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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Applications Center Valuable Resource...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Applications Center Valuable Resource for Wind for Schools Partners March 14, 2013 Audio with Jerry Hudgins, Nebraska Wind Applications Center Director and Joel Jacobs,...

2

NREL: Education Programs - Wind Applications Center Valuable Resource for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications Center Valuable Resource for Wind for Schools Partners Applications Center Valuable Resource for Wind for Schools Partners March 14, 2013 Audio with Jerry Hudgins, Nebraska Wind Applications Center Director and Joel Jacobs, Nebraska Wind Applications Center Associate Director (MP3 3.6 MB). Download Windows Media Player. Time: 00:03:58. The Wind for Schools Program was launched in 2006 by the U.S. Department of Energy, Wind Powering America, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Six states were chosen as priorities for the program, and one of those states was Nebraska. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln houses the Wind Applications Center, which is the resource for K-12 partner schools in the program in Nebraska. Wind Applications Center Director Jerry Hudgins says wind is a fantastic resource in Nebraska, lending itself to renewable energy generation,

3

South Dakota Wind Application Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Application Center Wind Application Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: South Dakota Wind Application Center Name South Dakota Wind Application Center Address CEH 234, South Dakota State University Place Brookings, South Dakota Zip 57007 Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 2008 Coordinates 44.3116°, -96.7981° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.3116,"lon":-96.7981,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

MSU-Wind Applications Center: Wind Resource Worksheet Theoretical Power Calculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSU-Wind Applications Center: Wind Resource Worksheet Theoretical Power Calculation Equations: A= swept area = air density v= velocity R= universal gas constant Steps: 1. Measure wind speed from fan. = ___________/(________*________)= _________kg/m3 5. Theoretical Power a. Low Setting Theoretical Wind Power i. Power= ½*______*______*______*.59

Dyer, Bill

5

Wind energy applications guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The brochure is an introduction to various wind power applications for locations with underdeveloped transmission systems, from remote water pumping to village electrification. It includes an introductory section on wind energy, including wind power basics and system components and then provides examples of applications, including water pumping, stand-alone systems for home and business, systems for community centers, schools, and health clinics, and examples in the industrial area. There is also a page of contacts, plus two specific example applications for a wind-diesel system for a remote station in Antarctica and one on wind-diesel village electrification in Russia.

anon.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NREL: Wind Research - National Wind Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Center The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the base of the foothills just south of Boulder, Colorado, is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. Built in 1993, the center provides an ideal environment for the development of advanced wind energy technologies. The goal of the research conducted at the center is to help industry reduce the cost of energy so that wind can compete with traditional energy sources, providing a clean, renewable alternative for our nation's energy needs. Research at the NWTC is organized under two main categories, Wind Technology Development and Testing and Operations. Illustration of the National Wind Technology Center's organization chart. Fort Felker is listed as the Center Director, with Mike Robinson, Deputy Center Director; Paul Veers, Chief Engineer, and Laura Davis and Dorothy Haldeman beneath him. The Associate Director position is empty. Beneath them is the Wind Technology Research and Development Group Manager, Mike Robinson; the Testing and Operations Group Manager, Dave Simms; and the Offshore Wind and Ocean Power Systems Acting Supervisor, Fort Felker.

7

Applied wind energy research at the National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Applied research activities at the National Wind Technology Center are divided into several technical disciplines. Not surprisingly, these engineering and science disciplines highlight the technology similarities between aircraft and wind turbine design requirements. More often than not, wind turbines are assumed to be a subset of the much larger and more comprehensive list of well understood aerospace engineering accomplishments and it is difficult for the general public to understand the poor performance history of wind turbines in sustained operation. Often overlooked are the severe environmental conditions and operational demands placed on turbine designs which define unique requirements beyond typical aerospace applications. It is the role of the National Wind Technology Center to investigate and quantify the underlying physical phenomena which make the wind turbine design problem unique and to provide the technology advancements necessary to overcome current operational limitations. This paper provides a brief overview of research areas involved with the design of wind turbines.

Robinson, M C; Tu, P

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

NREL: Technology Transfer - Wind Technology Center Installing ...  

Wind Technology Center Installing a Dynamic Duo August 25, 2009. Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will ...

9

Applications: Operational wind turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Operational wind turbines Benefits: Optimize wind turbine performance Summary: Researchers at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Intelligent Wind Turbine Program are developing a multi-physics modeling approach for the analysis of wind turbines in the presence of realistic

10

Alta Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alta Wind Energy Center Alta Wind Energy Center Address 10315 Oak Creek Road Place Mojave, California Zip 93501 Sector Wind energy Phone number 1-877-4WI-ND88 (1-877-494-6388) Website http://altawindenergycenter.co Region Southern CA Area References Alta Wind Energy Center[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! The Alta Wind Energy Center (AWEC) is located in the heart of one of the most proven wind resources in the United States - the Tehachapi-Mojave Wind Resource Area. Terra-Gen is developing the AWEC, California's largest wind energy project, adjacent to existing wind projects between the towns of Mojave and Tehachapi. Due to a welcoming community and the participation of a diverse group of landowners (private and public, local and non-local,

11

Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Cow Branch Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Developer Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Energy Purchaser Associated Electric Cooperative Location Atchison County MO Coordinates 40.423897°, -95.477781° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.423897,"lon":-95.477781,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

12

NREL: National Wind Technology Center Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Wind Technology Center National Wind Technology Center National Wind Technology Center NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility. The NWTC advances the development of innovative land-based and offshore wind energy technologies through its research and testing facilities. Researchers draw on years of experience and their wealth of expertise in fluid dynamics and structural testing to also advance marine and hydrokinetic water power technologies. At the NWTC researchers work side-by-side with industry partners to develop new technologies that can compete in the global market and to increase system reliability and reduce costs. Learn more about the facilities and capabilities at the NWTC by viewing our fact sheet.

13

Mountaineer Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountaineer Wind Energy Center Mountaineer Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountaineer Wind Energy Center Facility Mountaineer Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Atlantic Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Exelon Location Thomas WV Coordinates 39.163081°, -79.554516° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.163081,"lon":-79.554516,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Small Wind Turbine Testing and Applications Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small wind turbines offer a promising alternative for many remote electrical uses where there is a good wind resource. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory helps further the role that small turbines can play in supplying remote power needs. The NWTC tests and develops new applications for small turbines. The NWTC also develops components used in conjunction with wind turbines for various applications. This paper describes wind energy research at the NWTC for applications including battery charging stations, water desalination/purification, and health clinics. Development of data acquisition systems and tests on small turbines are also described.

Corbus, D.; Baring-Gould, I.; Drouilhet, S.; Gevorgian, V.; Jimenez, T.; Newcomb, C.; Flowers, L.

1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

15

National Wind Technology Center: A Proven and Valued Wind Industry Partner (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology Center (NWTC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fact sheet gives an overview of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Establishment of Small Wind Regional Test Centers  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth of the small wind turbine (SWT) market is attracting numerous entrants. Small wind turbine purchasers now have many options, but often lack information (such as third-party certification) to select a quality turbine. Most SWTs do not have third-party certification due to the expense and difficulty of the certification process. Until recently, the only SWT certification bodies were in Europe. In North America, testing has been limited to a small number of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsidized tests conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) under the ongoing Independent Testing Project. During the past few years, DOE, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and some states have worked with the North American SWT industry to create a SWT certification infrastructure. The goal is to increase the number of certified turbines and gain greater consumer confidence in SWT technology. The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) released the AWEA Small Wind Turbine Performance and Safety Standard, AWEA Standard 9.1 - 2009, in December 2009. The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC) and Intertek, North American SWT certification bodies, began accepting applications for certification to the AWEA standard in 2010. To reduce certification testing costs, DOE and NREL are providing financial and technical assistance for an initial round of tests at four SWT test sites, which were selected through a competitive solicitation. The four organizations selected are Windward Engineering (Utah), The Alternative Energy Institute at West Texas A and M (Texas), a consortium consisting of Kansas State University and Colby Community College (Kansas), and Intertek (New York). Each organization will test two small wind turbines as part of their respective subcontracts with DOE and NREL. The testing results will be made publically available. The goal is to establish a lower-cost U.S. small wind testing capability that will lead to increased SWT certification. Turbine installation is ongoing. Testing began in early 2011 and is scheduled to conclude in mid-late 2012.

Jimenez, T.; Forsyth, T.; Huskey, A.; Mendoza, I.; Sinclair, K.; Smith, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

Not Available

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and...

20

Vantage Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vantage Wind Energy Center Vantage Wind Energy Center Facility Vantage Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Co Location East of Ellensburg between Vantage Highway and I90 Coordinates 46.965336°, -120.245204° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.965336,"lon":-120.245204,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Weatherford Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Weatherford Wind Energy Center Weatherford Wind Energy Center Facility Weatherford Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser American Electric Power Location Weatherford OK Coordinates 35.559414°, -98.742992° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.559414,"lon":-98.742992,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Minco Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Center Wind Energy Center Facility Minco Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Public Service Company of Oklahoma Location South of Minco OK Coordinates 35.294204°, -97.926081° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.294204,"lon":-97.926081,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Oliver Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Center Wind Energy Center Facility Oliver Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Minnesota Power Location Oliver County ND Coordinates 47.180446°, -101.225116° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.180446,"lon":-101.225116,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Wyoming Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Wyoming Wind Energy Center Facility Wyoming Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Orion Energy Energy Purchaser PPM Energy Inc Location Evanston WY Coordinates 41.304414°, -110.793904° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.304414,"lon":-110.793904,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

25

NREL: Wind Research - Regional Test Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map Printable Version Regional Test Centers To increase the availability of small wind turbine testing and share field expertise, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL...

26

NREL: Wind Research - National Wind Technology Center Blade Testing Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Blade Testing Video (Text Version) Center Blade Testing Video (Text Version) Below is the text version for the National Wind Technology Center Blade Testing Video. The video opens with the NREL and NWTC logos, surrounded by black screen and including the title: "NWTC Test Facility Introduction, Dr. Fort Felker, Director of the National Wind Technology Center, TRT 1:42, May 29, 2013." Fort Felker is in a yellow helmet and vest, standing in the NWTC's testing facility. There is a railing to his left, construction cones behind him, and a ladder to his right. Fort Felker: "I'm Fort Felker, I'm the director at the Department of Energy's National Wind Technology Center." Fort's name and title cut in on the right. Fort walks toward the camera while talking. Fort Felker: "Here at the NWTC, we have been conducting structural testing

27

The National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy research began at the Rocky Flats test site in 1976 when Rockwell International subcontracted with the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The Rocky Flats Plant was competitively selected from a number of ERDA facilities primarily because it experienced high instantaneous winds and provided a large, clear land area. By 1977, several small wind turbines were in place. During the facility`s peak of operation, in 1979-1980, researchers were testing as many as 23 small wind turbines of various configurations, including commercially available machines and prototype turbines developed under subcontract to Rocky Flats. Facilities also included 8-kW, 40-kW, and 225-kW dynamometers; a variable-speed test bed; a wind/hybrid test facility; a controlled velocity test facility (in Pueblo, Colorado); a modal test facility, and a multimegawatt switchgear facility. The main laboratory building was dedicated in July 1981 and was operated by the Rocky Flats Plant until 1984, when the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) and Rocky Flats wind energy programs were merged and transferred to SERI. SERI and now the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) continued to conduct wind turbine system component tests after 1987, when most program personnel were moved to the Denver WEst Office Park in Golden and site ownership was transferred back to Rocky Flats. The Combined Experiment test bed was installed and began operation in 1988, and the NREL structural test facility began operation in 1990. In 1993, the site`s operation was officially transferred to the DOE Golden Field Office that oversees NREL. This move was in anticipation of NREL`s renovation and reoccupation of the facility in 1994.

Thresher, R.W.; Hock, S.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Loose, R.R.; Cadogon, J.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Distributed Wind Market Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Wind Market Distributed Wind Market Applications T. Forsyth and I. Baring-Gould Technical Report NREL/TP-500-39851 November 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Technical Report NREL/TP-500-39851 November 2007 Distributed Wind Market Applications T. Forsyth and I. Baring-Gould Prepared under Task No. WER6.7502 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

29

Massachusetts realizes wind center dream | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts realizes wind center dream Massachusetts realizes wind center dream February 23, 2010 - 3:15pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this project do? The new testing center...

30

National Wind Technology Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Wind Technology Center Name National Wind Technology Center Place Boulder, Colorado Region Rockies Area Number of employees 51-200 Year founded 1993 Coordinates 39.9127646676°, -105.227651596° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9127646676,"lon":-105.227651596,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Blade Testing at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation of Blade Testing at NREL's National Wind Technology Center for the 2010 Sandia National Laboratories Blade Testing Workshop.

Hughes, S.

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

32

Establishment of Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Centers (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation offers an overview of the Regional Test Centers project for Small Wind Turbine testing and certification.

Sinclair, K.

2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Model Validation at the 204 MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we describe methods to derive and validate equivalent models for a large wind farm. FPL Energy's 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center, which is interconnected to the Public Service Company of New Mexico (PNM) transmission system, was used as a case study. The methods described are applicable to any large wind power plant.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

NREL: News Feature - NREL Thinks Big at Wind Technology Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thinks Big at Wind Technology Center Thinks Big at Wind Technology Center March 22, 2012 An aerial photograph of the National Wind Technology Center site shows three large wind turbines with other smaller wind turbines in the background. Mountains are in the background of the photo behind the site. Enlarge image The most noticeable change at the NWTC in recent years is the addition of multi-megawatt wind turbines used for a wide variety of R&D activities in collaboration with industry partners. Credit: Dennis Schroeder The Front Range environment at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is harsh. The winds - the very reason the NWTC is there - have little mercy. The frigid cold of winter gives way to the baking sun of summer. Yet in the midst of this difficult landscape, the future of wind energy grows

36

The Answer Is Blowing in the Wind: Analysis of Powering Internet Data Centers with Wind Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Answer Is Blowing in the Wind: Analysis of Powering Internet Data Centers with Wind Energy Yan. As a result, many IDC operators have started using renewable energy, e.g., wind power, to power their data centers. Unfortunately, the utilization of wind energy has stayed at a low ratio due to the intermittent

37

NREL: Learning - National Wind Technology Center Video (Text Version)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Wind Technology Center Video (Text Version) National Wind Technology Center Video (Text Version) This is the text version for the National Wind Technology Center video. The video opens with spinning blades of wind turbines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory logo. It then cuts to images of windmills turning on farms. The video cuts in between shots of wind turbines and face-to-face interviews of scientists from NREL's National Wind Technology Center. (Voiceover) It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Jim Johnson, Senior Engineer: "Right now, wind is in high demand." (Voiceover) And it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. Fort Felker, National Wind Technology Center Director: "It's changing the way power is being made in the country. It's really having an impact."

38

Establishment of Small Wind Regional Test Centers: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rapid growth of the small wind turbine (SWT) market is attracting numerous entrants. Small wind turbine purchasers now have many options but often lack information (such as third-party certification) to select a quality turbine. Most SWTs do not have third-party certification due to the expense and difficulty of the certification process. Until recently, the only SWT certification bodies were in Europe. In North America, testing has been limited to a small number of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsidized tests conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) under the ongoing Independent Testing Project. Within the past few years, the DOE, National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and some states have worked with the North American SWT industry to create a SWT certification infrastructure. The goal is to increase the number of certified turbines and gain greater consumer confidence in SWT technology. The American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) released the AWEA Small Wind Turbine Performance and Safety Standard (AWEA Standard 9.1 - 2009) in December 2009. The Small Wind Certification Council (SWCC), a North American certification body, began accepting applications for certification to the AWEA standard in February 2010. To reduce certification testing costs, DOE/NREL is providing financial and technical assistance for an initial round of tests at four SWT test sites which were selected via a competitive solicitation. The four organizations selected are Windward Engineering (Utah), The Alternative Energy Institute at West Texas A&M (Texas), a consortium consisting of Kansas State University and Colby Community College (Kansas), and Intertek (New York). Each organization will test two small wind turbines as part of their respective subcontract with DOE/NREL. The testing results will be made publically available. The goal is to establish a lower-cost U.S. small wind testing capability that will lead to increased SWT certification.

Jimenez, T.; Forsyth, T.; Huskey, A.; Mendoza, I.; Sinclair, K.; Smith, J.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Axial Flux, Modular, Permanent-Magnet Generator with a Toroidal Winding for Wind Turbine Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CP-500-24996 Ÿ UC Category: 1213 CP-500-24996 Ÿ UC Category: 1213 Axial Flux, Modular, Permanent- Magnet Generator with a Toroidal Winding for Wind Turbine Applications E. Muljadi C.P. Butterfield Yih-Huei Wan National Wind Technology Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at IEEE Industry Applications Conference St. Louis, MO November 5-8, 1998 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

40

Distributed Wind Market Applications  

SciTech Connect

Distributed wind energy systems provide clean, renewable power for on-site use and help relieve pressure on the power grid while providing jobs and contributing to energy security for homes, farms, schools, factories, private and public facilities, distribution utilities, and remote locations. America pioneered small wind technology in the 1920s, and it is the only renewable energy industry segment that the United States still dominates in technology, manufacturing, and world market share. The series of analyses covered by this report were conducted to assess some of the most likely ways that advanced wind turbines could be utilized apart from large, central station power systems. Each chapter represents a final report on specific market segments written by leading experts in this field. As such, this document does not speak with one voice but rather a compendium of different perspectives, which are documented from a variety of people in the U.S. distributed wind field.

Forsyth, T.; Baring-Gould, I.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to...

42

Massachusetts realizes wind center dream | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25 million in funding from the Recovery Act to accelerate development of a Wind Technology Testing Center in Charlestown that will create as many as 300 construction,...

43

Offshore Wind Research (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology Center (NWTC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Offshore Offshore Wind Research The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is internationally recognized for offshore wind energy research and development (R&D). Its experience and capabilities cover a wide spectrum of wind energy disciplines. NREL's offshore wind R&D efforts focus on critical areas that address the long-term needs of the offshore wind energy industry and the Department of Energy (DOE). R&D efforts include: * Developing offshore design tools and methods * Collaborating with international partners * Testing offshore systems and developing standards * Conducting economic analyses * Characterizing offshore wind resources * Identifying and mitigating offshore wind grid integration challenges and barriers NREL documented the status of offshore wind energy in the United

44

National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine...

45

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at wind energy sites are becoming paramount. Regime-switching space-time (RST) models merge meteorological forecast regimes at the wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime

Washington at Seattle, University of

46

Final Environmental Assessment, Burleigh County Wind Energy Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1542 August 2005 Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Environmental Assessment Burleigh County Wind Energy Center Burleigh County, North Dakota Final Burleigh County Wind, LLC BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE Central Power Electric Cooperative, Inc. Introduction 1-1 Burleigh County Wind Energy Center Environmental Assessment CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION The Burleigh County Wind Energy Center is a wind generation project proposed by FPL Energy Burleigh County Wind, LLC (Burleigh County Wind). The proposed project would produce up to 50 megawatts (MW) of electricity, averaged annually. The proposed project is located in Burleigh County, North Dakota, approximately 3 miles south and 2 miles east of the town of Wilton, North Dakota (Figures 1-1

47

Application Darling Marine Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment September 12, 2007 Lise Dondy (CCEF) Legislation 1998 / Launch 2000 Administered by Connecticut Innovations (CI) Surcharge on electric CCEF Goals 6 #12;Clean Energy Technologies Fuel Cells Solar Biomass Hydro Landfill Gas Wave Wind 7 #12

Boss, Emmanuel S.

48

NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REL's wind energy research and development efforts at REL's wind energy research and development efforts at the National WInd Technology Center (NWTC) have contributed to numerous successes for the wind industry. In addition to helping its industry partners develop commercially successful wind turbines, NREL has developed award-winning components and modeling software. The Laboratory also engages in deployment activities that help schools, communities, and utilities understand the benefits of wind energy and how it can be successfully integrated into our nation's electrical system to provide for a cleaner, more secure energy future. NREL's successes in wind energy research, development, and deployment have: * Reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies

49

Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Centers 50-MHz Doppler radar wind profiler (DRWP) for use in vehicle wind loads and ...

Robert E. Barbr Jr.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Wind characteristics for agricultural wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

Wind energy utilization in agriculture can provide a potentially significant savings in fuel oil consumption and ultimately a cost savings to the farmer. A knowledge of the wind characteristics within a region and at a location can contribute greatly to a more efficient and cost-effective use of this resource. Current research indicates that the important wind characteristics include mean annual wind speed and the frequency distribution of the wind, seasonal and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction, and the turbulent and gustiness characteristics of the wind. Further research is underway to provide a better definition of the total wind resource available, improved methods for siting WECS and an improved understanding of the environment to which the WECS respond.

Renne, D. S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Spotsylvania Career and Tech Center Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Career and Tech Center Wind Project Career and Tech Center Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Spotsylvania Career and Tech Center Wind Project Facility Spotsylvania Career and Tech Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location VA Coordinates 38.230911°, -77.556313° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.230911,"lon":-77.556313,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

Stanton Energy Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Wind Farm Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Stanton Energy Center Wind Farm Facility Stanton Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Location Martin County TX Coordinates 32.159868°, -101.76723° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.159868,"lon":-101.76723,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Huayi Wind Blade Research Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huayi Wind Blade Research Center Huayi Wind Blade Research Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Huayi Wind Blade Research Center Place Baoding, Hebei Province, China Zip 71051 Sector Wind energy Product China's first research center for wind turbine blade. Coordinates 38.855011°, 115.480217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.855011,"lon":115.480217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Hayes Center Public Schools Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Public Schools Wind Project Center Public Schools Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Hayes Center Public Schools Wind Project Facility Hayes Center Public Schools Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Location NE Coordinates 40.510666°, -101.015503° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.510666,"lon":-101.015503,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration 9: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to improve grid performance and thereby aid in the integration of wind generation into the local electricity supply. Under the proposed action, DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability would provide cost shared funding for the project through American Reinvestment and Recovery Act

56

Applications: Wind turbine structural health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of turbine system management. The data obtained from this multi-scale sensing capability will be fullyCapability Applications: Wind turbine structural health monitoring Individual turbine maintenance for active control in the field Limit damage propagation and maintenance costs Maximize return

57

EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties,...

58

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Facility Horse Hollow Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Near Abilene TX Coordinates 32.230566°, -100.047991° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.230566,"lon":-100.047991,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

59

Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center I Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center I Facility Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Tennessee Valley Authority Developer EnXco Energy Purchaser Tennessee Valley Authority Location Anderson County TN Coordinates 36.115822°, -84.333742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.115822,"lon":-84.333742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

60

Wilton Wind Energy Center II I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II I Wilton Wind Energy Center II I Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Florida Power & Light Co. Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Wilton ND Coordinates 47.128392°, -100.739837° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.128392,"lon":-100.739837,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - A Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - A Facility Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - A Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Oklahoma Muncipal Power Authority Location Woodward OK Coordinates 36.6051°, -99.327829° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.6051,"lon":-99.327829,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

62

Elk City Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Center Wind Energy Center Facility Elk City Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Public Service Company of Oklahoma Location Roger Mills and Beckham Counties OK Coordinates 35.472664°, -99.442602° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.472664,"lon":-99.442602,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

63

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

64

Northern Colorado Wind Energy Center (GE) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center (GE) Center (GE) Jump to: navigation, search Name Northern Colorado Wind Energy Center (GE) Facility Northern Colorado Wind Energy Center (GE) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Developer NextEra Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Logan County CO Coordinates 40.974539°, -103.025336° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.974539,"lon":-103.025336,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

65

Loess Hills Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loess Hills Wind Energy Center Loess Hills Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Loess Hills Wind Energy Center Facility Loess Hills Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Developer Wind Capital Group/John Deere Capital Energy Purchaser Missouri Joint Municipal Electric Utility Commission Location Rock Port MO Coordinates 40.410864°, -95.514861° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.410864,"lon":-95.514861,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

66

Applications: Wind turbine and blade design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capability Applications: Wind turbine and blade design optimization Energy production enhancement Summary: As the wind energy industry works to provide the infra- structure necessary for wind turbine develops a means to aug- ment power production with wind-derived energy. Turbines have become massive

67

Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project North Dakota North Dakota Wind, LLC FPL Energy DOE/EA-1465 April 2003 Summary S - 1 Final EA SUMMARY The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a

68

Woods Hole Research Center Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hole Research Center Wind Turbine Hole Research Center Wind Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Woods Hole Research Center Wind Turbine Facility Woods Hole Research Center Wind Turbine Sector Wind energy Facility Type Small Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Woods Hole Research Center Developer Sustainable Energy Developments Energy Purchaser Woods Hole Research Center Location Falmouth MA Coordinates 41.548637°, -70.64326° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.548637,"lon":-70.64326,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

69

NREL: MIDC/National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (39.91 N...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center collects Irradiance and Meterological data from the National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower....

70

Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Science Center Wind Farm Science Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Great Lakes Science Center Wind Farm Facility Great Lakes Science Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Great Lakes Science Center Developer Great Lakes Science Center Energy Purchaser Great Lakes Science Center Location Cleveland OH Coordinates 41.506659°, -81.696816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.506659,"lon":-81.696816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

71

State Fair Wind Energy Education Center Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Education Center Wind Farm Wind Energy Education Center Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name State Fair Wind Energy Education Center Wind Farm Facility Wind Energy Education Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser Iowa State Fair Location IA State Fairgrounds IA Coordinates 41.595052°, -93.548779° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.595052,"lon":-93.548779,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

72

Northern Colorado Wind Energy Center (Siemens) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Center (Siemens) Wind Energy Center (Siemens) Jump to: navigation, search Name Northern Colorado Wind Energy Center (Siemens) Facility Northern Colorado Wind Energy Center (Siemens) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Developer NextEra Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Logan County CO Coordinates 40.974539°, -103.025336° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.974539,"lon":-103.025336,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

73

Minco II Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minco II Wind Energy Center Minco II Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Minco II Wind Energy Center Facility Minco II Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Google Energy Location South of Minco OK Coordinates 35.346236°, -98.00364° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.346236,"lon":-98.00364,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

74

Mower County Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mower County Wind Energy Center Mower County Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Mower County Wind Energy Center Facility Mower County Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.695822°, -92.649608° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.695822,"lon":-92.649608,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

75

Callahan Divide Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Divide Wind Energy Center Divide Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Callahan Divide Wind Energy Center Facility Callahan Divide Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Austin Energy Location Taylor County TX Coordinates 32.310556°, -100.149167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.310556,"lon":-100.149167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

76

White Oak Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Center Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name White Oak Wind Energy Center Facility White Oak Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser TVA Location Northwest of Bloomington near Carlock IL Coordinates 40.593859°, -89.062607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.593859,"lon":-89.062607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

77

Lee-Dekalb Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lee-Dekalb Wind Energy Center Lee-Dekalb Wind Energy Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Lee-Dekalb Wind Energy Center Facility Lee-Dekalb Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Location Lee and Dekalb Counties IL Coordinates 41.710783°, -89.041507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.710783,"lon":-89.041507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

78

Evaluation of the National Hurricane Centers Tropical Cyclone Wind Speed Probability Forecast Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tropical cyclone (TC) wind speed probability forecast product developed at the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA) and adopted by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) is evaluated for U.S. land-threatening and landfalling ...

