind Energy Duke Energy Acquisition Catamount Veolia

Bolinger, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Wind Engineering Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Wind Engineering Information at NIST. Wind Engineering Information at NIST. (the links below are a compilation ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

New England Wind Forum: New England Wind Projects  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share New England Wind Projects This page shows the location of installed and planned New England wind projects. Find windfarms, community-scale wind projects, customer-sited wind projects, small wind projects, and offshore wind projects. Read more information about how to use the Google Map and how to add your wind project to the map. Text version New England Wind Energy Projects Connecticut, East Canaan Wind Connecticut, Klug Farm Connecticut, Phoenix Press Connecticut, Wind Colebrook (South and North)

379

Alternative Design Study Report: WindPACT Advanced Wind Turbine Drive Train Designs Study; November 1, 2000 -- February 28, 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the Phase I results of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) WindPACT (Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies) Advanced Wind Turbine Drive Train Designs Study. Global Energy Concepts, LLC performed this work under a subcontract with NREL. The purpose of the WindPACT project is to identify technology improvements that will enable the cost of energy (COE) from wind turbines to be reduced. Other parts of the WindPACT project have examined blade and logistics scaling, balance-of-station costs, and rotor design. This study was designed to investigate innovative drive train designs.

Poore, R.; Lettenmaier, T.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Dual-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect

Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NREL: Wind Research - National Wind Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the base of the foothills just south of Boulder, Colorado, is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. Built in 1993, the center provides an ideal environment for the development of advanced wind energy technologies. The goal of the research conducted at the center is to help industry reduce the cost of energy so that wind can compete with traditional energy sources, providing a clean, renewable alternative for our nation's energy needs. Research at the NWTC is organized under two main categories, Wind Technology Development and Testing and Operations. Illustration of the National Wind Technology Center's organization chart. Fort Felker is listed as the Center Director, with Mike Robinson, Deputy Center Director; Paul Veers, Chief Engineer, and Laura Davis and Dorothy Haldeman beneath him. The Associate Director position is empty. Beneath them is the Wind Technology Research and Development Group Manager, Mike Robinson; the Testing and Operations Group Manager, Dave Simms; and the Offshore Wind and Ocean Power Systems Acting Supervisor, Fort Felker.

382

Wind Powering America: Wind Energy Videos  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative designed to increase the use of wind energy across the United States by working with regional stakeholders. A list of videos developed by and for the program includes interviews, short news clips, and documentary-like programs.

383

Hurricane Katrina Wind Investigation Report  

SciTech Connect

This investigation of roof damage caused by Hurricane Katrina is a joint effort of the Roofing Industry Committee on Weather Issues, Inc. (RICOWI) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory/U.S. Department of Energy (ORNL/DOE). The Wind Investigation Program (WIP) was initiated in 1996. Hurricane damage that met the criteria of a major windstorm event did not materialize until Hurricanes Charley and Ivan occurred in August 2004. Hurricane Katrina presented a third opportunity for a wind damage investigation in August 29, 2005. The major objectives of the WIP are as follows: (1) to investigate the field performance of roofing assemblies after major wind events; (2) to factually describe roofing assembly performance and modes of failure; and (3) to formally report results of the investigations and damage modes for substantial wind speeds The goal of the WIP is to perform unbiased, detailed investigations by credible personnel from the roofing industry, the insurance industry, and academia. Data from these investigations will, it is hoped, lead to overall improvement in roofing products, systems, roofing application, and durability and a reduction in losses, which may lead to lower overall costs to the public. This report documents the results of an extensive and well-planned investigative effort. The following program changes were implemented as a result of the lessons learned during the Hurricane Charley and Ivan investigations: (1) A logistics team was deployed to damage areas immediately following landfall; (2) Aerial surveillance--imperative to target wind damage areas--was conducted; (3) Investigation teams were in place within 8 days; (4) Teams collected more detailed data; and (5) Teams took improved photographs and completed more detailed photo logs. Participating associations reviewed the results and lessons learned from the previous investigations and many have taken the following actions: (1) Moved forward with recommendations for new installation procedures; (2) Updated and improved application guidelines and manuals from associations and manufacturers; (3) Launched certified product installer programs; and (4) Submitted building code changes to improve product installation. Estimated wind speeds at the damage locations came from simulated hurricane models prepared by Applied Research Associates of Raleigh, North Carolina. A dynamic hurricane wind field model was calibrated to actual wind speeds measured at 12 inland and offshore stations. The maximum estimated peak gust wind speeds in Katrina were in the 120-130 mph range. Hurricane Katrina made landfall near Grand Isle, Louisiana, and traveled almost due north across the city of New Orleans. Hurricane winds hammered the coastline from Houma, Louisiana, to Pensacola, Florida. The severe flooding problems in New Orleans made it almost impossible for the investigating teams to function inside the city. Thus the WIP investigations were all conducted in areas east of the city. The six teams covered the coastal areas from Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, on the west to Pascagoula, Mississippi, on the east. Six teams involving a total of 25 persons documented damage to both low slope and steep slope roofing systems. The teams collected specific information on each building examined, including type of structure (use or occupancy), wall construction, roof type, roof slope, building dimensions, roof deck, insulation, construction, and method of roof attachment. In addition, the teams noted terrain exposure and the estimated wind speeds at the building site from the Katrina wind speed map. With each team member assigned a specific duty, they described the damage in detail and illustrated important features with numerous color photos. Where possible, the points of damage initiation were identified and damage propagation described. Because the wind speeds in Katrina at landfall, where the investigations took place, were less than code-specified design speeds, one would expect roof damage to be minimal. One team speculated that damage to all roofs in the area they examined was les

Desjarlais, A. O.

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Measuring wind plant capacity value  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electric utility planners and wind energy researchers pose a common question: What is the capacity value of a wind plant? Tentative answers, which can be phrased in a variety of ways, are based on widely varying definitions and methods of calculation. From the utility`s point of view, a resource that has no capacity value also has a reduced economic value. Utility planners must be able to quantify the capacity value of a wind plant so that investment in conventional generating capacity can be potentially offset by the capacity value of the wind plant. Utility operations personnel must schedule its conventional resources to ensure adequate generation to meet load. Given a choice between two resources, one that can be counted on and the other that can`t, the utility will avoid the risky resource. This choice will be reflected in the price that the utility will pay for the capacity: higher capacity credits result in higher payments. This issue is therefore also important to the other side of the power purchase transaction -- the wind plant developer. Both the utility and the developer must accurately assess the capacity value of wind. This article summarizes and evaluates some common methods of evaluating capacity credit. During the new era of utility deregulation in the United States, it is clear that many changes will occur in both utility planning and operations. However, it is my judgement that the evaluation of capacity credit for wind plants will continue to play an important part in renewable energy development in the future.

Milligan, M.R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Wind powering America: Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet contains information about green power programs in Colorado and a description of the Ponnequin Wind Farm.

O'Dell, K.

2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

386

Wind powering America: Kansas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind resources in the state of Kansas show great potential for wind energy development according to the wind resource assessment conducted by the Kansas Electric Utilities Research Program, UWIG, and DOE. This fact sheet provides a brief description of the resource assessment and description of the state's new educational wind kiosk as well as its green power program and financial incentives available for the development of renewable energy technologies. A list of contacts for more information is also included.

NREL

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Carroll County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance sets forth regulations for the zoning, erection, and operation of small wind energy systems in Carroll County, Maryland.

388

Kent County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance establishes provisions and standards for small wind energy systems in various zoning districts in Kent County, Maryland.

389

America's Booming Wind Industry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Sharing key findings from two new Energy Department reports that highlight the record growth of America's wind industry.

390

Mesoscale Time and Space Wind Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a program to study the time and space variability of the wind field below 5 km are presented. Wind data were collected using pilot balloons tracked with the METRAC positioning system. Balloons were launched at 10-30 min intervals ...

W. H. Jasperson

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

2008 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2008 Wind Technologies Market Report Ryan Wiser and Mark Bolinger Lawrence Berkeley National.S. wind energy market report · Wind installation trends · Wind industry trends · Price, cost, and performance trends ­ Power sales prices ­ Installed wind project costs ­ Wind turbine transaction prices

392

Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fun Facts Why do meteorologists use wind vanes? Wind vanes are used to determine the direction of the wind. Wind· vanes are also called weather vanes. What do wind vanes look like on a weather station? Wind vanes that are on weather stations look a lot like the one you· made! The biggest differences

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

393

Wind Derivatives: Modeling and Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind is considered to be a free, renewable and environmentally friendly source of energy. However, wind farms are exposed to excessive weather risk since the power production depends on the wind speed, the wind direction and the wind duration. This risk ... Keywords: Forecasting, Pricing, Wavelet networks, Weather derivatives, Wind derivatives

A. Alexandridis; A. Zapranis

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A Horizontal Wind and Wind Confidence Algorithm for Doppler Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary layer wind profilers are increasingly being used in applications that require high-quality, rapidly updated winds. An example of this type of application is an airport wind hazard warning system. Wind shear can be a hazard to flight ...

Robert K. Goodrich; Corrinne S. Morse; Larry B. Cornman; Stephen A. Cohn

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

NREL: Wind Research - KidWind Project and Wind Education in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KidWind Project and Wind Education in the Classroom: Wind Powering America Lessons Learned July 1, 2013 Integrating wind energy curricula into the classroom can seem like a...

396

Wind: wind speed and wind power density GIS data at 10m and 50m...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikScat SeaWinds scatterometer.

...

397

Wind: wind speed and wind power density maps at 10m and 50m above...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

data files of wind speed and wind power density at 10 and 50 m heights. Global data of offshore wind resource as generated by NASA's QuikSCAT SeaWinds scatterometer.

...

398

Wind Power in Paradise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discusses how an international team of engineers brought wind power to the Galapagos Islands. The san cristobal system is a wind-diesel hybrid. The electricity generated by the wind turbines and by three diesel generators converges at the substation ...

E. Guizzo

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Wind power outlook 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual brochure provides the American Wind Energy Association's up-to-date assessment of the wind industry in the United States. This 2006 general assessment shows positive signs of growth, use and acceptance of wind energy as a vital component of the U.S. energy mix.

anon.

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

400

Wind Economic Development (Postcard)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

Not Available

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wind energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Redirected from Wind) (Redirected from Wind) Jump to: navigation, search Wind energy is a form of solar energy.[1] Wind energy (or wind power) describes the process by which wind is used to generate electricity. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical power. A generator can convert mechanical power into electricity[2]. Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as pumping water. The US DOE developed a short wind power animation that provides an overview of how a wind turbine works and describes the wind resources in the United States. Contents 1 Wind Energy Basics 1.1 Equation for Wind Power 2 DOE Wind Programs and Information 3 Worldwide Installed Capacity 3.1 United States Installed Capacity 4 Wind Farm Development 4.1 Land Requirements

402

Brazil Wind Data (40km) from CEPEL | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40km) from CEPEL 40km) from CEPEL Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Annual average of the aeolic potential at 50m. Content: wind speed in m/s, power class (7 classes), power density in W/m2 and Weibull k value organized into cells with 40km x 40km (Purpose): The thematic map by code of colors permits quick viewing of all the Brazilian territory dataset. That map indicates, for the height of 50m, the annual average, in W/m2, of wind speed, power class, power density and Weibull k value. (Supplemental Information): The information is organized into cells measuring 10 x 40km. The wind potential maps were calculated from simulations produced by the MesoMap(*) for 360 days, extracted of a period of 15 years of data. The days were chosen by means of random sampling at several heights, so that each month and season be considered in a representative way.