Michael E. Splitt; Jaclyn A. Shafer; Steven M. Lazarus; William P. Roeder

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Wilton Wind Energy Center I (2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

I (2005) I (2005) Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilton Wind Energy Center I (2005) Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Florida Power & Light Co. Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Wilton ND Coordinates 47.128392°, -100.739837° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.128392,"lon":-100.739837,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

B B Jump to: navigation, search Name Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - B Facility Oklahoma Wind Energy Center - B Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Oklahoma Gas & Electric Location Woodward OK Coordinates 36.58642°, -99.310015° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.58642,"lon":-99.310015,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Wilton Wind Energy Center I (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Wilton Wind Energy Center I (2006) Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

82

Testing of a 50-kW Wind-Diesel Hybrid System at the National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In remote off-grid villages and communities, a reliable power source is important in improving the local quality of life. Villages often use a diesel generator for their power, but fuel can be expensive and maintenance burdensome. Including a wind turbine in a diesel system can reduce fuel consumption and lower maintenance, thereby reducing energy costs. However, integrating the various components of a wind-diesel system, including wind turbine, power conversion system, and battery storage (if applicable), is a challenging task. To further the development of commercial hybrid power systems, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the New World Village Power Corporation (NWVP), tested a NWVP 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system connected to a 15/50 Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) wind turbine. Testing was conducted from October 1995 through March 1996 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). A main objective of the testing was to better understand the application of wind turbines to weak grids typical of small villages. Performance results contained in this report include component characterization, such as power conversion losses for the rotary converter system and battery round trip efficiencies. In addition, system operation over the test period is discussed with special attention given to dynamic issues. Finally, future plans for continued testing and research are discussed.

Corbus, D. A.; Green, H. J.; Allderdice, A.; Rand, K.; Bianchi, J.; Linton, E.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Testing of a 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system at the National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To further the development of commercial hybrid power systems, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), in collaboration with the New World Village Power Corporation (NWVP), tested a NWVP 50-kW wind-diesel hybrid system connected to a 15/50 Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) wind turbine. Testing was conducted from October 1995 through March 1996 at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). A main objective of the testing was to better understand the application of wind turbines to weak grids typical of small villages. Performance results contained in this paper include component characterization, such as power conversion losses for the rotary converter systems and battery round trip efficiencies. In addition, systems operation over this period is discussed with special attention given to dynamic issues. Finally, future plans for continued testing and research are discussed.

Corbus, D.A.; Green, J.; Allderdice, A.; Rand, K.; Bianchi, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Linton, E. [New World Village Power, Waitsfield, VT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results show that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J. K.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing model validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

New Mexico Wind Energy Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Mexico Wind Energy Center New Mexico Wind Energy Center Facility New Mexico Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Public Service New Mexico Location Quay & DeBaca Counties NM Coordinates 34.548414°, -104.084157° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.548414,"lon":-104.084157,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

88

Wind energy applications in agriculture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstract are included for each of the papers presented concerning the use of wind turbines in agriculture.

Kluter, H.H.; Soderholm, L.H. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Guidelines for Control Center Application Program Interfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying the interoperability concept to the utility control center requires application program interfaces (API) for energy management systems (EMS). This report contains guidelines for achieving plug compatibility of application programs in the control center EMS.

1996-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Certification testing at the National Wind Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The International Electrotechnical Commission is developing a new standard that defines power performance measurement techniques. The standard will provide the basis for international recognition of a wind turbine`s performance primarily for certification, but also for qualification for tax and investment incentives, and for contracts. According to the standard, the power performance characteristics are defined by a measured power curve and by projections of annual energy production for a range of wind conditions. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) has adopted these power performance measurement techniques. This paper reviews the results of the NWTC`s first test conducted under the new protocol on the Atlantic Orient Corporation`s AOC 15/50 wind turbine at the NWTC. The test required collecting sufficient data to establish a statistically significant database over a range of wind speeds and conditions. From the data, the power curve was calculated. Then the results from a site calibration procedure determined the flow distortion between winds measured at the turbine location and those measured at the meteorological tower. Finally, this paper discusses the uncertainty analysis that was performed in accordance with the standard. Use of these procedures resulted in the definition of the AOC 15/50`s power curve within about 3 kW.

Huskey, A.; Link, H.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime-Switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting at the Stateline Wind Energy Center: The Regime at a wind energy site and fits a conditional predictive model for each regime. Geographically dispersed was applied to 2-hour-ahead forecasts of hourly average wind speed near the Stateline wind energy center

Genton, Marc G.

92

Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Buffalo Mountain Wind Energy Center Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Invenergy Developer Invenergy Energy Purchaser Tennessee Valley Authority Location Anderson County TN Coordinates 36.115822°, -84.333742° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.115822,"lon":-84.333742,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Power Transformer Application for Wind Plant Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power plants use power transformers to step plant output from the medium voltage of the collector system to the HV or EHV transmission system voltage. This paper discusses the application of these transformers with regard to the selection of winding configuration, MVA rating, impedance, loss evaluation, on-load tapchanger requirements, and redundancy.

Behnke, M. R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bloethe, W.G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Bradt, M. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Brooks, C. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Camm, E H [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Dilling, W. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Goltz, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Li, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Niemira, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Nuckles, K. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Patino, J. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Reza, M [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Richardson, B. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Samaan, N. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Schoene, Jens [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Walling, R. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group; Zahalka, G. [IEEE PES Wind Plant Collector System Design Working Group

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Test application of a semi-objective approach to wind forecasting for wind energy applications  

SciTech Connect

The test application of the semi-objective (S-O) wind forecasting technique at three locations is described. The forecasting sites are described as well as site-specific forecasting procedures. Verification of the S-O wind forecasts is presented, and the observed verification results are interpreted. Comparisons are made between S-O wind forecasting accuracy and that of two previous forecasting efforts that used subjective wind forecasts and model output statistics. (LEW)

Wegley, H.L.; Formica, W.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility...

97

NREL: Renewable Resource Data Center - Wind Resource Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Information Wind Resource Information Photo of five wind turbines at the Nine Canyon Wind Project. The Nine Canyon Wind Project in Benton County, Washington, includes 37 wind turbines and 48 MW of capacity. Detailed wind resource information can be found on NREL's Wind Research Web site. This site provides access to state and international wind resource maps. Wind Integration Datasets are provided to help energy professionals perform wind integration studies and estimate power production from hypothetical wind plants. In addition, RReDC offers Meteorological Field Measurements at Potential and Actual Wind Turbine Sites and a Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the United States. Wind resource maps are also available from the NREL Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Web site.

98

Blade Testing at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation of Blade Testing at NREL's National Wind Technology Center for the 2010 Sandia National Laboratories Blade Testing Workshop.

Hughes, S.

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

New Wind Energy Technologies Are Cost-Effective in Federal Applications--Technology Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind energy systems are producing Wind energy systems are producing electricity in some areas of the United States for 5¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) or less. As the demand for advanced wind systems increases, wind turbines can be manufactured on a larger scale. This demand, coupled with improvements in the technology, will further reduce the cost of wind- generated electricity. Today, using wind systems to generate electricity can be a cost-effective option for many Federal facilities. This is especially true for facilities that have access to good wind resources and rela- tively high utility costs, and those that depend on diesel power generation. Applications for wind systems are similar to those for solar systems: * Remote communications equipment * Ranger stations * Military installations * Visitor centers and other facilities in

100

Streamlined Reliability Centered Maintenance Analysis Application Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic evaluation of plant equipment and maintenance requirements using reliability centered maintenance (RCM) techniques can help hold down operating costs while maintaining plant availability and reliability. This report describes the application of streamlined reliability centered maintenance (streamlined RCM) methodology and software at four utilities.

2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sample Farm Bill Application: Guide for Small Wind Applicant  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Section 9006 Sample Small Wind Application Revised April 2007 This Sample Application is provided by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to assist applicants in meeting requirements under the Simplified Application Process contained in 7 CFR Part 4280. This sample describes a fictional project and is meant as an example for guidance purposes only. For complete application requirements, applicants should consult the regulation. Further information is available at http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rbs/farmbill/. This document is not officially endorsed by USDA. Table of Contents Forms, Certifications and Agreements Project specific forms: SF-424 Application for Federal Assistance 1 SF-424C Budget Information - Construction Programs 2

102

NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms. Today's utility-scale wind turbine structures are more complex and their compo- nents more of algorithms to control the dynamic systems of wind turbines must account for multiple complex, nonlinear

103

A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University November 15, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis James Madison University received an $800,000 grant through the State Energy Program to build a small wind testing and training facility. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of summer 2011. The university's existing 1 kW wind turbine is pictured above. | Photo courtesy of Remy Luerssen/JMU James Madison University received an $800,000 grant through the State Energy Program to build a small wind testing and training facility. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of summer 2011. The university's existing 1 kW wind turbine is pictured above. | Photo courtesy of Remy Luerssen/JMU Stephen Graff

104

A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University A New Small Wind Center for James Madison University November 15, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis James Madison University received an $800,000 grant through the State Energy Program to build a small wind testing and training facility. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of summer 2011. The university's existing 1 kW wind turbine is pictured above. | Photo courtesy of Remy Luerssen/JMU James Madison University received an $800,000 grant through the State Energy Program to build a small wind testing and training facility. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of summer 2011. The university's existing 1 kW wind turbine is pictured above. | Photo courtesy of Remy Luerssen/JMU Stephen Graff

105

Performance Characteristics of the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Using the Median Filter/First-Guess Data Reduction Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of an improved signal-processing algorithm implemented on the NASA 50-MHz radar wind profiler at Kennedy Space Center is analyzed. In 1990, NASA began using a 50-MHz Doppler radar wind profiler to demonstrate the applicability of ...

Robin S. Schumann; Gregory E. Taylor; Francis J. Merceret; Timothy L. Wilfong

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo 61: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota EIS-0461: Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, Hyde and Buffalo Counties, South Dakota Summary This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of interconnecting the proposed 150 megawatt Hyde County Wind Energy Center Project, in Hyde County, South Dakota, with DOE's Western Area Power Administration's existing Fort Thompson Substation in Buffalo County, South Dakota. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 19, 2011 EIS-0461: Notice of Cancellation of the Environmental Impact Statement Hyde County Wind energy Center Project November 30, 2010 EIS-0461: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement and

107

AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Clean Energy Application Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this topic. DOE's Regional Clean Energy Application Centers (CEACs), formerly called the Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Regional Application Centers (RACs), promote and assist in...

108

NREL's Wind R&D Success Stories, National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy research, development, and deployment have reduced the cost of large and small wind turbine technologies, increased wind energy system reliability and operability, lowered risk by validating performance and design, increased the understanding of the true impacts of wind energy on the U.S. electrical infrastructure, and expanded wind energy markets. A synopsis of research conducted on utility-scale wind turbines, small wind turbines, software, components, market development and grid integration are detailed.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

A Short-Term Ensemble Wind Speed Forecasting System for Wind Power Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study develops an adaptive, blended forecasting system to provide accurate wind speed forecasts 1 h ahead of time for wind power applications. The system consists of an ensemble of 21 forecasts with different configurations of the Weather ...

Justin J. Traiteur; David J. Callicutt; Maxwell Smith; Somnath Baidya Roy

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

LIDAR Applications to Wind-Energy Technology Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) is an emerging technology in the wind industry that has the potential to improve preconstruction wind project development as well as increase reliability and performance of operating projects. Realizing this potential will reduce the cost of wind-power generation. Several LIDAR models have been developed for the wind-energy industry in the past decade as ground-based and nacelle-mounted wind measurement systems. Cost-benefit analyses were conducted for the application ...

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh 9: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota Summary Western Area Power Administration is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to Western's existing Wilton/Baldwin substation and allowing NextEra's existing wind projects in this area to operate above 50 annual MW. Western is preparing a Supplemental Draft EIS to address substantial changes to the proposal, including 30 turbine locations and 5 alternate turbine locations in Crofte Township. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download

112

Small Wind Turbine Applications: Current Practice in Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous small wind turbines are being used by homeowners in Colorado. Some of these installations are quite recent while others date back to the federal tax-credit era of the early 1980s. Through visits with small wind turbine owners in Colorado, I have developed case studies of six small wind energy applications focusing on the wind turbine technology, wind turbine siting, the power systems and electric loads, regulatory issues, and motivations about wind energy. These case studies offer a glimpse into the current state-of-the-art of small-scale wind energy and provide some insight into issues affecting development of a wider market.

Green, J.

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to...

114

National Wind Technology Center to Debut New Dynamometer (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New test facility will be used to accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation offshore and land-based wind energy technologies.

Not Available

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

New Wind Energy Technologies Are Cost-Effective in Federal Applications--Technology Focus  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

energy systems are producing energy systems are producing electricity in some areas of the United States for 5¢ per kilowatt-hour (kWh) or less. As the demand for advanced wind systems increases, wind turbines can be manufactured on a larger scale. This demand, coupled with improvements in the technology, will further reduce the cost of wind- generated electricity. Today, using wind systems to generate electricity can be a cost-effective option for many Federal facilities. This is especially true for facilities that have access to good wind resources and rela- tively high utility costs, and those that depend on diesel power generation. Applications for wind systems are similar to those for solar systems: * Remote communications equipment * Ranger stations * Military installations * Visitor centers and other facilities in

116

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Compression Fitting Application Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Compression Fitting Application Manual provides power plant maintenance personnel with current maintenance information on this type of component used in power plants, both fossil fuel and nuclear. This guide will assist plant maintenance personnel in improving the reliability of and reducing the maintenance costs for this equipment.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Vertical Resolution of the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective vertical resolution of the Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler radar wind profiler is determined using vertical wavenumber spectra and temporal coherence. The resolution ranges from being Nyquist limited at 300 m to as coarse as 900 ...

Francis J. Merceret

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Operational Use of QuikSCAT Ocean Surface Vector Winds at the National Hurricane Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The utility and shortcomings of near-real-time ocean surface vector wind retrievals from the NASA Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) in operational forecast and analysis activities at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) are described. The use of ...

Michael J. Brennan; Christopher C. Hennon; Richard D. Knabb

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to one of DOEs Western Area Power Administrations existing substations and to operate NextEras existing wind projects in this area above 50 annual MW.

120

NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms. Today's utility-scale wind turbine structures are more complex and their compo- nents more turbine designers is to capture the maximum amount of energy, with minimal structural loading, for minimal

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE/EA-1652: Final Environmental Assessment Wind Technology Testing Center (August 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Technology Testing Center Boston, Massachusetts August 2009 DOE/EA-1652 Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401-3393 NREL - ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE WIND TECHNOLOGY TESTING CENTER, BOSTON, M.A. FINAL EA, AUGUST 2009 i Table of Contents SUMMARY ................................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 1.1 THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT AND RELATED PROCEDURES ................................ 1 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ....................................................................................................................... 2

122

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Ohio Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Ohio Power Siting Board Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be used to assess the environmental effects of the proposed facility. An applicant for a certificate to site a wind-powered electric generation

123

NREL: About NREL - National Wind Technology Center - Visitor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO weather as of: 700 PM MST SAT JAN 18 2014 Clear 41F (5C) Clear Details & Forecast Transportation There is no public transportation to the National Wind Technology...

124

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

SciTech Connect

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Primer on Wind Power for Utility Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wind industry still faces many market barriers, some of which stem from utilities' lack of experience with the technology. Utility system operators and planners need to understand the effects of fluctuating wind power on system regulation and stability. Without high-frequency wind power data and realistic wind power plant models to analyze the problem, utilities often rely on conservative assumptions and worst-case scenarios to make engineering decisions. To remedy the situation, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has undertaken a project to record long-term, high-resolution (1-hertz [Hz]) wind power output data from large wind power plants in various regions. The objective is to systematically collect actual wind power data from large commercial wind power plants so that wind power fluctuations, their frequency distribution, the effects of spatial diversity, and the ancillary services of large commercial wind power plants can be analyzed. It also aims to provide the industry with nonproprietary wind power data in different wind regimes for system planning and operating impact studies. This report will summarize the results of data analysis performed at NREL and discuss the wind power characteristics related to power system operation and planning.

Wan, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Siting guidelines for utility application of wind turbines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-oriented guidelines are described for identifying viable sites for wind turbines. Topics and procedures are also discussed that are important in carrying out a wind turbine siting program. These topics include: a description of the Department of Energy wind resource atlases; procedures for predicting wind turbine performance at potential sites; methods for analyzing wind turbine economics; procedures for estimating installation and maintenance costs; methods for anlayzing the distribution of wind resources over an area; and instrumentation for documenting wind behavior at potential sites. The procedure described is applicable to small and large utilities. Although the procedure was developed as a site-selection tool, it can also be used by a utility who wishes to estimate the potential for wind turbine penetration into its future generation mix.

Pennell, W.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Mobile Crane Application Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center Mobile Crane Application Guide contains mobile crane industry best practice, guidance from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and manufacturer and equipment guidelines common to types of cranes used in and around the nuclear industry.Any crane malfunction, failure, or operator error at a nuclear utility can have serious consequences. Depending on the cranes location and the ...

2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

128

Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (3Q07) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (3Q07) Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (3Q07) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (3Q07) Facility Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (3Q07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Florida Power & Light Co. Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Logan County CO Coordinates 40.98149°, -102.973891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.98149,"lon":-102.973891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

129

Testing Active Power Control from Wind Power at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

Ela, E.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Reference wind speed distributions and height profiles for wind turbine design and performance evaluation applications. [USA  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a set of reference or standard values of wind profiles, wind speed distributions and their effects on wind turbine performance for engineering design applications. Based on measured Weibull distribution parameters, representative average, low, and high variance data are given for height profiles of mean, 25 percentile, and 75 percentile wind speeds; and for wind speed probability density (velocity frequency) functions and cumulative probability (velocity duration) functions at selected heights. Results of a sensitivity analysis of the dependence of wind turbine performance parameters on cut-in speed, and rated speed for various mean wind and wind variance regimes are also presented. Wind turbine performance is expressed in terms of capacity factor (ratio of mean power output to rated power) and recovery factor (ratio of mean energy output to energy theoretically available in the wind). The representative high, mean, and low variance cases were determined from calculated Weibull distributions at 140 sites across the Continental U.S., and all of the representative functions are evaluated at mean wind speeds of 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 m/s at standard 10 m level.

Justus, C.G.; Hargraves, W.R.; Mikhail, A.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Practical applications of a drilling data center  

SciTech Connect

Tenneco Oil is using a real-time drilling-data acquisition, telemetry, data base, and applications-program system for Gulf of Mexico operations. The system provides for data acquisition in real time from commercially available logging units. The data are transmitted into a central office onshore via microwave or satellite telemetry links. Up to 352 drilling parameters are transmitted from each computerized logging unit and archived in the data base every 20 sec. Parameters can include measurement-while-drilling (MWD) data as well as mud-logging data. Applications programs utilizing these parameters are available in the central site data center (CSDC) and in locations throughout Tenneco's facilities in Lafayette, La. Access to the CSDC and its computing power is also available on the offshore rig. Backup surveillance of critical drilling parameters is provided through alarms and continuous monitoring of the parameters, thus providing for a safer operation. Rig efficiency has also been improved through analysis of the data and comparison of the data between various rig operations and rigs. Both tangible and intangible cost savings are discussed.

Graff, R.L.; Segrest, R.P.

1986-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

132

NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC): M2 Tower; Boulder, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), located at the foot of the Rocky Mountains near Boulder, Colorado, is a world-class research facility managed by NREL for the U.S. Department of Energy. NWTC researchers work with members of the wind energy industry to advance wind power technologies that lower the cost of wind energy through research and development of state-of-the-art wind turbine designs. NREL's Measurement and Instrument Data Center provides data from NWTC's M2 tower which are derived from instruments mounted on or near an 82 meter (270 foot) meteorological tower located at the western edge of the NWTC site and about 11 km (7 miles) west of Broomfield, and approximately 8 km (5 miles) south of Boulder, Colorado. The data represent the mean value of readings taken every two seconds and averaged over one minute. The wind speed and direction are measured at six heights on the tower and air temperature is measured at three heights. The dew point temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, totalized liquid precipitation, and global solar radiation are also available.

Jager, D.; Andreas, A.

133

Final Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 31, 2002 May 31, 2002 DOE/EA 1378 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICAflJT IMPACT For the NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER Site Operations and Short-Term and Long-Term Improvement Programs Golden, Colorado AGENCY: Department of Energy, Golden Field Office ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) conducted a Site-Wide Environmental Assessment (EA) of the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) to evaluate potential impacts of site operations and short-term and long-term improvement programs. DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) leads the national research effort to develop clean, competitive, and reliable renewable energy and power delivery technologies for the 21st century. The mission of EERE's Wind Energy Program is to help the

134

United Technologies Research Center 8-kW prototype wind system. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center 8 kW prototype wind system underwent testing at the Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center from April 1980 through August 1980. During atmospheric testing, the machine survived wind speeds of 30.8 m/s (69 mph) without incurring damage and proved it was capable of meeting the design specification for power production (8 kW at 9 m/s - 20 mph). Erratic cycling of the generator speed detector was the only operational problem encountered. Vibration tests indicated the first and second bending modes of the tower were excited during actual machine operation, but modifications were not required. Noise measurements revealed that sound pressure levels of the UTRC are within an acceptable range and should pose no barriers to machine use.

Higashi, K. K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Operational Impact of QuikSCAT Winds at the NOAA Ocean Prediction Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA Quick Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) has revolutionized the analysis and short-term forecasting of winds over the oceans at the NOAA Ocean Prediction Center (OPC). The success of QuikSCAT in OPC operations is due to the wide 1800-km swath ...

Joan M. Von Ahn; Joseph M. Sienkiewicz; Paul S. Chang

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: State Wind Activities  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Federal, Federal, State, & Local Printable Version Bookmark and Share Economic Development Policy Public Lands Public Power Regional Activities State Activities State Lands Siting State Wind Activities The U.S. map below summarizes Wind Powering America's state activities as of February 2010, which include Wind Working Groups, validated wind maps, anemometer loan programs, small wind guides, Wind for Schools Wind Applications Centers, exhibits, and workshops or webcasts. To read more state-specific news, click on a state. You can also view an enlarged map or print the state wind activities map. U.S. map showing Wind Powering America's activities in each state. Washington has an inactive/evolved wind working group, validated wind map, and a small wind guide. Exhibits have been displayed. Oregon has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. California has an inactive/evolved wind working group and valided wind map. Exhibits have been displayed. Idaho has an inactive/evolved wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Nevada has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Montana has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Wyoming has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Utah has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Arizona has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and exhibits have been displayed. Colorado has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. New Mexico has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and exhibits have been displayed. North Dakota has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. South Dakota has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Nebraska has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Kansas has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Oklahoma has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Texas currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Minnesota has a small wind guide. Iowa has a small wind guide and has had exhibits. Missouri has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Arkansas has a wind working group, validated wind map, and workshops or Webcasts. Lousiana currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Mississippi currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Alabama currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. Georgia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Florida currently does not have any Wind Powering America activities. South Carolina has a wind working group. Alaska has a wind working group, validated wind map, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Hawaii has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had exhibits. Puerto Rico has a validated wind map and a planned wind working group. Wisconsin has a wind working group, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Illinois has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Michigan has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Indiana has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, and has had workshops or Webcasts and exhibits. Kentucky has a wind working group and a validated wind map. Tennessee has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. North Carolina has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Virginia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, exhibits have been displayed, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. West Virginia has a wind working group, a validated wind map, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Ohio has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Maryland has a wind working group, a validated wind map, a small wind guide, and an anemometer loan program. Pennsylvania has a wind working group, a validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, has had workshops or Webcasts, and it has a Wind for Schools Wind Applications Center. Delaware has a validated wind map and a small wind guide. New Jersey has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Connecticut has a wind working group and a validated wind map. New York has a small wind guide. Vermont has a validated wind map and a small wind guide. Massachusetts has a wind working group, validated wind map, a small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had exhibits. New Hampshire has a validated wind map and small wind guide. Maine has a wind working group, validated wind map, small wind guide, an anemometer loan program, and has had workshops or Webcasts. Rhode Island has a validated wind map and small wind guide. The U.S. Virgin Islands have a validated wind map.

137

Wind energy applications in agriculture: executive summary. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents an assessment of the potential use of wind turbine generator systems (WTGS) in US agriculture. In particular, this report presents the number of WTGS's economically feasible for use in US agriculture and the conditions which yielded economic feasibility of WTGS's for certain agricultural applications. In addition, for each case, i.e., set of assumed conditions, under which WTGS's were found to be economically feasible, this report identifies (1) the agricultural WTGS applications in terms of location, type and size (complete farm and dedicated-use applications); (2) the number of WTGS's by wind machine and generator size category; (3) aggregate energy conversion potential; and (4) other technical and economic WTGS performance data for particular applications. This report also describes the methodology, data and assumptions used for the analysis. A major part of the study was the development and use of a rigorous analytical system to assess an application's wind power generation and use potential.

David, M.L.; Buzenberg, R.J.; Glynn, E.F.; Johnson, G.L.; Shultis, J.K.; Wagner, J.P.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Research and Applications Fuel Cell Research and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Name Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications Place The Woodlands, Texas Zip TX 77381 Product A multi-sponsor research consortium that tests and evaluates commercial and near-commercial fuel cell systems. References Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications is a company located in The Woodlands, Texas . References ↑ "Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Center_for_Fuel_Cell_Research_and_Applications&oldid=343358

139

2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

1 1 Wind Program 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications Alice Orrell, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Heather Rhoads-Weaver, eFormative Options, LLC PNNL-SA-97689 2 What is "Distributed Wind"? Distributed wind is used on or near where it is generated and is... Not just small scale; could be any size turbine or array Employed by households, schools, farms, industrial facilities, municipalities Found in all 50 states and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands A large portion of turbines installed in U.S. on a per unit basis And has been used for more than 2,000 years to pump water and grind grain Photo Credit: Tom Rivers/The (Batavia, N.Y.) Daily News Photo Credit: Gamesa 3 Benefits of Distributed Wind

140

2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications August 21, 2013 Coordinator: Welcome and thank you all for holding. I'd like to inform participants that your lines are in a listen only for the duration of today's conference call. If you should need the operator's assistance, please press star then 0. Today's conference is also being recorded. If anyone has any objections, you may disconnect. I would now like to turn the call over to your host, Suzanne Tegen. You may begin. Suzanne Tegen: Thank you. Hi, everyone, and welcome to our monthly Wind Powering America Webinar. Thank you for joining us. I'm Suzanne Tegen from NREL and I'm filling in for Ian Baring-Gould for this webinar. As always, we're grateful to the Department of Energy's Wind and Water

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Wind for Schools (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

Baring-Gould, I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Wind for Schools (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses, by installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools, by implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school. This poster provides an overview of the first two years of the Wind for Schools project, primarily supporting activities in Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, Montana, and Idaho.

Baring-Gould, I.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (4Q07) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (4Q07) Facility Peetz Table Wind Energy Center (4Q07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Logan County CO Coordinates 40.98149°, -102.973891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.98149,"lon":-102.973891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

144

Expanding Small Wind Turbine Certification Testing - Establishment of Regional Test Centers (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

Presented at the WINDPOWER 2010 Conference & Exhibition, 23-26 May 2010, Dallas, Texas. The rapid growth of the small wind turbine (SWT) market is attracting numerous entrants. Small wind turbine purchasers now have many options but often lack information (such as third-party certification) to select a quality turbine. Most SWTs do not have third-party certification due to the expense and difficulty of the certification process. Until recently, the only SWT certification bodies were in Europe. In North America, testing has been limited to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) subsidized tests conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) under the ongoing Independent Testing Project. The goal is to increase the number of certified turbines and gain greater consumer confidence in SWT technology. To reduce certification testing costs, DOE/NREL is assisting in establishing a network of Regional Test Centers (RTCs) to conduct SWT third-party certification testing. To jump-start these RTCs, DOE/NREL is providing financial and technical assistance for an initial round of tests. The goal is to establish a lower-cost U.S. small wind testing capability that will lead to increased SWT certification. This poster describes the project, describes how it fits within broader SWT certification activities, and provides current status.

Jimenez, A.; Bowen, A.; Forsyth, T.; Huskey, A.; Sinclair, K.; van Dam, J.; Smith, J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

CIRES/SWPC Research Associate CIRES invites applications to fill a research associate position resident at the Space Weather Prediction Center to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resident at the Space Weather Prediction Center to support the recently announced DSCOVR solar wind mission. SWPC will be receiving calibrated, processed data in near-real-time from the DSCOVR solar wind plasma and magnetometer instruments. CIRES is looking for applicants capable of producing science quality space weather

Colorado at Boulder, University of

146

Wind energy systems. Application to regional utilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study developed a generic planning process that utilities can use to determine the feasibility of utilizing WECS (Wind Energy Conversion Systems) as part of their future mix of equipment. While this is primarily an economic process, other questions dealing with WECS availability, capacity credit, operating reserve, performance of WECS arrays, etc., had to be addressed. The approach was to establish the worth, or breakeven value, of WECS to the utility and to determine the impact that WECS additions would have on the utilities mix of conventional source.

Not Available

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Optimizing small wind turbine performance in battery charging applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many small wind turbine generators (10 kW or less) consist of a variable speed rotor driving a permanent magnet synchronous generator (alternator). One application of such wind turbines is battery charging, in which the generator is connected through a rectifier to a battery bank. The wind turbine electrical interface is essentially the same whether the turbine is part of a remote power supply for telecommunications, a standalone residential power system, or a hybrid village power system, in short, any system in which the wind generator output is rectified and fed into a DC bus. Field experience with such applications has shown that both the peak power output and the total energy capture of the wind turbine often fall short of expectations based on rotor size and generator rating. In this paper, the authors present a simple analytical model of the typical wind generator battery charging system that allows one to calculate actual power curves if the generator and rotor properties are known. The model clearly illustrates how the load characteristics affect the generator output. In the second part of this paper, the authors present four approaches to maximizing energy capture from wind turbines in battery charging applications. The first of these is to determine the optimal battery bank voltage for a given WTG. The second consists of adding capacitors in series with the generator. The third approach is to place an optimizing DC/DC voltage converter between the rectifier and the battery bank. The fourth is a combination of the series capacitors and the optimizing voltage controller. They also discuss both the limitations and the potential performance gain associated with each of the four configurations.

Drouilhet, S; Muljadi, E; Holz, R [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Wind Technology Div.; Gevorgian, V [State Engineering Univ. of Armenia, Yerevan (Armenia)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Agency/Company /Organization: Risoe DTU Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Wind Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.wasp.dk/ Cost: Paid Wind Atlas Analysis and Application Program (WAsP) Screenshot References: WAsP[1] Background "WAsP is a PC program for predicting wind climates, wind resources and power productions from wind turbines and wind farms. The predictions are based on wind data measured at stations in the same region. The program includes a complex terrain flow model, a roughness change model and a model

149

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Effective Grease Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generation facilities operate numerous machines with grease-lubricated components. Although this method of lubrication is commonplace, varying and conflicting recommendations exist related to type of grease, application methods, monitoring techniques, and optimization of grease and lubricated component life. Examples of best practices and proper application of technologies are found only after consulting numerous and varied sources, some of which may present contradictory information. This document...

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

150

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (2001 - 2011) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2001 - 2011) 2001 - 2011) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information, such as global PSP (W/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and wind speed and direction (at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m). Included here is a portion of the available data: from August 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011. A separate dataset is available for the period between September 23, 1996 and August 23, 2001.The NWTC website provides up to the day updates to this data, from as early as August 24, 2001 through yesterday, as well as instrument specifications.

151

Raw Data from National Wind Technology Center M2 Tower (1996 - 2001) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1996 - 2001) 1996 - 2001) Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL.The dataset includes irrandiance information (Global, kWs/m2) and meteorological data, such as temperature, pressure, and dew point, as well as wind speed and direction at 2m, 5m, 10m, 20m, 50m, and 80m. Included here is a portion of the available data: from September 23, 1996 - August 23, 2001. A separate dataset is available for Aug 24, 2001 - March 10, 2011 in OpenEI. The NWTC website provides current data (updated daily), from as early as August 24, 2001, as well as instrument specifications.

152

M.Nagrial, Switched reluctance generator for wind power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractGreen house effect has becomes a serious concern in many countries due to the increase consumption of the fossil fuel. There have been many studies to find an alternative power source. Wind energy found to be one of the most useful solutions to help in overcoming the air pollution and global. There is no agreed solution to conversion of wind energy to electrical energy. In this paper, the advantages of using a Switched Reluctance Generator (SRG) for wind energy applications. The theoretical study of the self excitation of a SRG and the determination of the variable parameters in a SRG design are discussed. The design parameters for the maximum power output of the SRG are computed using Matlab simulation. The designs of the circuit to control the variable parameters in a SRG to provide the maximum power output are also discussed.

M. Nassereddine; J. Rizk; M. Nagrial

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Characteristics Study of Transmission Line Mechanical Research Center (TLMRC) Wind Tower Data: Notes on Field-Wind Loading Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field determination of wind loads is one of the critical areas of wind research. In the past, researchers have used different procedures to collect, reduce, and analyze wind data, making it difficult to compare results. This study focused on data acquisition and reduction techniques for field-wind experiments and their derived results. The outcome will be useful for developing a standard procedure for future field-wind loading experiments.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Evolutionary Algorithms: Applications at the Informatik Center Dortmund  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to provide a brief overview of some of our projects involving the application of evolutionary algorithms to industrial application problems. These projects are established at the Center for Applied Systems Analysis (Casa) within the Informatik Centrum Dortmund (ICD), a research institute providing technology transfer from university research into industrial practice. Presently, 1

Thomas Bck; Ulrich Hammel; Edited D. Quagliarella; C. Poloni; G. Winter; John Wiley; Thomas B Ack

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Application of Radar Wind Observations for Low-Level NWP Wind Forecast Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Finnish Meteorological Institute has produced a new numerical weather prediction modelbased wind atlas of Finland. The wind atlas provides information on local wind conditions in terms of annual and monthly wind speed and direction averages. ...

Kirsti Salonen; Sami Niemel; Carl Fortelius

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Wind for Schools: Fostering the Human Talent Supply Chain for a 20% Wind Energy Future (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

Baring-Gould, I.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Conventional Vertical Pump Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical pumps are used in several applications in power plants, such as condensate, heater drain, circulating water, and service water/river water applications.BackgroundThe Maintenance Issue Surveys of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Generation Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) indicate that members are experiencing difficulties with various maintenance issues associated with vertical pumps. Some of the problems identified a need for ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

158

Optimisation of a Small Non Controlled Wind Energy Conversion System for Stand-Alone Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimisation of a Small Non Controlled Wind Energy Conversion System for Stand-Alone Applications. This article proposes a method to optimize the design of a small fixed-voltage wind energy conversion system are shown and discussed. Key words Wind energy conversion system, stand-alone application, nonlinear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Ris-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø-PhD-27(EN) Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar Merete Bruun Christiansen Risø National Laboratory Roskilde Denmark November 2006 #12;Author: Merete Bruun Christiansen Title: Wind Energy Applications of Synthetic Aperture Radar Department: Wind Energy Department Risø-PhD-27(EN) November 2006

160

Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental Technology Applications Center Environmental Technology Applications Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center Name Energy & Environmental Technology Applications Center Address 257 Fuller Rd. Place Albany, New York Zip 12203 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1998 Phone number 518-956-7364 Notes Renewable energy center at the College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering Coordinates 42.6878888°, -73.8324857° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.6878888,"lon":-73.8324857,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Investigation of aerodynamic braking devices for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the selection and preliminary design of a new aerodynamic braking system for use on the stall-regulated AWT-26/27 wind turbines. The goal was to identify and design a configuration that offered improvements over the existing tip brake used by Advanced Wind Turbines, Inc. (AWT). Although the design objectives and approach of this report are specific to aerodynamic braking of AWT-26/27 turbines, many of the issues addressed in this work are applicable to a wider class of turbines. The performance trends and design choices presented in this report should be of general use to wind turbine designers who are considering alternative aerodynamic braking methods. A literature search was combined with preliminary work on device sizing, loads and mechanical design. Candidate configurations were assessed on their potential for benefits in the areas of cost, weight, aerodynamic noise, reliability and performance under icing conditions. As a result, two configurations were identified for further study: the {open_quotes}spoiler-flap{close_quotes} and the {open_quotes}flip-tip.{close_quotes} Wind tunnel experiments were conducted at Wichita State University to evaluate the performance of the candidate aerodynamic brakes on an airfoil section representative of the AWT-26/27 blades. The wind tunnel data were used to predict the braking effectiveness and deployment characteristics of the candidate devices for a wide range of design parameters. The evaluation was iterative, with mechanical design and structural analysis being conducted in parallel with the braking performance studies. The preliminary estimate of the spoiler-flap system cost was $150 less than the production AWT-26/27 tip vanes. This represents a reduction of approximately 5 % in the cost of the aerodynamic braking system. In view of the preliminary nature of the design, it would be prudent to plan for contingencies in both cost and weight.

Griffin, D.A. [R. Lynette & Associates, Seattle, WA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Technology Applications Center | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Applications Technology Applications ... Technology Applications Center The Y-12 Technology Applications Center, established with more than 20 years of testing and evaluation experience at the Y-12 National Security Complex, provides a dedicated resource to technology providers and groups procuring security technologies. Y-12 TAC helps determine a security technology's value by testing in real-world settings. As an unbiased and independent organization, Y-12 TAC provides a qualitative look at the technology's performance and answers the tough question: "Will the system work effectively when needed?" Our customers can reliably draw upon on Y-12's extensive experience with and expertise in many current security technologies. Both the technology provider and the technology buyer derive significant

163

Wind for Schools: Developing Educational Programs to Train a New Workforce and the Next Generation of Wind Energy Experts (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; installing small wind turbines at community "host" schools; and implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

Flowers, L.; Baring-Gould, I.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Feed Pump Turbine Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Steam Turbines and Auxiliaries Program 65 and the Nuclear Maintenance Application Center have developed a series of maintenance guides to assist plant personnel with the performance of various maintenance tasks associated with a wide variety of plant components. The objective of this project was to publish a maintenance guide for the feed pump turbines that included an ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind U.S  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind U.S Transmission LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 73, No. 36 - Feb. 22, 2008 Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind U.S Transmission LLC: Federal Register Notice Volume 73, No. 36 - Feb. 22, 2008 Federal Register Notice in Vol 73 No 36 of Application from Baja Wind U.S Transmission LLC to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S-Mexico border. Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind U.S Transmission LLC More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind Transmission, LLC Application for presidential permit OE Docket No. PP-334 Baja Wind U.S Transmission LLC: Update

166

New Family of Multilevel Matrix Converters for Wind Power Applications: Final Report, July 2002 - March 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a new modular multilevel matrix converter for wind power applications and to demonstrate a working scale model in the laboratory.

Erickson, R.; Angkititrakul, S.; Almazeedi, K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

First semiannual report: Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center activities. Volume I. Description of the National Small Wind Systems Test Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the Rocky Flats wind turbine test site; the philosophy of testing at Rocky Flats; test procedure development; atmospheric SWECS testing; SWECS component testing; data collection, handling, and analysis; reporting procedures; and future plans.

None

1978-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

168

National Wind Technology Center to Debut New Dynamometer (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New test facility will be used to accelerate the New test facility will be used to accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation wind energy technologies. This fall, the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will open a new dynamometer test facility. Funded by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the new facility will offer wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct a wide range of tests on the mechanical and electrical power producing systems of a wind turbine including generators, gearboxes, power converters, bearings, brakes, lubrication, cooling, and control systems. Dynamometers enable industry and testing agencies to verify the performance and reliability

169

Repair and Replacement Applications Center Joint Welding Procedure Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the request of the EPRI Repair and Replacement Applications Center subscribers, a Joint Welding Procedure Qualification Program was developed to provide a medium whereby multiple utilities can share in the qualification of specific welding procedures. The program was developed in such a manner that it will supplement existing utility welding qualification programs. Specifically the program incorporates the more stringent attributes of each utility's internal welding program while meeting the individua...

1997-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

170

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Knowledge Transfer Improvement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Maintenance Application Center has begun a project a project to explore ways to improve how our products can be more easily used by our members and, in particular, the benefit that can be derived by the worker in the field. The project focuses on developing methods for improving the delivery of information that is specifically directed at maintenance tasks that are performed as part of preventive or corrective maintenance on plant equipment. The results are intended to benefit the maintenance...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Lube Notes Compilation, 1989-2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper equipment lubrication is a necessity for trouble-free operation in both nuclear and fossil power plants. In 1989, EPRI's Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center (NMAC) began publishing Lube Notes biannually. The intent of the newsletter was to address common lubrication issues and provide assistance to plant maintenance personnel. Lubrication topics vary from component-specific case studies to generic testing analysis. This report compiles all of the Lube Notes published from 1989 through 2007. In...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed 2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications Webinar 2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications Webinar August 21, 2013 3:00PM EDT Webinar DOE will present a live webcast titled "2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications" on Wednesday, August 21, from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Alice Orrell, energy analyst at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Heather Rhoads-Weaver, principal consultant at eFormative Options, will provide a detailed overview of the Energy Department's 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications. Jennifer Jenkins of the Distributed Wind Energy Association will provide an industry-focused update, reflecting on

173

Tropical Cyclone Wind Retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit: Application to Surface Wind Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal winds at 850 hPa from tropical cyclones retrieved using the nonlinear balance equation, where the mass field was determined from Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) temperature soundings, are compared with the surface wind fields ...

Kotaro Bessho; Mark DeMaria; John A. Knaff

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

NREL: News Feature - Change is in the Air at NREL's Wind Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the landscape surrounding it. One large wind turbine is in the foreground with four other wind turbines behind it, as well as several buildings and met towers. Mountains are in the...

175

Model Validation at the 204-MW New Mexico Wind Energy Center (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are: (1) to investigate the impact of aggregation on a large wind farm; and (2) to explore the dynamic behaviors of the power system and the wind turbine. The methods used are: (1) use equivalencing method previously developed to simplify Taiban Mesa wind power plant; (2) use PSLF dynamic analysis to simulate the wind power plant with AWEA-proposed low voltage ride through (LVRT) used to test the systems; and (3) represent a 204-MW wind plant two ways, treat the entire wind farm feeding a large power system network as a single generator and treat each wind turbine within the wind farm as an individual generator (136 generators) feeding the large power system network.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Miller, N.; Delmerico, R.; Ellis, A.; Mechenbier, J.; Zavadil, R.; Smith, J. C.; Hochheimer, J.; Young, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Control center survey: Installed and planned applications software  

SciTech Connect

This project surveyed the utility industry use of applications. In addition, the survey collected information regarding future plans to add applications, interest in and knowledge about new control center technologies and identification of current problems that might be solved by new software applications. Over three hundred (300) utilities were surveyed consisting of the investor-owned, rural electric generation and transmission cooperatives, municipal power pools and federally chartered utilities. Of these utilities, 10 are Canadian and 7 are power pools. The rest are United States utilities having a peak demand on installed capacity above 200 MW. The survey was conducted by mailing a questionnaire and/or following up with a telephone call. Information was received from 282 utilities, a 94% response. 13 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

NREL: Wind Research - Senator Introduces Legislation to Fund...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nebraska Wind Applications Center in Lincoln. State Facilitator Dan McGuire and Wind Powering America National Technical Director Ian Baring-Gould testified in favor of the bill....

178

Research Applications of a Boundary-Layer Wind Profiler  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A small UHF radar wind profiler was operated over a 40-day period during the summer of 1990 at a site on the windward coast of the island of Hawaii. It provided continuous measurements of winds up to the height of the trade-wind inversion, which ...

R. R. Rogers; S. A. Ethier; W. L. Ecklund; D. A. Carter; K. S. Gage

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Technology, Performance, and Market Report of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the current status of wind-diesel technology and its applications, the current research activities, and the remaining system technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems will be discussed, as well as how recent development to explore distributed energy generation solutions for wind generation can benefit from the performance experience of operating systems. The paper also includes a detailed discussion of the performance of wind-diesel applications in Alaska, where 10 wind-diesel stations are operating and additional systems are currently being implemented. Additionally, because this application represents an international opportunity, a community of interest committed to sharing technical and operating developments is being formed. The authors hope to encourage this expansion while allowing communities and nations to investigate the wind-diesel option for reducing their dependence on diesel-driven energy sources.

Baring-Gould, I.; Dabo, M.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Technology, Performance, and Market Report of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the current status of wind-diesel technology and its applications, the current research activities, and the remaining system technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems will be discussed, as well as how recent development to explore distributed energy generation solutions for wind generation can benefit from the performance experience of operating systems. The paper also includes a detailed discussion of the performance of wind-diesel applications in Alaska, where 10 wind-diesel stations are operating and additional systems are currently being implemented. Additionally, because this application represents an international opportunity, a community of interest committed to sharing technical and operating developments is being formed. The authors hope to encourage this expansion while allowing communities and nations to investigate the wind-diesel option for reducing their dependence on diesel-driven energy sources.

Baring-Gould, I.; Dabo, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy application study was performed by The Aerospace Corporation for the Wind Systems Branch of the Department of Energy. The objective was to identify integration problems for a Wind Energy Conversion System (WECS) placed into an existing conventional utility system. The integration problems included environmental, institutional and technical aspects as well as economic matters, but the emphasis was on the economics of wind energy. The Hawaiian Electric Company utility system on the island of Oahu was selected for the study because of the very real potential for wind energy on that island, and because of the simplicity afforded in analyzing that isolated utility.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

182

Failure analysis of ETAC (Enrichment Technology Applications Center) pressure vessel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an investigation into the failure of a graphite-epoxy composite cylinder. It investigates the quality of the as-fabricated cylinder and provides a verification of compressive material property input used in its design. The design is reevaluated in terms of the adjusted composition and material property input for its suitability for 18,000-psi pressure applications. A comparison between the composition and layup of a cylinder manufactured by Hitco is also provided, as well as the results of a pressurization test of an identical ETAC cylinder tested by the Naval Ocean Systems Center.

Frame, B.J.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Final Report on California Regional Wind Energy Forecasting Project:Application of NARAC Wind Prediction System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind power is the fastest growing renewable energy technology and electric power source (AWEA, 2004a). This renewable energy has demonstrated its readiness to become a more significant contributor to the electricity supply in the western U.S. and help ease the power shortage (AWEA, 2000). The practical exercise of this alternative energy supply also showed its function in stabilizing electricity prices and reducing the emissions of pollution and greenhouse gases from other natural gas-fired power plants. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the world's winds could theoretically supply the equivalent of 5800 quadrillion BTUs of energy each year, which is 15 times current world energy demand (AWEA, 2004b). Archer and Jacobson (2005) also reported an estimation of the global wind energy potential with the magnitude near half of DOE's quote. Wind energy has been widely used in Europe; it currently supplies 20% and 6% of Denmark's and Germany's electric power, respectively, while less than 1% of U.S. electricity is generated from wind (AWEA, 2004a). The production of wind energy in California ({approx}1.2% of total power) is slightly higher than the national average (CEC & EPRI, 2003). With the recently enacted Renewable Portfolio Standards calling for 20% of renewables in California's power generation mix by 2010, the growth of wind energy would become an important resource on the electricity network. Based on recent wind energy research (Roulston et al., 2003), accurate weather forecasting has been recognized as an important factor to further improve the wind energy forecast for effective power management. To this end, UC-Davis (UCD) and LLNL proposed a joint effort through the use of UCD's wind tunnel facility and LLNL's real-time weather forecasting capability to develop an improved regional wind energy forecasting system. The current effort of UC-Davis is aimed at developing a database of wind turbine power curves as a function of wind speed and direction, using its wind tunnel facility at the windmill farm at the Altamont Pass. The main objective of LLNL's involvement is to provide UC-Davis with improved wind forecasts to drive the parameterization scheme of turbine power curves developed from the wind tunnel facility. Another objective of LLNL's effort is to support the windmill farm operation with real-time wind forecasts for the effective energy management. The forecast skill in capturing the situation to meet the cut-in and cutout speed of given turbines would help reduce the operation cost in low and strong wind scenarios, respectively. The main focus of this report is to evaluate the wind forecast errors of LLNL's three-dimensional real-time weather forecast model at the location with the complex terrain. The assessment of weather forecast accuracy would help quantify the source of wind energy forecast errors from the atmospheric forecast model and/or wind-tunnel module for further improvement in the wind energy forecasting system.

Chin, H S

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

High Resolution Atmospheric Modeling for Wind Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

The ability of the WRF atmospheric model to forecast wind speed over the Nysted wind park was investigated as a function of time. It was found that in the time period we considered (August 1-19, 2008), the model is able to predict wind speeds reasonably accurately for 48 hours ahead, but that its forecast skill deteriorates rapidly after 48 hours. In addition, a preliminary analysis was carried out to investigate the impact of vertical grid resolution on the forecast skill. Our preliminary finding is that increasing vertical grid resolution does not have a significant impact on the forecast skill of the WRF model over Nysted wind park during the period we considered. Additional simulations during this period, as well as during other time periods, will be run in order to validate the results presented here. Wind speed is a difficult parameter to forecast due the interaction of large and small length scale forcing. To accurately forecast the wind speed at a given location, the model must correctly forecast the movement and strength of synoptic systems, as well as the local influence of topography / land use on the wind speed. For example, small deviations in the forecast track or strength of a large-scale low pressure system can result in significant forecast errors for local wind speeds. The purpose of this study is to provide a preliminary baseline of a high-resolution limited area model forecast performance against observations from the Nysted wind park. Validating the numerical weather prediction model performance for past forecasts will give a reasonable measure of expected forecast skill over the Nysted wind park. Also, since the Nysted Wind Park is over water and some distance from the influence of terrain, the impact of high vertical grid spacing for wind speed forecast skill will also be investigated.

Simpson, M; Bulaevskaya, V; Glascoe, L; Singer, M

2010-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

185

Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Study of Composite Materials Application for Horizontal Axis Wind ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the specific velocity is directly related to the coefficient of power Cp of a wind rotor, this article presents a comparative study with different materials and...

187

Active Power Control Testing at the U.S. National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to keep the electricity grid stable and the lights on, the power system relies on certain responses from its generating fleet. This presentation evaluates the potential for wind turbines and wind power plants to provide these services and assist the grid during critical times.

Ela, E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This represents the first systematic attempt at RAC program measurement in a manner consistent with approaches used for other efforts funded by DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In addition, data on CHP installations and associated effects were collected for the same years from a state-by-state database maintained for DOE by ICF international. A report documenting the findings of that study was produced in September, 2009. The purpose of the current report is to present the findings from a new study of RAC activities and accomplishments which examined what the Centers did in FY 2009, the last year in which they concentrated exclusively on CHP technologies. This study focused on identifying and describing RAC activities and was not designed to measure how those efforts influenced CHP installations or other outcomes.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Comparison of Divergent Winds from the National Meteorological Center and the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Global Analyses for 19801986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made of the divergent wind analyses of the National Meteorological Center (NMC) and those of the ECMWF/WMO dataset produced by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). Using a reliability criterion based on ...

Steven J. Lambert

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Model for simulating rotational data for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes a wind simulation model to be used in relation to wind turbine operations. The model is a computer code written in FORTRAN 77. The model simulates turbulence and mean wind effects as they are experienced at a rotating point on the blade of either a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) or a vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The model is fast, requiring 15 to 120 seconds of VAX execution time to produce a simulation and related statistics. The model allows the user to set a number of wind parameters so that he may evaluate the uncertainty of model results as well as their typical values. When this capability is combined with short execution time, the user can quickly produce a number of simulations based on reasonable variation of input parameters and can use these simulations to obtain a range of wind turbine responses to the turbulence. This ability is important because some of the wind parameters that cannot be precisely evaluated should be prescribed over a range of values. This document is essentially a user's guide. Its features include theoretical derivations, samples of output, comparisons of measured and modeled results, a listing of the FORTRAN code, a glossary for the code, and the input and output of a sample run.

Powell, D.C.; Connell, J.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Identifying centers of circulating and spiraling vector field patterns and its applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Identification of centers of circulating and spiraling vector fields, sources and sinks are important in many applications. Tropical cyclone tracking, rotating object identification, analysis of motion video and movement of fluids are but some examples. ... Keywords: Center identification, Circulating and spiraling vector field center, Rotation center detection, Tropical cyclone eye fix, Vector field

Ka Yan Wong; Chi Lap Yip

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Wind for Schools: A National Data and Curricula Development Activity for Schools (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the United States dramatically expands wind energy deployment, the industry is challenged with developing a skilled workforce and addressing public resistance. Wind Powering America?s Wind for Schools project addresses these issues by: 1) Developing Wind Application Centers (WACs) at universities; WAC students assist in implementing school wind turbines and participate in wind courses. 2) Installing small wind turbines at community 'host' schools. 3) Implementing teacher training with interactive curricula at each host school.

Baring-Gould, I.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

DAHM: A green and dynamic web application hosting manager across geographically distributed data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamic Application Hosting Management (DAHM) is proposed for geographically distributed data centers, which decides on the number of active servers and on the workload share of each data center. DAHM achieves cost-efficient application hosting by taking ... Keywords: Data center cost efficiency, hosting management, server management, workload management

Zahra Abbasi; Tridib Mukherjee; Georgios Varsamopoulos; Sandeep K. S. Gupta

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Measurements of Wind and Turbulence Profiles with Scanning Doppler Lidar for Wind Energy Applications  

SciTech Connect

High-quality profiles of mean and turbulent statistics of the wind field upstream of a wind farm can be produced using a scanning Doppler lidar. Careful corrections for the spatial filtering of the wind field by the lidar pulse produce turbulence estimates equivalent to point sensors but with the added advantage of a larger sampling volume to increase the statistical accuracy of the estimates. For a well-designed lidar system, this permits accurate estimates of the key turbulent statistics over various subdomains and with sufficiently short observation times to monitor rapid changes in conditions. These features may be ideally suited for optimal operation of wind farms and also for improved resource assessment of potential sites.