403

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind for Schools Project  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Participant Roles & Responsibilities Affiliate Projects Pilot Project Results Project Funding Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Wind for Schools Project As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. To address these issues, Wind Powering America launched the Wind for Schools project in 2005 by conducting a pilot project in Colorado that resulted in one small wind turbine installation in Walsenburg. The program has ended, but by the end of September 2013: Wind for Schools Portal on OpenEI Visit the OpenEI Wind for Schools Portal to access data from turbines at

404

Capacity Value of Wind Power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power systems are planned such that they have adequate generation capacity to meet the load, according to a defined reliability target. The increase in the penetration of wind generation in recent years has led to a number of challenges for the planning and operation of power systems. A key metric for system adequacy is the capacity value of generation. The capacity value of a generator is the contribution that a given generator makes to overall system adequacy. The variable and stochastic nature of wind sets it apart from conventional energy sources. As a result, the modeling of wind generation in the same manner as conventional generation for capacity value calculations is inappropriate. In this paper a preferred method for calculation of the capacity value of wind is described and a discussion of the pertinent issues surrounding it is given. Approximate methods for the calculation are also described with their limitations highlighted. The outcome of recent wind capacity value analyses in Europe and North America are highlighted with a description of open research questions also given.

Keane, Andrew; Milligan, Michael; Dent, Chris; Hasche, Bernhard; DAnnunzio, Claudine; Dragoon, Ken; Holttinen, Hannele; Samaan, Nader A.; Soder, Lennart; O'Malley, Mark J.

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

405

Wind energy applications guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

anon.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Wind energy information directory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Energy Information has been prepared to provide researchers, designers, manufacturers, distributors, dealers, and users of wind energy conversion systems with easy access to technical information. This directory lists organizations and publications which have the main objective of promoting the use of wind energy conversion systems, some organizations that can respond to requests for information on wind energy or make referrals to other sources of information, and some publications that occasionally include information on wind energy. The bibliography contains references to information for both the neophyte and the expert.

None

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Comparison Between Field Data and NASA Ames Wind Tunnel Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to compare the measured data from the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiment to those collected in the field at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) with the same turbine configuration. The results of this analysis provide insight into what measurements can be made in the field as opposed to wind tunnel testing.

Corbus, D.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Ris-R-1240(EN) Isolated Systems with Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the technical and economic performance of a wind diesel system in the feasibility phase. The impact has alsoRisø-R-1240(EN) Isolated Systems with Wind Power Results of Measurements in Egypt Henrik Bindner with a large amount of wind energy penetration. The objective of the measurements were to characterise

409

Wind resource mapping of the state of Vermont  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a wind mapping project and a validation study for the state of Vermont. The computerized wind resource mapping technique used for this project was developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The technique uses Geographic Information System (GIS) software and produces high resolution (1km{sup 2}) wind resource maps.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Nierenberg, R.

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

410

Duration Test Report for the Entegrity EW50 Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a duration test that NREL conducted on the Entegrity EW50 wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commissions' (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator System Part 2: Design requirements for small wind turbines, IEC 61400-2 Ed.2.0, 2006-03.

Smith, J.; Huskey, A.; Jager, D.; Hur, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessing Desert Tortoise Survival and Reproduction at a Wind Energy Facility Near Palm Springs of their habitat are characterized by significant wind and solar energy potential. As a result, the species in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts have preexisting wind energy facilities dating back over 25 years. One

412

Prairie Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie Winds Wind Farm Prairie Winds Wind Farm Facility Prairie Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Developer Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Location Near Minot ND Coordinates 48.022927°, -101.291435° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.022927,"lon":-101.291435,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

413

Federal Wind Energy Research Program  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Program Analysis (OPA) undertook an assessment of 55 research projects sponsored by the Federal Wind Energy Research Program. This report summarizes the results of that review. In accordance with statue and policy guidance, the program's research has targeted the sciences of wind turbine dynamics and the development of advanced components and systems. Wind turbine research has focused on atmospheric fluid dynamics, aerodynamics, and structural dynamics. Rating factors including project scientific and technical merit, appropriateness and level of innovation of the technical approach, quality of the project team, productivity, and probable impact on the program's mission. Each project was also given an overall evaluation supported with written comments. 1 fig.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Numerical wind speed simulation model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A relatively simple stochastic model for simulating wind speed time series that can be used as an alternative to time series from representative locations is described in this report. The model incorporates systematic seasonal variation of the mean wind, its standard deviation, and the correlation speeds. It also incorporates systematic diurnal variation of the mean speed and standard deviation. To demonstrate the model capabilities, simulations were made using model parameters derived from data collected at the Hanford Meteorology Station, and results of analysis of simulated and actual data were compared.

Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Ballinger, M.Y.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Numerical calculations of wind flow in a full-scale wind test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies on wind flow around the Texas Tech University (TTU) Wind Engineering Research Field Laboratory (WERFL) building were conducted. The main focus of this paper is wind loads on the TTU building in the INEEL proposed Windstorm Simulation Center. The results are presented in the form of distributions of static pressure, dynamic pressure, pressure coefficients, and velocity vectors on the surface and the vicinity of the TTU building.

C.H. Oh; J.M. Lacey

1999-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

416

NREL: Wind Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications The NREL wind research program develops publications about its R&D activities in wind energy technologies. Below you'll find links to recently published publications, links to the NREL Avian Literature and Publications Databases, and information about the Technical Library at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The NWTC's quarterly newsletter, @NWTC, contains articles on current wind energy research projects and highlights the latest reports, papers, articles, and events published or sponsored by NREL. Subscribe to @NWTC. Selected Publications Featured Publication Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers Here are some selected NWTC publications: 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

417

Energy in the Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Provi and BP Energy in the Wind - Exploring Basic Electrical Concepts by Modeling Wind Turbines Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, aerodynamics, weather/climatology, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy resources/transformations) Grade Level: High School Small groups: 2 students Time: Introductory packet will take 2-3 periods. Scientific investigation will take 2-3 periods. (45-50 minute periods) Summary: Students explore basic electrical concepts. Students are introduced to electrical concepts by using a hand held generator utilizing a multimeter, modeling, and designing a wind turbine in a wind tunnel (modifications are given if a wind tunnel is not available). Students investigate how wind nergy is used as a renewable energy resource. e

418

Wind energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Testing a Mobile Version of a Cross-Chain Loran Atmospheric (M-CLASS) Sounding System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have Rested the NCAR Cross-Chain LORAN Atmospheric Sounding System (CLASS) in a fully mobile configuration, which we call M-CLASS. The sondes use LORAN-C navigation signals to allow calculation of balloon position and horizontal winds. In ...

W. David Rust; Donald W. Burgess; Robert A. Maddox; Lester C. Showell; Thomas C. Marshall; Dean K. Lauritsen

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling the Benefits of Storage Technologies to Wind Power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rapid expansion of wind power in the electricity sector is raising questions about how wind resource variability might affect the capacity value of wind farms at high levels of penetration. Electricity storage, with the capability to shift wind energy from periods of low demand to peak times and to smooth fluctuations in output, may have a role in bolstering the value of wind power at levels of penetration envisioned by a new Department of Energy report ('20% Wind by 2030, Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply'). This paper quantifies the value storage can add to wind. The analysis was done employing the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, formerly known as the Wind Deployment System (WinDS) model. ReEDS was used to estimate the cost and development path associated with 20% penetration of wind in the report. ReEDS differs from the WinDS model primarily in that the model has been modified to include the capability to build and use three storage technologies: pumped-hydroelectric storage (PHS), compressed-air energy storage (CAES), and batteries. To assess the value of these storage technologies, two pairs of scenarios were run: business-as-usual, with and without storage; 20% wind energy by 2030, with and without storage. This paper presents the results from those model runs.

Sullivan, P.; Short, W.; Blair, N.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Wind loading on solar concentrators: some general considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A survey has been completed to examine the problems and complications arising from wind loading on solar concentrators. Wind loading is site specific and has an important bearing on the design, cost, performance, operation and maintenance, safety, survival, and replacement of solar collecting systems. Emphasis herein is on paraboloidal, two-axis tracking systems. Thermal receiver problems also are discussed. Wind characteristics are discussed from a general point of view; current methods for determining design wind speed are reviewed. Aerodynamic coefficients are defined and illustrative examples are presented. Wind tunnel testing is discussed, and environmental wind tunnels are reviewed; recent results on heliostat arrays are reviewed as well. Aeroelasticity in relation to structural design is discussed briefly. Wind loads, i.e., forces and moments, are proportional to the square of the mean wind velocity. Forces are proportional to the square of concentrator diameter, and moments are proportional to the cube of diameter. Thus, wind loads have an important bearing on size selection from both cost and performance standpoints. It is concluded that sufficient information exists so that reasonably accurate predictions of wind loading are possible for a given paraboloidal concentrator configuration, provided that reliable and relevant wind conditions are specified. Such predictions will be useful to the design engineer and to the systems engineer as well. Information is lacking, however, on wind effects in field arrays of paraboloidal concentrators. Wind tunnel tests have been performed on model heliostat arrays, but there are important aerodynamic differences between heliostats and paraboloidal dishes.

Roschke, E. J.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Operating Reserves and Wind Power Integration: An International Comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of additional operating reserves in power systems with high wind penetration is attracting a significant amount of attention and research. Wind integration analysis over the past several years has shown that the level of operating reserve that is induced by wind is not a constant function of the installed capacity. Observations and analysis of actual wind plant operating data has shown that wind does not change its output fast enough to be considered as a contingency event. However, the variability that wind adds to the system does require the activation or deactivation of additional operating reserves. This paper provides a high-level international comparison of methods and key results from both operating practice and integration analysis, based on the work in International Energy Agency IEA WIND Task 25 on Large-scale Wind Integration. The paper concludes with an assessment of the common themes and important differences, along with recent emerging trends.

Milligan, M.; Donohoo, P.; Lew, D.; Ela, E.; Kirby, B.; Holttinen, H.; Lannoye, E.; Flynn, D.; O'Malley, M.; Miller, N.; Ericksen, P. B.; Gottig, A.; Rawn, B.; Frunt, J.; Kling, W. L.; Gibescu, M.; Gomez-Lazaro, E.; Robitaille, A.; Kamwa, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A preliminary evaluation of the performance of wind tunnel and numerical modeling simulations of the wind flow over a wind farm  

SciTech Connect

This report is an analysis of physical and numerical model simulations of the wind flow over complex terrain. The specific area to which these models were applied is a wind farm in the Altamont Pass area of California. The physical model results were obtained from wind tunnel flow simulations, and the numerical model used was the optimizing version of the NOABL model. The goals of this analysis were (1) to evaluate the relative performance of the two models and (2) to uncover any clues that would point toward improvement of the wind tunnel modeling. The performances of the models were gauged by comparing model simulations to wind observations taken over the modeled area.

Barnard, J.C.; Wegley, H.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Regulations (California) San Diego County - Wind Regulations (California) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Wind Buying & Making...

425

Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

On the Algorithms Used to Compute the Standard Deviation of Wind Direction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard deviation of wind direction is a very important quantity in meteorology because in addition to being used to determine the dry deposition rate and the atmospheric stability class, it is also employed in the determination of the rate ...

Pierre S. Farrugia; James L. Borg; Alfred Micallef

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program - Micro Wind Initiative...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Energy Analysis Low Emission Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View...

428

New England Wind Forum: Buying Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Buying Wind Power Buying Wind Power On this page find information about: Green Marketing Renewable Energy Certificates Green Pricing Green Marketing Green power marketing refers to selling green power in the competitive marketplace, in which multiple suppliers and service offerings exist. In states that have established retail competition, customers may be able to purchase green power from a competitive supplier. Connecticut Connecticut Clean Energy Options Beginning in April 2005, Connecticut's two investor-owned utilities, Connecticut Light and Power and United Illuminating, began to offer a simple, affordable program to their customers for purchasing clean energy such as wind power. In late 2006, stakeholders started to explore a new offering that would convey the price stability of wind energy (and other renewable energy resources) to Connecticut consumers. This new offering is still under development.

429

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program (Massachusetts) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Strategies Oil & Gas Smart Grid Solar U.S. OpenLabs Utilities Water Wind Page Actions View form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special...