Frehlich, R.; Kelley, N.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Axial flux, modular, permanent-magnet generator with a toroidal winding for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Permanent-magnet generators have been used for wind turbines for many years. Many small wind turbine manufacturers use direct-drive permanent-magnet generators. For wind turbine generators, the design philosophy must cover the following characteristics: low cost, light weight, low speed, high torque, and variable speed generation. The generator is easy to manufacture and the design can be scaled up for a larger size without major retooling. A modular permanent-magnet generator with axial flux direction was chosen. The permanent magnet used is NdFeB or ferrite magnet with flux guide to focus flux density in the air gap. Each unit module of the generator may consist of one, two, or more phases. Each generator can be expanded to two or more unit modules. Each unit module is built from simple modular poles. The stator winding is formed like a torus. Thus, the assembly process is simplified and the winding insertion in the slot is less tedious. The authors built a prototype of one unit module and performed preliminary tests in the laboratory. Follow up tests will be conducted in the lab to improve the design.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Wan, Y.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Estimation of turbulence level and scale for wind turbine applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simplified method is presented for estimating onsite turbulence variance within the wind turbine layer for horizontal wind speed. The method is based principally on estimating the probability distribution of wind speed and assigning a variance to each mean wind speed based on surface roughness estimates. The model is not proposed as an alternative to onsite measurement and analysis, but rather as an adjunct to such a program. A revision of the Kaimal neutral u-component spectrum is suggested to apply to the mix of the stabilities occurring during operational winds. Values of integral length scale calculated from data analysis are shown to contradict the length scale model implicit in turbulence power spectra. Also, these calculated values are shown to be extremely sensitive to the length of the time series and the detrending method used. The analysis and modeling are extended to the rotational frame of reference for a horizontal-axis wind turbine by modeling the ratios of harmonic spike variances (1P, 2P, etc.) in the rotational spectrum to the Eulerian turbulence variance. 15 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Powell, D.C.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wind for Schools: Developing Educational Programs to Train the Next Generation of Wind Energy Experts (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the world moves toward a vision of expanded wind energy, the industry is faced with the challenges of obtaining a skilled workforce and addressing local wind development concerns. Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools Program works to address these issues. The program installs small wind turbines at community "host" schools while developing wind application centers at higher education institutions. Teacher training with interactive and interschool curricula is implemented at each host school, while students at the universities assist in implementing the host school systems while participating in other wind course work. This poster provides an overview of the program's objectives, goals, approach, and results.

Baring-Gould, I.; Flowers, L.; Kelly, M.; Miles, J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Worldwide wind/diesel hybrid power system study: Potential applications and technical issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The world market potential for wind/diesel hybrid technology is a function of the need for electric power, the availability of sufficient wind resource to support wind/diesel power, and the existence of buyers with the financial means to invest in the technology. This study includes data related to each of these three factors. This study does not address market penetration, which would require analysis of application specific wind/diesel economics. Buyer purchase criteria, which are vital to assessing market penetration, are discussed only generally. Countries were screened for a country-specific market analysis based on indicators of need and wind resource. Both developed countries and less developed countries'' (LDCs) were screened for wind/diesel market potential. Based on the results of the screening, ten countries showing high market potential were selected for more extensive market analyses. These analyses provide country-specific market data to guide wind/diesel technology developers in making design decisions that will lead to a competitive product. Section 4 presents the country-specific data developed for these analyses, including more extensive wind resource characterization, application-specific market opportunities, business conditions, and energy market characterizations. An attempt was made to identify the potential buyers with ability to pay for wind/diesel technology required to meet the application-specific market opportunities identified for each country. Additionally, the country-specific data are extended to corollary opportunities in countries not covered by the study. Section 2 gives recommendations for wind/diesel research based on the findings of the study. 86 refs.

King, W.R.; Johnson, B.L. III (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop Utility Wind Integration Group Distributed Wind/Solar Interconnection Workshop May 21, 2013 8:00AM MDT to May 22, 2013 5:00PM MDT Golden, Colorado This two-day workshop will answer your questions about interconnecting wind and solar plants and other distributed generation applications to electric distribution systems while providing insight on integrating large-scale renewable generation into the transmission system. Held at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) state-of-the-art Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) on the first day and at the Western Area Power Administration's Electric Power Training Center (EPTC) on the second day, the workshop will provide an overview of wind and solar interconnection

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Improvement Of The Wind Farm Model Flap For Offshore Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The wind farm program FLaP (Farm Layout Program), developed at the University of Oldenburg, has been extended to improve the description of wake development in offshore conditions, especially the low ambient turbulence and the effect of atmospheric stability. Model results have been compared with measurements from the Danish offshore wind farm Vindeby. Vertical wake profiles and mean turbulence intensities in the wake were compared for 32 scenarios of single, double and quintuple wake cases with different mean wind speed, turbulence intensity and atmospheric stability. It was found that within the measurement uncertainties the results of the wake model compares well with the measurements for the most important ambient conditions. The effect of the low turbulence intensity offshore on the wake development was modelled well. Deviations have been found when atmospheric stability deviates from near-neutral conditions. Especially for stable atmospheric conditions both the free flow model and the wake model do not give satisfying results.

Bernhard Lange; Hans-peter Waldl; Rebecca Barthelmie; Algert Gil Guerrero; Detlev Heinemann

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Short Circuit Analysis of Induction Machines Wind Power Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

he short circuit behavior of Type I (fixed speed) wind turbine-generators is analyzed in this paper to aid in the protection coordination of wind plants of this type. A simple network consisting of one wind turbine-generator is analyzed for two network faults: a three phase short circuit and a phase A to ground fault. Electromagnetic transient simulations and sequence network calculations are compared for the two fault scenarios. It is found that traditional sequence network calculations give accurate results for the short circuit currents in the balanced fault case, but are inaccurate for the un-faulted phases in the unbalanced fault case. The time-current behavior of the fundamental frequency component of the short circuit currents for both fault cases are described, and found to differ significantly in the unbalanced and balanced fault cases

Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Smith, Travis M [ORNL; Howard, Dustin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Harley, Ronald [Georgia Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Kenai Winds Response to Request for Grant Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kenai Winds LLC is pleased to respond the Alaska Energy Authority solicitation to assist with the realization of Renewable Energy Projects to be located within the State of Alaska. Our 15-18 Megawatt wind farm will be a landmark project for the State, one that brings significant public benefit and reinforces an important Kenai area industry. Our wind farm has been under development for nearly two years and we are beginning our Phase 3 efforts with an eye towards operation in the Summer of 2010. Our project is ideally located in a heavily industrial area, ensuring that the project will enhance the overall efficiency of the Alaska energy grid. By producing electric power where electric power is actually needed, we reduce the need for new construction of power lines, and we also reduce the energy losses associated with long distance and underwater transmission. The Kenai Winds plant is ready to move forward in Phase 3 immediately. We have consulted with permit authorities and local officials. Due to the siting adjacent to an operational refinery and a recently closed chemical plant, we reduce the need to disturb the natural environment of the area with the construction of supporting infrastructure. As part of our demonstrated public benefit, we intend to sell electric power to the Tesoro Kenai refinery, which is the

Attn Mr; Butch White

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Application of BP Neural Network for Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

n order to solve non-linear, parameter time changing, anti-disturb and time-lag problems, a PID control method based on the BP neural network has been presented and applied in the variable pitch wind turbine control system. After analyzing the BP neural ... Keywords: BP, Control, Network, Pitch, simulink

Zuoxia Xing; Qinwei Li; Xianbin Su; Hengyi Guo

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Application of Short-Range Lidar in Wind Shear Alerting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-range lidar systems have been used operationally at the Hong Kong International Airport for wind shear alerting. They are used for monitoring the headwinds over the last 3 n mi of all of the runway corridors of the Hong Kong International ...

P. W. Chan; Y. F. Lee

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

2012 Market Report on U.S. Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications  

SciTech Connect

At the end of 2012, U.S. wind turbines in distributed applications reached a 10-year cumulative installed capacity of more than 812 MW from more than 69,000 units across all 50 states. In 2012 alone, nearly 3,800 wind turbines totaling 175 MW of distributed wind capacity were documented in 40 states and in the U.S. Virgin Islands, with 138 MW using utility-scale turbines (i.e., greater than 1 MW in size), 19 MW using mid-size turbines (i.e., 101 kW to 1 MW in size), and 18.4 MW using small turbines (i.e., up to 100 kW in size). Distributed wind is defined in terms of technology application based on a wind projects location relative to end-use and power-distribution infrastructure, rather than on technology size or project size. Distributed wind systems are either connected on the customer side of the meter (to meet the onsite load) or directly to distribution or micro grids (to support grid operations or offset large loads nearby). Estimated capacity-weighted average costs for 2012 U.S. distributed wind installations was $2,540/kW for utility-scale wind turbines, $2,810/kW for mid-sized wind turbines, and $6,960/kW for newly manufactured (domestic and imported) small wind turbines. An emerging trend observed in 2012 was an increased use of refurbished turbines. The estimated capacity-weighted average cost of refurbished small wind turbines installed in 2012 was $4,080/kW. As a result of multiple projects using utility-scale turbines, Iowa deployed the most new overall distributed wind capacity, 37 MW, in 2012. Nevada deployed the most small wind capacity in 2012, with nearly 8 MW of small wind turbines installed in distributed applications. In the case of mid-size turbines, Ohio led all states in 2012 with 4.9 MW installed in distributed applications. State and federal policies and incentives continued to play a substantial role in the development of distributed wind projects. In 2012, U.S. Treasury Section 1603 payments and grants and loans from the U.S. Department of Agricultures Rural Energy for America Program were the main sources of federal funding for distributed wind projects. State and local funding varied across the country, from rebates to loans, tax credits, and other incentives. Reducing utility bills and hedging against potentially rising electricity rates remain drivers of distributed wind installations. In 2012, other drivers included taking advantage of the expiring U.S. Treasury Section 1603 program and a prosperous year for farmers. While 2012 saw a large addition of distributed wind capacity, considerable barriers and challenges remain, such as a weak domestic economy, inconsistent state incentives, and very competitive solar photovoltaic and natural gas prices. The industry remains committed to improving the distributed wind marketplace by advancing the third-party certification process and introducing alternative financing models, such as third-party power purchase agreements and lease-to-own agreements more typical in the solar photovoltaic market. Continued growth is expected in 2013.

Orrell, Alice C.; Flowers, L. T.; Gagne, M. N.; Pro, B. H.; Rhoads-Weaver, H. E.; Jenkins, J. O.; Sahl, K. M.; Baranowski, R. E.

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

Evaluation of Wave Forecasts Consistent with Tropical Cyclone Warning Center Wind Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm to generate wave fields consistent with forecasts from the official U.S. tropical cyclone forecast centers has been made available in nearreal time to forecasters since summer 2007. The algorithm removes the tropical cyclone from ...

Charles R. Sampson; Paul A. Wittmann; Efren A. Serra; Hendrik L. Tolman; Jessica Schauer; Timothy Marchok

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Wind in Education | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Education in Education Jump to: navigation, search Photo from Remy Luerssen Pangle, NREL 18543 U.S. Department of Energy's Wind for Schools Project Launched in 2005, Wind Powering America's Wind for Schools project supported Wind Application Centers at higher education institutions in 11 states. Students assisted in the assessment, design, and installation of small wind systems at host k-12 schools, acting as wind energy consultants. Students also participated in class work and other engineering projects in the wind energy field, preparing them to enter the wind workforce once they graduate. Teacher training and hands-on curricula were implemented at each host school to bring the wind turbine into the classroom through interactive and inter-school wind-related research tasks.[1] Project

209

WattApp: an application aware power meter for shared data centers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing heterogeneity between applications in emerging virtualized data centers like clouds introduce significant challenges in estimating the power drawn by the data center. In this work, we presentWattApp: an application-aware power meter for ... Keywords: power modeling

Ricardo Koller; Akshat Verma; Anindya Neogi

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Doppler LidarBased Wind-Profile Measurement System for Offshore Wind-Energy and Other Marine Boundary Layer Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurement of wind speed profiles aloft in the marine boundary layer is a difficult challenge. The development of offshore wind energy requires accurate information on wind speeds above the surface at least at the levels occupied by ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta; W. Alan Brewer; Scott P. Sandberg; R. Michael Hardesty

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

EPRI-DOE Handbook Supplement of Energy Storage for Grid Connected Wind Generation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, the use of energy storage systems to optimize wind power generation has been limited to small, off-grid rural or village power applications plus a few technology demonstration-scale battery storage projects for grid connected applications. However, recent developments in advanced energy storage technologies and other technical, economic, and social factors suggest a promising future for such energy storage applications. This Handbook Supplement provides an objective information resource on the l...

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Wind Energy Applications for Municipal Water Services: Opportunities, Situation Analyses, and Case Studies; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As communities grow, greater demands are placed on water supplies, wastewater services, and the electricity needed to power the growing water services infrastructure. Water is also a critical resource for thermoelectric power plants. Future population growth in the United States is therefore expected to heighten competition for water resources. Many parts of the United States with increasing water stresses also have significant wind energy resources. Wind power is the fastest-growing electric generation source in the United States and is decreasing in cost to be competitive with thermoelectric generation. Wind energy can offer communities in water-stressed areas the option of economically meeting increasing energy needs without increasing demands on valuable water resources. Wind energy can also provide targeted energy production to serve critical local water-system needs. The research presented in this report describes a systematic assessment of the potential for wind power to support water utility operation, with the objective to identify promising technical applications and water utility case study opportunities. The first section describes the current situation that municipal providers face with respect to energy and water. The second section describes the progress that wind technologies have made in recent years to become a cost-effective electricity source. The third section describes the analysis employed to assess potential for wind power in support of water service providers, as well as two case studies. The report concludes with results and recommendations.

Flowers, L.; Miner-Nordstrom, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A peak power tracker for small wind turbines in battery charging applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, implementation and testing of a prototype version of a peak power tracking system for small wind turbines in battery charging applications. The causes for the poor performance of small wind turbines in battery charging applications are explained and previously proposed configurations to increase the power output of the wind turbines are discussed. Through computer modeling of the steady-state operation the potential performance gain of the proposed system in comparison with existing systems is calculated. It is shown that one configuration consisting of reactive compensation by capacitors and a DC/DC converter is able to optimally load the wind turbine and thus obtain maximum energy capture over the whole range of wind speeds. A proof of concept of the peak power tracking system is provided by building and testing a prototype version. The peak power tracking system is tested in combination with a typical small wind turbine generator on a dynamometer. Steady-state operating curves confirming the performance improvement predicted by calculations are presented.

De Broe, A.M.; Drouilhet, S.; Gevorgian, V.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development, Implementation, and Testing of Fault Detection Strategies on the National Wind Technology Center's Controls Advanced Research Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's National Wind Technology Center dedicates two 600 kW turbines for advanced control systems research. A fault detection system for both turbines has been developed, analyzed, and improved across years of experiments to protect the turbines as each new controller is tested. Analysis of field data and ongoing fault detection strategy improvements have resulted in a system of sensors, fault definitions, and detection strategies that have thus far been effective at protecting the turbines. In this paper, we document this fault detection system and provide field data illustrating its operation while detecting a range of failures. In some cases, we discuss the refinement process over time as fault detection strategies were improved. The purpose of this article is to share field experience obtained during the development and field testing of the existing fault detection system, and to offer a possible baseline for comparison with more advanced turbine fault detection controllers.

Johnson, K. E.; Fleming, P. A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine

217

Aeroelastic tailoring in wind-turbine blade applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews issues related to the use of aeroelastic tailoring as a cost-effective, passive means to shape the power curve and reduce loads. Wind turbine blades bend and twist during operation, effectively altering the angle of attack, which in turn affects loads and energy production. There are blades now in use that have significant aeroelastic couplings, either on purpose or because of flexible and light-weight designs. Since aeroelastic effects are almost unavoidable in flexible blade designs, it may be desirable to tailor these effects to the authors advantage. Efforts have been directed at adding flexible devices to a blade, or blade tip, to passively regulate power (or speed) in high winds. It is also possible to build a small amount of desirable twisting into the load response of a blade with proper asymmetric fiber lay up in the blade skin. (Such coupling is akin to distributed {delta}{sub 3} without mechanical hinges.) The tailored twisting can create an aeroelastic effect that has payoff in either better power production or in vibration alleviation, or both. Several research efforts have addressed different parts of this issue. Research and development in the use of aeroelastic tailoring on helicopter rotors is reviewed. Potential energy gains as a function of twist coupling are reviewed. The effects of such coupling on rotor stability have been studied and are presented here. The ability to design in twist coupling with either stretching or bending loads is examined also.

Veers, P.; Lobitz, D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bir, G. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

NREL: Wind Research - Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Photo of a large wind turbine blade sticking out of the structural testing laboratory; it is perpendicular to a building at the National Wind Technology Center. A...

219

Top images used with permission from the Center for Sustainable Energy, Kansas State University "Earth, Wind, and Fire Sustainable Energy for the 21st  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Earth, Wind, and Fire ­ Sustainable Energy for the 21st Century" National Science Foundation ResearchTop images used with permission from the Center for Sustainable Energy, Kansas State University, 2011- August 5, 2011) at Kansas State University in the area of sustainable energy. This research

Peterson, Blake R.

220

Variable speed operation of generators with rotor-speed feedback in wind power applications  

SciTech Connect

The use of induction generators in wind power applications has been common since the early development of the wind industry. Most of these generators operate at fixed frequency and are connected directly to the utility grid. Unfortunately, this mode of operation limits the rotor speed to a specific rpm. Variable-speed operation is preferred in order to facilitate maximum energy capture over a wide range of wind speeds. This paper explores variable-speed operating strategies for wind turbine applications. The objectives are to maximize energy production, provide controlled start-up and reduce torque loading. This paper focuses on optimizing the energy captured by operating at maximum aerodynamic efficiency at any wind speed. The control strategy we analyze uses rotor speed and generator power as the feedback signals. In the normal operating region, rotor speed is used to compute a target power that corresponds to optimum operation. With power as the control objective, the power converter and generator are controlled to track the target power at any rpm. Thus, the torque-speed characteristic of the generator is shaped to optimize the energy capture. The target power is continuously updated at any rpm. in extreme areas of the operating envelope, during start-up, shutdown, generator overload, or overspeed, different strategies driven by other system considerations must be used.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Migliore, P.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Functional Requirements of Next Generation Control Center Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future electric grids will operate in an environment where there are increasing renewables, demand responses, and storage with aging infrastructures. Next generation control centers (NGCC) need enhanced and new monitoring, analysis, and control functions to help operators improve efficient, reliable, and low-carbon operation of the grid. This report reviews the status and trends in the integration of renewable generation, demand responses, and storage systems, and recommends requirements for NGCC functio...

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

The Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: The Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) Name The Energy and Environmental Technology Applications Center (E2TAC) Address 255 Fuller Road Place Albany, New York Zip 12203 Coordinates 42.690969°, -73.833092° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.690969,"lon":-73.833092,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Application of BSTRAIN software for wind turbine blade testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL currently operates the largest structural testing facility in US for testing wind turbine blades. A data acquisition system was developed to measure blade response and monitor test status; it is called BSTRAIN (Blade Structural Test Real-time Acquisition Interface Network). Software objectives were to develop a robust, easy-to-use computer program that could automatically collect data from static and fatigue blade tests without missing any significant events or overloading the computer with excess data. The program currently accepts inputs from up to 32 channels but can be expanded to over 1000 channels. In order to reduce the large amount of data collected during long fatigue tests, options for real-time data processing were developed including peak-valley series collection, peak-valley decimation, block decimation, and continuous recording of all data. Other BSTRAIN features include automated blade stiffness checks, remote terminal access to blade test status, and automated VCR control for continuous test recording. Results from tests conducted with the software revealed areas for improvement including test accuracy, post-processing analysis, and further data reduction.

Musial, W D; Clark, M E [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Stensland, T [Stensland (T.), Lakewood, CO (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Application of an Energy Management System to a Distribution Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capital outlays for energy management must be economically attractive to warrant an expenditure. An energy management system has one of the most economic returns for an investment decision, if applied effectively. The Quaker Oats Company installed such a System in its Dallas Distribution Center. In one year the electric bills were reduced by a total of $17,668.91. Electric consumption (KWH) was reduced by thirty-one percent, electrical demand (KW) was reduced by thirty-six percent while plant operations expanded. This paper discusses the control strategies employed by the energy management system and provided the resultant savings that was obtained from the first year of operation.

Warnick, T.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

64 kW concentrator Photovoltaics Application Test Center. Volume. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kaman Sciences Corporation has designed a 64 kW Concentrating Photovoltaic Applications Test Center (APTEC). The APTEC employs a combined concentrating photovoltaic array in a total energy system application for load sharing the electric and thermal demands of a large computer center with the interfaced electric and natural gas utility. The photovoltaic array is composed of two-axis tracking heliostats of Fresnel lens concentrating, silicon solar cell modules. The modules are cooled with a fluid which transfers heat to a ground coupled heat sink/storage unit for subsequent use in meeting the computer center's thermal load demand. The combined photovoltaic power system shares basic components - a power conditioning unit, batteries and thermal conditioning equipment - with the electric and natural gas utility service, improving the computer center's operating availability time and displacing a portion of the fossil fuel required to power the computer center with solar energy. The detailed system design is reported.

Jardine, D.M.; Jones, D.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Wire Brush and Alternatives Selection Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this product is to provide maintenance personnel guidance regarding the suitability of various non-wire filament brush products for different applications in the plant. The objective of the Wire Brush and Alternatives Selection Matrix is to provide recommendations and encourage the use of products in lieu of wire brushes. The recommendations in the matrix were developed based on the testing described EPRI report 1022273, Wire Brush Testing, Procurement and Usage Guide, and recommendations ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Siting Wind Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Siting Wind Energy Siting Wind Energy Jump to: navigation, search Wind turbines at the Forward Wind Energy Center in Fond du Lac and Dodge Counties, Wisconsin. Photo from Ruth Baranowski/NREL, NREL 21207 The following resources provide information about siting wind energy projects. Some are specific to a state or region but may still contain information applicable to other areas. Wind project siting tools, such as calculators and databases, can be found here. Resources American Wind Energy Association. (Updated 2011). Siting, Health, and the Environment. Accessed August 13, 2013. This fact sheet provides an overview of siting myths and facts. Environmental Law Institute. Siting Wind Energy Facilities: What Do Local Elected Officials Need to Know?. Accessed November 29, 2013.

228

Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.

Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.4.2 Wind roses . . . . . . . .Figure 5.5: Downscaled wind speed changes and componentin?uences on Californias wind energy resource. Part 1:

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NREL: Education Programs - Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies August 26, 2013 The Wind for Schools project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Powering America initiative. Since 2005, DOE provided funding for Wind Applications Centers in 11 Wind for Schools states, introducing teachers, students, and communities to wind energy applications and benefits. This Wind for Schools funding supported the project; it was not used to purchase turbines and equipment. Individual school champions emerged to find local funding mechanisms to purchase and install their turbines. On October 1, 2013, DOE will no longer fund the project; therefore, we feel that it is important to document the funding sources utilized by these states to purchase and install Wind for Schools project turbines. (1) By

231

Wind Energy In America: Ventower Industries | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Manufacturing Saving Energy and Resources Revolutionizing Manufacturing INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America National Wind Technology Center - Colorado America's Wind Testing...

232

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Analysis: Economic Impacts Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities June 18, 2004 - January 31, 2005 M. Pedden Eugene, Oregon Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-39099 January 2006 Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities June 18, 2004 - January 31, 2005 M. Pedden Eugene, Oregon NREL Technical Monitor: L. Flowers Prepared under Subcontract No(s). LEE-4-44834-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-39099 January 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

233

Control Center Application Program Interface (CCAPI) Project: API Standard Proposal Requirements for Generic Interface Definition (GID)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Control Center Application Program Interface (CCAPI) Task Force is charged with producing design criteria for international energy management system (EMS) standards. Their aim is to integrate independently developed EMS applications. The resulting standards will provide utilities with competitive choices in the design of their control systems, while offering less expensive applications to meet the needs of the rapidly changing electric power industry. The initial Task Force deliverable was the Common...

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

234

Wind Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Resources and Technologies Wind Energy Resources and Technologies Wind Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Photo of two wind turbines standing on a mountain in front of a cloudy blue sky. The Department of Energy tests wind turbine technologies and deployment applications at the National Wind Technology Center. This page provides a brief overview of wind energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply wind energy within the Federal sector. Overview Federal agencies can harvest wind energy to generate electricity or mechanical power (e.g., windmills for water pumping). To generate electricity, wind rotates large blades on a turbine, which spin an internal shaft connected to a generator. The generator produces electricity, the

235

Wind Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Resources and Technologies Wind Energy Resources and Technologies Wind Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Photo of two wind turbines standing on a mountain in front of a cloudy blue sky. The Department of Energy tests wind turbine technologies and deployment applications at the National Wind Technology Center. This page provides a brief overview of wind energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply wind energy within the Federal sector. Overview Federal agencies can harvest wind energy to generate electricity or mechanical power (e.g., windmills for water pumping). To generate electricity, wind rotates large blades on a turbine, which spin an internal shaft connected to a generator. The generator produces electricity, the

236

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maps showing locations of wind power conversion facilities,of US winds and wind power at 80 m derived fromEvaluation of global wind power. Journal of Geo- physical

Mansbach, David K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Simulating atmosphere flow for wind energy applications with WRF-LES  

SciTech Connect

Forecasts of available wind energy resources at high spatial resolution enable users to site wind turbines in optimal locations, to forecast available resources for integration into power grids, to schedule maintenance on wind energy facilities, and to define design criteria for next-generation turbines. This array of research needs implies that an appropriate forecasting tool must be able to account for mesoscale processes like frontal passages, surface-atmosphere interactions inducing local-scale circulations, and the microscale effects of atmospheric stability such as breaking Kelvin-Helmholtz billows. This range of scales and processes demands a mesoscale model with large-eddy simulation (LES) capabilities which can also account for varying atmospheric stability. Numerical weather prediction models, such as the Weather and Research Forecasting model (WRF), excel at predicting synoptic and mesoscale phenomena. With grid spacings of less than 1 km (as is often required for wind energy applications), however, the limits of WRF's subfilter scale (SFS) turbulence parameterizations are exposed, and fundamental problems arise, associated with modeling the scales of motion between those which LES can represent and those for which large-scale PBL parameterizations apply. To address these issues, we have implemented significant modifications to the ARW core of the Weather Research and Forecasting model, including the Nonlinear Backscatter model with Anisotropy (NBA) SFS model following Kosovic (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005).We are also modifying WRF's terrain-following coordinate system by implementing an immersed boundary method (IBM) approach to account for the effects of complex terrain. Companion papers presenting idealized simulations with NBA-RSFS-WRF (Mirocha et al.) and IBM-WRF (K. A. Lundquist et al.) are also presented. Observations of flow through the Altamont Pass (Northern California) wind farm are available for validation of the WRF modeling tool for wind energy applications. In this presentation, we use these data to evaluate simulations using the NBA-RSFS-WRF tool in multiple configurations. We vary nesting capabilities, multiple levels of RSFS reconstruction, SFS turbulence models (the new NBA turbulence model versus existing WRF SFS turbulence models) to illustrate the capabilities of the modeling tool and to prioritize recommendations for operational uses. Nested simulations which capture both significant mesoscale processes as well as local-scale stable boundary layer effects are required to effectively predict available wind resources at turbine height.

Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D; Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Lundquist, K A

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: School Wind Project Locations  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

School Wind Project Locations School Wind Project Locations This map shows the location of installed and planned school wind energy projects in the United States. Find school wind projects for K-12, community colleges, universities, and more. You can also learn how to use the Google Map and how to add your school wind project to the map. For more information and data from the schools, see the OpenEI website. Text Version School Wind Project Locations , Northern Alberta Institute of Technology Alaska, Alaska Wind-Diesel Wind Application Center (University of Alaska) Alaska, Begich Middle School Alaska, Kodiak High School Alaska, Mt. Edgecumbe High School Alaska, Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center Alaska, Sherrod Elementary School Alaska, U.S. Coast Guard - Juneau Alaska, University of Alaska Anchorage - Mat-Su College

239

NREL: Wind Research - Site Wind Resource Characteristics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Wind Resource Characteristics Site Wind Resource Characteristics A graphic showing the location of National Wind Technology Center and its wind power class 2. Click on the image to view a larger version. Enlarge image This graphic shows the wind power class at the National Wind Technology Center. You can download a printable copy. The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is on the Great Plains just miles from the Rocky Mountains. The site is flat and covered with short grasses. The terrain and lack of obstructions make the site highly suitable for testing wind turbines. Take a tour of the NWTC and its facilities to better understand its location and layout. Another prime feature of the NWTC is the strong directionality of the wind - most of the strong winds come within a few degrees of 285°. West of

240

Sowing the Seeds for a Bountiful Harvest: Shaping the Rules and Creating the Tools for Wisconsin's Next Generation of Wind Farms  

SciTech Connect

Project objectives are twofold: (1) to engage wind industry stakeholders to participate in formulating uniform permitting standards applicable to commercial wind energy installations; and (2) to create and maintain an online Wisconsin Wind Information Center to enable policymakers and the public to increaser their knowledge of and support for wind generation in Wisconsin.

Vickerman, Michael Jay

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Analysis of wind shear models and trends in different terrains M.L. Ray *, A.L. Rogers, and J.G. McGowan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Energy & Environment Research Center at the University of North Dakota [1]. Each site has wind speed data.F., J.G. McGowan, and A.L. Rogers. Wind Energy Explained: Theory, Design and Application. John Wiley." Proceedings of British Wind Energy Association Workshop on the Influence of Trees on Wind Farm Energy Yields

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

242

A Horizontal Wind and Wind Confidence Algorithm for Doppler Wind Profilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary layer wind profilers are increasingly being used in applications that require high-quality, rapidly updated winds. An example of this type of application is an airport wind hazard warning system. Wind shear can be a hazard to flight ...

Robert K. Goodrich; Corrinne S. Morse; Larry B. Cornman; Stephen A. Cohn

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Wind Turbine Development Small Wind Turbine Development A photo of Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine in front of a home. PIX14936 Southwest Windpower's Skystream wind turbine. A photo of the Endurance wind turbine. PIX15006 The Endurance wind turbine. A photo of the Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. PIX07301 The Atlantic Orient Corporation 15/50 wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. NREL supports continued market expansion of small wind turbines by funding manufacturers through competitive solicitations (i.e., subcontracts and/or grants) to refine prototype systems leading to commercialization. Learn more about the turbine development projects below. Skystream NREL installed and tested an early prototype of this turbine at the

244

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Assessment Wind Resource Assessment A map of the United States is color-coded to indicate the high winds at 80 meters. This map shows the wind resource at 80 meters for both land-based and offshore wind resources in the United States. Correct estimation of the energy available in the wind can make or break the economics of wind plant development. Wind mapping and validation techniques developed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) along with collaborations with U.S. companies have produced high-resolution maps of the United States that provide wind plant developers with accurate estimates of the wind resource potential. State Wind Maps International Wind Resource Maps Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Due to the existence of special use airspace (SUA) (i.e., military airspace

245

Flow visualization using momentum and energy transport tubes and applications to turbulent flow in wind farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a generalization of the mass-flux based classical stream-tube, the concept of momentum and energy transport tubes is discussed as a flow visualization tool. These transport tubes have the property, respectively, that no fluxes of momentum or energy exist over their respective tube mantles. As an example application using data from large-eddy simulation, such tubes are visualized for the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow in large wind farms, in fully developed wind-turbine-array boundary layers. The three-dimensional organization of energy transport tubes changes considerably when turbine spacings are varied, enabling the visualization of the path taken by the kinetic energy flux that is ultimately available at any given turbine within the array.

Meyers, Johan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Multibody Dynamics Using Conservation of Momentum with Application to Compliant Offshore Floating Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental, aesthetic and political pressures continue to push for siting off-shore wind turbines beyond sight of land, where waters tend to be deeper, and use of floating structures is likely to be considered. Savings could potentially be realized by reducing hull size, which would allow more compliance with the wind thrust force in the pitch direction. On the other hand, these structures with large-amplitude motions will make dynamic analysis both more challenging and more critical. Prior to the present work, there were no existing dynamic simulation tools specifically intended for compliant wind turbine design. Development and application of a new computational method underlying a new time-domain simulation tool is presented in this dissertation. The compliant floating wind turbine system is considered as a multibody system including tower, nacelle, rotor and other moving parts. Euler's equations of motion are first applied to the compliant design to investigate the large-amplitude motions. Then, a new formulation of multibody dynamics is developed through application of the conservation of both linear momentum and angular momentum to the entire system directly. A base body is prescribed within the compliant wind turbine system, and the equations of motion (EOMs) of the system are projected into the coordinate system associated with this body. Only six basic EOMs of the system are required to capture 6 unknown degrees of freedom (DOFs) of the base body when mechanical DOFs between contiguous bodies are prescribed. The 6 x 6 mass matrix is actually composed of two decoupled 3 x 3 mass matrices for translation and rotation, respectively. Each element within the matrix includes the inertial effects of all bodies. This condensation decreases the coupling between elements in the mass matrix, and so minimizes the computational demand. The simulation results are verified by critical comparison with those of the popular wind turbine dynamics software FAST. The new formulation is generalized to form the momentum cloud method (M- CM), which is particularly well suited to the serial mechanical N-body systems connected by revolute joints with prescribed relative rotation. The MCM is then expanded to multibody systems with more complicated joints and connection types.

Wang, Lei

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and business planning) Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program - Commercial Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers site assessment...

248

Block IV solar cell module design and test specification for Intermediate Load Center applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Requirements are established for performance of terrestial solar cell modules intended for use in various test applications typically characterized as Intermediate Load Centers. During the 1979 to 1980 time period, such applications are expected to be in the 20 kilowatt to 500 kilowatt size range. In addition to module design and performance requirements, a series of characterization and qualification tests necessary to certify the module design for production, and the necessary performance tests for acceptance of modules are also specified.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Southeast China  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in two regions of southeast China. The first region is the coastal area stretching from northern Fujian south to eastern Guangdong and extending approximately 100 km inland. The second region is centered on the Poyang Lake area in northern Jiangxi. This region also includes parts of two other provinces-Anhui and Hubei-and extends from near Anqing in Anhui south to near Nanchang in Jiangxi. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. We created the high-resolution (1-km2) maps in 1998 using a computerized wind resource mapping system developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The mapping system uses software known as a Geographical Information System (GIS).

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Micro Wind Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Through the Commonwealth Wind Incentive Program Micro Wind Initiative the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) offers rebates of up to $4/W with a maximum of $130,000 for design and...

251

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Vertical Pump Maintenance Guide -- Update to EPRI Report 1003467  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from several annual Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center (NMAC) maintenance issues surveys indicate that members are experiencing difficulties with various maintenance issues associated with vertical pumps. Some of the problems identified a need for information and assistance with pump and motor ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

252

Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operators of electrical grids, sometimes referred to as Balancing Authorities (BA), typically make critical decisions on how to most reliably and economically balance electrical load and generation in time frames ranging from a few minutes to six hours ahead. At higher levels of wind power generation, there is an increasing need to improve the accuracy of 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts. Forecasts on this time scale have typically been strongly dependent on short-term trends indicated by the time series of power production and meteorological data from a wind farm. Additional input information is often available from the output of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and occasionally from off-site meteorological towers in the region surrounding the wind generation facility. A widely proposed approach to improve short-term forecasts is the deployment of off-site meteorological towers at locations upstream from the wind generation facility in order to sense approaching wind perturbations. While conceptually appealing, it turns out that, in practice, it is often very difficult to derive significant benefit in forecast performance from this approach. The difficulty is rooted in the fact that the type, scale, and amplitude of the processes controlling wind variability at a site change from day to day if not from hour to hour. Thus, a location that provides some useful forecast information for one time may not be a useful predictor a few hours later. Indeed, some processes that cause significant changes in wind power production operate predominantly in the vertical direction and thus cannot be monitored by employing a network of sensors at off-site locations. Hence, it is very challenging to determine the type of sensors and deployment locations to get the most benefit for a specific short-term forecast application. Two tools recently developed in the meteorological research community have the potential to help determine the locations and parameters to measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of California's Tehachapi Pass during the warm (high generation) season. The paper is organized

Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

254

Application of Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis to Observation Targeting for Short-term Wind Speed Forecasting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operators of electrical grids, sometimes referred to as Balancing Authorities (BA), typically make critical decisions on how to most reliably and economically balance electrical load and generation in time frames ranging from a few minutes to six hours ahead. At higher levels of wind power generation, there is an increasing need to improve the accuracy of 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts. Forecasts on this time scale have typically been strongly dependent on short-term trends indicated by the time series of power production and meteorological data from a wind farm. Additional input information is often available from the output of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models and occasionally from off-site meteorological towers in the region surrounding the wind generation facility. A widely proposed approach to improve short-term forecasts is the deployment of off-site meteorological towers at locations upstream from the wind generation facility in order to sense approaching wind perturbations. While conceptually appealing, it turns out that, in practice, it is often very difficult to derive significant benefit in forecast performance from this approach. The difficulty is rooted in the fact that the type, scale, and amplitude of the processes controlling wind variability at a site change from day to day if not from hour to hour. Thus, a location that provides some useful forecast information for one time may not be a useful predictor a few hours later. Indeed, some processes that cause significant changes in wind power production operate predominantly in the vertical direction and thus cannot be monitored by employing a network of sensors at off-site locations. Hence, it is very challenging to determine the type of sensors and deployment locations to get the most benefit for a specific short-term forecast application. Two tools recently developed in the meteorological research community have the potential to help determine the locations and parameters to measure in order to get the maximum positive impact on forecast performance for a particular site and short-term look-ahead period. Both tools rely on the use of NWP models to assess the sensitivity of a forecast for a particular location to measurements made at a prior time (i.e. the look-ahead period) at points surrounding the target location. The fundamental hypothesis is that points and variables with high sensitivity are good candidates for measurements since information at those points are likely to have the most impact on the forecast for the desired parameter, location and look-ahead period. One approach is called the adjoint method (Errico and Vukicevic, 1992; Errico, 1997) and the other newer approach is known as Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA; Ancell and Hakim 2007; Torn and Hakim 2008). Both approaches have been tested on large-scale atmospheric prediction problems (e.g. forecasting pressure or precipitation over a relatively large region 24 hours ahead) but neither has been applied to mesoscale space-time scales of winds or any other variables near the surface of the earth. A number of factors suggest that ESA is better suited for short-term wind forecasting applications. One of the most significant advantages of this approach is that it is not necessary to linearize the mathematical representation of the processes in the underlying atmospheric model as required by the adjoint approach. Such a linearization may be especially problematic for the application of short-term forecasting of boundary layer winds in complex terrain since non-linear shifts in the structure of boundary layer due to atmospheric stability changes are a critical part of the wind power production forecast problem. The specific objective of work described in this paper is to test the ESA as a tool to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the wind generation area of California's Tehachapi Pass during the warm (high generation) season. The paper is organized

Zack, J; Natenberg, E; Young, S; Manobianco, J; Kamath, C

2010-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

255

Applications of WiMAX-based wireless mesh network in monitoring wind farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper has studied the feasibility of applying World Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) based Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) in monitoring wind farms. WMNs provide a dynamic topology which meets the requirements of communications ... Keywords: WMNs, WiMAX, World Interoperability for Microwave Access, communications, renewable energy, simulation, wind energy, wind farm monitoring, wind farms, wind power, wireless mesh networks, wireless networks

Gang Zheng; Hongbing Xu; Xinheng Wang; Jianxiao Zou

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Systems Engineering Applications to Wind Energy Research, Design, and Development (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, wind energy has evolved into a large international industry involving major players in the manufacturing, construction, and utility sectors. Coinciding with the industry's growth, significant innovation in the technology has resulted in larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and more complex designs in all subsystems. However, as the deployment of the technology grows, and its role within the electricity sector becomes more prominent, so has the expectations of the technology in terms of performance, reliability, and cost. The industry currently partitions its efforts into separate paths for turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated to meet a diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs between them. To address these challenges, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has embarked on the Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) initiative to use methods of systems engineering in the research, design, and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field that has a long history of application to complex technical systems. The work completed to date represents a first step in understanding this potential. It reviews systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems and illustrates how these methods can be combined in a WESE framework to meet the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry.

Dykes, K.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Ning, A.; Scott, G.; Sirnivas, S.; Veers, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Testing Facilities Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston 3 of 7 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

258

Acoustic ranging technique with application to assessment of low-frequency acoustic noise of wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Impulsive low-frequency noise from wind turbines can cause annoyance particularly when a residential structure is involved. Such noise is typically generated in some spatially restricted region of a turbine rotor swept area. Low-frequency impulsive noise of the MOD-1 turbine was generated when the rotor blades passed downwind of the tower legs encountering the complex unsteady flows there. An acoustic ranging technique that aids assessment of the degree of concentration of acoustic generation within the turbine swept area and which determines the time-average spatial source region of such concentration is described. Practical applications and limitations of the process are discussed.

Hemphill, R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Electric utility application of wind energy conversion systems on the island of Oahu  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to assess the potential for the application of Wind Energy Conversion Systems (a field of interconnected WTGs denoted in this report by the acronym WECS) in a specific utility contest to gain advance information concerning their economic feasibility; their optional problems; the criteria and procedures for site selection; environmental impacts; legal, social, and other problems; and the balance of cost and benefits from the point of view of the consumer and the utility. This study addresses the circumstances of the Hawaiian Electric Company operations onthe Island of Oahu.

Lindley, C.A.; Melton, W.C.

1979-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

near three California wind farms are then explored: Sancirculations that drive wind farms, and to consider the e?at three major California wind farms. This is clearly a much

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uences on Californias wind energy resource. Part 1: Generalin?uences on Californias wind energy resource. Part 2:uences on californias wind energy resource. part 1: General

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Makarov, Y. , 2007: Wind Integration Issues and So- lutionsexpectations, and integration strategy for any wind powerwind climate and variability. Site design and operation, as well as market integration

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Vanadium-redox flow and lithium-ion battery modelling and performance in wind energy applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As wind energy penetration levels increase, there is a growing interest in using storage devices to aid in managing the fluctuations in wind turbine output (more)

Chahwan, John A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Energy Education and Training  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind for Schools Project Wind for Schools Project Collegiate Wind Competition School Project Locations Education & Training Programs Curricula & Teaching Materials Resources Wind Energy Education and Training Programs This map shows the location of wind energy education and training programs in the United States. Find programs at community colleges, universities, and other institutions. You can also learn how to use the Google Map and how to add your educational program and training to the map. Text Version Education and Training Programs , Lethbridge College , Northern Alberta Institute of Technology Alaska, Alaska Wind-Diesel Wind Application Center (University of Alaska) Alaska, Matanuska-Susitna College Alaska, Northwestern Alaska Career and Technical Center Alaska, University of Alaska Anchorage - Mat-Su College

265

Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

Churchfield, M. J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Adding Complex Terrain and Stable Atmospheric Condition Capability to the Simulator for On/Offshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes changes made to NREL's OpenFOAM-based wind plant aerodynamics solver so that it can compute the stably stratified atmospheric boundary layer and flow over terrain. Background about the flow solver, the Simulator for Off/Onshore Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA) is given, followed by details of the stable stratification/complex terrain modifications to SOWFA, along with some preliminary results calculations of a stable atmospheric boundary layer and flow over a simple set of hills.

Churchfield, M. J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Axial-flux modular permanent-magnet generator with a toroidal winding for wind-turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Permanent-magnet (PM) generators have been used for wind turbines for many years. Many small wind-turbine manufacturers use direct-drive PM generators. For wind-turbine generators, the design philosophy must cover the following characteristics: low cost, light weight, low speed, high torque, and variable-speed generation. The generator is easy to manufacture and the design can be scaled up for a larger size without major retooling. A modular PM generator with axial flux direction was chosen. The permanent magnet used is NdFeB or ferrite magnet with flux guide to focus flux density in the air gap. Each unit module of the generator may consist of one, two, or more phases. Each generator can be expanded to two or more unit modules. Each unit module is built from simple modular poles. The stator winding is formed like a torus. Thus, the assembly process is simplified and the winding insertion in the slot is less tedious. The authors built a prototype of one unit module and performed preliminary tests in the laboratory. Follow-up tests will be conducted in the laboratory to improve the design.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Wan, Y.H.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Program on Technology Innovation: Decision-Centered Guidelines for the Design of Human System Interfaces for Electric Power Industry Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Decision-centered guidelines support improved user decision making across a broad range of electric power industry application areas. The guidelines will aid in the design of user-centered human-system interfaces (HSIs), while increasing the beneficial uses of new technologies for electric power generation, transmission, and distribution (GTD) systems. Decision-centered guidelines are applicable to system designs involving new technology that will transform current user tasks, responsibilities, ...

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Technology  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power Technology Wind Power Technology Modern wind turbines have become sophisticated power plants while the concept of converting wind energy to electrical energy remains quite simple. Follow these links to learn more about the science behind wind turbine technology. Wind Power Animation An image of a scene from the wind power animation. The animation shows how moving air rotates a wind turbine's blades and describes how the internal components work to produce electricity. It shows small and large wind turbines and the differences between how they are used, as stand alone or connected to the utility grid. How Wind Turbines Work Learn how wind turbines make electricity; what are the types, sizes, and applications of wind turbines; and see an illustration of the components inside a wind turbine.

270

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Knowledge Transfer AOV Maintenance Application - Windows Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application will develop a demonstration tool of a virtual Air Operated Valve using game-based technology, and create an immersive and interactive educational ...

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Application study of wind power technology to the city of Hart, Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning wind data collections and analysis; Hart power demand and consumer usage; wind power assessment; hydro power assessment; results of preliminary economics analysis; environmental impact of wind turbines and operation in the Hart, Oceana County, Michigan area; and systems model for the Hart power system with wind turbine. (DCC)

Asmussen, J.; Fisher, P.D.; Park, G.L.; Krauss, O.

1975-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Maintenance Engineering Fundamentals for Nuclear Utility Personnel - Student Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI report is the student handbook for participants in a training course on maintenance engineering fundamentals for nuclear utility personnel. The training course was developed in conjunction with EPRI report 1015307, Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Maintenance Engineer Fundamentals Handbook. Among the materials in the student handbook are an overview of the entire course; lists of pertinent definitions, acronyms, and resource materials; summaries of learning objectives and key points for...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

273

2008 Wind Energy Projects, Wind Powering America (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Powering America program produces a poster at the end of every calendar year that depicts new U.S. wind energy projects. The 2008 poster includes the following projects: Stetson Wind Farm in Maine; Dutch Hill Wind Farm in New York; Grand Ridge Wind Energy Center in Illinois; Hooper Bay, Alaska; Forestburg, South Dakota; Elbow Creek Wind Project in Texas; Glacier Wind Farm in Montana; Wray, Colorado; Smoky Hills Wind Farm in Kansas; Forbes Park Wind Project in Massachusetts; Spanish Fork, Utah; Goodland Wind Farm in Indiana; and the Tatanka Wind Energy Project on the border of North Dakota and South Dakota.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NREL: Wind Research - Awards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Awards NREL has received many awards for its technical innovations in wind energy. In addition, the research conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at NREL has led...

275

Development and application of a light-weight, wind-turbine rotor-based data acquisition system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind-energy researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), representing Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), are developing a new, light-weight, modular data acquisition unit capable of acquiring long-term, continuous time-series data from small and/or dynamic wind-turbine rotors. The unit utilizes commercial data acquisition hardware, spread-spectrum radio modems, and Global Positioning System receivers, and a custom-built programmable logic device. A prototype of the system is now operational, and initial field deployment is expected this summer. This paper describes the major subsystems comprising the unit, summarizes the current status of the system, and presents the current plans for near-term development of hardware and software.

Berg, D.E.; Robertson, P.J.; Ortiz, M.F. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

UPC Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL National Wind Technology Center...

277

Application of a wireless sensor node to health monitoring of operational wind turbine blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural health monitoring (SHM) is a developing field of research with a variety of applications including civil structures, industrial equipment, and energy infrastructure. An SHM system requires an integrated process of sensing, data interrogation and statistical assessment. The first and most important stage of any SHM system is the sensing system, which is traditionally composed of transducers and data acquisition hardware. However, such hardware is often heavy, bulky, and difficult to install in situ. Furthermore, physical access to the structure being monitored may be limited or restricted, as is the case for rotating wind turbine blades or unmanned aerial vehicles, requiring wireless transmission of sensor readings. This study applies a previously developed compact wireless sensor node to structural health monitoring of rotating small-scale wind turbine blades. The compact sensor node collects low-frequency structural vibration measurements to estimate natural frequencies and operational deflection shapes. The sensor node also has the capability to perform high-frequency impedance measurements to detect changes in local material properties or other physical characteristics. Operational measurements were collected using the wireless sensing system for both healthy and damaged blade conditions. Damage sensitive features were extracted from the collected data, and those features were used to classify the structural condition as healthy or damaged.

Taylor, Stuart G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D [UCSD

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

279

Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact: Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a renewable energy source at the lowest possible cost. A new 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission line would be built to transmit power generated by the proposed windfarm to an existing US Department of Energy Western Area Power Administration (Western) substation located near Edgeley. The proposed interconnection would require modifying Western's Edgeley Substation. Modifying the Edgeley Substation is a Federal proposed action that requires Western to review the substation modification and the proposed windfarm project for compliance with Section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332, and Department of Energy NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR Part 1021). Western is the lead Federal agency for preparation of this Environmental Assessment (EA). The US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is a cooperating agency with Western in preparing the EA. This document follows regulation issued by the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) for implementing procedural provisions of NEPA (40 CFR 1500-1508), and is intended to disclose potential impacts on the quality of the human environment resulting from the proposed project. If potential impacts are determined to be significant, preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement would be required. If impacts are determined to be insignificant, Western would complete a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI). Environmental protection measures that would be included in the design of the proposed project are included.

N /A

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Knowledge Transfer AOV Maintenance Application - Android Version  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application will develop a demonstration tool of a virtual Air Operated Valve using game-based technology, and create an immersive and interactive educational experience.This effort will lay the foundation for further visualization, simulation, and training capabilities.Upon successful completion of the development of the demonstration tool, including member and industry Subject Matter Expert input, it is anticipated ...

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Wind energy conversion. Volume X. Aeroelastic stability of wind turbine rotor blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nonlinear equations of motion of a general wind turbine rotor blade are derived from first principles. The twisted, tapered blade may be preconed out of the plane of rotation, and its root may be offset from the axis of rotation by a small amount. The aerodynamic center, center of mass, shear center, and area centroid are distinct in this derivation. The equations are applicable to studies of forced response or of aeroelastic flutter, however, neither gravity forcing, nor wind shear and gust forcing are included. The equations derived are applied to study the aeroelastic stability of the NASA-ERDA 100 kW wind turbine, and solved using the Galerkin method. The numerical results are used in conjunction with a mathematical comparison to prove the validity of an equivalent hinge model developed by the Wind Energy Conversion Project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Wendell, J.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

A Hurricane Boundary Layer and Wind Field Model for Use in Engineering Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines the radial dependence of the height of the maximum wind speed in a hurricane, which is found to lower with increasing inertial stability (which in turn depends on increasing wind speed and decreasing radius) near the ...

Peter J. Vickery; Dhiraj Wadhera; Mark D. Powell; Yingzhao Chen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Factors driving wind power development in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1: CUMULATIVE U.S. WIND ENERGY CAPACITY policies and broadof wind energy development, resource potential, and policythe states tax policy, the Mountaineer Wind Energy Center

Bird, Lori A.; Parsons, Brian; Gagliano, Troy; Brown, Matthew H.; Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

NREL: Technology Transfer - NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost ...  

NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs March 22, 2013. Wind energy research conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC ...

285

Synoptic and local influences on boundary layer processes, with an application to California wind power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wind climate and variability. Site design and operation, as well as market integration mechanisms and energy policy

Mansbach, David K

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The Influence of Atmospheric Stability on Wind Drift from Ultra-Low-volume Aerial Forest Spray Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of drift cloud mass from 11 cases selected from a study of wind-borne droplet drift from ultra low-volume aerial spray applications over northern Ontario forests are presented as a function of atmospheric stability. Six swaths were ...

R. S. Crabbe; M. McCooeye; R. E. Mickle

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Application of Diode-Clamped Cascaded Inverter in the Direct-Driven Wind Power System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power inverter is widely used in direct-driven variable speed constant frequency (VSVF) wind power system. With the level of wind power jumping from the kilowatt to megawatt, topologies and control of inverter have a corresponding change. Considering ... Keywords: direct-driven wind power, multi-level inverter, diode-clamped cascaded inverter, PD-SPWM and CPS-SPWM

Xianglian Xu; Pingting Xu; Zilin Tang; Gang Tang; Xiaole Ye

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Assessment of Wind Loads On Power Lines--Methodology and Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind load on electrical conductors is one of the most critical design loads for transmission structures, but many methods of determining wind load have only recently been validated experimentally. This document draws on EPRI field research to assist engineers in accurately determining design wind loads for conductors and helping utilities construct new transmission lines and upgrade existing lines at minimum cost while retaining reliability.