430

Wind Energy 101 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy 101 Energy 101 Jump to: navigation, search The 63-MW Dry Lake Wind Power Project in Arizona is the first utility-scale power project. The Salt River Project is purchasing 100% of the power from the Phase I of this project for the next 20 years. Photo from Iberdrola Renewables, NREL 16692 Wind is a form of solar energy and is a result of the uneven heating of the atmosphere by the sun, the irregularities of the earth's surface, and the rotation of the earth. Wind flow patterns and speeds vary greatly across the United States and are modified by bodies of water, vegetation, and differences in terrain. Humans use this wind flow, or motion energy, for many purposes: sailing, flying a kite, and even generating electricity.[1] The following links provide more information about wind energy basics.

431

Self Consistent Models of the Solar Wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origins of the hot solar corona and the supersonically expanding solar wind are still the subject of much debate. This paper summarizes some of the essential ingredients of realistic and self-consistent models of solar wind acceleration. It also outlines the major issues in the recent debate over what physical processes dominate the mass, momentum, and energy balance in the accelerating wind. A key obstacle in the way of producing realistic simulations of the Sun-heliosphere system is the lack of a physically motivated way of specifying the coronal heating rate. Recent models that assume the energy comes from Alfven waves that are partially reflected, and then dissipated by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, have been found to reproduce many of the observed features of the solar wind. This paper discusses results from these models, including detailed comparisons with measured plasma properties as a function of solar wind speed. Some suggestions are also given for future work that could answer the many remain...

Cranmer, Steven R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation (Text Version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

433

Blyth Offshore Wind Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blyth Offshore Wind Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Blyth Offshore Wind Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Blyth Offshore Wind Limited,...

434

Wave Wind LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Wind LLC Place Sun Prairie, Wisconsin Zip 53590 Sector Services, Wind energy Product Wisconsin-based wind developer and construction services provider. References Wave Wind...

435

Han Wind Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Han Wind Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Han Wind Energy Corporation Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100027 Sector Wind energy Product Han Wind...

436

Heilongjiang Lishu Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lishu Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Heilongjiang Lishu Wind Power Place Heilongjiang Province, China Sector Wind energy Product China-based wind project developer...

437

Crownbutte Wind Power LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crownbutte Wind Power LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Crownbutte Wind Power LLC Place Mandan, North Dakota Zip 58554 Sector Wind energy Product North Dakota wind power company...

438

Daqing Longjiang Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Longjiang Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Daqing Longjiang Wind Power Place Daqing, Heilongjiang Province, China Zip 163316 Sector Wind energy Product Local wind...

439

Gansu Xinhui Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Xinhui Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Gansu Xinhui Wind Power Place China Sector Wind energy Product China-based joint venture engaged in developing wind projects....

440

German Wind Energy Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Association Place Osnabrck, Germany Zip 49074 Sector Wind energy Product Assocation for the promotion of wind energy in Germany. References German Wind Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Power Performance Test Report for the SWIFT Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a power performance test that NREL conducted on the SWIFT wind turbine. This test was conducted in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission's (IEC) standard, Wind Turbine Generator Systems Part 12: Power Performance Measurements of Electricity Producing Wind Turbines, IEC 61400-12-1 Ed.1.0, 2005-12. However, because the SWIFT is a small turbine as defined by IEC, NREL also followed Annex H that applies to small wind turbines. In these summary results, wind speed is normalized to sea-level air density.

Mendoza, I.; Hur, J.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Wind Farm Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Saint Francis University has assessed the Swallow Farm property located in Shade Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania as a potential wind power development site. Saint Francis worked with McLean Energy Partners to have a 50-meter meteorological tower installed on the property in April 2004 and continues to conduct a meteorological assessment of the site. Results suggest a mean average wind speed at 80 meters of 17 mph with a net capacity factor of 31 - 33%. Approximate electricity generation capacity of the project is 10 megawatts. Also, the University used matching funds provided by the federal government to contract with ABR, Inc. to conduct radar studies of nocturnal migration of birds and bats during the migrations seasons in the Spring and Fall of 2005 with a mean nocturnal flight altitude of 402 meters with less than 5% of targets at altitudes of less than 125 meters. The mean nocturnal passage rate was 166 targets/km/h in the fall and 145 targets/km/h in the spring. Lastly, University faculty and students conducted a nesting bird study May - July 2006. Seventy-three (73) species of birds were observed with 65 determined to be breeding or potentially breeding species; this figure represents approximately 30% of the 214 breeding bird species in Pennsylvania. No officially protected avian species were determined to be nesting at Swallow Farm.

Richard Curry; Erik Foley; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

443

Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Global Onshore Wind Speed Distribution  

SciTech Connect

Wind power, a renewable energy source, can play an important role in electrical energy generation. Information regarding wind energy potential is important both for energy related modeling and for decision-making in the policy community. While wind speed datasets with high spatial and temporal resolution are often ultimately used for detailed planning, simpler assumptions are often used in analysis work. An accurate representation of the wind speed frequency distribution is needed in order to properly characterize wind energy potential. Using a power density method, this study estimated global variation in wind parameters as fitted to a Weibull density function using NCEP/CFSR reanalysis data. The estimated Weibull distribution performs well in fitting the time series wind speed data at the global level according to R2, root mean square error, and power density error. The spatial, decadal, and seasonal patterns of wind speed distribution were then evaluated. We also analyzed the potential error in wind power estimation when a commonly assumed Rayleigh distribution (Weibull k = 2) is used. We find that the assumption of the same Weibull parameter across large regions can result in substantial errors. While large-scale wind speed data is often presented in the form of average wind speeds, these results highlight the need to also provide information on the wind speed distribution.

Zhou, Yuyu; Smith, Steven J.

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

444

New England Wind Forum: Selling Wind Power  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Selling Wind Power Selling Wind Power Markets are either well-developed or developing for each of the 'products' produced by wind generators. These include electricity products and generation attributes. Electricity Electricity can be used in two ways: on-site (interconnected behind a retail customer's meter) of for sales of electricity over the electric grid. On-site generation can displace a portion of a customer's purchases of electricity from the grid. In addition, net metering rules are in place at the state level that in some cases allow generation in excess of on-site load to be sold back to the local utility (see state pages for net metering specifics). For sales over the electricity grid, the Independent System Operator of New England (ISO New England) creates and manages a wholesale market for electric energy, capacity, and ancillary services within the New England Power Pool (NEPOOL). Wind generators may sell their electric energy and capacity in spot markets organized by the ISO, or they may contract with wholesale buyers to sell these products for any term to buyers operating in the ISO New England marketplace. Wind generators do not generally produce other marketable ancillary services. The ISO has rules specific to the operation of wind generators reflecting operations, scheduling, calculation of installed capacity credit, and so forth.

445

Stabilized space---time computation of wind-turbine rotor aerodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show how we use the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space---Time (DSD/SST) formulation for accurate 3D computation of the aerodynamics of a wind-turbine rotor. As the test case, we use the NREL 5MW offshore baseline wind-turbine rotor. This class ... Keywords: DSD/SST formulation, Rotating turbulent flow, Space---time variational multiscale method, Torque values, Wind-turbine aerodynamics

Kenji Takizawa; Bradley Henicke; Tayfun E. Tezduyar; Ming-Chen Hsu; Yuri Bazilevs

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Power Wind Power Jump to: navigation, search Wind Power WIndfarm.Sunset.jpg Wind power is a form of solar energy.[1] Wind is caused by the uneven heating of the atmosphere by the sun, variations in the earth's surface, and rotation of the earth. Mountains, bodies of water, and vegetation all influence wind flow patterns[2], [3]. Wind energy (or wind power) describes the process by which wind is used to generate electricity. Wind turbines convert the energy in wind to electricity by rotating propeller-like blades around a rotor. The rotor turns the drive shaft, which turns an electric generator.[2] Three key factors affect the amount of energy a turbine can harness from the wind: wind speed, air density, and swept area.[4] Mechanical power can also be utilized directly for specific tasks such as

447

NREL: Wind Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Below are some select news stories from the National Wind Technology Below are some select news stories from the National Wind Technology Center. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. January 3, 2014 New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released an expanded version of its FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool under a new modularization framework. January 2, 2014 The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer On January 2, a reporter from The Denver Post toured the new 5-megawatt dynamometer test facility at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Archives 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities Projects Facilities

448

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for green energy 1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Wind Turbines and Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind power has been gaining prominence as a viable sustainable alternative to other forms of energy production. Studies have found that there is increasing population demand for green energy1,2. In Australia, this has been encouraged by the introduction of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act in 2000 and the Renewable Energy Target Scheme in 2009. As with any new technology, wind turbines are not without controversy. Those who oppose the development of wind farms contend that wind turbines can adversely impact the health of individuals living in close proximity. Do wind turbines impact on health? Concerns regarding the adverse health impacts of wind turbines focus on infrasound noise, electromagnetic interference, shadow flicker and blade glint produced

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

Sinnamon, Gordon J.

451

Wind loading on solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present design methodology for the determination of wind loading on the various solar collectors has been reviewed and assessed. The total force coefficients of flat plates of aspect ratios 1.0 and 3.0, respectively, at various angles of attack obtained by using the guidelines of the ANSI A58.1-1982, have been compared with those obtained by using the methodology of the ASCE Task Committee, 1961, and the experimental results of the full-scale test of heliostats by Peglow. The turbulent energy spectra, currently employed in the building code, are compared with those of Kaimal et al., Lumley, and Ponofsky for wind velocities of 20.0 m/s and 40.24 m/s at an elevation of 9.15 m. The longitudinal spectra of the building code overestimates the Kaimal spectra in the frequency range of 0.007 Hz to 0.08 Hz and underestimates beyond the frequency of 0.08 Hz. The peak angles of attack, on the heliostat, stowed in horizontal position, due to turbulent vertical and lateral components of wind velocity, have been estimated by using Daniel's methodology for three wind velocities and compared with the value suggested by the code. The experimental results of a simple test in the laboratory indicate the feasibility of decreasing the drag forces of the flat plate by reducing the solidity ratio.

Bhaduri, S.; Murphy, L.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

WindWaveFloat Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Principle Power Inc. and National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) have completed a contract to assess the technical and economic feasibility of integrating wave energy converters into the WindFloat, resulting in a new concept called the WindWaveFloat (WWF). The concentration of several devices on one platform could offer a potential for both economic and operational advantages. Wind and wave energy converters can share the electrical cable and power transfer equipment to transport the electricity to shore. Access to multiple generation devices could be simplified, resulting in cost saving at the operational level. Overall capital costs may also be reduced, provided that the design of the foundation can be adapted to multiple devices with minimum modifications. Finally, the WindWaveFloat confers the ability to increase energy production from individual floating support structures, potentially leading to a reduction in levelized energy costs, an increase in the overall capacity factor, and greater stability of the electrical power delivered to the grid. The research conducted under this grant investigated the integration of several wave energy device types into the WindFloat platform. Several of the resulting system designs demonstrated technical feasibility, but the size and design constraints of the wave energy converters (technical and economic) make the WindWaveFloat concept economically unfeasible at this time. Not enough additional generation could be produced to make the additional expense associated with wave energy conversion integration into the WindFloat worthwhile.

Alla Weinstein, Dominique Roddier, Kevin Banister

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Experiment Hazard Class 4.4 -Class 4 Lasers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Class 4 Lasers Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments involving class 4 lasers. Other hazard classifications and their associated hazard...

454

Availability of wind power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Meteorological studies of available wind power were begun at Sandia in 1973 to support the development of a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT, ''egg-beater''). This presentation reviews work to date. Copies of seven source reports were provided to ELETROBRAS; Scientia, Ltda., has included them in an extensive bibliography that was distributed at the seminar. This report summarizes those climatological studies that are needed to assist and promote wind energy exploitation in Brazil.