1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

Analysis of the electrical harmonic characteristics of a slip recovery variable speed generating system for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Variable speed electric generating technology can enhance the general use of wind energy in electric utility applications. This enhancement results from two characteristic properties of variable speed wind turbine generators: an improvement in drive train damping characteristics, which results in reduced structural loading on the entire wind turbine system, and an improvement in the overall efficiency by using a more sophisticated electrical generator. Electronic converter systems are the focus of this investigation -- in particular, the properties of a wound-rotor induction generator with the slip recovery system and direct-current link converter. Experience with solid-state converter systems in large wind turbines is extremely limited. This report presents measurements of electrical performances of the slip recovery system and is limited to the terminal characteristics of the system. Variable speed generating systems working effectively in utility applications will require a satisfactory interface between the turbine/generator pair and the utility network. The electrical testing described herein focuses largely on the interface characteristics of the generating system. A MOD-O wind turbine was connected to a very strong system; thus, the voltage distortion was low and the total harmonic distortion in the utility voltage was less than 3% (within the 5% limit required by most utilities). The largest voltage component of a frequency below 60 Hz was 40 dB down from the 60-Hz< component. 8 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs.

Herrera, J.I.; Reddoch, T.W.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

New England Wind Forum: Small Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies: Thomas Harrison Middle School, Virginia Wind for Schools Project Funding Case Studies: Thomas Harrison Middle School, Virginia August 26, 2013 Workshop Explores Information's Role in Wind Project Siting: A Wind Powering America Success Story November 19, 2012 More News Subscribe to News Updates Events Renewable Energy Market Update Webinar January 29, 2014 Strategic Energy Planning: Webinar February 26, 2014 Introduction to Wind Systems March 10, 2014 More Events Publications 2012 Market Report on Wind Technologies in Distributed Applications August 12, 2013 More Publications Features Sign up for the New England Wind Forum Newsletter. New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England

291

Surface Wind Convergence as a Short-Term Predictor of Cloud-to-Ground Lightning at Kennedy Space Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud-to-ground lightning is a significant forecast problem at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In this study, cloud-to-ground lightning is related in time and space to surface convergence for 244 days during the convective seasons of ...

Andrew I. Watson; Ronald L. Holle; Ral E. Lpez; Robert Ortiz; James R. Nicholson

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

THE RADIATION SAFETY INFORMATION COMPUTATIONAL CENTER (RSICC) - A RESOURCE FOR COMPUTATIONAL TOOLS FOR NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC), which has been in existence since 1963, is the principal source and repository in the United States for computational tools for nuclear applications. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and distributes nuclear software and data involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from 94 countries. RSICC software provides in-depth coverage of radiation related topics: the physics of the interaction of radiation with matter, radiation production and sources, criticality safety, radiation protection and shielding, radiation detectors and measurements, shielding materials properties, radiation waste management, atmospheric dispersion and environmental dose, medical applications, macro- and micro-dosimetry calculations.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Modeling, analysis, control and design application guidelines of doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) for wind power applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Double Fed Induction Generators (DFIG) has been widely used for the past two decades in large wind farms. However, there are many open-ended problems yet (more)

Masaud, Tarek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Roles and Responsibilities for Wind  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Roles and Responsibilities for Wind for Schools Participants Roles and Responsibilities for Wind for Schools Participants The following section describes the roles and responsibilities of each entity involved in a Wind for Schools project. Note that the structure was not rigidly defined to allow each state to implement the project as was most appropriate. School and Community Wind Application Center State Facilitator Wind Powering America Local Utility or Electric Cooperative State Energy Office School and Community In order for a Wind for Schools project to succeed, many people in the school community supported the concept, including the science teacher, the school principal and administration, the district superintendent and administration, and the school board. The school provided land for the project, support for the wind turbine interconnection to the school

295

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Southeast China (CD-ROM)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in two regions of southeast China. The first region is the coastal area stretching from northern Fujian south to eastern Guangdong and extending approximately 100 km inland. The second region is centered on the Poyang Lake area in northern Jiangxi. This region also includes parts of two other provinces-Anhui and Hubei-and extends from near Anqing in Anhui south to near Nanchang in Jiangxi. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. We created the high-resolution (1-km2) maps in 1998 using a computerized wind resource mapping system developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The mapping system uses software known as a Geographical Information System (GIS).

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Galactic cluster winds in presence of a dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain a solution for the hydrodynamic outflow of the polytropic gas from the gravitating center, in presence of the uniform Dark Energy (DE). The antigravity of DE is enlightening the outflow and make the outflow possible at smaller initial temperature, at the same density. The main property of the wind in presence of DE is its unlimited acceleration after passing the critical point. In application of this solution to the winds from galaxy clusters we suggest that collision of the strongly accelerated wind with another galaxy cluster, or with another galactic cluster wind could lead to the formation of a highest energy cosmic rays.

Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

CALCULATING EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY PROGRAMS AND ITS APPLICATION TO THE WIND FARMS IN THE TEXAS ERCOT REGION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In August 2008 the Texas State Legislature required adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015, and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also required the Public Utility Commission (PUC) to establish a target of 10,000 MW of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and required the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop a methodology for computing emission reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory is required to assist the TCEQ to quantify emission reduction credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. To satisfy these requirements the ESL has been developing and refining a method to calculate annually creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the TCEQ. This paper provides a detailed description of an improved methodology developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by a wind farm. Details are presented for the wind farm Sweetwater I (Abilene) as well as results from the application of this procedure to all the wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region in 2006.

Liu, Z.; Haberl, J.; Baltazar, J. C.; Culp, C.; Yazdani, B.; Chandrasekaran, V.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

NREL: Wind Research - Systems Engineering Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search More Search Options Site Map The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) wind energy systems engineering initiative has developed an analysis platform to leverage its...

299

NREL: Wind Research - Last Call: Illinois Wind for Schools Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last Call: Illinois Wind for Schools Program Accepting Applications February 25, 2013 Now in its second year, the Illinois Wind for Schools (ILWFS) program is accepting...

300

Technology, Performance, and Market of Wind-Diesel Applications for Remote and Island Communities (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market for wind-diesel power systems in Alaska and other areas has proven that the integration of wind turbines with conventional isolated generation is a commercial reality. During the past few years, the use of wind energy to reduce diesel fuel consumption has increased, providing economic, environmental, social, and security benefits to communities' energy supply. This poster provides an overview of markets, project examples, technology advances, and industry challenges.

Baring-Gould, E. I.; Dabo, M.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Overcoming Technical and Market Barriers for Distributed Wind Applications: Reaching the Mainstream; Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes how the distributed wind industry must overcome hurdles including system costs and interconnection and installation restrictions to reach its mainstream market potential.

Rhoads-Weaver, H.; Forsyth, T.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Control design and analysis of doubly-fed induction generator in wind power application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The work presented in this thesis includes control system design, analysis and grid synchronization of a DFIG (doubly-fed induction generator) driven by a wind turbine (more)

Mazari, Shukul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Multiblade Coordinate Transformation and Its Application to Wind Turbine Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the mulitblade coordinate transformation (MBC) modeling process that integrates the dynamics of individual wind turbine blades and expresses them as fixed frames.

Bir, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A doubly-fed induction generator and energy storage system for wind power applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind generation has become the most important alternate energy source and has experienced increased growth in Europe during the past decade while more recently, the (more)

Abbey, Chad

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analysis of superconducting magnetic energy storage applications at a proposed wind farm site near Browning, Montana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer program was developed to analyze the viability of integrating superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) with proposed wind farm scenarios at a site near Browning, Montana. The program simulated an hour-by-hour account of the charge/discharge history of a SMES unit for a representative wind-speed year. Effects of power output, storage capacity, and power conditioning capability on SMES performance characteristics were analyzed on a seasonal, diurnal, and hourly basis. The SMES unit was assumed to be charged during periods when power output of the wind resource exceeded its average value. Energy was discharged from the SMES unit into the grid during periods of low wind speed to compensate for below-average output of the wind resource. The option of using SMES to provide power continuity for a wind farm supplemented by combustion turbines was also investigated. Levelizing the annual output of large wind energy systems operating in the Blackfeet area of Montana was found to require a storage capacity too large to be economically viable. However, it appears that intermediate-sized SMES economically levelize the wind energy output on a seasonal basis.

Gaustad, K.L.; De Steese, J.G.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Linear Wind-Forced Beta Plumes with Application to the Hawaiian Lee Countercurrent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two numerical ocean models are used to study the baroclinic response to forcing by localized wind stress curl (i.e., a wind-forced ? plume, which is a circulation cell developing to the west of the source region and composed of a set of zonal jets)...

Ali Belmadani; Nikolai A. Maximenko; Julian P. Mccreary; Ryo Furue; Oleg V. Melnichenko; Niklas Schneider; Emanuele Di Lorenzo

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

GATE Center of Excellence at UAB in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of the UAB GATE Center of Excellence in Lightweight Materials for Automotive Applications. The first Phase of the UAB DOE GATE center spanned the period 2005-2011. The UAB GATE goals coordinated with the overall goals of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicles Technologies initiative and DOE GATE program. The FCVT goals are: (1) Development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to significantly reduce automotive vehicle body and chassis weight without compromising other attributes such as safety, performance, recyclability, and cost; (2) To provide a new generation of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. The UAB GATE focused on both the FCVT and GATE goals in the following manner: (1) Train and produce graduates in lightweight automotive materials technologies; (2) Structure the engineering curricula to produce specialists in the automotive area; (3) Leverage automotive related industry in the State of Alabama; (4) Expose minority students to advanced technologies early in their career; (5) Develop innovative virtual classroom capabilities tied to real manufacturing operations; and (6) Integrate synergistic, multi-departmental activities to produce new product and manufacturing technologies for more damage tolerant, cost-effective, and lighter automotive structures.

None

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Control of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Motors with Special Application to Fractional-Slot Concentrated Windings  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that the ability of the permanent magnet synchronous machine (PMSM) to operate over a wide constant power speed range (CPSR) is dependent upon the machine inductance [1,2,3,4,5]. Early approaches for extending CPSR operation included adding supplementary inductance in series with the motor [1] and the use of anti-parallel thyristor pairs in series with the motor-phase windings [5]. The increased inductance method is compatible with a voltage-source inverter (VSI) controlled by pulse-width modulation (PWM) which is called the conventional phase advance (CPA) method. The thyristor method has been called the dual mode inverter control (DMIC). Neither of these techniques has met with wide acceptance since they both add cost to the drive system and have not been shown to have an attractive cost/benefit ratio. Recently a method has been developed to use fractional-slot concentrated windings to significantly increase the machine inductance [6]. This latest approach has the potential to make the PMSM compatible with CPA without supplemental external inductance. If the performance of such drive is acceptable, then the method may make the PMSM an attractive option for traction applications requiring a wide CPSR. A 30 pole, 6 kW, 6000 maximum revolutions per minute (rpm) prototype of the fractional-slot PMSM design has been developed [7]. This machine has significantly more inductance than is typical of regular PMSMs. The prototype is to be delivered in late 2005 to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for testing and development of a suitable controller. In advance of the test/control development effort, ORNL has used the PMSM models developed over a number of previous studies to study the steady-state performance of high-inductance PMSM machines with a view towards control issues. The detailed steady-state model developed includes all motor and inverter-loss mechanisms and will be useful in assessing the performance of the dynamic controller to be developed in future work. This report documents the results of this preliminary investigation.

Lawler, J.S.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

309

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Here you will find contact information for NREL's research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. To learn more about us and our expertise, view our organizational charts and read the staff's biographies. Below is a listing of the research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. View organizational charts. Lab Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program Brian Smith Program Integration, Wind and Water Power Program Elise DeGeorge Albert LiVecchi Dana Scholbrock Teresa Thadison Director, National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Laura Davis Kim Domenico Deputy Center Director, National Wind Technology Center Jim Green, Acting Research Fellow Bob Thresher Chief Engineer Paul Veers Wind Technology Research and Development

310

Wind power today  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication highlights initiatives of the US DOE`s Wind Energy Program. 1997 yearly activities are also very briefly summarized. The first article describes a 6-megawatt wind power plant installed in Vermont. Another article summarizes technical advances in wind turbine technology, and describes next-generation utility and small wind turbines in the planning stages. A village power project in Alaska using three 50-kilowatt turbines is described. Very brief summaries of the Federal Wind Energy Program and the National Wind Technology Center are also included in the publication.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative Commonwealth Wind Community-Scale Initiative < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Public Entities: $100,000 Non-Public Entities: $67,000 Program Info Funding Source Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) Expiration Date 08/01/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on applicant type (public vs. non-public) and grant type (site assessment, feasibility study, onsite wind monitoring, acoustic studies, and business planning) Provider Massachusetts Clean Energy Center

312

Wind energy: Program overview, FY 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Wind Energy Program assists utilities and industry in developing advanced wind turbine technology to be economically competitive as an energy source in the marketplace and in developing new markets and applications for wind systems. This program overview describes the commercial development of wind power, wind turbine development, utility programs, industry programs, wind resources, applied research in wind energy, and the program structure.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Wind farms modeling files transformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind farms modeling software are very important in the process of planning, dimensioning, and developing a wind farm. These applications offer valuable information about some key factors in the process of wind farm creation. The platforms do not offer ...

D. I. Gota; D. Petreus; L. Miclea

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Wind power application for low flow irrigation from the Edwards-Trinity aquifer of West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Attempts were made to reduce the cost of energy for irrigation in West Texas. To do this two wind turbines of 10 kW size were installed in Garden City and Stiles, Texas to pump water. The turbines were installed on 30 m towers. The pumping water head at Garden City and Stiles were 48 m and 80 m, respectively.A double Fourier series analysis of wind speed characteristics was done to better predict wind speed for the test areas and the use of a N=3 and M=7 harmonic term was suggested for this region. A relationship of flow pumped from a wind powered pumping system was developed to better predict flow rate based on available wind speed and pumping water depth data.The economic analysis of this system showed that if the local utility sold power at rate of $0.09kWh then a wind powered pumping system can be economically feasible if the cost of a 10 kW wind turbine was less than $5000 payable over 30 years at 5% interest rate. The current cost of such a system is $30,000, making it prohibitively expensive. However, such a system may become a more economical alternative as the cost of electricity increases and the cost of the turbines decrease.

Molla, Saiful Islam

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Application of wind energy to Great Plains irrigation pumping. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy systems without energy storage for irrigation in the Great Plains are studied. Major uses of irrigation energy were identified as pumping for surface distribution systems, which could be supplied by variable flow, and pumping for sprinkler systems using constant flow. A computer program was developed to simulate operation of wind-powered irrigation wells. Pumping by wind turbine systems was simulated for 2 variable and 2 constant flow operational modes in which auxiliary motors were used in 3 of the modes. Using the simulation program, the well yields and maximum pumping rates among the 4 modes as a function of drawdown in a typical well are compared.

Hagen, L.J.; Lyles, L.; Skidmore, E.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Application of a Bayesian Wind Profile Retrieval Technique to Radar Data Collected in the Alpine Southern Upslope Region and Comparison with Upstream Wind Profiler Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a new operational technique to retrieve the horizontal wind profile from Doppler radar measurements is used to carry out a statistical comparison of upslope and upstream wind profiles in the southern flank of the European Alps. The ...

P. Tabary; M. Petitdidier

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Advanced Wind Turbine Controls Reduce Loads (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's National Wind Technology Center provides the world's only dedicated turbine controls testing platforms.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Development and Application of a Physical Approach to Estimating Wind Gusts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new wind gust estimate method (denoted WGE method) is proposed. Contrary to most techniques used in operational weather forecasting, the determination of gusts in this approach is fully based on physical considerations. The main motivation for ...

O. Brasseur

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Application of Snowfall and Wind Statistics to Snow Transport Modeling for Snowdrift Control in Minnesota  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models were utilized to determine the snow accumulation season (SAS) and to quantify windblown snow for the purpose of snowdrift control for locations in Minnesota. The models require mean monthly temperature, snowfall, density of snow, and wind ...

Martha D. Shulski; Mark W. Seeley

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Correction of Land-Based Wind Data for Offshore Applications: A Further Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A formula that linearly relates the difference in wind speed between onshore and offshore regions, as tested successfully in the Great Lakes region, has been revised and extended to other parts of the world. This formula is further substantiated ...

S. A. Hsu

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Note on the Use of the Inverse Gaussian Distribution for Wind Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inverse Gaussian distribution is suggested as an alternative to the three-parameter Weibull distribution for the description of wind speed data with low frequencies of low speeds. A comparison of the two distributions indicates a region of ...

W. E. Bardsley

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

An Application of Model Output Statistics to the Development of a Local Wind Regime Forecast Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Output Statistics (MOS) approach is used to develop a procedure for forecasting the occurrence of a local wind regime at Rota, Spain known as the levante. Variables derived solely from surface pressure and 500 mb height forecast fields ...

Robert A. Godfrey

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Cross-calibrated, Multiplatform Ocean Surface Wind Velocity Product for Meteorological and Oceanographic Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface wind mediates exchanges between the ocean and the atmosphere. These airsea exchange processes are critical for understanding and predicting atmosphere, ocean, and wave phenomena on many time and space scales. A cross-calibrated ...

Robert Atlas; Ross N. Hoffman; Joseph Ardizzone; S. Mark Leidner; Juan Carlos Jusem; Deborah K. Smith; Daniel Gombos

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Application of Synoptic Stratification to Precipitation Forecasting in the Trade Wind Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1129-day high quality rainfall dataset was collated, from the months of March to November 199397, where trade wind flow predominates across the northeast Queensland tropical coast. This dataset was matched with numerical model fields from the ...

Gregory J. Connor; Frank Woodcock

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Wind Turbine Design Using A Free-wake Vortex Method With Winglet Application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind turbine blades are traditionally designed with blade element momentum theory (BEMT). This method is incapable of accurately analyzing non-conventional or non-planar blade planforms. Modern (more)

Maniaci, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Applications of an Infrared Doppler Lidar in Detection of Wind Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2005, operational wind shear alerting at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) reached an important milestone with the launch of the automatic Lidar (light detection and ranging) Windshear Alerting System (LIWAS). This signifies ...

C. M. Shun; P. W. Chan

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

NREL: Wind Research - Global Wind Ambassador Visits the National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Wind Ambassador Visits the National Wind Technology Center December 2, 2013 Photo of Brian Smith, Dave Simms, and Stever Sawyer atop a turbine at the NWTC. The men are...

329

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: A PRELIMINARY INVENTORY OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight Regional CHP Application Centers (RACs) are funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies in all 50 states. The RACs build end-user awareness by providing CHP-related information to targeted markets through education and outreach; they work with the states and regulators to encourage the creation and adoption of favorable public policies; and they provide CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. The RACs were started by DOE as a pilot program in 2001 to support the National CHP Roadmap developed by industry to accelerate deployment of energy efficient CHP technologies (U.S. Combined Heat and Power Association 2001). The intent was to foster a regional presence to build market awareness, address policy issues, and facilitate project development. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has supported DOE with the RAC program since its inception. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort involving DOE and some CHP industry stakeholders to establish quantitative metrics for measuring the RACs accomplishments. This effort incorporated the use of logic models to define and describe key RAC activities, outputs, and outcomes. Based on this detailed examination of RAC operations, potential metrics were identified associated with the various key sectors addressed by the RACs: policy makers; regulatory agencies; investor owned utilities; municipal and cooperative utilities; financiers; developers; and end users. The final product was reviewed by a panel of representatives from DOE, ORNL, RACs, and the private sector. The metrics developed through this effort focus on major RAC activities as well as on CHP installations and related outcomes. All eight RACs were contacted in August 2008 and asked to provide data for every year of Center operations for those metrics on which they kept records. In addition, data on CHP installations and related outcomes were obtained from an existing DOE-supported data base. The information provided on the individual RACs was summed to yield totals for all the Centers combined for each relevant item.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Final Environmental Assessment East Altamont Energy Center Application for Certification (01-AFC-4) Alameda County  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EAST ALTAMONT ENERGY CENTER EAST ALTAMONT ENERGY CENTER FINAL STAFF ASSESSMENT / ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.......................................................................................................1 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................................2 PROJECT DESCRIPTION ....................................................................................................3 RESPONSE TO PUBLIC AND AGENCY COMMENTS.......................................................4 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT .....................................................................................5 AIR QUALITY ...........................................................................................................5.1

331

NREL: Wind Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photo of the non-torque loading system at the National Wind Technology Center. Photo of the non-torque loading system at the National Wind Technology Center. New NWTC Test Facility to Improve Wind Turbines Testing the performance of multimegawatt wind turbine drivetrains Illustration showing mountains, several wind turbines, a power plant, a crane setting up a turbine blade, and two semi-trucks carrying turbine blades. The concept is to show all the pieces and parts of a complete wind energy system and how they work together. NWTC Systems Engineering Initiative Analysis Platform New platform helps analyze and integrate entire wind energy systems Short video featuring Fort Felker, Center Director of the National Wind Technology Center, highlighting the NWTC's dual-axis resonant blade testing capabilities. Images from this video include Fort speaking, the static turbine blade in the testing facility, and flapwise and edgewise testing in action.

332

Southwest Wind Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL National Wind Technology Center...

333

R. Lynette & Associates and Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff exchange: Analysis and evaluation of the application of the Pulse Amplitude Synthesis and Control (PASC) converter in a wind power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of staff exchanges is to facilitate cooperative activities between PNL staff and U.S. private industry. Funding for the projects is provided by the DOE Office of Energy Research Laboratory Technology Transfer Program. Dr. Matthew Donnelly, a Research Engineer in the Applied Physics Center, Initiated a PNL disclosure for Pulse Amplitude Synthesis and Control (PASC) converter intellectual property protection in 1993. PASC converter research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been funded through the ETDI LDRD program. Recent work has centered on building the three-phase 20kW laboratory unit, the development of control algorithms and the study of the application of PASC converters in a 25MW wind power plant (through the staff exchange with RLA reported on here). An overview and description of the PASC converter is included as Appendix A.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Small Wind Independent Testing (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Small Wind Independent Testing at the NWTC and the Regional Test Centers project.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Renewable Energy Technology Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Technology Center Place Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany Zip D-22335 Sector Wind energy Product RETC, a JV formed which...

336

Agronomy Research Assistant Biofuels The Hawaii Agriculture Research Center (HARC) is seeking a qualified applicant to fill a full time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agronomy Research Assistant ­ Biofuels The Hawaii Agriculture Research Center (HARC) is seeking a qualified applicant to fill a full time Research Assistant position to work with biofuel crops to assist in the evaluation of multiple crops of interest to the biofuels research program. The position

Kaye, Jason P.

337

Application of measured loads to wind turbine fatigue and reliability analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cyclic loadings produce progressive damage that can ultimately result in wind turbine structural failure. There are many issues that must be dealt with in turning load measurements into estimates of component fatigue life. This paper deals with how the measured loads can be analyzed and processed to meet the needs of both fatigue life calculations and reliability estimates. It is recommended that moments of the distribution of rainflow-range load amplitudes be calculated and used to characterize the fatigue loading. These moments reflect successively more detailed physical characteristics of the loading (mean, spread, tail behavior). Moments can be calculated from data samples and functional forms can be fitted to wind conditions, such as wind speed and turbulence intensity, with standard recession techniques. Distributions of load amplitudes that accurately reflect the damaging potential of the loadings can be estimated from the moments at any, wind condition of interest. Fatigue life can then be calculated from the estimated load distributions, and the overall, long-term, or design spectrum can be generated for any particular wind-speed distribution. Characterizing the uncertainty in the distribution of cyclic loads is facilitated by using a small set of descriptive statistics for which uncertainties can be estimated. The effects of loading parameter uncertainty can then be transferred to the fatigue life estimate and compared with other uncertainties, such as material durability.

Veers, P.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Winterstein, S.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Intermediate Photovoltaic System Application Experiment. Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts. Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the key results of the Phase II efforts for the Intermediate PV System Applications Experiment at the Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts (OCSA). This phase of the project involved fabrication, installation and integration of a nominal 140 kW flat panel PV system made up of large, square polycrystalline-silicon solar cell modules, each nominally 61 cm x 122 cm in size. The output of the PV modules, supplied by Solarex Corporation, was augmented, 1.35 to 1 at peak, by a row of glass reflectors, appropriately tilted northward. The PV system interfaces with the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Utility at the OCSA main switchgear. Any excess power generated by the system is fed into the utility under a one to one buyback arrangement. Except for a shortfall in the system output, presently suspected to be due to the poor performance of the modules, no serious problems were encountered. Certain value engineering changes implemented during construction and early operational failure events associated with the power conditioning system are also described. The system is currently undergoing extended testing and evaluation.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities July 17, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

340

SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

America's Wind Testing Facilities America's Wind Testing Facilities SLIDESHOW: America's Wind Testing Facilities July 17, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 1 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado The first of 4 towers is lifted as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-15 13:53 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado 2 of 7 National Wind Technology Center - Colorado Workers use a giant crane for lifting the blade assembly as work continues on the 2 MW Gamesa wind turbine being installed at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). | Photo by Dennis Schroeder. Date taken: 2011-09-22 12:06 Wind Technology Testing Center - Boston

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Estimation of fatigue and extreme load distributions from limited data with application to wind energy systems.  

SciTech Connect

An estimate of the distribution of fatigue ranges or extreme loads for wind turbines may be obtained by separating the problem into two uncoupled parts, (1) a turbine specific portion, independent of the site and (2) a site-specific description of environmental variables. We consider contextually appropriate probability models to describe the turbine specific response for extreme loads or fatigue. The site-specific portion is described by a joint probability distribution of a vector of environmental variables, which characterize the wind process at the hub-height of the wind turbine. Several approaches are considered for combining the two portions to obtain an estimate of the extreme load, e.g., 50-year loads or fatigue damage. We assess the efficacy of these models to obtain accurate estimates, including various levels of epistemic uncertainty, of the turbine response.

Fitzwater, LeRoy M. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Applicability of digital terrain analyses to wind energy prospecting and siting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent publication of the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) database by the US Geological Survey (USGS) has provided a unique opportunity for the development of cost-effective wind energy prospecting technology. This database contains terrain elevation values on a Latitude-Longitude grid with a resolution of 3 arc-seconds (about 90 m) for the contiguous United States, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. This database has been coupled with software that will produce shaded-relief maps on a laser printer in a format compatible with the state wind power maps in the US wind energy atlas. By providing a much higher resolution of the terrain features than was possible when the US atlas was prepared, these maps can be useful in general wind prospecting activities. As highly resolved as the 90-m DEM data seem to be when compared to the atlas grid, they still appear to be too coarse to resolve terrain features in the detail required for local wind flow characterization and wind plant layout. Gridded terrain data at about 10-m resolution are available from the USGS for some areas of the United States. In areas where these data are unavailable, they may be generated by digitizing and gridding the contours from a 1:24,000-scale USGS map over the area of interest. Comparisons of terrain profiles from cross sections of the 10-m and 90-m data provide an indication of the effect of resolution on the reliability of terrain feature representation. Oblique views of the terrain in shaded-relief format provide a dramatic enhancement of the shape and relative position of features of interest.

Wendell, L.L.; Gower, G.L.; Birn, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Castellano, C.C. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Wind Power Today: Federal Wind Program Highlights  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power Today is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry.

Not Available

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

High Horizontal and Vertical Resolution Limited-Area Model: Near-Surface and Wind Energy Forecast Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As harvesting of wind energy grows, so does the need for improved forecasts from the surface to the top of wind turbines. To improve mesoscale forecasts of wind, temperature, and dewpoint temperature in this layer, two different approaches are ...