Reed, J.W.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Wind Turbine Generator System Duration Test Report for the Gaia-Wind 11 kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Independent Testing project. This project was established to help reduce the barriers of wind energy expansion by providing independent testing results for small turbines. In total, five turbines are being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NRELs) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) as a part of this project. Duration testing is one of up to five tests that may be performed on the turbines, including power performance, safety and function, noise, and power quality tests. The results of the testing will provide the manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification. The test equipment includes a Gaia-Wind 11 kW wind turbine mounted on an 18 m monopole tower. Gaia-Wind Ltd. manufactured the turbine in Denmark, although the company is based in Scotland. The system was installed by the NWTC Site Operations group with guidance and assistance from Gaia-Wind.

Huskey, A.; Bowen, A.; Jager, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Michigan Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind II Wind Farm Wind II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Michigan Wind II Wind Farm Facility Michigan Wind II Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Exelon Wind Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Minden City MI Coordinates 43.6572421°, -82.7681278° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6572421,"lon":-82.7681278,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Wind Power Development in the United States: The Perfect (Wind...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power Development in the United States: The Perfect (Wind) Storm? Speaker(s): Mark Bolinger Date: February 25, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Wind power development is...

458

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Powering America Hosts 12th Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Powering America Hosts 12th Annual All-States Summit: A Wind Powering America Success Story May 21, 2013 In 2012, the wind energy industry saw great expansion in capacity as...

459

NREL: Wind Research - Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies August 26, 2013 The Wind for Schools project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Powering America initiative....

460

Wind Power Today, 2010, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP)  

SciTech Connect

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind energy research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Program.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Wind for Schools Project Curriculum Brief (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) 20% Wind Energy by 2030 report recommends expanding education to ensure a trained workforce to meet the projected growth of the wind industry and deployment. Although a few U.S. higher education institutions offer wind technology education programs, most are found in community and technical colleges, resulting in a shortage of programs preparing highly skilled graduates for wind industry careers. Further, the United States lags behind Europe (which has more graduate programs in wind technology design and manufacturing) and is in danger of relinquishing the economic benefits of domestic production of wind turbines and related components and services to European countries. DOE's Wind Powering America initiative launched the Wind for Schools project to develop a wind energy knowledge base among future leaders of our communities, states, and nation while raising awareness about wind energy's benefits. This fact sheet provides an overview of wind energy curricula as it relates to the Wind for Schools project.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Dynamic simulation of dual-speed wind turbine generation  

SciTech Connect

Induction generators have been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness, and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single- speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. The operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind-speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative to capture more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine will be investigated. One type of control algorithm for dual- speed operation is proposed. Results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works and how power, current and torque of the system vary as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NREL: Wind Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

@NWTC Newsletter @NWTC is a quarterly newsletter that contains articles on current wind energy research projects and highlights the latest reports, papers, articles, and events...

464

Forecasting Wind Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emerging Technologies, Data, and NEM Modeling Issues in Wind Resource Supply Data and Modeling Chris Namovicz ASA Committee on Energy Statistics

465

Offshore Wind 101  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

visual impact and potential user conflict. Sorry. According to the Department of Energy's national renewable energy lab, the nation's potential offshore wind energy resource is...

466

Wind Manufacturing Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

America's wind energy industry supports a growing domestic industrial base. Check out this map to find manufacturing facilities in your state.

467

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

468

Wind/Water Nexus  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nobel laureate Richard Smalley cited energy and water as among humanity's top problems for the next 50 years as the world's population increases from 6.3 billion to 9 billion. The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Program has initiated an effort to explore wind energy's role as a technical solution to this critically important issue in the United States and the world. This four-page fact sheet outlines five areas in which wind energy can contribute: thermoelectric power plant/water processes, irrigation, municipal water supply, desalination, and wind/hydropower integration.

Not Available

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

NREL: Wind Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectrum of engineering disciplines that are applicable to both land-based and offshore wind energy, including: atmospheric fluid mechanics and aerodynamics; dynamics, structures,...

470

Wind Energy Myths  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This two-sided fact sheet succinctly outlines and counters the top misconceptions about wind energy. It is well suited for general audiences.

Not Available

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

US Wind Farmers Network  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through this program Windustry representatives have produced, widely used, and distributed new materials and have participated in a wide variety of wind energy events, meetings, and conferences. In this work Windustry representatives have sought to reach a broad audience and grow interest and enthusiasm for wind energy. At the same time, Windustry representatives have sought to provide tools, detailed case studies, and other technical resources that deepen Windustry constituency's knowledge of wind energy options. All of this has served to facilitate development of many actual wind energy projects, particularly projects that emphasize local and community benefits.

Lisa Daniels; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

Wind Powering the Government  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are more than half a million Federal buildings with electric bills totaling about $3.5 billion per year. The Wind Powering America Initiative challenges the Federal government to reduce its use of energy produced by fossil fuels by obtaining at least 5% of its electricity from wind by 2010. As part of the current efforts to achieve the initiative's goal, NREL's Technical Information Services published Wind Powering the Government, a brochure that encourages the use of wind energy on Federal properties and the purchase of green power or green tags by Federal property managers.

Pitchford, P.

2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

473

Wicomico County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Establishes zoning regulations for the installation and construction of small wind energy systems in Wicomico County for private landowners, subject to reasonable restrictions.

474

Washington County- Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance establishes regulations to facilitate the installation and construction of Small Wind Energy Systems in Washington County for private landowners, subject to reasonable restrictions...

475

Allegany County Wind Ordinance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This ordinance sets requirements for industrial wind energy conversion systems. These requirements include minimum separation distances, setback requirements, electromagnetic interference analysis ...

476

WindEnergyPEIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all or parts of the States of Iowa, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The draft PEIS assesses environmental impacts associated with wind energy...