Natacha B. Bernier; Stphane Blair

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Statistics of Wind over the Red Sea with Application to the Exodus Question  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper supplements an earlier article by Nof and Paldor that offered a possible explanation for the biblical crossing of the Red Sea in terms of natural phenomena. In that article, it was suggested that sustained winds (of 20 m s?1) could ...

Doron Nof; Nathan Paldor

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A New Multi-level Inverter with FACTS Capabilities for Wind Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modular multilevel converter (MMC) is an attractive topology for HVDC/FACTS systems. In this paper a new single-phase MMC-based D-STATCOM inverter for grid connection is proposed. The proposed inverter is designed for grid-connected wind turbines ... Keywords: D-STATCOM, Modular Multi-level Converter, Renewable Energy Source

Pedram Sotoodeh, Ruth Douglas Miller

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Three-Dimensional Wind Retrieval: Application of MUSCAT to Dual-Doppler Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the field campaign of the Terrain-induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) in the spring of 2006, Doppler lidar measurements were taken in the complex terrain of the Californian Owens Valley for six weeks. While fast three-dimensional (3D) wind ...

Susanne Drechsel; Georg J. Mayr; Michel Chong; Martin Weissmann; Andreas Drnbrack; Ronald Calhoun

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Real-Time Analysis of Local Wind Patterns for Application to Nuclear-Emergency Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PGandE) has sponsored development of a computer-based system for real-time analysis of local wind measurements in a complex-terrain setting. Mass-consistent modeling of tower- and Doppler-sounder data produces ...

Richard H. Thuillier

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Application of wind power systems to the Service Area of the Minnesota Power and Light Company. Final report, July 1975--August 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell, in a joint effort with Minnesota Power and Light Company (MP and L), Boeing Vertol Company, and Dr. C.G. Justus, Georgia Institute of Technology, has conducted a regional application study of wind energy systems. Minnesota Power and Light Company, an investor-owned company with 853-MW owned capacity, has served as the case study subject utility. An initial system definition was developed based on available wind information and near-term wind turbine generator (WTG) technology. The system was tailored to fit MP and L's forecasted generation needs and the company's existing transmission and distribution system. Honeywell developed a WECS simulation to convert wind data to wind energy available for input to the utility's grid. The simulation was used to evaluate the performance of preliminary design wind turbine generators developed for ERDA/NASA by the General Electric Company and Kaman Aerospace Corporation, and to evaluate the performance of a wind turbine optimized for the Northern Minnesota wind regime and developed by the Boeing Vertol Company under subcontract to Honeywell.

Lindquist, O.H.; Malver, F.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Comparison of Winds from the STRATAN Data Assimilation System to Balanced Wind Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Winds derived from a stratospheric and tropospheric data assimilation system (STRATAN) are compared with balance winds derived from National Meteorological Center/Climate Analysis Center (NMC/CAC) heights. At middle latitudes in the lower ...

Lawrence Coy; Richard B. Rood; Paul A. Newman

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Wind energy information guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapters 1--8 provide background and annotated references on wind energy research, development, and commercialization. Chapter 9 lists additional sources of printed information and relevant organizations. Four indices provide alphabetical access to authors, organizations, computer models and design tools, and subjects. A list of abbreviations and acronyms is also included. Chapter topics include: introduction; economics of using wind energy; wind energy resources; wind turbine design, development, and testing; applications; environmental issues of wind power; institutional issues; and wind energy systems development.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

NREL: Wind Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

spectrum of engineering disciplines that are applicable to both land-based and offshore wind energy, including: atmospheric fluid mechanics and aerodynamics; dynamics, structures,...

353

NREL: Wind Research - International Research Collaboratives  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Collaboratives Research Collaboratives Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) leverage U.S. research dollars by participating in multi-lateral research collaborations with many international organizations. NWTC collaborates with several of the world's most respected institutions, including the national research institutions of other countries. NREL also works through international agencies dedicated to the common interests of energy research and applications such as the International Energy Agency (IEA), the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), Underwriters Laboratory, and the International Measuring Network of Wind Energy Institutes (MEASNET). International Energy Agency NREL supports international research efforts through its participation in

354

NREL: Wind Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Below are some select news stories from the National Wind Technology Below are some select news stories from the National Wind Technology Center. Subscribe to the RSS feed RSS . Learn about RSS. January 3, 2014 New Modularization Framework Transforms FAST Wind Turbine Modeling Tool The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) recently released an expanded version of its FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool under a new modularization framework. January 2, 2014 The Denver Post Highlights the NWTC's New 5-MW Dynamometer On January 2, a reporter from The Denver Post toured the new 5-megawatt dynamometer test facility at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Archives 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 Printable Version Wind Research Home Capabilities Projects Facilities

355

DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS FOR THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY S CLEAN ENERGY APPLICATION CENTERS: FISCAL YEAR 2010  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsors a set of Clean Energy Application Centers that promote the development and deployment of clean energy technologies. There are eight regional centers that provide assistance for specific areas of the country plus a separate center operated by the International District Energy Association that provides technical assistance on district energy issues and applications to the regional centers. The original focus of the centers was on combined heat and power (CHP) alone but, beginning in fiscal year 2010, their scope expanded to include district energy systems and waste heat recovery. At that time, the official name of the centers changed from CHP Regional Application Centers (RACs) to Clean Energy Application Centers, and their number was expanded to include the previously-mentioned center focusing on district energy. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has performed two previous studies of RAC activities. The first one examined what the RACs had done each year from the initiation of the program through fiscal year (FY) 2008 and the second one examined RAC activities for the 2009 fiscal year. The most recent study, described in this report, examines what was accomplished in fiscal year 2010, the first year since the RACs expanded their focus and changed their name to Clean Energy Application Centers.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Analysis: Economic Impacts of Wind Applications in Rural Communities; June 18, 2004 -- January 31, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to compile completed studies on the economic impact of wind farms in rural communities and then to compare these studies. By summarizing the studies in an Excel spreadsheet, the raw data from a study is easily compared with the data from other studies. In this way, graphs can be made and conclusions drawn. Additionally, the creation of a database in which economic impact studies are summarized allows a greater understanding of the type of information gathered in an economic impact study, the type of information that is most helpful in using these studies to promote wind energy development in rural communities, and the limitations on collecting data for these studies.

Pedden, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Application of piezoelectric active-sensors for SHM of wind turbine blades  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this study is to characterize the dynamic response of a CX-100 wind blade and the design parameters of SHM techniques as they apply to wind turbine blades, and to investigate the performance of high-frequency active-sensing SHM techniques, including lamb wave and frequency response functions, as a way to monitor the health of a wind turbine blade. The results of the dynamic characterization will be used to validate a numerical model and understand the effect of structural damage on the performance of the blades. The focus of SHM study is to assess and compare the performance of each method in identifying incipient damage, with a special consideration given to field deployability. For experiments, a 9-m CX-100 blade was used. Overall, the methods yielded sufficient damage detection to warrant further investigation into field deployment. This paper also summarizes the SHM results of a full-scale fatigue test of 9-m CX-100 blade using piezoelectric active-sensors.

Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, JaeKyung [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

359

NREL: Wind Research - Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and Results Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and Results A video of Gaia-Wind's 11-kW wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Gaia-Wind's 11-kilowatt (kW) small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Gaia-Wind's turbine is a three-phase induction generator that operates at 480 volts. The turbine's downwind rotor has a 13-meter diameter, and its tower is 18 meters tall. The two-bladed, oversized rotor is designed for low to moderate wind speeds. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is below with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 6/11/2008: 210; 6/13/2008: 528; 6/16/2008: 716; 6/18/2008: 731; 6/19/2008:

360

Students Learn about Wind Power First-Hand through Wind for Schools Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Learn about Wind Power First-Hand through Wind for Schools Learn about Wind Power First-Hand through Wind for Schools Program Students Learn about Wind Power First-Hand through Wind for Schools Program February 18, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis JMU student Greg Miller shows Northumberland students how the blades of a wind turbine work | courtesy of Virginia Center for Wind Energy JMU student Greg Miller shows Northumberland students how the blades of a wind turbine work | courtesy of Virginia Center for Wind Energy April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What will the project do? Wind for Schools raises awareness in rural America about the benefits of wind energy while simultaneously developing a wind energy knowledge base in communities across the nation. For years, Jenny Christman tried to find a way to get a wind turbine to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Turbine Section of the Combu stion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Compressor Section of the C ombustion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

General Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Combustor Section of the Combus tion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant. As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

364

Wind Power Today and Tomorrow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind Power Today and Tomorrow is an annual publication that provides an overview of the wind research conducted under the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program. The purpose of Wind Power Today and Tomorrow is to show how DOE supports wind turbine research and deployment in hopes of furthering the advancement of wind technologies that produce clean, low-cost, reliable energy. Content objectives include: educate readers about the advantages and potential for widespread deployment of wind energy; explain the program's objectives and goals; describe the program's accomplishments in research and application; examine the barriers to widespread deployment; describe the benefits of continued research and development; facilitate technology transfer; and attract cooperative wind energy projects with industry. This 2003 edition of the program overview also includes discussions about wind industry growth in 2003, how DOE is taking advantage of low wind speed region s through advancing technology, and distributed applications for small wind turbines.

Not Available

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

ENERGY CENTER OF WISCONSIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of electrical energy (hydro, solar and wind), using thermal energy more realistically assesses the true nature for wind-energy systems that experience rapid changes in energy output. While based on gasENERGY CENTER OF WISCONSIN Report Summary 210-1 Life-Cycle Energy Costs and Greenhouse Gas

366

Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

Yordy, John S., E-mail: john.yordy@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Almond, Peter R. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Delclos, Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

NREL: Wind Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications The NREL wind research program develops publications about its R&D activities in wind energy technologies. Below you'll find links to recently published publications, links to the NREL Avian Literature and Publications Databases, and information about the Technical Library at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The NWTC's quarterly newsletter, @NWTC, contains articles on current wind energy research projects and highlights the latest reports, papers, articles, and events published or sponsored by NREL. Subscribe to @NWTC. Selected Publications Featured Publication Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers Here are some selected NWTC publications: 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

368

Value Capture in the Global Wind Energy Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA: Personal Computing Industry Center, working paper.flows in the wind energy industry. Peterson Institute, WPin the Global Wind Energy Industry Jason Dedrick, Syracuse

Dedrick, Jason; Kraemer, Kenneth L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy and Resources Revolutionizing Manufacturing National Wind Technology Center - Colorado America's Wind Testing Facilities Beyond Solyndra: How the Energy Department's...

370

Wind Energy Resources for Teachers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resources for Teachers Resources for Teachers Jump to: navigation, search Photo from the South Dakota Wind Applications Center, NREL 18283 The following links lead to curricula and classroom resources for teachers who want to incorporate wind energy into their lesson plans. 4-H Group Wind Curriculum Developed The Power of the Wind, which consists of one Youth Guide and one Facilitator's Guide. The activities involve young people in the engineering design process as they learn about the wind and its uses. The site also offers videos. Boise State University Compiled a list of resources for educators, including lesson plans created using the Idaho State and Common Core Standards. California Energy Commission Developed a set of educational materials called "Energy Quest" that

371

Nesting large-eddy simulations within mesoscale simulations for wind energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With increasing demand for more accurate atmospheric simulations for wind turbine micrositing, for operational wind power forecasting, and for more reliable turbine design, simulations of atmospheric flow with resolution of tens of meters or higher are required. These time-dependent large-eddy simulations (LES), which resolve individual atmospheric eddies on length scales smaller than turbine blades and account for complex terrain, are possible with a range of commercial and open-source software, including the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. In addition to 'local' sources of turbulence within an LES domain, changing weather conditions outside the domain can also affect flow, suggesting that a mesoscale model provide boundary conditions to the large-eddy simulations. Nesting a large-eddy simulation within a mesoscale model requires nuanced representations of turbulence. Our group has improved the Weather and Research Forecasting model's (WRF) LES capability by implementing the Nonlinear Backscatter and Anisotropy (NBA) subfilter stress model following Kosovic (1997) and an explicit filtering and reconstruction technique to compute the Resolvable Subfilter-Scale (RSFS) stresses (following Chow et al, 2005). We have also implemented an immersed boundary method (IBM) in WRF to accommodate complex terrain. These new models improve WRF's LES capabilities over complex terrain and in stable atmospheric conditions. We demonstrate approaches to nesting LES within a mesoscale simulation for farms of wind turbines in hilly regions. Results are sensitive to the nesting method, indicating that care must be taken to provide appropriate boundary conditions, and to allow adequate spin-up of turbulence in the LES domain.

Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D; Chow, F K; Kosovic, B; Lundquist, K A

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

Application of Surface-Adjusted GOES Low-Level Cloud-Drift Winds in the Environment of Atlantic Tropical Cyclones. Part II: Integration into Surface Wind Analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at the University of WisconsinMadison recently (1997 season) began providing real-time Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) low-level cloud-drift winds in the ...

Jason P. Dunion; Samuel H. Houston; Christopher S. Velden; Mark D. Powell

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Development of an 8 kW wind turbine generator for residential type applications. Phase I: design and analysis. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This Phase I summary report contains a description of the 8 kW wind energy conversion system developed by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) for the Department of Energy. The wind turbine employs the UTRC Bearingless Rotor Concept in conjunction with a passive pendulum control system which controls blade pitch for start-up, efficient power generation, and high-speed survivability. The report contains a summary of the experimental and analytical programs in support of design efforts. These supporting programs include materials tests, a wind tunnel program, and aeroelastic analyses to evaluate system stability. An estimate is also made of the projected manufacturing cost of the system if produced in quantity.

Cheney, M.C.

1979-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Real-Time Simulator for Doubly Fed Induction Generator based Wind Turbine Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- This paper describes a real-time simulator of wind turbine generator system suitable for controller design and tests. The simulated generator is a grid-connected doubly fed induction machine with back-to-back PWM voltage source vector control of the rotor. The simulator is based on RT-LAB real-time simulation platform that allows for easy model-to-real-time-target design from Simulink models. The paper puts special emphasis on the fixed-step simulation problematic of kHz-range PWM inverter drives and the techniques used in the real-time simulator to accurately simulate those drives.

Christian Dufour; Jean Blanger

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, High-Pressure Coolant Injection (HPCI) Application: Replaces 1007459, TR-105874, and TR-016909-R1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terry turbines represent a critical component in many nuclear power plants. The troublefree and reliable operation of these turbines is important for both plant safety and for maximizing the availability of safety-related systems.Since their publication, three Nuclear Maintenance and Applications Center (NMAC) reports, Terry Turbine Controls Maintenance Guide, Revision 1 (TR-016909-R1), Terry Turbine Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide (TR-105874), and Terry ...

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Terry Turbine Maintenance Guide, Auxiliary Feedwater (AFW) Application: Replaces 1007461, T R-105874, and TR-016909-R1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terry turbines represent a critical component in many nuclear power plants. The troublefree and reliable operation of these turbines is important for both plant safety and for maximizing the availability of safety-related systems.Since their publication, three Nuclear Maintenance and Applications Center (NMAC) reports, Terry Turbine Controls Maintenance Guide, Revision 1 (TR-016909-R1), Terry Turbine Maintenance and Troubleshooting Guide (TR-105874), and Terry ...

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

377

NREL Wind Organization Chart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

/16/13 /16/13 National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Wind Technology Research & Development Fort Felker, Group Manager (Acting) Wind Innovation & Reliability Jason Cotrell, Supervisor - Palmer Carlin - Lee Fingersh - Paul Fleming - Jim Johnson - Bonnie Jonkman - Jon Keller - Andrew Scholbrock - Shawn Sheng - Alan Wright Joint Appointees: - Katie Johnson (CSM) Students - Brendan Geels Post Docs - Yi Guo - Jason Laks Contractors: - Brian McNiff - Lucy Pao (CU) Aero & Systems Dynamics Pat Moriarty, Supervisor - Marshall Buhl - Matt Churchfield - Andrew Clifton - Rick Damiani - Caroline Draxl - Dennis Elliott - Steve Haymes - Jason Jonkman - Khanh Nguyen - Andrew Platt - Scott Schreck - George Scott - Diwanshu Shekhar

378

Testing requirements for variable-speed generating technology for wind turbine applications. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for evaluating the impacts of integrating variable-speed, constant-frequency (VSCF) wind turbines into electric utility systems have been proposed based upon prior test experiences with the NASA VSCF system and the expected performance of the Westinghouse and OMNION VSCF systems. The NASA and Westinghouse VSCF generating systems use a wound rotor induction generator and a cycloconverter, while the OMNION system uses a wound rotor induction generator and a dc-current link converter. The design of VSCF/utility system interface requirements and test plans is based on utility system electrical issues such as utility system control and operation, protection, voltage/reactive power management, power quality, and reliability. A framework for testing VSCF concepts is proposed which includes a three stage process: modeling of the system to analyze design alternatives and simulate disturbances that could be harmful to the actual system; laboratory testing which involves the use of the system under controlled conditions; and field testing to collect data under actual conditions to validate models and analyze the wind turbine behavior.

Herrera, J.I.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Vertical axis wind turbines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

Krivcov, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Krivospitski, Vladimir (Miass, RU); Maksimov, Vasili (Miass, RU); Halstead, Richard (Rohnert Park, CA); Grahov, Jurij (Miass, RU)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

380

The Application of Power Quality Monitoring Data for Reliability Centered Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses some requirements of implementing a reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) based power quality system using an open architecture. It also identifies a knowledge base to develop for processing power quality data for maintenance purposes and provides case studies that show how power quality monitoring data can indicate system anomalies. Finally, the report discusses applying artificial intelligence (AI) in such a system.

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

382

General reliability and safety methodology and its application to wind energy conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In conventional system reliability calculations, each component may be in the Operable state or the Under Repair state. These calculations derive system unavailability, or the probability of the system's being down for repairs. By introducing a third component state between Operable and Under Repair - namely, Defective, But Defect Undetected - the methods developed in this report enable system safety projections to be made in addition to availability projections. Also provided is a mechanism for computing the effect of inspection schedules on both safety and availability. A Reliability and Safety Program (RASP) is detailed which performs these computations and also calculates costs for system inspections and repairs. RASP is applied to a simplified wind energy conversion system example.

Edesess, M.; McConnell, R. D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The application of non-destructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NonDestructive Testing (NDT), also called NonDestructive Evaluation (NDE), is commonly used to monitor structures before, during, and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electron shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Furthermore, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

Sutherland, H.; Beattie, A.; Hansche, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Musial, W.; Allread, J.; Johnson, J. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Summers, M. [United Technologies, West Palm Beach, FL (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Cascade and Damping of Alfvn-Cyclotron Fluctuations: Application to Solar Wind Turbulence Spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the diffusion approximation, we study the cascade and damping of Alfv\\'{e}n-cyclotron fluctuations in solar plasmas numerically. Motivated by wave-wave couplings and nonlinear effects, we test several forms of the diffusion tensor. For a general locally anisotropic and inhomogeneous diffusion tensor in the wave vector space, the turbulence spectrum in the inertial range can be fitted with power-laws with the power-law index varying with the wave propagation direction. For several locally isotropic but inhomogeneous diffusion coefficients, the steady-state turbulence spectra are nearly isotropic in the absence of damping and can be fitted by a single power-law function. However, the energy flux is strongly polarized due to the inhomogeneity that leads to an anisotropic cascade. Including the anisotropic thermal damping, the turbulence spectrum cuts off at the wave numbers, where the damping rates become comparable to the cascade rates. The combined anisotropic effects of cascade and damping make this cutoff wave number dependent on the wave propagation direction, and the propagation direction integrated turbulence spectrum resembles a broken power-law, which cuts off at the maximum of the cutoff wave numbers or the $^4$He cyclotron frequency. Taking into account the Doppler effects, the model can naturally reproduce the broken power-law wave spectra observed in the solar wind and predicts that a higher break frequency is aways accompanied with a greater spectral index change that may be caused by the increase of the Alfv\\'{e}n Mach number, the reciprocal of the plasma beta, and/or the angle between the solar wind velocity and the mean magnetic field. These predictions can be tested by future observations.

Yan Wei Jiang; Siming Liu; Vah Petrosian; Christopher L. Fryer

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

385

Hurricane Andrew's Landfall in South Florida. Part II: Surface Wind Fields and Potential Real-Time Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All available wind data associated with Hurricane Andrew's passage were analysed for periods corresponding to landfall south of Miami and emergence from southwest Florida. At landfall in southeast Florida, maximum sustained 1-min surface wind ...

Mark D. Powell; Samuel H. Houston

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Standardized Software for Wind Load Forecast Error Analyses and Predictions Based on Wavelet-ARIMA Models - Applications at Multiple Geographically Distributed Wind Farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the multi-scale variability and uncertainty of wind generation and forecast errors, it is a natural choice to use time-frequency representation (TFR) as a view of the corresponding time series represented over both time and frequency. Here we use wavelet transform (WT) to expand the signal in terms of wavelet functions which are localized in both time and frequency. Each WT component is more stationary and has consistent auto-correlation pattern. We combined wavelet analyses with time series forecast approaches such as ARIMA, and tested the approach at three different wind farms located far away from each other. The prediction capability is satisfactory -- the day-ahead prediction of errors match the original error values very well, including the patterns. The observations are well located within the predictive intervals. Integrating our wavelet-ARIMA (stochastic) model with the weather forecast model (deterministic) will improve our ability significantly to predict wind power generation and reduce predictive uncertainty.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Makarov, Yuri V.; Samaan, Nader A.; Etingov, Pavel V.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

NREL: Wind Research - WindPACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WindPACT WindPACT The Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technology (WindPACT) studies were conducted to assist industry by testing innovative components, such as advanced blades and drivetrains, to lower the cost of energy. Specific goals included: Foster technological advancements to reduce the cost of wind energy Determine probable size ranges of advanced utility-scale turbines over the next decade for U.S. application Evaluate advanced concepts that are necessary to achieve objectives of cost and size for future turbines Identify and solve technological hurdles that may block industry from taking advantage of promising technology Design, fabricate, and test selected advanced components to prove their viability Support wind industry through transfer of technology from

388

Application of genetic algorithm to improve voltage regulation of self-excited induction generator in a wind energy conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Self-excited induction generators have been found to be most suitable for wind energy conversion in remote locations. In this paper, an attempt has been made to improve the voltage regulation of self-excited induction generator (SEIG) using series compensation. ... Keywords: genetic algorithms, intelligent systems, modelling, renewable energy, self-excited induction generators, simulation, voltage regulation, wind energy conversion systems, wind power

Dheeraj Joshi; K. S. Sandhu; M. K. Soni

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

UWIG Distributed Wind Impacts Analysis Tool Progress Report: Utility Wind Interest Group Distributed Wind Impacts Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed wind generation systems consist of small clusters of wind turbines located near small load centers and connected directly to the distribution system. Depending on the electrical characteristics of the distribution line, the type of wind turbine, and the relative locations of the interconnection to the distribution system, the substation, and customer connections, distributed wind generation can significantly affect the stability, power quality, and operations of the distribution line. As a re...

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

NREL: Wind Research - NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs NREL's Wind Technology Patents Boost Efficiency and Lower Costs March 22, 2013 Wind energy research conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) during the last decade has earned the lab two patents, one for adaptive pitch control and one for a resonance blade test system that will ultimately help its industry partners increase the efficiency of wind technologies and reduce the cost of wind energy. The most recent patent for adaptive pitch control for variable-speed wind turbines was granted in May 2012. Variable-speed wind turbines use rotor blade pitch control to regulate rotor speed at the high wind speed limit. Although manufacturers and operators have been interested in developing a nominal pitch to improve

392

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Armenia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This wind energy resource atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in the country of Armenia. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications. The maps portray the wind resource with high-resolution (1-km2) grids of wind power density at 50-m above ground. The wind maps were created at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) using a computerized wind mapping system that uses Geographic Information System (GIS) software.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of Oaxaca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oaxaca Wind Resource Atlas, produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) wind resource group, is the result of an extensive mapping study for the Mexican State of Oaxaca. This atlas identifies the wind characteristics and distribution of the wind resource in Oaxaca. The detailed wind resource maps and other information contained in the atlas facilitate the identification of prospective areas for use of wind energy technologies, both for utility-scale power generation and off-grid wind energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; Scott, G.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; George, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Role of the Pacific ENSO Applications Climate Center in Reducing Vulnerability to Climate Hazards: Experience from the U.S.-Affiliated Pacific Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific ENSO Applications Center (PEAC) was established in August 1994 as a multi-institutional partnership to conduct research and produce information products on climate variability and impacts related to the El NioSouthern Oscillation climate ...

Thomas A. Schroeder; Md Rashed Chowdhury; Mark A. Lander; Charles Chip Guard; Charlene Felkley; Duncan Gifford

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Wind Energy Resource Atlas of the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a wind resource analysis and mapping study for the Philippine archipelago. The study's objective was to identify potential wind resource areas and quantify the value of those resources within those areas. The wind resource maps and other wind resource characteristic information will be used to identify prospective areas for wind-energy applications.

Elliott, D.; Schwartz, M.; George, R.; Haymes, S.; Heimiller, D.; Scott, G.; McCarthy, E.

2001-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

396

Second Wind Sonic Wind Profiler: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-08-00297  

SciTech Connect

Second Wind will deploy their Triton Sonic Wind Profiler at the National Wind Technology Center for the purposes of verification with measurements made by the NWTC 80 meter Meteorological tower.

Johnson, J. A.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The application of nondestructive techniques to the testing of a wind turbine blade  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NonDestructive Testing (NDT) is commonly used to monitor structures before, during and after testing. This paper reports on the use of two NDT techniques to monitor the behavior of a typical wind turbine blade during a quasi-static test-to-failure. The test used a three-point spanwise load distribution to load a 7.9-m blade to failure. The two NDT techniques used were acoustic emission and coherent optical. The former monitors the acoustic energy produced by the blade as it is loaded. The latter uses electronic shearography to measure the differences in surface displacements between two load states with an accuracy of a few microns. Typical results are presented to demonstrate the ability of these two techniques to locate and monitor both high damage regions and flaws in the blade structure. Further, this experiment highlights the limitations in the techniques that must be addressed before one or both can be transferred, with a high probability of success, to the inspection and monitoring of turbine blades during the manufacturing process and under normal operating conditions.

Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (US); Musial, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Spectroscopic properties of photosynthetic reaction centers. 2. Application of the theory to Rhodopseudomonas viridis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the preceding paper (Warshel and Parson, companion paper), a nonphenomenological molecular theory is developed to calculate the spectroscopic properties of the reaction centers of photosynthetic bacteria. They here apply the theory to the reaction center of Rhodopseudomonas viridis, whose structure is known from recent X-ray crystallographic studies. Optical absorption, linear dichroism, and circular dichroism spectra are calculated and are compared with the spectra observed experimentally. Intermolecular charge-transfer (CT) transitions between the two bacteriochlorophylls (BChls) of the photochemically reactive special pair (BChl/sub LP/ and BChl/sub MP/) appear to make major contributions to the spectroscopic properties. Estimates of the energies of the CT transitions are obtained. Good agreement with the observed spectra is obtained by placing the lowest energy CT transition from BChl/sub MP/ to BChl/sub LP/ near 14,000 cm/sup -1/, well above the reaction center's lowest excited state (10,400 cm/sup -1/), and placing the corresponding CT transition from BChl/sub LP/ to BChl/sub MP at a substantially higher energy. Charge-transfer transitions involving the other two BChls (BChl/sub LA/ and BChl/sub MA/) are found not to contribute significantly to the spectra. To model the absorption changes that occur when the special pair of BChls is photooxidized, or when one of the two bacteriopheophytins is reduced, calculations are performed in which one or more of the molecules are omitted from the structure. The absorption changes that occur in the region from 790 to 860 nm reflect a strong mixing of the transitions of all six pigments.

Parson, W.W.; Warshel, A.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Multidimensional renewal theory in the non-centered case. Application to strongly ergodic Markov chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Let $(S_n)_n$ be a $R^d$-valued random walk ($d\\geq2$). Using Babillot's method [2], we give general conditions on the characteristic function of $S_n$ under which $(S_n)_n$ satisfies the same renewal theorem as the classical one obtained for random walks with i.i.d. non-centered increments. This statement is applied to additive functionals of strongly ergodic Markov chains under the non-lattice condition and (almost) optimal moment conditions.

Guibourg, Denis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme Winds and Wind Effects on Structures. The Engineering ... section. I. Extreme Winds: ... II. Wind Effects on Buildings. Database ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

New England Wind Forum: Building Wind Energy in New England  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share Building Wind Energy in New England Many factors influence the ability to develop wind power in the New England region. A viable project requires the right site and the right technology for the application. It must provide suitable revenue or economic value to justify investment in this capital-intensive but zero-fuel technology. Policy initiatives are in place throughout the region to support the expansion of wind power's role in the regional supply mix. However, issues affecting public acceptance of wind projects in host communities must be addressed. Information on topics affecting wind power development in New England can be found by using the navigation to the left.

402

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Application Guide for Motor-Operated Valves in Nuclear Power Plants - Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor-operated gate and globe valves are widely used in both safety-related and non-safety-related systems in nuclear power plants. Their proper operation is essential for reliable plant performance and can help eliminate costly downtime. This second revision of the Application Guide for Motor-Operated Valves provides the latest in methods for conducting engineering evaluations in order to confirm that motor-operated gate, globe, and butterfly valves will perform their required function and offers sugges...

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Smart Grid, Center for Commercialization of Electric Technology, Technology Solutions for Wind Integration in ERCOT, Houston, Texas EA-1750: Smart Grid, Center for...

404

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC): A Resource for Nuclear Science Applications  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) has been in existence since 1963. RSICC collects, organizes, evaluates and disseminates technical information (software and nuclear data) involving the transport of neutral and charged particle radiation, and shielding and protection from the radiation associated with: nuclear weapons and materials, fission and fusion reactors, outer space, accelerators, medical facilities, and nuclear waste management. RSICC serves over 12,000 scientists and engineers from about 100 countries. An important activity of RSICC is its participation in international efforts on computational and experimental benchmarks. An example is the Shielding Integral Benchmarks Archival Database (SINBAD), which includes shielding benchmarks for fission, fusion and accelerators. RSICC is funded by the United States Department of Energy, Department of Homeland Security and Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Kirk, Bernadette Lugue [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator is derived in a coordinate system that is well suited for the implementation in a numerical code. This differential operator is transformed such that it can commute with the orbit-averaging operation. Thus, in the low-collisionality approximation, a three-dimensional Fokker-Planck evolution equation for the orbit-averaged distribution function in a space of invariants is obtained. This transformation is applied to a collision operator with nonuniform isotropic field particles. Explicit neoclassical collisional transport diffusion and convection coefficients are derived, and analytical expressions are obtained in the thin orbit approximation. To illustrate this formalism and validate our results, the bootstrap current is analytically calculated in the Lorentz limit.

Decker, J.; Peysson, Y.; Duthoit, F.-X. [IRFM, CEA, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brizard, A. J. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Saint Michael's College, Colchester, Vermont 05439 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Wind energy systems application to regional utilities. [SERIES code; WINDS code; PHASES code; AVERAGE code; NETLOAD code; GENSYS code; PROCOST code; CAP6 code; EVEN code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for analyzing the economic impact of WECS on a utility is described in Volume I of this report. The methodology requires extrapolating both historical utility load data and historical wind power into a year of analysis; calculating the total amount of funds made available in that year, as a result of the inclusion of wind power in the utility mix; and then estimating the present value of the total funds made available to the utility over the life of the WECS. To apply the methodology to a specific case, it was necessary to develop various computer programs. The following sections in this report list the programs developed for this study, briefly summarize their contents, and explain how they are used. Wherever possible, a typical input/output file is shown.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A Methodology for Calculating Emissions Reductions from Renewable Energy Programs and Its Application to the Wind Farms in the Texas ERCOT Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Texas Legislature required adding 5,880 MW of generating capacity from renewable energy technologies by 2015, and 500 MW from non-wind renewables. This legislation also required the Public Utility Commission (PUC) to establish a target of 10,000 MW of installed renewable capacity by 2025, and required Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to develop a methodology for computing emissions reductions from renewable energy initiatives and the associated credits. In this legislation the Energy Systems Laboratory was to assist the TCEQ to quantify emissions reductions credits from energy efficiency and renewable energy programs. To satisfy these requirements the ESL has been developing and refining a method to annually calculate creditable emissions reductions from wind and other renewable energy resources for the TCEQ. This paper provides a detailed description of the methodology developed to calculate the emissions reductions from electricity provided by a wind farm. Details are presented for the wind farm Sweetwater I as well as results from the application of this procedure to all the wind energy providers in the Texas ERCOT region.

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Liu, Z.; Subbarao, K.; Baltazar-Cervantes, J. C.; Yazdani, B.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wind Turbine Generator System Acoustic Noise Test Report for the Gaia Wind 11-kW Wind Turbine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the acoustic noise test conducted on the Gaia-Wind 11-kW wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center. The test turbine is a two- bladed, downwind wind turbine with a rated power of 11 kW. The test turbine was tested in accordance with the International Electrotechnical Commission standard, IEC 61400-11 Ed 2.1 2006-11 Wind Turbine Generator Systems -- Part 11 Acoustic Noise Measurement Techniques.

Huskey, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Application of advanced laser diagnostics to hypersonic wind tunnels and combustion systems.  

SciTech Connect

This LDRD was a Sandia Fellowship that supported Andrea Hsu's PhD research at Texas A&M University and her work as a visitor at Sandia's Combustion Research Facility. The research project at Texas A&M University is concerned with the experimental characterization of hypersonic (Mach>5) flowfields using experimental diagnostics. This effort is part of a Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) and is a collaboration between the Chemistry and Aerospace Engineering departments. Hypersonic flight conditions often lead to a non-thermochemical equilibrium (NTE) state of air, where the timescale of reaching a single (equilibrium) Boltzmann temperature is much longer than the timescale of the flow. Certain molecular modes, such as vibrational modes, may be much more excited than the translational or rotational modes of the molecule, leading to thermal-nonequilibrium. A nontrivial amount of energy is therefore contained within the vibrational mode, and this energy cascades into the flow as thermal energy, affecting flow properties through vibrational-vibrational (V-V) and vibrational-translational (V-T) energy exchanges between the flow species. The research is a fundamental experimental study of these NTE systems and involves the application of advanced laser and optical diagnostics towards hypersonic flowfields. The research is broken down into two main categories: the application and adaptation of existing laser and optical techniques towards characterization of NTE, and the development of new molecular tagging velocimetry techniques which have been demonstrated in an underexpanded jet flowfield, but may be extended towards a variety of flowfields. In addition, Andrea's work at Sandia National Labs involved the application of advanced laser diagnostics to flames and turbulent non-reacting jets. These studies included quench-free planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of nitric oxide (NO) and mixture fraction measurements via Rayleigh scattering.

North, Simon W. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Hsu, Andrea G. (Texas A& M University, College Station, TX); Frank, Jonathan H.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Wind Energy: Issues to Consider Brian J. Frosch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy: Issues to Consider Brian J. Frosch Joe L. Outlaw AFPCAgricultural and Food Policy Center The Texas A&M University System #12;Wind Energy: Issues to Consider Brian J. Frosch Joe L. Outlaw, such as wind. According to the World Wind Energy Association (WWEA), 14,900 megawatts (MW) of wind generation

411

A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a composite wind turbine rotor blade," Structural Healthdetection in composite wind turbine blades," Journal offor structural monitoring of wind turbine rotor blades," in

Taylor, Stuart Glynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A multi-scale approach to statistical and model-based structural health monitoring with application to embedded sensing for wind energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a composite wind turbine rotor blade," Structural Healthmonitoring of wind turbine rotor blades," in progress 2013.in a composite wind turbine rotor blade." The dissertation

Taylor, Stuart Glynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Wind Program Commercial Wind Program Commonwealth Wind Commercial Wind Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State Government Tribal Government Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate Public Entities: $100,000 Non-Public Entities: $67,000 Program Info Funding Source Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust Start Date 05/2011 Expiration Date 08/01/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type State Grant Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on applicant type (public vs. non-public) and grant type (site assessment, feasibility study, onsite wind monitoring, acoustic studies, and business planning)

414

On Wind-Driven Mixed Layers with Strong Horizontal GradientsA Theory with Application to Coastal Upwelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of a two-dimensional wind-driven diabatic ocean mixed layer with strong horizontal gradients is formulated analytically. An equation that allows the relaxation of the strict Ekman balanceCoriolis force against wind stressis derived ...

R. A. De Szoeke; J. G. Richman

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Loewdin alpha function and its application to the multi-center molecular integral problem over Slater-type orbitals  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we trace the evolution of the Lowdin alpha-function method in its application to multi-center molecular integrals over Slater-type orbitals (STOs). As is well-known, any STO displaced from the origin can be expanded in an infinite series of spherical harmonics; the functional coefficients have been designated as Lowdin alpha functions. These alpha functions can be represented as exponentials multiplied by polynomials in the displacement distance and the radial distance. The polynomials are used to construct a C matrix with integer elements. To avoid cancellation errors in some cases, the exponentials are expanded to obtain E matrices for interior regions and F matrices for exterior regions. We believe that this careful approach to molecular integrals will succeed in producing accurate and rapid evaluation of the integrals needed in STO basis-set methods for quantum chemistry.

Jones, H.W.; Weatherford, C.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Wind-induced contaminant transport in near-surface soils with application to radon entry into buildings  

SciTech Connect

Indoor air exposures to gaseous contaminants originating in soil can cause large human health risks. To predict and control these exposures, the mechanisms that affect vapor transport in near-surface soils need to be understood. In particular, radon exposure is a concern since average indoor radon concentrations lead to much higher risks than are generally accepted for exposure to other environmental contaminants. This dissertation examines an important component of the indoor radon problem: the impacts of wind on soil-gas and radon transport and entry into buildings. The research includes experimental and modeling studies of wind`s interactions with a building`s superstructure and the resulting soil-gas and radon flows in the surrounding soil. In addition to exploring the effects of steady winds, a novel modeling technique is developed to examine the impacts of fluctuating winds on soil-gas and radon transport.

Riley, W.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Application of a Dynamic Fuzzy Search Algorithm to Determine Optimal Wind Plant Sizes and Locations in Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper illustrates a method for choosing the optimal mix of wind capacity at several geographically dispersed locations. The method is based on a dynamic fuzzy search algorithm that can be applied to different optimization targets. We illustrate the method using two objective functions for the optimization: maximum economic benefit and maximum reliability. We also illustrate the sensitivity of the fuzzy economic benefit solutions to small perturbations of the capacity selections at each wind site. We find that small changes in site capacity and/or location have small effects on the economic benefit provided by wind power plants. We use electric load and generator data from Iowa, along with high-quality wind-speed data collected by the Iowa Wind Energy Institute.

Milligan, M. R., National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Factor, T., Iowa Wind Energy Institute

2001-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

418

Advanced Coal Wind Hybrid: Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Growing concern over climate change is prompting new thinking about the technologies used to generate electricity. In the future, it is possible that new government policies on greenhouse gas emissions may favor electric generation technology options that release zero or low levels of carbon emissions. The Western U.S. has abundant wind and coal resources. In a world with carbon constraints, the future of coal for new electrical generation is likely to depend on the development and successful application of new clean coal technologies with near zero carbon emissions. This scoping study explores the economic and technical feasibility of combining wind farms with advanced coal generation facilities and operating them as a single generation complex in the Western US. The key questions examined are whether an advanced coal-wind hybrid (ACWH) facility provides sufficient advantages through improvements to the utilization of transmission lines and the capability to firm up variable wind generation for delivery to load centers to compete effectively with other supply-side alternatives in terms of project economics and emissions footprint. The study was conducted by an Analysis Team that consists of staff from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Western Interstate Energy Board (WIEB). We conducted a screening level analysis of the economic competitiveness and technical feasibility of ACWH generation options located in Wyoming that would supply electricity to load centers in California, Arizona or Nevada. Figure ES-1 is a simple stylized representation of the configuration of the ACWH options. The ACWH consists of a 3,000 MW coal gasification combined cycle power plant equipped with carbon capture and sequestration (G+CC+CCS plant), a fuel production or syngas storage facility, and a 1,500 MW wind plant. The ACWH project is connected to load centers by a 3,000 MW transmission line. In the G+CC+CCS plant, coal is gasified into syngas and CO{sub 2} (which is captured). The syngas is burned in the combined cycle plant to produce electricity. The ACWH facility is operated in such a way that the transmission line is always utilized at its full capacity by backing down the combined cycle (CC) power generation units to accommodate wind generation. Operating the ACWH facility in this manner results in a constant power delivery of 3,000 MW to the load centers, in effect firming-up the wind generation at the project site.

Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles; Larson, Doug; Carr, Tom; Rath, Larry; Balash, Peter; Yih-Huei, Wan

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

419

Session: Offshore wind  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Session: Offshore wind  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations. Due to time constraints, a discussion period was not possible. The session addressed the current state of offshore wind energy development. The first presentation ''Monitoring Program and Results: Horns Rev and Nysted'' by Jette Gaarde summarized selected environmental studies conducted to date at operating offshore wind turbine projects in Denmark and lessons from other offshore wind developments in Europe. Wildlife impacts studies from the Danish sites focused on birds, fish, and mammals. The second presentation ''What has the U.S. Wind Industry Learned from the European Example'' by Bonnie Ram provided an update on current permit applications for offshore wind developments in the U.S. as well as lessons that may be drawn from the European experience.

Gaarde, Jette; Ram, Bonnie

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EERE: Wind  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Buildings The U.S. Department of Energy funds R&D to develop wind energy. Learn about the DOE Wind Program, how to use wind energy and get financial incentives, and access...

422

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary since energy production depends non-linearly on wind speed (U ), and wind speed observa- tions for the assessment of future long-term wind supply A. M. R. Bakker1 , B. J. J. M. Van den Hurk1 and J. P. Coelingh2 1

Haak, Hein

423

NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Energy PTC Extension Essential, Beneficial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center executive director (MP3 2.4 MB) Download Windows Media Player. Time: 00:02:30. The wind power Production Tax Credit championed in the 1990s by Iowa Senator Chuck Grassley is...

425

NREL: Wind Research - Controls Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controls Analysis Controls Analysis Photo of a man working inside the hub of a large 3-blades turbine. Working in the hub of Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART) at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) Man in wind turbine hub viewed from inside a wind turbine's blade. At the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), we design, implement, and test advanced wind turbine controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are simulated using specialized modeling software. The resulting advanced controls algorithms are field tested on the NWTC's Controls Advanced Research Turbines (CARTs). NWTC researchers are also studying blade pitch and generator torque, and employing advanced sensors to optimize power capture and reduce wind

426

Wind Energy Update  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Energy Update Wind Powering America January 2012 NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Evolution of Commercial Wind Technology NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Small (≤100 kW) Homes Farms Remote Applications (e.g. water pumping, telecom sites, icemaking) Midscale (100-1000 kW) Village Power Hybrid Systems Distributed Power Large, Land-based (1-3 MW) Utility-scale wind farms Large Distributed Power Sizes and Applications Large, Offshore (3-7 MW) Utility-scale wind farms, shallow coastal waters No U.S. installations NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY Capacity & Cost Trends As of January 2012 (AWEA) 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200

427

NREL: Wind Research - Site Tours  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This is a simulated tour of the National Wind Technology Center showing its location in the state, elevation, and its facilities. Two...

428

Center Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Center Research ... Supports Electric Utility Restructuring Winds of change in the U.S. power sector: factors listed in the left column have created a gap between the prices utilities must charge to recover their embedded costs and the lower rates they would have to charge in a competitive environment. Possible responses to these pressures are listed to the right. The electricity industry in the U.S. is being dramatically restructured by state regulatory commissions and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. Efforts are underway to create a wholesale market for electricity, with wholesale prices to distributing utility companies no longer being regulated. Discussions in several states and at the FERC are aimed at revising the regulation of the structure, operation, and pricing of the

429

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

LIDAR Wind Speed Measurements of Evolving Wind Fields  

SciTech Connect

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems are able to measure the speed of incoming wind before it interacts with a wind turbine rotor. These preview wind measurements can be used in feedforward control systems designed to reduce turbine loads. However, the degree to which such preview-based control techniques can reduce loads by reacting to turbulence depends on how accurately the incoming wind field can be measured. Past studies have assumed Taylor's frozen turbulence hypothesis, which implies that turbulence remains unchanged as it advects downwind at the mean wind speed. With Taylor's hypothesis applied, the only source of wind speed measurement error is distortion caused by the LIDAR. This study introduces wind evolution, characterized by the longitudinal coherence of the wind, to LIDAR measurement simulations to create a more realistic measurement model. A simple model of wind evolution is applied to a frozen wind field used in previous studies to investigate the effects of varying the intensity of wind evolution. LIDAR measurements are also evaluated with a large eddy simulation of a stable boundary layer provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Simulation results show the combined effects of LIDAR errors and wind evolution for realistic turbine-mounted LIDAR measurement scenarios.

Simley, E.; Pao, L. Y.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Wind-To-Hydrogen Energy Pilot Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

WIND-TO-HYDROGEN ENERGY PILOT PROJECT: BASIN ELECTRIC POWER COOPERATIVE In an effort to address the hurdles of wind-generated electricity (specifically wind's intermittency and transmission capacity limitations) and support development of electrolysis technology, Basin Electric Power Cooperative (BEPC) conducted a research project involving a wind-to-hydrogen system. Through this effort, BEPC, with the support of the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota, evaluated the feasibility of dynamically scheduling wind energy to power an electrolysis-based hydrogen production system. The goal of this project was to research the application of hydrogen production from wind energy, allowing for continued wind energy development in remote wind-rich areas and mitigating the necessity for electrical transmission expansion. Prior to expending significant funding on equipment and site development, a feasibility study was performed. The primary objective of the feasibility study was to provide BEPC and The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with sufficient information to make a determination whether or not to proceed with Phase II of the project, which was equipment procurement, installation, and operation. Four modes of operation were considered in the feasibility report to evaluate technical and economic merits. Mode 1 - scaled wind, Mode 2 - scaled wind with off-peak, Mode 3 - full wind, and Mode 4 - full wind with off-peak In summary, the feasibility report, completed on August 11, 2005, found that the proposed hydrogen production system would produce between 8000 and 20,000 kg of hydrogen annually depending on the mode of operation. This estimate was based on actual wind energy production from one of the North Dakota (ND) wind farms of which BEPC is the electrical off-taker. The cost of the hydrogen produced ranged from $20 to $10 per kg (depending on the mode of operation). The economic sensitivity analysis performed as part of the feasibility study showed that several factors can greatly affect, both positively and negatively, the "per kg" cost of hydrogen. After a September 15, 2005, meeting to evaluate the advisability of funding Phase II of the project DOE concurred with BEPC that Phase I results did warrant a "go" recommendation to proceed with Phase II activities. The hydrogen production system was built by Hydrogenics and consisted of several main components: hydrogen production system, gas control panel, hydrogen storage assembly and hydrogen-fueling dispenser The hydrogen production system utilizes a bipolar alkaline electrolyzer nominally capable of producing 30 Nm3/h (2.7 kg/h). The hydrogen is compressed to 6000 psi and delivered to an on-site three-bank cascading storage assembly with 80 kg of storage capacity. Vehicle fueling is made possible through a Hydrogenics-provided gas control panel and dispenser able to fuel vehicles to 5000 psi. A key component of this project was the development of a dynamic scheduling system to control the wind energy's variable output to the electrolyzer cell stacks. The dynamic scheduling system received an output signal from the wind farm, processed this signal based on the operational mode, and dispatched the appropriate signal to the electrolyzer cell stacks. For the study BEPC chose to utilize output from the Wilton wind farm located in central ND. Site design was performed from May 2006 through August 2006. Site construction activities were from August to November 2006 which involved earthwork, infrastructure installation, and concrete slab construction. From April - October 2007, the system components were installed and connected. Beginning in November 2007, the system was operated in a start-up/shakedown mode. Because of numerous issues, the start-up/shakedown period essentially lasted until the end of January 2008, at which time a site acceptance test was performed. Official system operation began on February 14, 2008, and continued through the end of December 2008. Several issues continued to prevent consistent operation, resulting in operation o

Ron Rebenitsch; Randall Bush; Allen Boushee; Brad G. Stevens; Kirk D. Williams; Jeremy Woeste; Ronda Peters; Keith Bennett

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

Application of the U.S. high cycle fatigue data base to wind turbine blade lifetime predictions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates a methodology for predicting the service lifetime of wind turbine blades using the high-cycle fatigue data base for typical U.S. blade materials developed by Mandell, et al. (1995). The first step in the analysis is to normalize the data base (composed primarily of data obtained from specialized, relatively small coupons) with fatigue data from typical industrial laminates to obtain a Goodman Diagram that is suitable for analyzing wind turbine blades. The LIFE2 fatigue analysis code for wind turbines is then used for the fatigue analysis of a typical turbine blade with a known load spectrum. In the analysis, a linear damage model, Miner`s Rule, is used to demonstrate the prediction of the service lifetime for a typical wind turbine blade under assumed operating strain ranges and stress concentration factors. In contrast to typical European data, the asymmetry in this data base predicts failures under typical loads to be compressive.

Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mandell, J.F. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Models of Tropical Cyclone Wind Distribution and Beta-Effect Propagation for Application to Tropical Cyclone Track Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the tangential wind speed in the outer regions of tropical cyclones is proposed based on approximate conservation of angular momentum. The purpose is to derive an operationally useful model of the beta-effect propagation (BEP), which ...

Lester E. Carr III; Russell L. Elsberry

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Assimilation of High-Resolution Mode-S Wind and Temperature Observations in a Regional NWP Model for Nowcasting Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the beneficial impacts of high-resolution (in space and time) wind and temperature observations from aircraft on very short-range numerical weather forecasting are presented. The observations are retrieved using the tracking and ...

Siebren de Haan; Ad Stoffelen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Reliability measures of second order semi-Markov chain in state and duration with application to wind energy production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of wind energy production using a second order semi-Markov chain in state and duration as a model of wind speed. We present the mathematical model, we describe the data and technical characteristics of a commercial wind turbine (Aircon HAWT-10kW). We show how to compute some of the main dependability measures such as reliability, availability and maintainability functions. We compare the results of the model with real energy production obtained from data available in the Lastem station (Italy) and sampled every 10 minutes. The computation of the dependability measures is a crucial point in the planning and development of a wind farm.

D'Amico, Guglielmo; Prattico, Flavio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Development and Testing of Commercial Prototype Wind-Electric Battery Charging Station  

SciTech Connect

The technical aspects of charging 12-volt (V) batteries with a small permanent magnet wind-turbine generator suggested that a special battery-charging station be developed. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducted research on several possible configurations of wind-electric battery-charging stations. Based on preliminary modeling and test results, the optimal system for this application was the one with individual charge controllers. This paper presents the development efforts and test results of a commercial prototype wind-electric battery-charging station designed and manufactured by Ascension Technology, a Division of Applied Power Corporation (APC). The system, which is powered by a 3-kilowatt (kW) wind turbine, was tested at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The paper discusses control strategies to improve system performance, and includes recommendations for system integrators based on the testing experience accumulated at the NWTC.

Gevorgian, V.; Corbus, D.; Kern, G.

2000-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

437

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJ ECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RECIPIENT:University of Massachusetts Wind Energy Center PROJECT TITLE: Wind Energy Curriculum, Workforce Development and Educational Plan Page 1 of2 STATE: MA Funding Opportunity...

438

Development in wind energy technology: an update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of the development in wind energy technology. Growth in wind technology and components of wind energy conversion systems are provided. Ratings, and system size are included for various applications in addition to power ... Keywords: development, power electronics converters, technology, wind energy

Faeka M. H. Khater

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

NREL: Wind Research - U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Wind Program Initiates Regional Resource Centers October 30, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)...

440

NREL: Education Programs - Last Call: Illinois Wind for Schools...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Last Call: Illinois Wind for Schools Program Accepting Applications February 25, 2013 Now in its second year, the Illinois Wind for Schools (ILWFS) program is accepting...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "wind application center" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

County Wind Ordinance Standards (California) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

detailing the number of local wind ordinances adopted after January 1, 2011; the number of applications to install wind turbines that were received and approved by those...

442

Wind Turbine Generator Condition Monitoring via the Generator Control Loop.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on the development of condition monitoring techniques for application in wind turbines, particularly for offshore wind turbine driven doubly fed induction generators. (more)

ZAGGOUT, MAHMOUD,NOUH

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wind-hydrogen energy systems for remote area power supply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind-hydrogen systems for remote area power supply are an early niche application of sustainable hydrogen energy. Optimal direct coupling between a wind turbine and an (more)

Janon, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUPWG Meeting FUPWG Meeting NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Robi Robichaud November 18, 2009 Topics Introduction Review of the Current Wind Market Drivers for Wind Development Siting g Issues Wind Resource Assessment Wind Characteristics Wind Power Potential Basic Wind Turbine Theory Basic Wind Turbine Theory Types of Wind Turbines Facts About Wind Siting Facts About Wind Siting Wind Performance 1. United States: MW 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 Current Status of the Wind Industry Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity

445

Wind News and Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind News and Blog Wind News and Blog Wind News and Blog Blog Energy Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman speaks at the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility dedication in South Carolina. | Photo courtesy of Clemson University Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry November 27, 2013 1:35 PM Two state-of-the-art wind turbine drivetrain test facilities are now open for business: the Clemson University Wind Turbine Drivetrain Testing Facility in South Carolina and a National Renewable Energy Laboratory dynamometer at the National Wind Technology Center in Colorado. Read The Full Story Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy Steven Chalk speaks during the American Wind Energy Association WINDPOWER Offshore conference in Providence, Rhode Island. | Photo courtesy of American Wind Energy Association