477

Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing: Phase 2: 12-Month Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy forecasting systems are expected to support system operation in cases where wind generation contributes more than a few percent of total generating capacity. This report presents final results from the Texas Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing Project at a 75-MW wind project in west Texas.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

The design of new wind power controller based on Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fluctuation and intermittent with wind power output, as a key factor to connect a large-scale wind power system to grid, which result s in an adverse impact on the power system continues to grow. In order to reduce the net stability impact of the ... Keywords: Wind Farm, Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage, Wind Power, Applied Superconductivity

Zhou Xue-Song; Quan Bo; Ma You-Jie; Wu Le

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Application study of wind power technology to the city of Hart, Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning wind data collections and analysis; Hart power demand and consumer usage; wind power assessment; hydro power assessment; results of preliminary economics analysis; environmental impact of wind turbines and operation in the Hart, Oceana County, Michigan area; and systems model for the Hart power system with wind turbine. (DCC)

Asmussen, J.; Fisher, P.D.; Park, G.L.; Krauss, O.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Measuring the Dynamic Performance of Wind Vanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has proposed a standard method for testing the performance characteristics of a wind vane. This paper presents the procedures used to test and evaluate the ASTM method, and the results of that ...

Peter L. Finkelstein

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind class resulting" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

Lodde, P.F.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Appendix I3-1 to Wind HUI Initiative 1: AWST-WindNET-Phase 1 Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an appendix to the Hawaii WindHUI efforts to develop and operationalize short-term wind forecasting and wind ramp event forecasting capabilities. The report summarizes the WindNET Phase 1 efforts on the Big Island of Hawaii and includes descriptions of modeling methodologies, use of field validation data, results and recommendations. The objective of the WindNET project was to investigate the improvement that could be obtained in short-term wind power forecasting for wind generation facilities operating on the island grids operated by Hawaiian Electric Companies through the use of atmospheric sensors deployed at targeted locations. WindNET is envisioned as a multiphase project that will address the short-term wind forecasting issues of all of the wind generation facilities on the all of the Hawaiian Electric Companies' island grid systems. The first phase of the WindNET effort (referred to as WindNET-1) was focused on the wind generation facilities on the Big Island of Hawaii. With complex terrain and marine environment, emphasis was on improving the 0 to 6 hour forecasts of wind power ramps and periods of wind variability, with a particular interest in the intra-hour (0-1 hour) look-ahead period. The WindNET project was built upon a foundation that was constructed with the results from a previously completed observation targeting study for the Big Island that was conducted as part of a project supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and interactions with the western utilities. The observational targeting study provided guidance on which variables to measure and at what locations to get the most improvement in forecast performance at a target forecast site. The recommendations of the observation targeting study were based on the application two techniques: (1) an objective method called ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) (Ancell and Hakim, 2007; Torn and Hakim, 2008; Zack et al, 2010); and (2) a subjective method based on a diagnostic analysis of large ramp events. The analysis was completed for both the wind farm on the southern tip of the Big Island and on the northern tip of the island. The WindNET project was designed to also deploy sensors to validate the Big Island observational targeting study and enhance operator's understanding of predominate causes of wind variability conditions at the wind facilities. Compromises had to be made with the results from the observation targeting study to accommodate project resource limitations, availability of suitable sites, and other factors. To focus efforts, field sensor deployment activities focused on the wind facility on the southern point of Big Island.

John Zack

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

California Wind Energy Forecasting System Development and Testing, Phase 1: Initial Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind energy forecasting uses sophisticated numerical weather forecasting and wind plant power generation models to predict the hourly energy generation of a wind power plant up to 48 hours in advance. As a result, it has great potential to address the needs of the California Independent System Operator (ISO) and the wind plant operators, as well as power marketers and buyers and utility system dispatch personnel. This report gives the results of 28 days of testing of wind energy forecasting at a Californ...

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

484

Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project This report provides an independent review included an initial evaluation of the technical configuration and capital costs of establishing an undersea cable system and examining impacts to the existing electric transmission systems as a result of interconnecting the islands. 50411.pdf More Documents & Publications Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project OAHU Wind Integration And Transmission Study: Summary Report, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

485

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS);  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project Phase 2 Report: Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS); Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project This report provides an independent review included an initial evaluation of the technical configuration and capital costs of establishing an undersea cable system and examining impacts to the existing electric transmission systems as a result of interconnecting the islands. 50414.pdf More Documents & Publications Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study (OWITS): Hawaiian Islands Transmission Interconnection Project OAHU Wind Integration And Transmission Study: Summary Report, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

486

DOE/NREL Advanced Wind Turbine Development Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of technologically advanced, high-efficiency wind turbines continues to be a high-priority activity of the US wind industry. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute), sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), has initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine Program to assist the wind industry in the development of a new class of advanced wind turbines. The initial phase of the program focused on developing conceptual designs for near-term and advanced turbines. The goal of the second phase of this program is to use the experience gained over the last decade of turbine design and operation combined with the latest existing design tools to develop a turbine that will produce energy at $0.05 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) in a 5.8-m/s (13-mph) wind site. Three contracts have been awarded, and two more are under negotiation in the second phase. The third phase of the program will use new innovations and state-of-the-art wind turbine design technology to produce a turbine that will generate energy at $0.04/kWh in a 5.8-m/s wind site. Details of the third phase will be announced in early 1993.

Butterfield, C.P.; Smith, B.; Laxson, A.; Thresher, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Goldman, P. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Wind/Hydro/Ocean Technologies Div.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Wind Turbine Generator System Power Quality Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the power quality test on the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Independent Testing Project. In total five turbines are being tested as part of the project. Power quality testing is one of up to five test that may be performed on the turbines including power performance, safety and function, noise, and duration tests. The results of the testing provide manufacturers with reports that may be used for small wind turbine certification.

Curtis, A.; Gevorgian, V.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology Center (NWTC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Offshore Wind Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: * Developing offshore design tools and methods * Collaborating with international partners * Testing offshore systems and developing standards * Conducting economic analyses * Characterizing offshore wind resources * Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United

489

NREL: Wind Research - New England Wind Forum Publishes Newsletter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 The New England Wind Forum Newsletter informs stakeholders of New England Wind Energy Education Project (NEWEEP) announcements, plus events and project, siting, and policy...

490

NREL: Wind Research - Last Call: Illinois Wind for Schools Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last Call: Illinois Wind for Schools Program Accepting Applications February 25, 2013 Now in its second year, the Illinois Wind for Schools (ILWFS) program is accepting...